THE One in a 100

The Austin-Healey 100S is undoubtedly the most prized model of the marque, with prices far exceeding any other model. While Healey prices have risen significantly in the past few years, the 100S remains clearly in the lead.
The 100S was the result of a project undertaken by the Donald Healey Motor Company with financing from Austin. The goal was to develop Austin-Healeys for racing and record-breaking purposes, and though outwardly similar to the 100 and 100M, each 100S was Read More

Bugeye Sprite: 50 and Counting

Healey 100 designer Gerry Coker came up with “a working man’s Ferrari,” which could be kept in a bike shed, and used standard parts from BMC sedans


Question: What collectible automobile copied the chassis design of the Jaguar D-type, was introduced at the Monte Carlo Grand Prix, took first, second, and third at Sebring during its first year of production, and yet was intended “for a chap to park Read More

Everyman Goes Racing

With Ferraris, Porsches, and Alfas around me as the flag dropped, I was living the dream I’d had as far back as I can remember

If you walked the paddock at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca during the 35th Annual Monterey Rolex Historic Automobile Races on August 16-17, you might have thought vintage racing was entirely the province of wealthy enthusiasts-especially the three featured classes.

On your left you would have Read More

Just What the Doctor Ordered

With inheritance check in hand, I made a list of my favorite 20 British sports cars. It took only 20 minutes.


What a coincidence. I’ve just been left a great deal of money and been informed I must pick the top 20 British cars I’ve admired in my years at SCM. It took me less than 20 minutes to make a list. I started with the easiest to find Read More

How One Little Car Brought Down An Empire

Conservatives bolstered Rootes fortunes in the ’50s, but Labor and the Hillman Imp doomed it in the ’60s

Of all the sad sagas told about the collapse of the British automotive industry, none is more depressing than that of the Rootes Group, and the once-respected marques it took down with it.

We all know about the demise of Rootes because of the death of the Sunbeam Tiger, when new owner Read More

Bad Dog, Rover

At the end of the day, the Rover P6 counts as a “nice try.” It’s the equivalent of a brainy kid who’s always sick

Some of you may find this hard to believe, but I’m the last person to argue that all old British cars-regardless of how quirky or unusual-are collectible. There, I’ve said it.

Just because a car was made by a company that is now out of business, Read More

The Mystery of Morgan Prices

Big Healeys that cost $25,000 in 2000 are selling for $50,000 today; even pristine MG As, TR4s and TR6s cost more than Morgans


In January 2000, a “good, clean example” of a 1966 Morgan Plus 4 sold for $26,620, and the SCM commentator remarked “Sold for quite good money. Is this the signal for an uptick in Plus 4 prices, or is it Barrett-Jackson fever?”

Seven years later, Read More

Healey Prices on Cruise Control

Many cars sell for $60,000 to $75,000-about the cost to restore a solid original car, if you know what you’re doing

With only one “Gee whiz, what-was-he-thinking? over-six-figures” Austin-Healey sale price in Scottsdale in January and one fairly respectable car that sold for less than $25,000, some folks are asking whether the recent run-up in big Healey prices resembles the Jaguar and Ferrari bubbles of the late 1980s.

To gain Read More

An MG That Fits You to a ‘T’

The fastest TF takes 18.9 seconds to reach 60 mph and you run the risk of being rear-ended by a soccer mom in her SUV


The MG TC, TD, and TF brought top-down British sports car motoring to America, and all three are now affordable collectibles that give you an authentic taste of a bygone era.

In the beginning. well almost

Bankrupted by WWII, Britain faced “export or Read More

Extras, Extras, Read All About It!

How about fitted luggage, a child seat that mounted over the center
armrest, and leopard-skin seat covers?


“Comes equipped with clock, luggage rack, driving lights, detachable hard top, AM/FM radio, and air conditioning.”

That’s pretty typical equipment for any new sports car today, and in the 1960s, high-end Jaguars and Aston Martins offered similar options, but did you know that you could have bought all that equipment Read More

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