1914 Mercedes 28/95 Phaeton

1914 Mercedes 28/95 Phaeton Profile

Readied in 1914 to replace the 4-cylinder 37/90, for all intents and purposes, the Mercedes 28/95 did not reach production until after World War I. By the time it did reach its customers, the big 7,280-cc, 90-bhp overhead-camshaft 6-cylinder engine had been fitted with a cover to enclose the previously exposed shaft-and-bevel gear-driven valve-gear.

Two Zenith updraft carburetors and individual intake passages to each cylinder ensured exceptional breathing for the period. The large six was closely related to the Daimler Read More

1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing


Launched in 1954, the production 300SL retained the space frame chassis and lightweight aluminum-alloy bodywork of the W194 racer, while its mechanical underpinnings, like the latter’s, owed much to the contemporary Mercedes-Benz 300 luxury saloon. A 2,996-cc overhead-camshaft inline six, the 300SL’s engine was canted at 45 degrees to achieve a low bonnet line and produced 215 brake horsepower at 5,800 rpm using Bosch mechanical fuel injection. A 4-speed, all-synchromesh manual gearbox transmitted power to the hypoid bevel rear axle. Read More

1937 Mercedes-Benz 540K Cabriolet


When presented at the Paris Salon in 1936, the Mercedes-Benz 540K was the culmination of two models that served as test beds: the 380 and the 500K.

The 380, introduced in 1933, was the work of Hans Nibel, the legendary Mercedes engineer who had developed some formidable competition machines. Thus, the new Mercedes featured a particularly sophisticated suspension for its time: all independent, with double wishbones at the front and swing axles at Read More

1937 Mercedes-Benz 540K Special Roadster


The Mercedes-Benz 540K was one of the most prestigious and most beautiful automobiles of the interwar years. Its combination of power, light weight and sheer beauty made it the master of the road, and it was a testimonial to the astonishing capabilities of the German automotive engineers of the day. It was also breathtakingly expensive, guaranteeing exclusivity amongst its owners. Just 419 chassis were built, and of those, only 25 carried the superlative long-tail Special Roadster coachwork that may well Read More

1957 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster


In 1954, at the New York Motor Show, Max Hoffman unveiled two new Mercedes sports cars: the 190SL and the 300SL touring car. This car was adapted from the 300SL racing car for road use and its distinguishable feature was its “gullwing” doors.

Although slightly more down to earth than the factory cars, the 300SL remained a car for racing enthusiasts craving acceleration. Mercedes-Benz still managed to sell 1,400 units in four years, but faced with a slump in demand Read More

Mercedes-Benz 300SL Coupes All Over the Arizona Map


1954 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Coupe, Lot 284 at RM Auctions Phoenix, sold for $544,500, including premium

A full-bore restoration project, an all-out bidder’s war and a nicely restored car blow the Gullwing market around like desert sand

Chassis number: 4500049
Engine number: 4500052

The prices for 300SL Gullwings were all over the map in Arizona this year, and the money paid for four very different cars ranged from $1,375,000 to $544,500, quite a gap even for Gullwings; the price paid for Read More

1937 Mercedes-Benz 540K Cabriolet C

The low price achieved here puzzles me. Maybe it took a little punch in the nose for being right-hand drive, but this seems like a lot of car for the money

Together with its predecessor the 500K, the magnificent Mercedes-Benz 540K was arguably the most noteworthy production model offered by the Stuttgart firm during the 1930s.

A development of the 500K, whose independently suspended chassis it shared, the 540K was Read More

1951 Porsche 356 Split-Window Coupe

This car is fitted with the rare 1,500-cc engine, when most were 1,100 cc to 1,300 cc. I don’t know if it’s the actual engine from new, but it is correct

During the Second World War, Ferdinand “Ferry” Porsche and a handful of his faithful employees started work on development number 356 in their workshops in the town of Gmünd in Kärnten, Austria. The first design drawings were completed on July Read More

1963 Porsche 356 Carrera 2 Cabriolet

The Carrera was intended for high-speed touring, a fast, exclusive car built for hops from Paris to Monaco with a wife or lover-your choice

The evocative “Carrera” name first graced the flanks of a Porsche in 1955. Applied to a 356A powered by a slightly less ferocious version of the racing 550 Spyder’s 1.5-liter, twin-overhead-camshaft, roller-bearing engine, it had been adopted to capitalize on Porsche’s victories in the Carrera PanAmericana in Read More

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