1966 Ford GT40 Mk I

The failed merger in 1963 between Ford and Ferrari and the subsequent return to competition motorsport at the highest level by the American company is motoring lore. After their rejection by Ferrari, Lee Iacocca and Leo Bebee formed Ford Advanced Vehicles and went shopping for a Le Mans winner. Following their visit to Eric Broadley’s business in England, they knew they had the basis for a winning car for international long-distance road racing. The resultant car was unveiled in Read More

1957-68 Lotus Seven S1 and S2

The dual-purpose road/race car that could be built from a kit of parts pretty much characterizes the early efforts by Colin Chapman and Lotus. The concept came more clearly into focus with the Six, but after more than 100 cars, the swing-axle front suspension became antiquated and the bodywork expensive to fabricate.
Compared to the Lotus Six, the Seven was a simplified, modernized and productionized club racer that set new standards in appearance and performance. Still roadable and sold Read More

1976 Ferrari 365 GT4 BB “Boxer”

When the Lamborghini Miura appeared, high-performance coupes with engines in front of the driver began to look quite old fashioned to some observers. Stung by outspoken criticism of their front-engined Daytona models, Ferrari unveiled at the 1971 Turin Motor Show the aggressive 365 BB flat-twelve, mid-engined Boxer Berlinetta. At this point it was still a concept car used to make a point, demonstrating what could be done with a flat-twelve powerplant similar to that used in the Scuderia’s Formula One Read More

1957 Chevrolet Corvette FI Roadster


America was sadly without a true sports car until Chevrolet introduced the Corvette at the 1953 Motorama show and started production that year. The early Corvettes were lower and sportier than any other domestic car on the market but they lacked the innovative technology necessary to break open the market. Starting in 1955, Corvettes carried a V8 engine which improved their performance but their styling badly needed updating.
In order for Chevy to combat the T-Bird Read More

1965 Shelby GT 350

The marriage between Carroll Shelby and the Ford Motor Company began in early 1965 when Ford wanted to take a shot at the performance market dominated by GM’s Corvette. Unveiled by Shelby on January 27, 1965, the modified Mustang fastback had a few subtle exterior changes: a fiberglass hood with functional scoop, a clean-looking grille and a tri-colored running horse on the driver’s side of the grille. All Shelbys in 1965 were Wimbledon White, with a blue GT 350 side Read More

1972 Ferrari 365 GTS/4 Daytona Spyder

Introduced at the 1968 Paris Salon, the 365 GTB/4 “Daytona” was an obvious winner from the start, and a noteworthy successor to the 275 GTB/4 Berlinetta it had replaced. The Daytona used underpinnings similar to the 275 GTB’s chassis and suspension, but with vastly improved braking. Ferrari finally dispensed with the substandard Dunlop discs that had been used since the 250 series. The new four-cam, 4.4-liter, V12 engine was fitted with six Weber 40 DCN carburetors and produced an impressive Read More

1972 McLaren M8 E/F Can-Am

In 1966, a new form of racing started in the US and Canada. This was the famous Can-Am series, short for the Canadian-American Trophy. John Surtees won the first Can-Am title in a Lola T-70 in 1966 but after this, McLarens in the hands of Bruce McLaren himself and Denny Hulme, ruled the series. Like Lola, McLaren depended for financial survival on selling copies of its winning cars to private customers who would then go have fun in the Read More

1951 Simca 8 Super Sport

Simca first appeared in 1934, making Fiat cars under license in their factory at Nanterre which had previously produced the Donnet cars. For many years the fortunes of Simca were closely linked to those of the tuning wizard Amédée Gordini and many competition successes were achieved including class wins in the 1949-50 Alpine and Monte Carlo rallies in the hands of drivers such as Jean Behra and Johny Claes.
The Simca 8 Sports Coupé made its debut in Read More

1951 Ferrari 212 Export Berlinetta

The example shown here is a very rare “Export” model intended for racing in the GT and Sports classes. Chassis number 0141/T is unique, being the only 212 to have been built with a “Tuboscocca” type chassis, an early attempt by Ferrari to give three-dimensional rigidity to the ladder-type chassis. Wheelbase for the Inter model was given as 2600 mm but that of 0141/T was given as 2250 mm, the same as the sister 166MMs. Most Inters weighed around Read More

1966 Ferrari 275 GTB/C


This immensely desirable and highly usable Ferrari 275 GTB/C is the third of only 12 such Berlinetta Competizione models produced by the world-famous Maranello factory, and is absolutely not to be confused with the normal, standard production GTB models.

Here was a purebred endurance-racing competition car whose fundamental bodyshape and basic technical specification were almost the only characteristics it shared in common with the production model it represented on the great race circuits of the world.

The 275 GTB/C on Read More

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