• This Month's Issue

    Level Flier: At $220k, This Fighter-Plane-Inspired '09 Spyker Lands Close to Its Original MSRP

    $575k 1969 Aston Martin DB6 Mk I

    Viva l'Italia! In the Driver's Seat at Villa d'Este, the Mille MIglia and Modena Cento Ore

    Fast-Rising Collectible: "The Fast and the Furious" '93 Supra Stunt Car Hurtles to $200k

    Slow-Rising Collectible: Karmann Ghias Gain Ground

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  • SCM Platinum

    Over 200 cars that sold at auction covered in every issue of SCM. Our market reports include detailed information about the vehicle, including VIN, condition, options, and expert analysis from SCM's auction reporters.

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  • Glovebox Notes

    SCM doesn't just cover collector cars. Every week, SCM reviews a brand new car online and in our newsletters, and there are new reviews every month in the magazine. Thinking of buying a new car? Check out our reviews!

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  • Insider’s Guide to Concours d’Elegance

    The 2014 guide includes a calendar of events and detailed descriptions of 21 featured concours.

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Collector Car News

  • Come See Us In Monterey +

    Monterey Classic Car Week is just around the corner, and the SCM team will be all over the Peninsula. Keith Martin returns as emcee at Concorso Italiano and Legends of the Autobahn. We will have booths at the following locations: Gooding & Company: Wednesday, August 12 through Sunday, August 16 Legends Read More
  • Russo and Steele Consigns Ex-Adam Carolla 1966 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Series II +

    A 1966 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Series II formerly owned by radio and television personality Adam Carolla and featured on "Jay Leno's Garage" is set to cross the block at Russo and Steele's 15th anniversary Monterey auction. The sale takes place August 13–15.  This particular Series II 330 GT 2+2 Read More
  • Sales Total $15.4m at Auctions America California +

    Auctions America racked up more than $15.4m in total sales at its third annual California sale, held July 17–18. The multi-day auction, held for the first time at Santa Monica's historic Barker Hangar, lifted the gavel on approximately 300 collector vehicles. Vehicles drove onto the auction podium via the tail section of Read More
  • Meet Keith Martin at the Concours d'Elegance of America +

    Keith Martin returns as emcee for the Concours d'Elegance of America on July 26 in Plymouth, MI. View the three-day schedule of events here. The featured concours classes are as follows: Pre-War Classes Motorcycles 1918 - 1929: The Dawn of the Modern MotorcycleGas Light: prior to 1914Jazz Age: 1915 - 1929Duesenberg Model Read More
  • Monterey Roundup: More Star Cars! +

    Monterey Car Week is less than a month away. Have you checked out the lastest consignments? Here is a roundup of some very significant star cars: Gooding & Company has consigned a 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder for their Pebble Beach auction (pictured above; Gooding & Company estimate: $16m–$18m). The Read More
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1960 austin healey 3000 mk ii


There is no mistaking the lines of an Austin-Healey. Perhaps second only to the seductive curves of the Jaguar E-type, the long flowing lines of the front shroud and powerful haunches of the short rear fenders make this car an icon of the golden decades of sports cars. Remarkable is the fact that the lines of the Healey were penned by a 24-year-old designer named Gerry Coker, who had never designed a car before in his career. More remarkable is the fact that the design was so inspired that its essence was unchanged from the first prototypes in 1952 to the last car assembled in 1968. The grille was changed twice, a small scoop was added to the hood, the shroud was modified slightly to accommodate two back seats for occasional use and, in the last version, a curved windshield, roll-up windows and a convertible top were added. The changes were so subtle that only aficionados of the marque can identify the slight variations among the models.
The combination of inspiration of styling and consistency of design means that all Healeys are almost equally desirable. Among the rarest of the cars is the two-seat roadster with the six-cylinder engine, usually called a "BN7" from the body style prefix of its serial number.
Produced alongside the two-plus-two body style introduced in 1957 (the "BT7"), less than 3,000 of the two-seat six-cylinder cars were built (including 355 built with the triple-carburetor engine), compared to 15,000 of the two-plus-twos. They shared the simpler rear shroud of the original Healey Hundred but had the smoother and potentially more powerful six-cylinder "3000" engine. The straight-six put out 124 bhp as new, but could easily be tuned to much higher horsepower levels. Weather-proofing still left something to be desired, however. Even with the side-curtains installed and the soft-top pulled from behind the seats and erected-a two-person job taking at least five minutes-driver and passenger could count on getting more than a little damp in a driving rain. Nevertheless, the sleek lines today are preferred by many to the successor convertibles that entered production in 1962.
However, when these cars were new it seemed as if nearly everyone wanted the model with the extra rear seats, even though they were only practical for children under the age of ten. So when the nifty new convertible model was introduced to replace the roadster in 1962 in response to competition from the Sunbeam Alpine, Triumph TR4 and MGB, the two-seat body style was dumped as well.


{analysis}{auto}599{/auto} This BN7 fetched $47,250 including commission when it sold at Barrett-Jackson on January 19, 2001. Even the seller was pleasantly surprised when the hammer dropped at this price, a level that previously had only been reached by a few unusual big Healeys. But the relative rarity of the body style doesn't explain why this car sold for so much. Two other Healeys also sold at Barrett-Jackson for similarly unprecedented prices, a nicely prepared Mark III convertible, and a 2+2 BT7 roadster, plain vanilla except for its gorgeous black finish, and with all the same mechanical specifications as the BN7.
We believe instead that it was the quality of the restoration, done by a Healey specialist with a well-deserved reputation for excellence, which caught the eye of the buyer. A car with an undamaged, unrusted chassis was taken down to the frame, stripped to bare metal, then primed, painted and clear-coated in the very desirable Healey Blue, an original cool ice-blue metallic color. The engine, transmission and rear end were rebuilt to original specifications, with all parts repaired or replaced as necessary. Finally, the car was reassembled and the interior trimmed following the Austin-Healey clubs' concours-original specifications in the original dark blue leather and vinyl, piped in white. The two other record-setting Healeys had also been restored to a comparable quality by professional dealer-restorers.
For $50,000, a buyer who knows what to look for can find a pretty nice E-type Jaguar or XK 150. The theory of some market watchers is that the rising wave of baby boomers now entering the expensive hobby period of their lives
arrive at a car auction with a list of several nostalgic marques in mind and a budget of around $50,000 to spend. When they see the evocative lines of a freshly restored Austin-Healey in pristine condition and find that the Jaguar E-type available at that price isn't quite as nice, they don't consult the price guides; they just go with their emotions.
These sales do, however, raise the price ceiling on the very best of the Healeys. But if you've got an old Healey sitting up on blocks out in the back forty, don't assume that a rise in the prices of top-quality restorations automatically raises the value of your project car. These benchmarks simply assure owners that if the current market conditions are sustained, Healey enthusiasts will be able to come closer to recovering the costs of a decent restoration.-Gary Anderson
(Photo courtesy of Skip Dusseau.){/analysis}

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