Columns (1960)

  This all started innocently enough. A friend gave me a ride to a Porsche event in her black 993. I hadn’t had a sip of that clattering air-cooled elixir for some time, and it was intoxicating. I immediately emailed my good friend and Porsche guru Jim Schrager, and asked him for the best buy in late-model air-cooled 911s (the 993 models). His response was immediate and definite. Forget the 993s. A first-gen 996 turbo with a Tiptronic (automatic) was his favorite. He owned one and drove it daily. He felt the turbo was a much-improved engine over the stock…
We all know that it’s going to be windy when a low-pressure area bumps up against a high-pressure area. The difference in air pressure sucks air into the low-pressure area until the pressures are equalized. “Legal Files” recently reported (June 2014, p. 54) how this same principle applies to economic disequilibrium, resulting in an industry that buys new cars in the United States and exports them to countries where the same cars typically sell for much more due to manufacturers’ pricing policies. Now the U.S. government has taken action to stop the reverse situation — the illegal importation of used…
Simply the best. No other phrase better sums up BGH 23. In its day, this was the outstanding British sports touring car. Georges Roesch’s long line of “Invincible Talbots” needs little introduction to the discerning car connoisseur, and only a combination of poor luck and poor timing meant they never achieved the big-race overall victory which would have made the Talbots from Barlby Road, London, W10, much more widely appreciated. Talbot competed so widely within their period that BGH 23, as offered here, is eligible for all of the great historic rallies and major-circuit events, such as the Mille Miglia…
• Rare VW Type 2 265 Double Cab Pickup • 1,600-cc motor • 4-speed transmission • Power front disc brakes • Very few miles since restoration • New interior • Two-owner California black-plate car • Maintenance records • Extra keys SCM AnalysisThis pickup, Lot F199.1, sold for $34,560, including buyer’s premium, at Mecum Auctions’ Chicago sale on October 10, 2014. Although a pickup truck version of the Volkswagen Type 2 Transporter was first available from the factory in 1952, that was a traditional style with a single bench seat, and enthusiasts now call it a Single Cab. The Double Cab…
The original, immortal Ferrari 250 GTO had been developed for the FIA GT Championship, duly taking the manufacturer’s title for Ferrari in 1962, 1963 and 1964. So, clearly, any revival of the GTO name could only be permitted for a very special car indeed. Enter the 288 GTO. Like its illustrious forebear, the 288 GTO (the initials stand for Gran Turismo Omologato) was conceived as a limited-edition model, just 200 units being planned to meet the then-existing Group B homologation requirements for international sports car racing. Styled by Pininfarina’s Leonardo Fioravanti, creator of the awe-inspiring Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona, the…
Designed by Giorgetto Giugiaro for Ghia, the DeTomaso Mangusta was first introduced in 1967. Only 401 cars were manufactured until production ceased in 1971, with its successor being the well-known DeTomaso Pantera. Housing a 289-ci Ford V8, mated to a 5-speed ZF manual transmission, the Mangusta served out over 300 bhp. In standard trim, the specification included all-around disc brakes, four-wheel independent suspension and electric windows — a luxury for a supercar of its time. When opened to reveal the beautiful V8 engine, the unique design of the two clamshells gives the Mangusta an unforgettable silhouette that even a non-petrol-head…
During the 1950s, the most accessible, most appealing, and in many cases, the most successful club racing car available to any aspiring racing driver was one of the products of the Donald Healey Motor Company’s famous factory at The Cape, Warwick. This particularly appealing, and in period highly successful, Austin-Healey 100S is a shining example of the type. It has an outstanding record as one of the most successful 100S cars of its period, as it competed in no fewer than 49 races on almost all U.K. circuits — and claimed 30 podium places, including 14 outright wins. For 37…
The 1958–60 Lincolns and Lincoln Continentals were the most massive American passenger cars produced since World War II, as they were built on a 131-inch wheelbase and had an overall length of 229 inches. The Mark III convertible tips the scales at an impressive 4,928 pounds, and only 3,048 were produced. This stunning Mark III Continental received a nut-and-bolt restoration about a dozen years ago and has been driven very little since. The Matador Red paint is complemented by a red, white, and black pleated-leather interior, which is in very good condition. The chrome is very good, and the car…
Stop for a moment and consider the plight of the Porsche 924. If ever there was a car that was born on the wrong side of the blanket, the 924 is it. Coming onto the scene as a 1977 model, the 924 was Porsche’s first attempt at a conventional, water-cooled, inline 4-cylinder car. The 924 was created to replace the 914, which had suffered under the stigma of its Volkswagen heritage — the factory couldn’t even manage to put a Porsche crest on its nose. The new 924 had the same problem. VW had asked Porsche to design a sports…
We had just crested the 4,311-foot Cardenal Antonio Samoré Pass, crossing from Argentina into Chile. The 1969 Series 1.5 Jaguar XKE we were driving was performing brilliantly. It was a clear day, and we were surrounded by the snow-covered peaks of the Andes. This was the second day of the 26th Annual 1000 Millas Sport de la República Argentina — the premier classic-car rally in South America. SCMer Martin Sucari introduced me to this rally eight years ago. This year, the Club de Automóviles Sport, which hosts the rally, invited me back for another go. Damian Pozzoli graciously provided us…
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