Columns (1933)

The Ferrari 250 GT Omologato needs little introduction as the most iconic, most habitable, street-useable, race-winning, World Championship-winning — and simply gorgeous — closed two-seat coupe car from the world-famous Maranello factory. The GTO was developed to contest the 1962 3-liter class FIA GT World Championship series of classical endurance-racing events. Selective production at Maranello and in the Scaglietti body plant in Modena ran on through the 1963 FIA GT World Championship and — sure enough — the Ferrari 250 GTO won the World title both seasons in succession. Ferrari 250 GTO chassis 3851GT offered here was acquired by young…
Chassis number GT108 is one of just six open-top GT40 roadsters constructed, reflecting Ford’s experimentation with the open configuration to test for market appeal and salability. Built for Shelby American as a test and development vehicle, it was driven by Ken Miles, Lew Spencer, Carroll Shelby, Jim Clark and others. Documented by GT40 historian Ronnie Spain, it is the only GT40 roadster to have survived in its original form. This car was also a 2003 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance award winner and has enjoyed single prominent ownership for over two decades. GT108 is notable as one of the 12 early…

Tucker vs. Tucker

Written by November 2014
Chassis 1036 (RM Auctions) A factory report dated October 28, 1948, held in the Tucker archives at the Gilmore Car Museum, indicates that chassis number 1036 had been completed on October 20, with body number 33 and engine number 33585. It was one of a dozen cars painted Maroon (paint code 600). No transmission was listed, as it is believed that this was one of more than a dozen Tuckers that remained unfinished and were waiting for transmissions when the factory closed. This is confirmed by the final factory inventory, dated March 3, 1949, which shows the car being in…
  Is it fair to say that we love our cars? Over time, we develop relationships with them based on the things we have done with them — from changing spark plugs to repairing upholstery to going on tours and rallies. In a way, a favorite car is like a faithful Labrador retriever. It sits and waits for us, and when we turn the key, it jumps to its wheels and wags its exhaust pipes. Our favorite cars exist to be our companions in adventure. But a relationship with a pet comes to a natural end. Dogs and cats age…
Two recent cases that attracted a lot of attention seem to involve different issues, but they actually have a lot in common. In one, SCM and ACC contributor John Stein brought to our attention a recent fire in a Sacramento repair shop that destroyed a number of Porsches. In the other, SCMer Joel Gardner shared a very lengthy Internet chat-board thread about a Ferrari FF that was damaged while being driven by a dealer’s employee. Two calamities The Sacramento shop was completely destroyed during a three-alarm fire that also destroyed a number of Porsches — 356s, Speedsters, early 911s, 914s,…
The Fiat X1/9 has been all but forgotten in the 40 years since it was introduced to North American markets. Most collectors just ignore the little mid-engine, two-seater convertible. Many see the car as Fiat’s underpowered and somewhat half-hearted effort to hold onto the American market — and really, who wouldn’t rather have a Fiat 124 Spider of the same vintage, all things being equal? On the other hand, autocrossers, track-day addicts and those who just wanted an agile sports car prized the X1/9 in its era. But Toyota’s MR2 came along in 1984, and Mazda’s ultra-popular MX-5 Miata arrived…
1966 Brabham-Repco BT20 F1 When the FIA announced in late 1963 that a 3-liter limit would be imposed on Formula One racing in 1966, a scramble ensued among competitors to develop suitable new engines. Jack Brabham turned to Repco, an Australian parts supplier. Development centered on Oldsmobile’s F-85 V8 block, which offered the advantage of a pre-existing and proven crankcase to create a 300-hp, 2,994-cc SOHC V8 engine. Jack Brabham began the 1966 season driving the sole BT19 chassis, but within a matter of months, two BT20 cars were built. Chassis F1266, the second of these two cars, commenced racing…
For some people, the best is not enough. In 1984, the Koenig Workshop, a German preparer based in Munich, developed an extreme high-performance car that was given the name Ferrari Testarossa Koenig Competition Evolution. As the name reveals, the model used as a starting point was extraordinary in its own right, as the Testarossa was a car that ordinary mortals could only dream of. However, Koenig went even further, making this supercar a hypercar before its time. Clients could get 1,000 or more horsepower if requested. Meticulously re-worked running gear set on a widened track, stabilizers, anti-roll bars and wide…
A rare survivor, this very original 31,370-mile-from-new 3500 GTi spent four decades in the care of a single California owner. The Amaranto Rame paint has taken on an added layer of character over the years, while the tan leather interior is clean and inviting. Benefiting from all of the final production upgrades bestowed upon it within the last two years of production, this fuel-injected 3500 retains its original engine. It is reported that a recent drive by a Maserati specialist produced enthusiastic comments on the car’s performance and preservation. As with any unrestored motorcar, it is recommended that a degree…
One of just 91 examples produced with coachwork by Abbott of Farnham during a four-year production run, OLY136 was first registered on March 25, 1954. In the current ownership since 2007, the car was entrusted to marque specialists Classic Restorations Ltd. in 2009 to carry out soda blasting of the body and a bare-metal respray, followed by a thorough engine overhaul in 2010. All five wheels were also blasted, powder-coated and painted. Invoices for the work carried out are contained in the car’s accompanying history file. The most recent service was carried out by Speedweld of Farley Hill in April…