Columns (1992)

1977 Ferrari 308 GTB Vetroresina Chassis number 20271; engine number 00441 This superb fiberglass Ferrari 308 has always been fastidiously maintained. During its restoration it showed no signs of previous repair. The engine was refurbished in 2000. The car has therefore been completely overhauled and fitted with a high-performance exhaust. The current owner sent the car to Ferrari after purchasing, where they found no significant faults. The original rims with four new Michelin XWX tires were installed after our photos were taken. The rims seen in our photos will be supplied with the car. The “polyester” or “glass-reinforced plastic (GRP)”…
The first Series I cars produced between late 1969 and early 1970 are identified by the fresh-air exhaust vents located on the rear hatch. Datsun quickly realized that they had hit the mark with the modern lines and overhead-cam 6-cylinder that redlined at 7,000 rpm. Restored to like-new condition, this 240Z is one of the most pristine examples on the market. The only thing this car lacks to be a ZCCA gold-medallion car is the factory wheels and hubcaps, as the restorer chose a period centerline wheel to complete the sportier look. From the paint to the interior, great attention…

1958 AC Aceca Bristol

Written by February 2015
1958 Aceca Bristol chassis BEX678 The Aceca Bristol offered here has its original Bristol engine, the number of which matches the car’s original firewall tag. According to the consignor, John Moir, the car’s original owner was Peter Winston, the son of renowned New York City jeweler Harry Winston. Young Mr. Winston used the car as an everyday driver in Manhattan for some years, after which he sold it through an acquaintance to Tom Hickey, a well-known motorcycle and sports car racer from Cambridge, MA. Mr. Hickey sent the Aceca Bristol back to AC Cars in Thames-Ditton, where it was totally…
  Like a surface vein of gold in the Sierra Nevada of California in 1848, Lancias have suddenly been discovered by the larger collector car world. Long hidden in plain sight, these superbly over-engineered, pioneering and championship-winning cars are leaving behind their reputation for being woefully undervalued. Lancias are setting new auction records, and prices have hit levels scarcely imaginable by long-term Lancisti just a few years ago. In point of fact, a very good argument could be raised for the inappropriateness of including the Lancia Fulvia HF as an Affordable Classic at all. While the factory-designed-and-built 1.2-liter and 1.3-liter…
Chassis number: 9F03R483249 • 360 horsepower, 428-ci Cobra Jet Ram Air V8 engine with twin Holley 4-barrel carburetors • Ford C-6 3-speed automatic transmission • Independent front suspension with unequal-length A-arms, coil springs and an anti-roll bar • Live rear axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs and staggered shock absorbers • Power front disc and rear drum hydraulic brakes • Wheelbase: 108 inches • One of just 75 GT500 convertibles finished in Grabber Yellow • Documented by a Marti Report, original invoice and order form • Beautifully restored and perfect for MCA and SCCA events SCM AnalysisThis car, Lot 153, sold for $280,500, with buyer’s premium, at…
  George felt his time was coming. He was through with his studies and was just getting established in his career. Unburdened by a wife or kids, he had been able to save up some money and he was ready to have some fun with it. His interest in collector cars beckoned, and he was quite a fan of the Mercedes-Benz “Pagoda” cars. A lengthy Internet search led him to the website of a dealer a long airplane ride away. The dealer prided himself on a reputation built upon many years of successful business. He claimed expertise in classic cars…
  Our collector car world has four epicenters, and each has its own anchor event. The vintage car calendar starts with Monterey in August, followed by Arizona in January, Paris in February and Amelia Island in March. The signature event for the Monterey Classic Car Week is the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. It follows the auctions, marque shows and historic races. All eyes are on the cars displayed on the 18th Fairway that Sunday. Five months later, and now nearly upon us, is Round Two: Arizona Auction Week. In the desert, it is Barrett-Jackson that is the once and future…
Ask any American to name an Opel product, and they’re overwhelmingly likely to name the GT — often known as the “Baby Corvette” that arrived in America in 1969. But few could tell you that General Motors bought most of Opel in 1929 — and took complete ownership in 1931. By the end of the 1930s, Opel was the second-biggest automaker in Germany. Relations with the parent corporation were severed during the World War II years, but after 1945, Opel came right back to building cars for GM in the European market. GM and Opel began importing cars to the…
Introduced in 1965, the GTA — the A stood for Alleggerita (lightened) — was the official competition version of the Giulia Sprint GT, and it was produced in both road and race variants. The latter, as usual, was the responsibility of the factory’s Autodelta competitions department, which had been founded in 1961 as an independent company by Carlo Chiti and Ludovico Chizzola, and subsequently absorbed by Alfa Romeo. Visually almost indistinguishable from the road-going Sprint GT, the GTA differed by virtue of its aluminum body panels, Plexiglas side and rear windows and lightened interior fittings and trim. As a result,…
In September of 1959, Porsche revealed their fully updated 356 known as the 356B. This had a completely revised body that was more suitable for the American market. The 356B used the new T-5 body style, which raised the front and rear bumpers nearly four inches. Furthermore, the headlights were also repositioned higher to meet American regulations. Inside, Porsche fitted a new deep-dish steering wheel and deeper front seats. New to the model was the Type 616/7 Super 90 engine, which was an indirect replacement for the Carrera de Luxe models. The engine was fully revised with a new intake…