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2008 BUGATTI VEYRON “WELL BOUGHT” AT $934K Sports Car Market Keith Martin’s The Insider’s Guide to Collecting, Investing, Values, and Trends 1989 1990 1991 1992 1995 1996 25 YEARS Thanks for riding along with us! 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 January 2013 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 www.sportscarmarket.com 2009 2010 2011 2012 1993 1994 1997 1998 ™


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Sports Car Market PROFILES Keith Martin’s The Insider’s Guide to Collecting, Investing, Values, and Trends January 2013 . Volume 25 . Number 1 FERRARI by Steve Ahlgrim 42 What You Need to Know ENGLISH by Gary Anderson 44 AUCTIONS What Sold, and Why 179 Vehicles Rated at 10 Sales 62 70 78 1965 Ferrari 275 GTS Spyder $648,709 / Bonhams Never a superstar, but always sought-after ETCETERINI by Colin Comer 46 1959 MGA Twin Cam $60,614 / Bonhams Bargain-priced entry to invitation-only events GERMAN by Paul Hardiman 48 86 94 102 2008 Bugatti Veyron EB 16.4 $933,814 / RM An essentially new car at 50% off sticker AMERICAN by Carl Bomstead 52 1928 Mercedes-Benz 36/220 S-type $4,543,394 / Bonhams Sold at almost double the pre-sale estimate RACE by Thor Thorson 54 112 1909 Stanley Model R roadster $121,000 / RM Good to go without additional expense 8 1930–31 Maserati Tipo 26 Sport racer $2,727,010 / Bonhams A bargain buy in a little-understood market 118 106 BARRETT-JACKSON Las Vegas, NV: 523 cars total $22.8m, led by a 1967 Shelby continuation GT500 Super Snake at $330k — Dan Grunwald BONHAMS Chichester, U.K.: 65 cars total $20m, with the high sale a 1928 Mercedes-Benz 36/220 S-type at $4.5m — Paul Hardiman RM AUCTIONS Hershey, PA: 110 cars total $9.9m, with a 1931 Duesenberg Model J Barrelside phaeton the top sale at $1.3m — John Lyons BONHAMS Philadelphia, PA: 50 cars total $2.6m, and a 1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona coupe brings $357k — John Lyons BRANSON Branson, MO: 124 cars total $2m, with a high-sale 1964 Shelby Cobra 289 roadster at $513k — B. Mitchell Carlson, Dean Merrell CLASSIC MOTORCAR AUCTIONS Canton, OH: 73 cars total $1.5m, led by a 1937 Cord 812 SC phaeton at $162k — Kevin Coakley AUCTIONS AMERICA BY RM Rollinsford, NH: 129 cars total $1m, with a 1925 Lancia Lambda Casaro Spider leading the pack at $207k — Adam Blumenthal ROUNDUP Highlights from Dan Kruse Classics, Austin, TX; J. Wood & Co., Birmingham, AL; and Silver Auctions, Portland, OR — Phil Skinner, Somer Hooker, Jim Pickering EBAY MOTORS Best buys around $20k — Chad Tyson Sports Car Market


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DEPARTMENTS 14 Auction Calendar 18 The Inside Line: Corvette Seminar at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale, Pebble Beach donation, SCMers’ new book 20 Contributors: Get to know our writers 22 You Write: At least one race for Ferrari TdF, Alfa Romeo values, and a Shelby’s trip from Minnesota to Monterey and back 24 Display Advertisers Index 26 Time Pieces: Fine watches de-evolved 26 Neat Stuff: The key to simplicity, plus 12 months of Ferrari 28 In Miniature: 1955–56 Maserati 300S 28 Book Review: Vitesse — Élégance: French Expression of Flight and Motion 84 Fresh Meat: 2011 Porsche 911 Carrera GTS cabriolet, 2013 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 coupe, 2013 Shelby GT500 120 Mystery Photo: “I told you no one walks in L.A.” 120 Comments with Your Renewal: “My favorite auto read since 1998!” Collecting Thoughts 40 COLUMNS 12 Shifting Gears Celebrating our Silver Anniversary Keith Martin 30 Affordable Classic Alfa Romeo 2600 — an underrated grand tourer Donald Osborne 40 Collecting Thoughts A very rare — and kind of weird — 2CV Miles Collier 50 The Cumberford Perspective Examining a 1928 Mercedes-Benz 36/220 S-type Robert Cumberford 56 Under the Skin Handling the heat of a 1909 Stanley steam car — and a 2008 Bugatti Veyron Dennis Simanaitis 130 eWatch Automotive trinkets and treasure from eBay Carl Bomstead John Draneas’ Legal Files column will return next month FEATURES 34 St. Michaels Concours: Beautiful cars and wooden boats at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum 36 Ironstone Concours: Vintage racers, nitro dragsters and an honor for Martin Swig 38 25 Years of SCM: A timeline for our Silver Anniversary 10 JOIN US Subscribe! Sports Car Market Ironstone Concours 36 122 Showcase Gallery: Cars for sale 126 Resource Directory: Meet your car’s needs


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Shifting Gears Keith Martin Let’s Get On With the Next 25 What we know for certain is that in 2038, we’ll still have subscribers asking what their MGB is worth When I would describe a car to a client, I would give a detailed overview of the car and enough information so that the potential customer could create a mental picture of the car. For overall condition, I would choose between “not running,” “runs,” “runs and will drive around the block,” “runs and will get you 100 miles,” and “runs and you could drive it across the country.” One sale I remember in particular was what I called “Five Pigs 25 years of sold! sold! sold! Alfa Romeos and Lotuses. I devoured the various market letters when they arrived. The pa- I triarch of the clan was Gerald Roush’s Ferrari Market Letter, unique in its insistence that sellers list the VIN numbers of their cars. The Porsche Market Letter, the Maserati Market Letter and more filled my mailbox. The upstart of the gang was the Tower Report, which had more editorial comment than the FML. As yet, there was no Alfa Romeo Market Letter. My fear was that someone else would get the jump on me and start one, that it wouldn’t be done to the high standard set by Gerald, and that I would regret not creating one myself. So I carefully scrawled an advertisement on the tissue-thin page of the Hemmings Motor News ad form and submitted it. It went something like this. “Subscribe today to the Alfa Romeo Market Letter. Prices, market trends, classifieds and more. One year, just $32.” This being the pre-Internet age, about six weeks later I started get- ting checks. Soon there were over one hundred of them, and I realized I had better produce something! I decided to print the Alfa Romeo Market Letter on blue paper, as I liked the distinctive nature of the Ferrari Market Letter’s yellow paper with the masthead in red. Soon enough, the first issue was on the Multilith duplicator at the local quick-print shop, and my publishing career was launched. Geneva, Guggisberg and Van Schoote The first issue carried an in-person review of the Geneva Auction, put on by Al Guggisberg (“Guggie”). Working at the hotel, if memory serves me, was Patrick Van Schoote, who became enamored of the auction circus, taught himself Japanese, and, partly because of a longstanding association with Symbolic Motors, has gone on to become one of the great players in the Japanese market. At that time, I was also the editor of a newsletter called Automotive Investor (which we later purchased), and I recall taking a fax machine and a voltage converter to Europe, so I could fax in auction descriptions to the Mothership and we could beat the competition by weeks — not today’s Internet-fueled nanoseconds — with breaking news about auction results. The secret sauce Even then, the formula for the reports was the same. I described the condition of each car in detail, provided a VIN number, gave the selling price or high bid, and an analysis of the result. The root for that formula came from the fax reports I created for overseas clients when I was selling cars to Europe. 12 remember clearly when I decided to launch the Alfa Romeo Market Letter. It was 1988, and the market was beginning to heat up. I had recently left my day job as a manager of Ron Tonkin’s Gran Turismo in Portland, OR, where I sold Ferraris, Maseratis, in a Blanket.” I had come across someone who had been hoarding cast-iron Tipo 102 Alfa 2000 Spiders for reasons unknown, and then inexplicably left them out in the wet Oregon weather to gradually melt into the ground. I bought the five, and after carefully liberating the key parts, such as trunk and floor mats (which were not being reproduced at that time, and which makes me appreciative of Re-Originals every time I order rubber pieces for my Alfas), I sold the package of piggies to Jürgen End of Saarbrucken, Germany. He was delighted to have his own instant Tipo 102 parts yard. DIY printing Those were our cowboy days. I soon learned that both Roush and the publisher of the Maserati Market Letter, Frank Mandarano, owned their own presses. Roush ran a Chief duplicator and Mandarano a black Heidelberg 64. Showing more bravery than knowledge, I bought a bankrupt print shop and began printing the Alfa Market Letter on a Multilith 1850. We graduated to a Hamada 880 14x18-inch one-blanket two-color press. Then we moved up to a gray 18x24-inch Heidelberg 64 — a one-color press, so when we printed four colors on two sides, a single piece of paper went through the press eight times — and finally a 40inch Komori two-tower. That press, which I trucked up from Los Angeles, was supposedly the one that printed the brochures for the first “Star Wars” movie. I liked believing that, but then I think that everything sellers say about their cars is true as well, especially if it’s an Alfa from the ’50s or ’60s. 25 years later Now, Alfa Romeo Market Letter has grown into Sports Car Market and has a sister publication, American Car Collector. A dedicated staff of 15 full-time old-car fanatics — and many more auction reporters and contributors all over the world — stoke the collector-car boilers each issue. Each month, SCM is sent digitally to the Waseca, MN, plant of the Brown Printing Company, and every edition is produced more beautifully than I ever could have imagined 25 years ago. We take part of this issue to celebrate our silver anniversary — and to acknowledge the subscribers and advertisers who have been with us for 20 years or more. Just think, a quarter century has passed, and we are still driving the same cranky old cars, still trying to find that elusive piece of door trim and still wondering if we should replace our factory Solexes with Webers. Presidents have come and gone, the economy has had its booms and busts, and the Prius has become the best-selling car in California — the once-home of the sports-car craze. Here at SCM we’re girding up for the next 25 years. What we know for certain is that in 2038, we’ll still have subscrib- ers asking what their MGB is worth, and does it matter that it was repainted in pink instead of the original green and has tasty cloth seat covers over the tattered original leather? Our answer? What matters is that you are enjoying the car, and letting it be a time machine that takes you to a land where being the driver of a little, under-powered car from across the ocean makes you the cat’s meow of the automotive world. ♦ Sports Car Market


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Crossing the Block Tony Piff For more information about events below, see the 52-page SCM Insider’s Guide to the Arizona Auctions, polybagged with this issue 1949 Delahaye Type 175 Saoutchik Coupe de Ville at Barrett-Jackson’s Scottsdale auction Dave Rupp—Fort Lauderdale Beach Auction Where: Fort Lauderdale, FL When: January 4–6 More: www.ftlauderdaleauction. com A new year of car collecting kicks off just blocks from the beach at Dave Rupp’s longrunning Florida sale. Look for 300 classics at a range of price points. Among the featured early highlights are a 1966 Chevrolet Nova L79, equipped with numbers-matching 327/350 V8 and 4-speed manual, fully documented and driven just 17k miles since new, and still wearing original paint; and a low-mile, one-family 1965 Amphicar 770, offered at no reserve. Tom Mack—Charlotte in January Where: Charlotte, NC When: January 12 More: www.tommackclassics.com Tom Mack’s 29th annual Charlotte auction will feature 150 vehicles, with another 100 Barrett-Jackson—Scottsdale 2013 Where: Scottsdale, AZ When: January 13–15 More: www.barrett-jackson.com Last Year: 1,288/1,291 cars sold / $90.4m Barrett-Jackson’s weeklong flagship sale will feature more than 1,000 quality collectibles at no reserve, including no fewer than 14 Shelbys, from a 1965 GT350 to a 2012 GT500 50th Anniversary Super Snake. Among the highly anticipated “Salon Offerings” are a 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing, bought new by Clark Gable; a 1947 Talbot Lago T-26 Grand Sport coupe, believed one of only three Grand Sports with Franay coachwork; the 1956 Chrysler/Ghia Diablo convert- Auction Calendar All dates listed are current at time of publication. Contact information for most auction companies may be found in the Resource Directory at the back of this issue. Please confirm dates and locations before attending any event. Email auction info to: chad.tyson@sportscarmarket.com. JANUARY DECEMBER 1—RM North Palm Beach, FL 1—VICARI New Orleans, LA 3—BONHAMS Brooklands, U.K. 4—COYS London, U.K. 5—H&H Newbury, U.K. 5—SILVER Spokane, WA 6–8—MECUM Kansas City, MO 7–8—RALEIGH CLASSIC Raleigh, NC 8—AUCTIONS AMERICA BY RM Auburn, IN 18—BARONS Surrey, U.K. 4–6—DAVE RUPP Fort Lauderdale, FL 10—BONHAMS Las Vegas, NV 10–12—MIDAMERICA Las Vegas, NV 11–13—TOM MACK Charlotte, NC 12—COYS Birmingham, U.K. 13–20—BARRETTJACKSON Scottsdale, AZ 16–20—RUSSO AND STEELE Scottsdale, AZ 17—BONHAMS Scottsdale, AZ 18—RM Phoenix, AZ 18–19—GOODING & CO. Scottsdale, AZ 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing at Bonhams Scottsdale 14 Sports Car Market 18–19—SILVER Fort McDowell, AZ 18–27—MECUM Kissimmee, FL FEBRUARY 2—PETERSEN Salem, OR 6–7—BONHAMS Paris, FRA 8—ARTCURIAL Paris, FRA 15–16—RM Madison, GA 22–23—MECUM Boynton Beach, FL 22–24—MCCORMICK’S Palm Springs, CA 23—SILVERSTONE Northamptonshire, U.K. 23—CHEFFINS Bristol, U.K. 23—BONHAMS Boca Raton, FL 24—BARONS Surrey, U.K. available to purchase in the covered car corral, as well as a massive indoor swapmeet. The star auction consignment is a 1966 Mustang convertible with 4-speed, completely unrestored. ible; and a 1949 Delahaye Type 175 Saoutchik Coupe De Ville. Bonhams—The Scottsdale, AZ, Auction Where: Scottsdale, AZ When: January 17 More: www.bonhams.com Last year: 46/67 cars sold / $6.9m Important consignments at Bonhams’ second Arizona sale include “La Petite Royale,” Scott Nidemaier, courtesy of Bonhams Courtesy of Barrett-Jackson


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Crossing the Block Tony Piff restored to highest standards and a class-award winner at Pebble Beach 2012 ($1.4m– $1.8m). And alongside the vintage classics, look for a few modern supercars such as a 2003 Ferrari Enzo and a 1995 Ferrari F50. Silver Auctions—Arizona in January Where: Fort McDowell, AZ When: January 18–19 More: www.silverauctions.com Last year: 158/270 cars sold / $2.7m This well-established sale, 1963 Pontiac Catalina “Swiss Cheese” Super Duty at Russo and Steele in Scottsdale a 1930 Bugatti Type 46 Faux Cabriolet with complete history known from new (Bonhams Estimate: $900k–$1.2m); a 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing ($750k–$1m); a 1928 Stearns-Knight Model F-6-85 Six-passenger roadster; and a 1925 Stutz 695 Torpedo Tail Speedster. Russo and Steele—Sports and Muscle in Scottsdale Where: Scottsdale, AZ When: January 17-20 More: www.russoandsteele.com Last Year: 414/655 / $19.3m Russo predicts more than 700 cars for Scottsdale 2013. Big-money consignments include a 1973 BMW 3.0 CSL “Batmobile”; a 1969 Chevrolet Yenko Camaro; a Hemi-powered 1968 Dodge Dart factory race car; a 1937 Hudson Terraplane pickup, offered without reserve; and a 1963 Pontiac Catalina “Swiss Cheese” Super Duty, fully restored to concours level in 2010. RM Auctions—Automobiles of Arizona Where: Phoenix, AZ When: January 18 More: www.rmauctions.com Last year: 126/140 cars sold / $25.7m This annual sale offers a carefully chosen assortment of blue-chip collectibles. Early featured lots include a 1963 Shelby “Factory CompetitionSpecification” Cobra (RM estimate: $750k–$950k); a 1965 Shelby Mustang GT350 R ($750k–$950k); a 1966 Ferrari 275 GTB, Ferrari Classiche certified ($1.2m–$1.6m); a 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 fresh from comprehensive restoration by Ferrari Classiche in Maranello ($1.4m–$1.75m); a 1938 Delahaye 135 MS coupe ($1m– $1.4m); a Pebble Beach-winning 1934 Cadillac V16 convertible sedan ($650k–$850k); a 1933 Chrysler Imperial CL convertible ($550k–$750k); and a 1935 Auburn 851 SC Boattail Speedster ($500k–$575k). Gooding & Company—The Scottsdale Auction Where: Scottsdale, AZ When: January 18–19 More: www.goodingco.com Last year: 116/118 cars sold / $39.6m Gooding will once again offer a handpicked selection of some of the world’s rarest and most desirable automobiles at their annual Scottsdale sale. The early headliners are the prototype 1957 Maserati 150 GT Spider ($3m–$4m) and a 1938 Bugatti 57C Atalante, now in its 16th year, offers fun, drivable classics in an inviting, family-friendly atmosphere. Hosted at the Radisson Fort McDowell Casino and Resort just 30 minutes outside Scottsdale, it’s a perfect break from the rest of Arizona auction week. Expect a variety of American and foreign sports, luxury and muscle cars under $30k. Mecum Auctions—Kissimmee High Performance Auction Where: Kissimmee, FL When: January 18–27 More: www.mecum.com Last year: 1,546/2,243 cars sold / $58.5m Mecum has expanded their Kissimmee mega-auction to an unbelievable 10 days. A whopping 3,000 cars will cross the block, including a highly optioned and very original 1970 Plymouth Hemi ’Cuda; and a 1962 Chevrolet Corvette Big Brake Tanker, equipped with fuel-injected 327/360 engine, RPO 276 15x5.5 wheels, RPO 687 heavy-duty brakes and suspension, and RPO 687 24-gallon fuel tank; and “ZL-55,” a noexpense-spared 1955 Chevrolet resto-mod. ♦ 1963 Shelby “Factory Competition Specification” Cobra at RM Phoenix 16 1957 Maserati 150 GT Spider, offered at Gooding & Co. in Scottsdale Sports Car Market Courtesy of RM Auctions Courtesy of Russo and Steele Courtesy of Gooding & Company


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Inside Line Alex Martin-Banzer Send news and event listings to insideline@sportscarmarket.com. SCM News ■ The prestigious Society of Automotive Historians has awarded Sports Car Market with the Richard and Grace Bingham Award for “the outstanding treatment of historical topics in an automotive periodical in 2011.” We are deeply honored. The SAH, founded in 1969, is an international organization with more than 900 members. It encourages research into any aspect of automotive history, to safeguard, broaden and deepen the understanding of motorized, wheeled land transportation through the modern age and into the future. SCM contributor John Lyons was on hand to receive the award on behalf of publisher Keith Martin. www.autohistory.org Our panel of experts offers a Corvette education at last year’s Insider’s Seminar munity can do when everyone works together,” said Pebble Beach Concours Chairwoman Sandra Button. “The Pebble Beach Concours has been contributing to charity since its beginning, but in recent years the amount being raised has increased dramatically. We’re so glad that in celebrating our passion, we can also help people in need.” www.pebblebeachconcours.net (CA) ■ SCM contributing writers Ken Gross and Tom Cotter are the authors of the new Rockin’ Garages book from Motorbooks. Gross and Cotter delve into the world of gearhead rock ’n’ rollers with 20 chapters on famous collectors, including Billy Joel, Nick Mason, Mick Fleetwood and Sir Mix-A-Lot. Photographer Michael Alan Ross captures the stars with their cars. $35. www. motorbooks.com ■ The 2012 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance raised more than $1.25 million for more than 60 charities on the Monterey Peninsula, including $100,000 in college scholarships. Other charities that received Pebble Beach donations included United Way Monterey County, Boys & Girls Clubs of Monterey County, Natividad Medical Foundation and Community Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula. “It’s amazing what our com- 18 Events ■ The 6th Annual Corvette Insider’s Seminar, hosted by American Car Collector, will take place from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. on Thursday, January 17, at the Barrett-Jackson auction site in Scottsdale, AZ. Keynote speaker is Tom Stevens, vice chairman of GM Global Product Operations, who will discuss the C7 powerplant. Keith Martin, SCM and ACC Publisher, will lead a panel discussion that will focus on the Corvette Market from 1953 to 2013. Our experts will also recommend their best-buy picks in the current Corvette market. The panelists will be: Jim Jordan, president of County Corvette Kevin Mackay, expert Corvette restorer and owner of Corvette Repair restoration shop Terry Michaelis, ProTeam Corvette owner Lance Miller, co-owner of Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca Sports Car Market Carlisle Events Michael Pierce, NCRS senior judge and ACC writer Roy Sinor, NCRS national judging chairman Mike Yager, founder of Mid America Motorworks Admission is free for ACC and SCM subscribers, registered Barrett-Jackson bidders and consignors, owners of Bloomington Gold-certified Corvettes and NCRS members. Space is limited! To register, go to www. americancarcollector.com (AZ) ■ Winter is a hard time for collector-car lovers, and if you desperately need to scratch that itch, what could be better than seeing 400 Ferraris? The 22nd Cavallino Classic is scheduled for January 22–27 at the Breakers Resort Hotel in Palm Beach, FL. This event offers an array of classic Italian racing cars. The Concorso d’Elegance will showcase 150 Ferraris — and display Ferraris that were designed and custom built by Pininfarina, up to the year 1966, in honor of Sergio Pininfarina. www.cavallino.com/cavallinoclassic (FL) ■ Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca has announced their 2013 race schedule, which will be the 56th season for the world-famous track near Monterey, CA. This season’s race dates are: May 8–11: American Le Mans Monterey July 19–21: Red Bull U.S Grand Prix — returning for its ninth year featuring the MotoGP World Championship August 16–18: Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion — featured marque this year is the Chevrolet Corvette September 5–7: Continental Tire Sports Car Races — featuring the Grand-Am Rolex Sports Car series. www.mazdaraceway.com (CA) ♦ Jim Pickering David Tomaro


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SCM Contributors GARY ANDERSON, SCMContributor, enjoys as many aspects of the classic-car hobby as he can find time for. He is the Editor in Chief of The Star, which is the magazine of the Mercedes-Benz Club of America. He has been active for many years in the Austin-Healey Club USA, and is co-author of MBI’s best-selling Austin-Healey Restoration Guide, as well as editor of the Austin-Healey Magazine. An avid vintage race driver, he ran his 1960 MGA in three Monterey Historics, four Wine Country Classics, and the Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix. He is the author of Motoring: Getting the Maximum from Your New Mini, a comprehensive guide to the new Mini Cooper, available through Amazon.com. He shows us the charms of a 1959 MGA Twin Cam on p. 44. MILESC. COLLIER, SCMContributor, is a retired business executive, practicing artist, investor, philanthropist and noted authority on vintage automobiles. He nurtured his interest in art at Yale University, where he received a B.A. in Painting. When family business intervened, he received an MBA from Columbia University. He retired as Managing Partner of Collier Enterprises in 1995 and returned to painting, studying for three years with the noted Graham Nickson at the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture. Today, he paints professionally. Collier maintains a private automobile collection in Naples, FL, and hosts biennial symposiums on automobile connoisseurship. This month, on p. 40, you can find his thoughts on the quirky — yet irresistible — Citroën Sahara. STEVE AHLGRIM, SCMContributing Editor, has been a car guy since he raced his first quarter midget at age 10. A 17-year stint with the former Atlanta Ferrari dealership FAF Motorcars gave him the background for a career in the Ferrari business, and now he manages a Ferrari parts house, consults on Ferraris and brokers a few cars. He has been involved in concours judging for more than 20 years and is Chief Judge of the Celebration Exotic Car Festival. To be sure, the Ahlgrims are a Ferrari family; his wife, Chris, is Membership Services and Advertising Director for the Ferrari Club of America, Steve is Vice President, and their son, Alex, is starting to judge. Ahlgrim has been contributing to SCM for eight years, and you’ll find his thoughts on a 1965 Ferrari 275 GTS Spyder on p. 42. DAVEOLIMPI, SCMContributor, is a marketer of distinctive collectible automobiles, with a particular passion for Italian cars. His career in the automobile business began as an employee of the Ferrari/Maserati/Lancia dealership that had acquired the Derham Custom Body Company in Rosemont, PA, one of several carriage-trade concerns that manufactured one-off bodies for the great automotive marques of the 1920s and 1930s. Dave’s interest in motor racing was fine-tuned when he obtained his competition driver’s license and drove Porsche 911s in the IMSA GT series during the 1970s. A longtime member of the Ferrari Club of America, Dave is an FCA concours judge at the Cavallino Classic and the Concorso Italiano, as well as the Chief Judge for the St. Michaels Concours d’Elegance and the Bahamas Speed Week Revival concours in Nassau. He covers the St. Michaels Concours d’Elegance for us on p. 34. 20 Sports Car Market Publisher Keith Martin keith.martin@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 210 Executive Editor Chester Allen chester.allen@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 203 Art Director David Tomaro david.tomaro@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 202 Managing Editor Jim Pickering jim.pickering@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 208 Digital Media Director Jeff Stites jeff.stites@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 221 Auctions Editor and Photographer Tony Piff tony.piff@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 206 Associate Editor Chad Tyson chad.tyson@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 207 Copy Editors Yael Abel, David Tomaro Senior Auction Analysts B. Mitchell Carlson, Carl Bomstead, Paul Hardiman (Europe) Auction Analysts John Clucas (Australia), Daniel Grunwald, Jérôme Hardy (Europe), Norm Mort (Canada), Dale Novak, Phil Skinner Contributing Editors Steve Ahlgrim (Ferrari), Gary Anderson (English), Colin Comer (Muscle Cars), Robert Cumberford (Design), John Draneas (Legal), Prescott Kelly (Porsche), Donald Osborne (Etceterini), Dennis Simanaitis (Technical), Thor Thorson (Race Cars) Contributors John Apen, Diane Brandon, Marshall Buck, Miles Collier, Martin Emmison, Jay Harden, Paul Hardiman, Alex Hofberg, Simon Kidston, Ed Milich, Stephen Serio, John L. Stein, Brad E. Stevens Lead Web Developer Marc Emerson marc.emerson@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 212 Information Technology / Internet Brian Baker brian.baker@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 215 SEO Consultant Michael Cottam me@michaelcottam.com; 503.283.0177 Financial Manager Cheryl Ann Francisco cheryl.francisco@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 205 Strategic Planner Bill Woodard Print / Promotions Manager Wendie Martin wmartin@enthusiastmediagroup.com; 206.427.1652 Intern and Blogger Alex Martin-Banzer Executive Producer, SCM Television Roger Williams roger_williams@earthlink.net ADVERTISING Display Advertising Executives Randy Zussman randy.zussman@sportscarmarket.com; 877.219.2605 x 214 Nadine Mosier nadine.mosier@sportscarmarket.com; 877.219.2605 x 211 Advertising Coordinator / Web Content Administrator Erin Olson erin.olson@sportscarmarket.com; 877.219.2605 x 218 Classified Advertising classifieds@sportscarmarket.com SUBSCRIPTIONS Subscriptions Manager Rich Coparanis rich.coparanis@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 217 To order new subscriptions or for questions about current subscriptions 877.219.2605, x 1; service@sportscarmarket.com, fax 503.253.2234 M–F 9 am to 5 pm PST @scmhelp www.sportscarmarket.com CORRESPONDENCE Email service@sportscarmarket.com Customer Support www.sportscarmarket.com/helpdesk Fax 503.253.2234 General P.O. Box 4797, Portland, OR 97208 FedEx/DHL/UPS 401 NE 19th Ave., Suite 100, Portland, OR 97232 The information in Sports Car Market magazine is compiled from a variety of reliable sources. However, we disclaim and deny any responsibility or liability for the timeliness, use, interpretation, accuracy, and completeness of the information presented. All material, data, formats and intellectual concepts in this issue © 2012 by Sports Car Market, Inc., Automotive Investor Media Group and Automotive Investor in this format and any other used by Sports Car Market magazine. Copyright registered with the United States copyright office. Canada Post Publication Agreement #41578525 PRINTED IN USA


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You Write We Read All letters are subject to editing. Please address correspondence to SCM, P.O. Box 4797, Portland, OR 97208. Fax 503.253.2234, e-mail: youwrite@sportscarmarket.com You are quite right that this early Tour de France Ferrari lacked a rich racing history (November 2012, Ferrari Profile, p. 35). But the car did make one competition outing… One race ran To the Editor: You are quite right that this early Tour de France Ferrari, s/n 0585GT, lacked a rich racing history (November 2012 Ferrari Profile, p. 35). But the car did make one competition outing when first delivered to Tony Parravano. That occasion was the Palm Springs race on April 7, 1957. Since the SCCA did not accept it as a production model to run against Mercedes and Corvette, Tony entered the car in the main event with young, promising newcomer Skip Hudson at the wheel. Sorry, I do not have complete results, but Skipper did rave about the car and used it for a few days to show off to his old school friends in Riverside, CA. — Jim Sitz, Grants Pass, OR More SCM love for ’94 Alfa Romeo Spiders? To the Editor: I am seeing very depressed 22 valuations of Alfa Spiders in your Pocket Price Guide, particularly Series 4 (1991–94) cars, compared to what I am observing in private sales and other valuations (particularly Hagerty’s). I know that Spiders in general are still fairly common and inexpensive, but I beg to differ on this latter point. There were only 190 total 1994 Commemorative Edition 2000 Spiders made. In #2 or better condition, with low miles, they are selling in the low to mid-$20,000s. In fact, I am commonly seeing other-year, pristine low-mile Series 4 Spiders being sold by dealers in the $20k–$25k range. I think it may warrant some thought in reconsidering their valuations, and the collectibility grade for the ’94 Commemorative Editions. — David Wiener, Chapel Hill, NC Keith Martin responds: David, we’re always revising our Pocket Price Guide to reflect this ever-changing market. We’ll take a good, hard look at prices this winter, and, if necessary, we’ll change values for this car in the updated 2013 Pocket Price Guide. Two 1973 911S 2.4 cars, two different prices To the Editor: I have long enjoyed your fine publications. I almost always find myself reading them coverto-cover and value the experience of learning about marques that I’ll probably never be fortunate enough to be involved with. However, your November 2012 edition makes me wonder. Since that is the Monterey edition, it doesn’t really bother me that all six of your “In-Depth Profiles” averaged $7,168,000, which I imagine is way out of the means of the bulk of your readers. In more moderate territory, I appreciated Mike Sheehan’s coverage of some of the anomalies among Ferrari sales prices, especially the disparity between two 1974 Dinos — one at $252,500 vs. one at $467,500 (an 85% increase over the “market-correct” price of the lower-priced car per your auction analyst’s comments on p. 154). Cutting to the chase, here’s what I really wonder about: Why wouldn’t you address the even more massive disparity between the 1973 Porsche 911S coupe at the Gooding auction (at $214,500, it was number 162 of the top 200 sellers of the week, p. 88) vs. the ex-Al Holbert 1973 911S that sold at Mecum’s sale for $96,460 (“seemed like big money” per your auction analyst, p. 126)? That’s a difference of 124%. Wow! I’m not suggesting a feature article, just maybe some mention in a column, or even just the inclusion of the Gooding car among the auction analysts’ coverage. I think we deserve to know where this market is, or where it may be going, and some discussion as to why. — Bob Murphy, Larkspur, CO Sports Car Market Pawel Litwinski ©2012 Courtesy of RM Auctions


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You Write We Read Ad Index 2shores International.................................. 121 ACC Corvette Market Seminar.................... 32 Aston Martin of New England..................... 99 Auctions America......................................... 13 Autosport Designs Inc................................ 119 Barrett-Jackson ............................................ 15 Bennett Law Office.................................... 117 Beverly Hills Car Club............................... 109 BMW Car Club of America, Inc.................. 35 Boca Raton Concours d’Elegance ............... 83 Bonhams / SF............................................... 19 Canepa.......................................................... 97 Carlisle Events ............................................. 89 Century 1031 Exchange, Inc........................ 68 Charles Prince Classic Cars ......................... 29 Chubb Personal Insurance............................ 21 Classic Assets Motorsports Center............. 109 Classic Motorcar Auctions........................... 91 Classic Showcase......................................... 81 CMC Classic Model Cars .......................... 115 Collector Car Price Tracker ....................... 117 COMEXPOSIUM...................................... 125 Copley Motorcars....................................... 100 Cosdel ........................................................ 125 Dealer Accelerate......................................... 27 Driversource Houston LLC.................. 77, 103 European Collectibles ................................ 115 Exotic Classics........................................... 125 Fantasy Junction........................................... 93 Gooding & Company..............................2, 4-5 Grand Prix Classics - La Jolla CA............... 99 Gullwing Motor Cars, Inc.......................... 107 Hamann Classic Cars................................... 71 Heacock Classic .......................................... 17 Heritage Classics.......................................... 67 Hollywood Wheels Inc............................58-59 Hyman, LTD ................................................ 85 Intercity Lines .............................................. 35 JC Taylor...................................................... 63 Jeff Brynan................................................. 101 JJ Best Banc & Co ..................................... 123 L’ art et L’ automobile ................................ 119 L.A. Prep...................................................... 69 Mac Neil Automotive Products Ltd............. 65 Mercedes Classic Center.............................. 51 Mershon’s World Of Cars ............................ 97 Mid America Auctions................................6-7 Miller’s Mercedes Parts, Inc...................... 100 Morris & Welford, LLC............................... 57 Motor Classic & Competition Corp............. 99 Motorcar Portfolio ....................................... 91 Palm Springs Exotic Car Auctions............... 73 Paramount Classic Cars ............................... 87 Paul Russell And Company ....................... 103 Premier Financial Services ........................ 131 Putnam Leasing............................................ 31 RB Collection............................................... 41 Reliable Carriers .......................................... 61 RM Auctions............................................ 9, 11 Road Scholars .............................................. 37 Ron Tonkin Gran Turismo ......................... 107 RPM Auto Books....................................... 101 Russo & Steele LLC ............................ 23, 132 SCM at Retromobile .................................... 32 Silver Collector Car Auctions ...................... 25 Sports & Specialist Cars .............................111 Swissvax USA, LLC.................................... 33 Symbolic Motor Car Co................................. 3 T. Rutlands ................................................... 75 Take Your Car To Auction, LLC................ 121 Terry E. Johnson .......................................... 79 The Stable, Ltd............................................. 95 Tom Mack Classics.................................... 117 Vintage Rallies............................................. 93 VintageAutoPosters.com............................ 125 24 You Write We Read The car was driven from and to the Minneapolis area, total 4,500 miles, by the owner, Tom Warth, who has owned it since 1974 Keith Martin responds: Bob, you raise an excellent question — one that we should have anticipated and answered. In short, the Gooding car was a matching-numbers, prize-winning car, while the Mecum car was a nice 911S 2.4 with terrific ownership provenance. SCM’s Pocket Price Guide values a #2 1973 911S 2.4 between $60k and $80k, so both cars sold well. Every auction is different, and it could be that two or more bidders really wanted the 911S 2.4 in the Gooding tent. We’ll work harder in the future to anticipate questions such as this one. From Minnesota to Monterey — and back To the Editor: The “COBRA” license plate on the 289 Cobra in “Car Spotting on the Peninsula” (November 2012, p. 82) was a Minnesota plate. The car was driven from and to the Minneapolis area, total 4,500 miles, by the owner, Tom Warth, who has owned it since 1974. It was also in the Shelby corral and on the Cobra parade lap at Laguna Seca on Saturday, but alas, SAAC had no award for distance traveled. — Logan Gray, Portland OR Free use of an E-type, and perhaps a tiny profit To the Editor: Every month when SCM arrives in the post, I read it from front to back almost immediately. I thoroughly enjoy the magazine, and the informative articles written by John Draneas are one of the treasures I look forward to. Keep up the good work. However, almost every month I see your auction reviewers comment about how much profit a particular person made on a sale, and they get the profit wrong. Case in point: Volume 24, No. 11, November 2012. Ray Nierlich reviews the Russo and Steele Monterey 2012 Auction, and on p. 138, Lot S615, he comments, “The seller must be pleased, as he enjoyed 3,400 miles with it and came out $28k ahead.” The sale price, commission included, was $71,500, and the purchase price was $43,500 in 2004. $71,500 is what the new owner paid, with 10% commission included. This means that the sale price was $65,000. Taking away the 10% seller commission means that the seller actually received $58,500, a gross profit of $15,000. Now we must look at the costs of entering the car into the auction, transportation from the Phoenix auction, where the car was purchased, transportation to the Monterey auction, where it was sold, storage fees for the eight years, maintenance, insurance, license fees, taxes (if any), etc. For eight years of using the car on average 425 miles per year, the seller possibly made a little money. Getting to drive an XKE for free is a proposition very few would refuse. However it must be understood that the seller did not make $28,000. — Terence Dittman, St. Jacques-deMontcalm, Quebec, Canada ♦ Sports Car Market Tony Piff


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Time Pieces by Alex Hofberg De-Evolution Towards the Future of Fine Watches I have to admit it — I am attracted to shiny objects. From diamonds and other precious gemstones, whose scintillation and brilliance reflect ambient light and break that light into its colored components the way a prism does, to gold that seems to emit a light and warmth of its own. Of course, I have obsessed over automobiles, but they tend to be spendy, hard to store and always at risk of the many dangers of the road, parking lots and vandals. I have found that watches satisfy many of the same pleasure receptors in my psyche as cool cars. Traditionally, watches were spring-wound and used a balance wheel to govern or regulate that spring’s steady unwinding. They tended to be somewhat fragile and definitely not water-resistant. By the 1950s, wristwatches had improved in many ways, but to assure continued market share by product differentiation, the major Swiss brands — and some American firms — experimented with a technology that nearly destroyed the entire fine-watch industry. In the late 1950s, teams of horologists and engineers were contemplating certain aspects of wristwatch design: How can we power a watch electronically? How small can the power cell be for reasonable run time? How accurate can an electronic watch be? How small and/or thin can we make it? How inexpensively can we make it? And so on... By the late 1960s through the mid-1980s, most of the world’s watch brands had found common answers to these questions. Now, we make wafer-thin watches — or tiny watches — that use the resonant nature of a quartz crystal that is accurate to seconds per year powered with a battery that can last three years or more — for less than $100. Although the Swiss developed most of these technologies, the competition from Asia proved to be devastating — as they could mass produce watches at much lower costs. Consider these watches to be the Chrysler K cars of their day. They were built cheaply and offered Neat Stuff by Tony Piff The Key to Simplicity In my ongoing quest to streamline the contents of my pockets, no gadget has been so revolutionary as the Keyport Slide. The matchbook-sized unit ($39) has six slots for keys ($4.99 each), and you can add some Swiss Army-style utility with a bottle opener ($5.99), flashlight ($9.99) and 32-gigabyte USB flash drive ($44.99). Your local locksmith or car dealer cuts the Keyport-supplied blanks in the traditional Time Piec Time Piec Time Piec Time Piec Time Piec Time Piec es by Alex Hofberg De-Evolution Towards the Future of Fine Watches I have to admit it — I am attracted to shiny objects. From diamonds and other precious gemstones, whose Pieces by Alex Hofberg De-Evolution Towards the Future of Fine Watches I have to admit it — I am attracted to shiny objects. From diamonds and other precious gemstones, whose scintillation and brilliance reflect ambient light and break that light into its colored components the way a prism does, to gold that seems to emit a light and warmth of its own. Of course, I have obsessed over automobiles, but they tend to be spendy, hard to store and always at risk of the many dangers of the road, parking lots and van- dals. I have found that watches satisfy many of the same pleasure receptors in my psyche as cool cars. Traditionally, watches were spring-wound and used a balance wheel to govern or regulate that spring’s steady unwinding. They tended to be somewhat fragile and definitely not water-re- sistant. By the 1950s, wristwatches had improved in many ways, but to assure continued market share by product differentiation, the major Swiss brands — and some American firms — experi- mented with a technology that nearly destroyed the entire fine-watch industry. In the late 1950s, teams of horologists and engineers were contemplating certain aspects of wristwatch design: How can we power a watch electronically? How small can the power cell be for reasonable run time? How accurate can an electronic watch be? How small and/or thin can we make it? How inexpensively can we make it? And so on... By the late 1960s through the mid-1980s, most of the world’s watch brands had found common answers to these questions. Now, we make wafer-thin watches — or tiny watches — that use the resonant nature of a quartz crystal that is accurate to seconds per year powered with a battery that can last three years or more — for less than $100. Although the Swiss developed most of these technologies, the competition from Asia proved to be devastating — as they could mass produce watches at much lower costs. Consider these watches to be the Chrysler K cars of their day. They were built cheaply and offered Neat Stuff by Tony Piff The Key to Simplicity In my ongoing quest to streamline the contents of my pockets, no gadget has been so revolutionary as the Keyport Slide. The matchbook-sized unit ($39) has six slots for keys ($4.99 each), and you can add some Swiss Army-style utility with a bottle opener ($5.99), flashlight ($9.99) and 32-gigabyte USB flash drive ($44.99). Your local locksmith or car dealer cuts the Keyport-supplied blanks in the traditional some some mileage, but they were ultimately disposable and uninspiring. Not all watch manufacturers chased the “electronic dragon.” Brands such as Patek Philippe, Rolex and few others continued to offer a wide variety of mechanical timepieces. By many standards, these watches are possibly less accurate, have shorter service intervals and require more expensive maintenance. Yet affluent watchbuyers and enthusiasts supported these firms, as they came to the realization that the quartz watch revolution may have had some benefits — but generally served to cheapen the whole notion of the watch. Who wants a disposable heirloom? Thankfully, in the past 30 years, the whole notion of the fine watch has, in essence, deevolved. Fine watches are still made with older, more-traditional techniques. Fine watchmakers are still making improvements, but they continue to rely on the simpler — yet fascinating — technologies of the mainspring and balance wheel. Once the circuitry of the watch is removed, the longevity of the engine is enhanced tenfold, as a watchmaker with the right talents can fix or remake a broken part. In contrast, a micro-circuit board is generally not repairable. Additionally, watch manufacturers and designers have recognized that we tend to use our watches harder than ever — and we expect them to be robust and water-resistant. The modern mechanical timepiece is thought by many to be a cross between the science and art of horology. It is the union of form and function, of metallurgy, physics, applied mathematics — and an example of artistic expression and aesthetic values. It is an object to be cherished and passed along generationally — and also used. With roughly $17 billion of gross sales reported by the Swiss watch industry in 2011, there is no doubt that the appetites of the watch connoisseurs of the world are insatiable. I am proudly one of those afflicted with that hunger. There is, however, room in my garage for one more car — and maybe a motorcycle, too. Twelve Months of Ferrari The official licensed 2013 Ferrari calendars are here, and they are every bit as outrageously beautiful as you’d expect. “Ferrari Myth” ($89.95) features iconic Ferraris new and old, gorgeously shot in exotic locations. It’s a massive piece of wall art, at more than two feet wide, 1.6 feet tall, and printed on art-gloss stock. Ferrari prints just 5,000 numbered copies each year. The new “Scuderia Ferrari” calendar ($39.95) captures the Ferrari F1 team in motion, with an insider’s view of drivers Fernando Alonso and Felipe Massa dominating the track and podium. In the Americas, order from www.bullpublishing.com. In other regions, go to www.raupp.com. © 26 Sports Car Market


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In Miniature by Marshall Buck 1955–56 Maserati 300S Sir Stirling Moss wrote that the 300S was “one of the easiest, nicest, best balanced sports-racing cars ever made.” Moss should certainly know. I’ll add my two cents’ worth. The Maserati 300S is still one of the prettiest as well. CMC Classical Models has just raised the bar one more notch, this time with their brandnew release of a Maserati 300S, modeled in 1:18 scale. Stunning, marvelous and spectacular are words that all aptly apply to this miniature. It is a piece you will want, even though the particular car they’ve chosen to replicate is not necessarily the ideal choice of 300S to model. The car that CMC has replicated is Chassis 3056, which originally started life as 3066. The factory repaired and upgraded this 300S, and on one visit in mid-1958, it received the engine from 3056, hence the official change. The “first” 3056 was also officially renumbered to 3077. The whereabouts of both the chassis and engine of 3066 are unknown. The model replicates the car as it was restored around 1989–90. No other 300S looks like this car, which is the result of combing the various Worksadded details and upgrades along with the interim style that only a few of these cars carried. I would have chosen a more recognizable 300S — and one with a more successful race record than 3066/3056. With that said, I am still happy and thankful to see a superb model of any Maserati 300S. No matter where or how you display this model, it has a com- manding presence, especially with the front and rear deck lids removed. The flowing body of 3056 is perfectly captured, and covered in an excellent high-gloss, hand-rubbed paint finish. This jewel is made up of a staggering number of parts — 1,838 in total. There is so much going on that it is difficult to focus on one area at a time. As with all models from CMC, this piece features a completely Speaking Volumes by Mark Wigginton Vitesse — Élégance: French Expression of Flight and Motion By Serge Bellu, Philipp Moch and The Mullin Automotive Museum editorial staff, Coachbuilt Press, 288 pages, $110.00 (Amazon) The third book examining the Mullin Automotive Museum collection, Vitesse — Élégance rolls metaphorically, and properly, onto the motor book equivalent of the lawn at Pebble Beach. It belongs. From the first glance of the cover, it captures your attention with the simple line of fender and hood coming together in a head-turning display of style. Following the two previous vol- umes, French Curves — Delahaye, Delage, Talbot-Lago and The Art of Bugatti, Vitesse — Élégance brings the focus to Voisin, Hispano-Suiza, Renault and a broad range of French automotive history, from the highest examples of art to utilitarian cars for the masses. As much as the cars, it is about the men who made the cars, the visionaries and risk-takers — the men who changed the notion of the automobile, inside and out. The authors tie together the early days of flight and the automobile in France, connecting the dots between the physical, ground-breaking lessons of early aviators and designers as they struggled to get into the air with the technology and sensibilities they brought to cars. In the time after The Great War, idle aviation factories turned to automobiles as the next big thing. Voisin airplanes led inevitably to race cars and coachwork motorcars. 28 The cars from the Mullin collection remain the stars of Vitesse — Élégance, and Michael Furman’s photography again provides truly breathtaking moments, page after page. Combined with historical photographs and the text, the book explores the remarkable world of French design, from the unmistakable beauty and purpose of the 1922 Voisin C3 S race car to the “less is more” 1960 Citroën 2CV Camionette, a people’s car that became a fashion statement. Vive la France. Provenance: Serge Bellu, former editor of Automobiles Classiques magazine, author and design lecturer at the Art Center College of Design, puts his long background to bear as he, along with Philipp Moch, weave together the threads of change in aviation, art, automobiles and culture to tell a clear story of the men and forces that created the French automobile world. Fit and finish: Another quite beautiful book from the Mullin Museum, nothing less than note-perfect in typography, photography and design. Drivability: The book is terrific. I’m gushing, I know, but the authors, the photographer and the many folks at the Mullin Museum who contributed to its creation should be proud. But for me, what stands out and makes it all possible is the vision, the aesthetic, that collector Peter Mullin has brought to the table. Along with a handful of special, passionate collectors, Mullin has demonstrated a unique, personal vision in regard to the automobiles he brought together. And that vision, this series of books, and the museum work together for all of us who love the art that is the automobile. ♦ Sports Car Market detailed chassis. Framework, suspension, all components, hoses, cables, clamps and more. Undo any one of the knockoff wheel spinners and remove one of the beautifully made wheels — which should be painted but are not. Get past that problem, and you’re treated to beautiful finned brake drums. The rear wheels also feature the spoke pattern of what 3056 originally raced on, but not what it is seen with today. Up top again, the doors pivot smoothly on U-shaped hinges and are held closed by little button latches that gently click. The interior is a joy to behold, with a detailed dash and those wellknown blue face gauges. The removable front and rear deck lids are held in place via leather straps and buckles, along with delicate functional latches that pivot with working springs. Overall an exciting engine bay is unveiled, although I Model Details Production Date: 2012–13 Quantity: This edition is open-ended SCM Five-Star Rating: Overall Quality: Authenticity: Overall Value: Web: www.cmcmodelcarsusa. com do have a couple of quibbles. The gorgeous triple carbs are incorrectly angled, and there is some colorful wiring that I can’t quite place or recall ever seeing on any 300S — including 3056. However, the perfect valve covers, each with 16 bolts, and the 12 spark plugs with boots and wires, make up for those missteps. Strapped in place behind the cockpit, and above the rear framework, transaxle and central leaf spring is the spare tire. Just aft of that is a beautiful fuel tank with opening cap, and to its left is the oil tank, also with an opening cap. This is truly a wonderful and most impressive model. Reasonably priced at $449. Find one and buy it.


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Affordable Classic Alfa Romeo 2600 Sprint Alfa Romeo’s Underrated Grand Tourer These cars are quite expensive to restore, so buying work already done is imperative by Donald Osborne The sedan was delightfully transatlantic baroque, complete with lashings of chrome trim and fins, albeit discreet ones. The Spider was an elegant Carrozzeria Touring creation — and very much the style equal of Maserati and Aston Martin drop tops. But the pick of the litter was the sleek, clean and beautiful Sprint, which was the first job a frighteningly young Giorgetto Giugiaro did for Carrozzeria Bertone. The 2000 was a sales disappointment, and executives realized that further distance was needed between the “small” Giulietta and the “big” Alfa. Enter the 2600 In 1962, the Alfa Romeo line received 1963 Alfa Romeo 2600 Sprint T his was supposed to be an Affordable Classic piece about the entire Alfa Romeo 2600 range. It has become a piece about only one of the five models of the Alfa 2600 — the Sprint. Why? I don’t want SCM World Headquarters to be bombarded with emails, letters and tweets complaining about the definition of “affordable.” I believe that all Alfa 2600s are undervalued for what they offer, but it’s tough to call the $65,000-plus it takes to buy a good example of the 2600 Spider or the $145,000 cost of a non-project 2600 SZ affordable by any real measure, as “affordable” is roughly synonymous with “credit card” for most of us. While my Amex Platinum Card has no pre-set spending limit, I’d hate to get that bill at the end of the month. The Alfa Romeo 2600 has long been one of my favorite cars, which is not surpris- ing, as I am the definition of a Grand Touring Man. The 2600 was responsible for my 1996 writing debut in the pages of SCM: “Mr. Osborne Builds His Dream Car” (March/April, p. 24). The story chronicled my adventures with no fewer than three Alfa 2600 Sprints in pursuit of one perfect car. I, and other perceptive souls, have seen in the 2600 the essence of what Alfa Romeo was born to be — and, in fact, was for most of the first 40 of the 103 years the company has built cars. I’m talking about the time when Alfa Romeo made road cars for the ultra-wealthy in very small numbers. It also made racing cars that were quite successful until the late 1930s, when “The Leader” in Berlin started outspending “The Leader” in Rome in auto racing subsidies. Alfa’s road cars were fast (enough), chic, expensive and stylish. They were a symbol of the prosperous man and well-kept woman of the 1920s and 1930s. A new Alfa Romeo emerges from the ashes The transformation of the company in the immediate post-World War II years to a volume manufacturer with a middle-class — well, upper middle class — market was a remarkable one. In creating first the 1900 models and then the Giulietta, Alfa Romeo perfectly forged a new identity with light, easy-handling sporty sedans, coupes and spiders, which were a marketer’s dream. Alfa Romeo also managed to completely erase in a decade all that had come before. The 1900 was succeeded by the 2000 in 1958. All new bodies came in Berlina (sedan), Spider and Sprint (coupe), with a cast-iron, 4-cylinder engine. 30 a heart transplant with a new 2,584-cc, DOHC, inline 6-cylinder engine — the 2600. The Berlina and Spider got facelifts, while the Sprint gained a functional hood scoop and three inches in the wheelbase to accommodate the extra cylinders. A super-sleek — and slightly wacky — Zagato model was added to the lineup with the 2600 SZ. Finally, the contract body firm OSI built a very limited number of six-window sedans — the 2600 DeLuxe. The 2600 Spider and Sprint cars were as austere and ascetic as the factory Berlina was overstyled. When the cars were new, the improved power from the smooth, refined 6-cylinder engine was universally praised. Further, Road & Track magazine’s legendary scribe Henry Manney III wrote of the 2600 line at the time of the launch: “The steering is light, vision good, handling impeccable, brakes super.” Manney’s review makes later assessments of the 2600 as a badly oversteering, ill-balanced beast somewhat tough to believe. Allow me to elaborate: The weight penalty for the six cylinders over the four cylinders is only 90 pounds. Yes, it would be good if the cars had power steering, but it would be better to have a suspension that was designed more recently than 1948 as well. That’s the real shortcoming of the 2600, as it is an updated 2000, which is an updated 1900, which was designed as the smoke from World War II was settling. To Details Years produced: 1962–68 Current price range: $18,000–$45,000 Number built: 6,999 understand and appreciate the 2600, it should be put into the proper context. When you com- Pros: A great design, a smooth, powerful engine, good build quality and fine details. Cons: Heavy low-speed steering and frequent carburetor maintenance. The cost of restoration is high, and some parts are hard to find. Best place to drive one: Any road with long, fast sweepers. A typical owner is: Secure in his/her tastes and a Grand Touring enthusiast. Sports Car Market


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pare the driving experience to the proper cars, the appeal of the Alfa 2600 becomes clearer. The competition was the Mercedes-Benz 220SE, BMW 3200 CS, and, of course, the home-grown Lancia Flaminia. While the Alfa put out 130 horsepower in the single-carb Berlina, the Sprint and Spider’s 145-hp, three-carburetor system compares favorably to the 150 horsepower of the 2.8-liter Flaminia and the 160 horsepower of the BMW V8 — while handily beating the 134-hp Mercedes inline 6. As an aside, the SZ put out a healthy 165 horsepower with the lightest body of all the cars. The 2600 was a return to high retail prices for Alfa as well. The 1962 Sprint cost nearly $6,000, but it did boast leather upholstery and power front windows, while the Mercedes coupe was $8,700 with roll-up windows and vinyl seats — and a Maserati 3500 cost twice as much. Of the full 2600 range, today’s market consists mostly of Spiders, with an occa- sional Sprint popping up. The rare Zagato coupes seem to come to market in clumps, with none seen for years, then two or three in a row. I have only seen a couple of Berlinas in the United States, and the only OSI DeLuxe Berlina I have ever seen was at the Auto e Moto d’Epoca show in Padua, Italy, a few years ago. Production figures are also interesting. For most Alfa models, the sedan was the volume leader; for the 2600 it was a distant third. Most 2600s were Sprints, with 6,999 built, followed by 2,555 Spiders, 2,092 of the Berlina, 105 SZs and a few dozen OSI DeLuxe Berlinas. I mentioned the values of Spiders and Zagatos earlier; what a Berlina would go for if a good one appeared is anyone’s guess. One sold on eBay in 2009 for $18,900 after being on the market for a year with a price of $25k. Sorting out the carburetor issue When assessing a 2600, the carburetors have to be considered as important as the car’s cosmetic condition. The triple Solex 44 PHH carburetors, as fitted to the Spider, Sprint and SZ, had a very bad reputation for a very long time. Interestingly, versions of this same carburetor were used on the Mercedes 190SL and BMW 1600/1800/2000/2002. While the Solex 44 PHH carburetors have double chambers — like a traditional two-barrel carburetor — they are actually two-stage in use. Vacuum operation opens the second chamber under wide-open throttle for added air and fuel delivery. It’s a clever system that delivers very smooth power when needed and saves fuel and helps drivability at low speeds. So, what’s the catch? The vacuum hoses must be maintained and the vacuum capsule mechanisms must be scrupulously cleaned and lubricated. If not, they will stick, eventually leading to burned valves. Don’t be seduced by Weber conversions — this rare original factory option required a completely different intake manifold that is difficult to find and expensive to fabricate. Without it, the lash-ups made to accommodate Webers render 2600s largely undriveable and certainly not as smooth in performance as the Solexes. There is also the typical peakiness associated with big Webers. Values stalled for a decade Values have been static for Sprints, as nice examples have drifted around the $35,000 mark for a decade now. Occasionally, a show queen gets sold near $50k, but that’s still an anomaly. These cars are quite expensive to restore, with com- plex curved body panels with many mud traps, NLA chrome attachment clips and the aforementioned pleated leather interior with double-stitched French seams on the dashboard top. Here a restoration is completely uneconomical and buying work already done is imperative. Familiarity behind the wheel of a well-sorted 2600 Sprint is almost bound to make a convert. Leave your preconceptions at the curb and let this 1960s flagship coupe carry you back to the glory days of Alfa in its middle youth. The 2600 is the deserving descendant of the great 6C Alfas of yore. And it need not apologize for what it isn’t. ♦ January 2013 31


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Barrett-Jackson Endorsed Collector Car Insurance and American Car Collector magazine present CAR COLLECTOR Thursday, January 17, 2013, 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. at the Barrett-Jackson Auction, Scottsdale, AZ Specialized Automotive Transportation SEMINAR TOPICS • Tom Stevens discusses the C7 powerplant • ACC experts pick the most significant events in the Corvette community during the past year • Each expert picks his favorite “best buy” from C1 to C6 ae i i ie r SM o C usrbr. $0 amsin ohr ie AMERICAN The 6th Annual Corvette Market Insider’s Seminar ONE DAY ONLY Keynote speaker: Tom Stevens, Vice Chairman of GM Global Product Operations WORLD-RENOWNED PANEL OF CORVETTE EXPERTS INCLUDING: JIM JORDAN, President of County Corvette, West Chester, PA KEVIN MACKAY, owner of Corvette Repair Inc., Valley Stream, NY TERRY MICHAELIS, President of ProTeam Corvette Sales, Napolean, OH LANCE MILLER of Carlisle Events, Carlisle, PA MICHAEL PIERCE, NCRS Senior Judge, Portland, OR ROY SINOR, NCRS National Judging Chairman, Tulsa, OK MIKE YAGER, founder of Mid America Motorworks, Effingham, IL MODERATOR: KEITH MARTIN, publisher of Sports Car Market and American Car Collector Register: www.AmericanCarCollector.com/2013seminar Phone: 503.261.0555 ext. 217 S pc s lmtd — pergsrto s srnl norgd o cs o art-ako eitrd bdes o C r AC sbcies 1 d iso tews. r-eitai n i togy ecuae! N ot f r BretJcsn rgsee idr Advanced registration/check-in opens at 8 a.m. (separate admission to Barrett-Jackson is required.) BE A PART OF SCM IN PARIS! Join Keith and Wendie Martin, and SCM Blogger Alex MartinBanzer for the annual SCM reception at Retromobile. When: Wednesday, February 6, 2013, 5:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Where: Café Le Jambon à la Broche, Rétromobile Show, Porte de Versailles Expo Center, Paris, France RSVP: Donald Osborne via email; dosborne@sportscarmarket.com No later than Monday, January 28th, 2013. Yes, it’s true! The legendary SCM subscribers and friends reception at Le Café Jambon à la Broche restaurant at the Rétromobile show in Paris is coming up fast! Co-sponsored by Cave Creek Classics and Automotive Valuation Services, hosted by AVS Head and SCM Contributing Editor Donald Osborne and Ed Fallon of Cave Creek Classics, we welcome you to spend quality time discussing the offerings automotive and exploring the vagaries of currency exchange with your fellow SCMers over ham, crudités and cheese, washed down with wine, beer or water as you choose. For the first time in five years, SCM Publisher Keith Martin will be attending, eager to swap tales with you. Also in attendance will be his wife, Wendie and his daughter, Alex Martin-Banzer, who will be blogging about the event. She is ready to share your tall tales with the SCM world! The Bonhams Paris auction and Artcurial sale will be topics of eager discussion no doubt—and our timing even allows a visit with us as well as other receptions! For show information please visit: http://en.retromobile.com 32 Sports Car Market Keith Martin's


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Feature 2013 St. Michaels Concours A Rising Tide of Success Along scenic Chesapeake Bay, the Best of Show award went to Sonny and Joan Abagnale’s 1929 Duesenberg Model J Murphy Roadster 2013 St. Michaels Concours A Rising Tide of Success Along scenic Chesapeake Bay, the Best of Show award went to Sonny and Joan Abagnale’s 1929 Duesenberg Model J Murphy Roadster People’s People’s Choice: 1937 Bugatti Type 57C roadster, owned by SCMer Malcolm Pray S t. Michaels is one of several pocket-sized historic villages on Maryland’s eastern shore of the Chesapeake Bay — a hub for sailors and power-boaters alike. A destination for those who appreciate colonial architecture, charming shops, and fine dining, it is also fast becoming home to one of the foremost concours in the Eastern United States. Held on the campus of the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, the 2012 St. Michaels Concours displayed pristine vintage cars against a backdrop of antique wooden boats moored at the museum docks. The entire setting of the September 28–30 event had the ambience of an art gallery. There was sufficient space to observe the 67 entries from all angles — and to spend time studying the individual cars. The cars, as one entrant stated “were, without exception, sensational. The standard and variety were exceptional.” SCM contributor Bill Rothermel was master of ceremonies. The ever-popular motor tour got a police escort to ensure the entrants’ orderly ar- rival at the Hyatt Regency Golf Resort and Marina in Cambridge, where a catered lunch was served. After returning to the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, the entrants buckled down to the business of returning their cars to concours condition — and then adjourned to the charity dinner and auction at the Harbourtowne Golf and Conference Center. The day of the concours delivered Chamber of Commerce weather. The Honorary Chairman of this year’s event was noted collector — and SCMer — Malcolm Pray, who generously exhibited six of his exceptional cars. Pray honored Charles Gillet’s 1938 Packard Derham Touring with the Chairman’s Trophy. The Best of Show award was virtually unanimous, and was presented to Sonny and Joan Abagnale’s 1929 Duesenberg Model J Murphy roadster. The Timeless Elegance award went to Ed Details Plan ahead: The Seventh Annual St. Michaels Concours d’Elegance is scheduled for September 29, 2013 Where: Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum, St. Michaels, MD Cost: General admission is $35 More: www.smcde.org 34 Winfelder’s 1948 Delahaye Cabriolet, and the 1932 Auburn Speedster of Carl and Barbara Gardella was presented with the trophy for the Best Restoration by an Owner. F.I.V.A. presented its award for Unrestored Excellence to the 1915 Packard of Michael Rowan, and SCMer Robert Hanson’s 1938 Lincoln Model K limousine Cabriolet received the judges’ award for Best Unrestored. The popular People’s Choice award went to Pray’s 1937 Bugatti Type 57C roadster. David Kraus won the Hagerty Youth Judging Award for his 1946 Nash Woody Suburban sedan. In the wooden boat classes, the award for best cruiser went to SCMer Dave Butler’s 1903 Lawley Custom Sailing Sloop “Witchcraft.” The top runabout was SCMer Jim Grundy’s mesmeric 1926 triple-cockpit 37foot Dodge Gold Cup racer, “Horace,” powered by its original 650-hp Wright Typhoon V12 engine. This was the second year of the popular Post World War II Sports and Racing Class. This year’s field encompassed some extraordinarily rare cars, such as a 1950 Jaguar alloy XK 120 roadster, a 1957 BMW 507, a 1962 Aston Martin DB4GT, a 1947 Bandini Sports, a former Pebble Beach 100-point 1955 Ferrari 500 Mondial, a 1948 HRG roadster, a 1957 Lotus 11 and a 1956 Jaguar D-type. As one participant said, “There’s something for everybody. I must bring another car next year. This was delightful.” All proceeds from the concours benefit the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum. ♦ Best of Show: 1929 Duesenberg Model J Murphy Roadster, owned by Sonny and Joan Abagnale Sports Car Market Ken Visser Dave Olimpi


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Feature 2013 Ironstone Concours California Dreamin’ Almost 20% of the entries came from within an hour’s drive of the winery, underlining the area’s strong automotive culture by Michael Leven regularly drives up and down a treacherous mountain section of Highway 17, high above his hometown of Capitola, CA. The event has also become well known for an excellent trailer and camper class, and this year was no exception. Numerous campmobiles from the 1940s and 1950s — complete with period supplies, dishes and accessories — were cleverly displayed in the upper reaches of the field, adjacent to the trees and scrub. Several of the 16 trailers were still attached to vintage pickups and station wagons. Rather than multiple placings per class, the judging teams chose to select a Best of Class winner, with other cars receiving Award of Merit recognition. Two Best of Show awards were given out: Bill Kuettel’s 1923 Hispano-Suiza H6B I t was another glorious day in the Sierra Nevada foothills during the 16th Annual Ironstone Concours d’Elegance on September 22, 2012. With over 300 cars on display at the Ironstone Winery amphitheater and surrounding gardens, there was plenty to take in, and with 31 classes of vehicles, there was something for everyone. Such is the beauty of this site that it has also become a major concert venue, this year hosting, among others, Reba McEntire, Kelly Clarkson and the great Tony Bennett. Almost 20% of the entries came from within an hour’s drive of the winery, once again underlining the strong, long-extant automotive culture near Murphys, CA. One need not look beyond George Lucas’ classic movie “American Graffiti,” inspired by and set in his hometown of nearby Modesto, for confirmation of this legacy. The featured class this year was Vintage Race Cars, so I was especially delighted to take in the wide array of hardware that ranged from a 1930 Morgan trike with a J.A.P. motor and period Brooklands history to a front-engine Nostalgia rail sporting a blown nitro Hemi engine. Tossed in were a Peter Gregg-driven Bud Moore Trans-Am Mustang, a real Ford Fairlane Thunderbolt, a McLaren M8 and Shadow Mk II Can-Am cars, and an exSchumacher Ferrari F2001. Other notable entries included pre-World War II and preWorld War I Indy cars — and SCMer John Grosseto’s 1955 OSCA MT4 Spyder. The rolling stock was great, but the best part was when they fired up the engines on some of these bad boys. The blown nitro engine, with its staccato concussions, made the big-block Can-Am cars sound — and feel — quite pedestrian by comparison. DeTomaso and Franklin were featured marques with their own classes, and they were well represented, with seven Panteras and nine Franklins holding court. I especially liked the 1933 Franklin 16B Victoria that Michael Knips of Campbell, CA, brought to the field. It was reminiscent of a very large Ford Model A coupe, unadorned if not a bit plain, yet charming and dignified in its simplicity. Baby ’Birds were the best-represented model Details Plan ahead: The 17th Annual Ironstone Concours d’Elegance is scheduled for September 28, 2013 Where: Ironstone Vineyards, Murphys, CA Cost: Admission is $20 per adult or $35 for a couple or family More: www.ironstonefoundation.org 36 by far, with 21 cars entered, all coming out of the Bay Area and Santa Clara Thunderbird Clubs. Perhaps my favorite car of the day was the 1923 Hispano-Suiza H6B, which owner Bill Kuettel A win honoring Martin Swig: 1911 National Indianapolis racer, owned by SCMers Brian and Sandy Blain of Visalia, CA Sports Car Market one to SCMer Tom Watling of Turlock, CA, for his 1903 Cadillac A Rear Entrance Tonneau, and the other went to the National Auto Museum in Reno, NV, for their 1933 Cadillac V16 Fleetwood convertible sedan. It was a good day to be a Caddy. SCMers Bill and Donna Odle of Corcoran, CA, won the Sponsor’s Award with their very handsome 1935 Hudson Deluxe convertible, and Lawrence Camuso of San Jose, CA, saw his 1948 Oldsmobile 78 take both Best of Class for Unrestored Automobiles, Post-World War II, and Best Unrestored, Overall. The Oldsmobile still has its original paint, interior, brightwork, and is in remarkable condition, as it shows only 7,400 miles on the odometer. In a salute to former concours director and longtime friend of SCM, the late Martin Swig, the Memorial Race Car Award is now given in his name, and this year it was won by the 1911 National Indianapolis racer owned by SCMers Brian and Sandy Blain of Visalia, CA. Another notable marker in the history of this very successful event is that Chris Bock, a dedicated Packard man, SCMer and Ironstone Concours board member, will be the Chief Judge at the Pebble Beach Concours, starting next year. ♦ Michael Leven


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Feature SCM’s Silver Anniversary 25 Years of Speed and Beauty S ports Car Market got its start as the Alfa Romeo Market Letter 25 years ago in Publisher Keith Martin’s basement in Portland, OR. The first issue was modest — just five pages — but the motto, “Liber de velocissimo et bellissimo,” was grandiose. The April/May 1988 issue ended with these words: “In the end, no matter which car you buy, forget everything else except whether or not you actually enjoy looking at the car, touching the car and driving the car. Then, the true return on your investment will be high, and the risk factor in your expenditure will be nil. Of course, we Noteworthy Events in SCM History advocate the maintaining of your subscription to your friendly Market Letter — even if just for grins.” Those words still work for us today. We believe they work well for our ever-growing number of SCMers and friends. These days, a typical copy of SCM has between 175 and 200 pages, and we travel the world to keep you up to date on the always-fluid collector car market. We’ll celebrate our 25 years in lots of different ways this year, but this timeline will show landmark SCM issues and events in our world of cars. ♦ 2001: Russo and Steel launches in Scottsdale, AZ 1989: Robert Brooks starts Robert Brooks Auctioneers to sell classic cars 1993: The magazine takes the title Sports Car Market 1988: Keith Martin launches the Alfa Romeo Market Letter, later to evolve into Sports Car Market 1997: Craig Jackson takes over Barrett-Jackson, which started auctioning collector cars in 1971 2000: Robert Brooks Auctioneers buys Bonhams, creating Bonhams & Brooks 1991: RM Auctions opens for business 2001: Bonhams & Brooks acquires Phillips and changes name to Bonhams 1988: Dana Mecum starts Mecum Auctions ̈Feature SCM’s Silver Anniversary 25 Years of Speed and Beauty S ary 25 Years of Speed and Beauty S ports Car Market got its start as the Alfa Romeo Market Letter 25 years ago in Publisher Keith Martin’s basement in Portland, OR. The first issue was modest — just five pages — but the motto, “Liber de velocissimo et bellissimo,” was grandiose. The April/May 1988 issue ended with these words: “In the end, no matter which car you buy, forget everything else except whether or not you actually enjoy look 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000


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Subscribers to SCM for more than 20 years Robert A. Abhalter Jeff Anderman Angelo’s Auto Body Tom Appleton Gregory S. Baldwin Richard Ballantine Jack Beauchamp Doak Bentz Melinda Bergman-Burgener Jim Bisakowski Gordon Block Stephen Block Harvey Botwin Robert Boucher Michael Brooks James Brown David Brownell David E. Brumsted Thos L. Bryant Thomas Byrnes Joe Cabibbo Gavin Campbell Mark Carpenter Gerald A. Case Robert Cess Don and Donna Chapman Stefan Chmara David L. Christensen Richard Christian Alex Dearborn Bill Devor Marnix F.E. Dillenius Glen Drew Paul Duchene Don Dulaney Jr. Keith R. Duly Robert K. Dunn Thomas DuPont John Duss John Ebey Peter Egan Curt Engler Jerry Exline Robert Fabrey Tim Gerrity Phil Gilman Geoffrey Goldberg Joost Gompels Riley Grannan David Greenhoe Lewis R. Gridley William J. Gruss R. Spencer Guder Sam Haberman Dave Hammond James R. Healey Norman Herstein Glenn Herz Jeffrey Hill Martin Horowitz Adams Hudson George R. Isaacs Robert Jewers Diehl Jones John Kane Jerry Kelley William Kontes Nathan Korn Larry Kozimor Richard Kreines Anton Krivanek Peter Lambert Gerald J Lettieri Lance Levethan Jay Mackro Francis G. Mandarano Peter Marshall Leonard McCue Diane McDowell Timothy McGrane Bruce McKean Bruce Milner Robert Mocas Robert Moses Prestige Motors Donald Osborne Fred Panici Michael Parchment Tim Parker Walt Partymiller Richard Peck Richard Penna George Pezold John R. Phillips Gene K. Ponder Dyke W. Ridgley David Rivkin Michael I. Robinson Don Rose Paul Ruimerman L. Jack Ruscilli Rocky Santiago Rob Shanahan Michael Sheehan Carol Shults Randy Simon Mike Sizemore Paul Sloan Frank Spadaro Charles Spiher Phil Stevens Jurg U. Streit Robert Sutter Robert Thomas Michel Timmermans Hugh Tompkins John H. Trevey Richard Tron Tom Vail Dan Vierra Tim Walker Craig Wehde Mark Wigginton Don Williams Willie Williams John H. Willock Maestro Hector Zaraspe Martin Swig, a good friend and supporter of SCM from its earliest days, died July 3. We miss you, Martin. Thank you to the Swig family and all of our subscribers for your support throughout the years. August 2003: The total sales at the Monterey Car Week auctions hit $24.5m August 2004: The total sales at the Monterey Car Week auctions reach $48.2m 1962 Chevrolet Big Brake Tanker at Mecum Kissimmee January 2013: Mecum Auctions will put more than 3,000 cars across the block over 10 days in Kissimmee, FL January 2010: Total sales at the Arizona auctions add up to $126m Summer 2003: David Gooding founds Gooding & Company August 2011: Sales at the Monterey Car Week auctions total $198m August 2011: A 1957 Ferrari Testa Rossa prototype sells for $16.4m at the Gooding & Company Pebble Beach Auction, setting a new record for a car sold at auction January 2012: Leake Auctions celebrates 40 years of selling collector cars March 2012: Total sales at Amelia Island reach $58.3m August 2012: The total sales at the Monterey Car Week auctions reach $258m 1936 Mercedes-Benz 540K Special Roadster, an $11.8m sale for Gooding at Monterey 2012 ̈Subscribers to SCM for more than 20 years Robert A. Abhalter Je han 20 years Robert A. Abhalter Jeff Anderman Angelo’s Auto Body Tom Appleton Gregory S. Baldwin Richard Ballantine Jack Beauchamp Doak Bentz Melinda Bergman-Burgener Jim Bisakowski Gordon Block Stephen Block Harvey Botwin Robert Boucher Michael Brooks James Brown David Brownell David E. Brumsted Thos L. Bryant Thomas Byrnes Joe Cabibbo Gavin Campbell Mark Carpenter Gerald A. Case Robert Cess Don and Donna Chapman Stefan Chmara David L. 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013


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Collecting Thoughts Citroën Sahara A Two-Headed Goat of a 2CV When the going gets tough, you engage the rear transmission shifter with a lever, fire up the rear-wheel-drive motor and press ahead by Miles Collier H aving handily tripled the low estimate of $40,000, this little “Deuche,” as they call the Citroën 2CVs in France, had to be the surprise lot of Bonhams’ Preserving the Automobile auction at the Simeone Museum in Philadelphia, PA, on October 8, 2012. This Sahara sold for an amazing $142,000, including buyer’s commission. This transaction clearly shows the kind of premium that rare and unusual variants of commonly available production cars can command. Now, let it never be said that the garden variety 2CV, or Deux Chevaux, 2-horsepower being the French fiscal power rating for tax purposes (cheval vapeur — steam horsepower), doesn’t have a great deal of appeal in and of itself. The “escargot” on wheels is redolent with the aura of France; not the France of Cannes or the Cote d’Azur, but of the countryside, of fresh baguettes and vin ordinaire; of, dare I say it, Inspector Clouseau. I don’t recall that Peter Sellers ever drove one of these cars in a Pink Panther movie, but it would have been so apropos. So it is that Citroen 2CVs command a lot of attention, especially in the United States, where their rarity and charming homeliness elicits the kind of effusive Francophilia lecting Thoughts Citroën Sahara A Two-Headed Goat of a 2CV Whe ting Thoughts Citroën Sahara A Two-Headed Goat of a 2CV When the going gets tough, you engage the rear transmission shifter with a lever, fire up the rear-wheel-drive motor and press ahead by Miles Collier H aving handily tripled the low estimate of $40,000, this little “Deuche,” as they call the Citroën 2CVs in France, had to be the surprise lot of Bonhams’ Preserving the Automobile auction at the Simeone Museum in Philadelphia, PA, on October 8, 2012. This Sahara sold for an amazing $142,000, including buyer’s commission. This transaction clearly shows the kind of premium that rare and unusual variants of commonly available production cars can command. Now, let it never be said that the garden variety 2CV, or Deux Chevaux, 2-horse- power being the French fiscal power rating for tax purposes (cheval vapeur — steam horsepower), doesn’t have a great deal of appeal in and of itself. The “escargot” on wheels is redolent with the aura of France; not the France of Cannes or the Cote d’Azur, but of the countryside, of fresh baguettes and vin ordi- naire; of, dare I say it, Inspector Clouseau. I don’t recall that Peter Sellers ever drove one of these cars in a Pink Panther movie, but it would have been so apropos. So it is that Citroen 2CVs command a lot of attention, espe- cially in the United States, where their rarity and charm- ing homeliness elicits the kind of effusive Francophilia Rarity Rarity from abundance Some 5 million Deux Chevaux were built over the life of the model between 1948 and 1990. Originally conceived in 1938, the car wasn’t introduced to the market until after World War II. Designed as an “umbrella on wheels” with the intention of providing farm-to-market transportation to France’s small farmers, the “Deuche” was arguably the simplest and cheapest — yet practical — motorcar ever produced. Under Michelin Tire’s visionary ownership, the 2CV incorporated a genius level of innovation and simplicity that still stands as a target to be emulated by product designers worldwide. The car’s iconoclastic anti-styling, coupled with its snail-like profile, embodies in its automotive idiom the same brilliantly reductive industrial arts aesthetic of the great mid-century French designers such as Jean Prouvé, Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand. Then came the Sahara, the rarest and most phantasmagoric 2CV variant. Introduced to the press in 1958 — but not placed into production until 1960 — the genesis of the Sahara lay in the fore/aft symmetry of the 2CV suspension. In essence, the front suspension and the rear suspension are identical, the front facing forward with leading arms, and the rear to the back with trailing arms. The springing on each side is shared, having one central coil module connecting that side’s front and rear arms. What this all means is that a front-suspension unit with its attendant engine and transmission can be turned around and more or less dropped into the rear of the car, creating an engine-driven rear-suspension module that mirrors the 2CV’s normal front-wheel-drive engine and suspension assembly. Et voilà, such a configuration creates a car with all four wheels driven, albeit requiring a second engine for the rear wheels. Because of the bolt-in nature of the ble niche market ecting Thoughts Citroën Sahara A Two-Headed Goat of a 2CV When the going gets tough, you engage the rear transmission shifter with a lever, fire up the rear-wheel-drive motor and press ahead by Miles Collier H aving handily tripled the low estimate of $40,000, this little “Deuche,” as they call the Citroën 2CVs in France, had to be the surprise lot of Bonhams’ Preserving the Automobile auction at the Simeone Museum in Philadelphia, PA, on October 8, 2012. This Sahara sold for an amazing $142,000, including buyer’s commission. This transaction clearly shows the kind of premium that rare and unusual variants of commonly available production cars can command. Now, let it never be said that the garden variety 2CV, or Deux Chevaux, 2-horse- power being the French fiscal power rating for tax purposes (cheval vapeur — steam horsepower), doesn’t have a great deal of appeal in and of itself. The “escargot” on wheels is redolent with the aura of France; not the France of Cannes or the Cote d’Azur, but of the countryside, of fresh baguettes and vin ordi- naire; of, dare I say it, Inspector Clouseau. I don’t recall that Peter Sellers ever drove one of these cars in a Pink Panther movie, but it would have been so apropos. So it is that Citroen 2CVs command a lot of attention, espe- cially in the United States, where their rarity and charm- ing homeliness elicits the kind of effusive Francophilia Rarity from abundance Some 5 million Deux Chevaux were built over the life of the model between 1948 and 1990. Originally conceived in 1938, the car wasn’t introduced to the market until after World War II. Designed as an “umbrella on wheels” with the intention of pro- viding farm-to-market transportation to France’s small farmers, the “Deuche” was arguably the simplest and cheapest — yet practical — motorcar ever produced. Under Michelin Tire’s visionary ownership, the 2CV incorporated a genius level of innova- tion and simplicity that still stands as a target to be emulated by product designers worldwide. The car’s iconoclastic anti-styling, coupled with its snail-like profile, em- bodies in its automotive idiom the same brilliantly reductive industrial arts aesthetic of the great mid-century French designers such as Jean Prouvé, Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand. Then came the Sahara, the rarest and most phantasmagoric 2CV variant. Introduced to the press in 1958 — but not placed into production until 1960 — the genesis of the Sahara lay in the fore/aft symmetry of the 2CV suspension. In essence, the front suspension and the rear suspension are identical, the front facing forward with leading arms, and the rear to the back with trailing arms. The springing on each side is shared, having one central coil module connecting that side’s front and rear arms. What this all means is that a front-suspension unit with its attendant engine and transmission can be turned around and more or less dropped into the rear of the car, creating an engine-driven rear-suspension module that mirrors the 2CV’s normal front-wheel-drive engine and suspension assembly. Et voilà, such a configuration creates a car with all four wheels driven, albeit requiring a second engine for the rear wheels. Because of the bolt-in nature of the ble niche market ould ould drive across porting boxes of uspension travel t redesigning for ollecting Thoughts Citroën Sahara A Two-Headed Goat of a 2CV When the going gets tough, you engage the rear transmission shifter with a lever, fire up the rear-wheel-drive motor and press ahead by Miles Collier H aving handily tripled the low estimate of $40,000, this little “Deuche,” as they call the Citroën 2CVs in France, had to be the surprise lot of Bonhams’ Preserving the Automobile auction at the Simeone Museum in Philadelphia, PA, on October 8, 2012. This Sahara sold for an amazing $142,000, including buyer’s commission. This transaction clearly shows the kind of premium that rare and unusual variants of commonly available production cars can command. Now, let it never be said that the garden variety 2CV, or Deux Chevaux, 2-horse- power being the French fiscal power rating for tax purposes (cheval vapeur — steam horsepower), doesn’t have a great deal of appeal in and of itself. The “escargot” on wheels is redolent with the aura of France; not the France of Cannes or the Cote d’Azur, but of the countryside, of fresh baguettes and vin ordi- naire; of, dare I say it, Inspector Clouseau. I don’t recall that Peter Sellers ever drove one of these cars in a Pink Panther movie, but it would have been so apropos. So it is that Citroen 2CVs command a lot of attention, espe- cially in the United States, where their rarity and charm- ing homeliness elicits the kind of effusive Francophilia Rarity from abundance Some 5 million Deux Chevaux were built over the life of the model between 1948 and 1990. Originally conceived in 1938, the car wasn’t introduced to the market until after World War II. Designed as an “umbrella on wheels” with the intention of pro- viding farm-to-market transportation to France’s small farmers, the “Deuche” was arguably the simplest and cheapest — yet practical — motorcar ever produced. Under Michelin Tire’s visionary ownership, the 2CV incorporated a genius level of innova- tion and simplicity that still stands as a target to be emulated by product designers worldwide. The car’s iconoclastic anti-styling, coupled with its snail-like profile, em- bodies in its automotive idiom the same brilliantly reductive industrial arts aesthetic of the great mid-century French designers such as Jean Prouvé, Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand. Then came the Sahara, the rarest and most phantasmagoric 2CV variant. Introduced to the press in 1958 — but not placed into production until 1960 — the genesis of the Sahara lay in the fore/aft symmetry of the 2CV suspension. In essence, the front suspension and the rear suspension are identical, the front facing forward with leading arms, and the rear to the back with trailing arms. The springing on each side is shared, having one central coil module connecting that side’s front and rear arms. What this all means is that a front-suspension unit with its attendant engine and transmission can be turned around and more or less dropped into the rear of the car, creating an engine-driven rear-suspension module that mirrors the 2CV’s normal front-wheel-drive engine and suspension assembly. Et voilà, such a configuration creates a car with all four wheels driven, albeit requiring a second engine for the rear wheels. Because of the bolt-in nature of the ble niche market ould drive across porting boxes of uspension travel t redesigning for e e built between road oil exploraa Civil in Spain, and, and across n other applicae a small, light -drive vehicle ed, say during r on Block Island. , the conversion 4 was considerably plex than I have , as quite a lot lecting Thoughts Citroën Sahara A Two-Headed Goat of a 2CV When the going gets tough, you engage the rear transmission shifter with a lever, fire up the rear-wheel-drive motor and press ahead by Miles Collier H aving handily tripled the low estimate of $40,000, this little “Deuche,” as they call the Citroën 2CVs in France, had to be the surprise lot of Bonhams’ Preserving the Automobile auction at the Simeone Museum in Philadelphia, PA, on October 8, 2012. This Sahara sold for an amazing $142,000, including buyer’s commission. This transaction clearly shows the kind of premium that rare and unusual variants of commonly available production cars can command. Now, let it never be said that the garden variety 2CV, or Deux Chevaux, 2-horse- power being the French fiscal power rating for tax purposes (cheval vapeur — steam horsepower), doesn’t have a great deal of appeal in and of itself. The “escargot” on wheels is redolent with the aura of France; not the France of Cannes or the Cote d’Azur, but of the countryside, of fresh baguettes and vin ordi- naire; of, dare I say it, Inspector Clouseau. I don’t recall that Peter Sellers ever drove one of these cars in a Pink Panther movie, but it would have been so apropos. So it is that Citroen 2CVs command a lot of attention, espe- cially in the United States, where their rarity and charm- ing homeliness elicits the kind of effusive Francophilia Rarity from abundance Some 5 million Deux Chevaux were built over the life of the model between 1948 and 1990. Originally conceived in 1938, the car wasn’t introduced to the market until after World War II. Designed as an “umbrella on wheels” with the intention of pro- viding farm-to-market transportation to France’s small farmers, the “Deuche” was arguably the simplest and cheapest — yet practical — motorcar ever produced. Under Michelin Tire’s visionary ownership, the 2CV incorporated a genius level of innova- tion and simplicity that still stands as a target to be emulated by product designers worldwide. The car’s iconoclastic anti-styling, coupled with its snail-like profile, em- bodies in its automotive idiom the same brilliantly reductive industrial arts aesthetic of the great mid-century French designers such as Jean Prouvé, Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand. Then came the Sahara, the rarest and most phantasmagoric 2CV variant. Introduced to the press in 1958 — but not placed into production until 1960 — the genesis of the Sahara lay in the fore/aft symmetry of the 2CV suspension. In essence, the front suspension and the rear suspension are identical, the front facing forward with leading arms, and the rear to the back with trailing arms. The springing on each side is shared, having one central coil module connecting that side’s front and rear arms. What this all means is that a front-suspension unit with its attendant engine and transmission can be turned around and more or less dropped into the rear of the car, creating an engine-driven rear-suspension module that mirrors the 2CV’s normal front-wheel-drive engine and suspension assembly. Et voilà, such a configuration creates a car with all four wheels driven, albeit requiring a second engine for the rear wheels. Because of the bolt-in nature of the ble niche market ould drive across porting boxes of uspension travel t redesigning for e built between road oil explora- a Civil in Spain, and, and across n other applica- e a small, light -drive vehicle ed, say during r on Block Island. , the conversion 4 was considerably plex than I have , as quite a lot ial ial Sahara bits d to be designed ake the car a re. The key identiof a Sahara are onnet inset spare location, the fan g opening for the hrough the boot d fender openings llecting Thoughts Citroën Sahara A Two-Headed Goat of a 2CV When the going gets tough, you engage the rear transmission shifter with a lever, fire up the rear-wheel-drive motor and press ahead by Miles Collier H aving handily tripled the low estimate of $40,000, this little “Deuche,” as they call the Citroën 2CVs in France, had to be the surprise lot of Bonhams’ Preserving the Automobile auction at the Simeone Museum in Philadelphia, PA, on October 8, 2012. This Sahara sold for an amazing $142,000, including buyer’s commission. This transaction clearly shows the kind of premium that rare and unusual variants of commonly available production cars can command. Now, let it never be said that the garden variety 2CV, or Deux Chevaux, 2-horse- power being the French fiscal power rating for tax purposes (cheval vapeur — steam horsepower), doesn’t have a great deal of appeal in and of itself. The “escargot” on wheels is redolent with the aura of France; not the France of Cannes or the Cote d’Azur, but of the countryside, of fresh baguettes and vin ordi- naire; of, dare I say it, Inspector Clouseau. I don’t recall that Peter Sellers ever drove one of these cars in a Pink Panther movie, but it would have been so apropos. So it is that Citroen 2CVs command a lot of attention, espe- cially in the United States, where their rarity and charm- ing homeliness elicits the kind of effusive Francophilia Rarity from abundance Some 5 million Deux Chevaux were built over the life of the model between 1948 and 1990. Originally conceived in 1938, the car wasn’t introduced to the market until after World War II. Designed as an “umbrella on wheels” with the intention of pro- viding farm-to-market transportation to France’s small farmers, the “Deuche” was arguably the simplest and cheapest — yet practical — motorcar ever produced. Under Michelin Tire’s visionary ownership, the 2CV incorporated a genius level of innova- tion and simplicity that still stands as a target to be emulated by product designers worldwide. The car’s iconoclastic anti-styling, coupled with its snail-like profile, em- bodies in its automotive idiom the same brilliantly reductive industrial arts aesthetic of the great mid-century French designers such as Jean Prouvé, Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand. Then came the Sahara, the rarest and most phantasmagoric 2CV variant. Introduced to the press in 1958 — but not placed into production until 1960 — the genesis of the Sahara lay in the fore/aft symmetry of the 2CV suspension. In essence, the front suspension and the rear suspension are identical, the front facing forward with leading arms, and the rear to the back with trailing arms. The springing on each side is shared, having one central coil module connecting that side’s front and rear arms. What this all means is that a front-suspension unit with its attendant engine and transmission can be turned around and more or less dropped into the rear of the car, creating an engine-driven rear-suspension module that mirrors the 2CV’s normal front-wheel-drive engine and suspension assembly. Et voilà, such a configuration creates a car with all four wheels driven, albeit requiring a second engine for the rear wheels. Because of the bolt-in nature of the ble niche market ould drive across porting boxes of uspension travel t redesigning for e built between road oil explora- a Civil in Spain, and, and across n other applica- e a small, light -drive vehicle ed, say during r on Block Island. , the conversion 4 was considerably plex than I have , as quite a lot ial Sahara bits d to be designed ake the car a re- . The key identi- of a Sahara are onnet inset spare location, the fan g opening for the hrough the boot d fender openings ew ew rear engine ting Thoughts Citroën Sahara A Two-Headed Goat of a 2CV When the going gets tough, you engage the rear transmission shifter with a lever, fire up the rear-wheel-drive motor and press ahead by Miles Collier H aving handily tripled the low estimate of $40,000, this little “Deuche,” as they call the Citroën 2CVs in France, had to be the surprise lot of Bonhams’ Preserving the Automobile auction at the Simeone Museum in Philadelphia, PA, on October 8, 2012. This Sahara sold for an amazing $142,000, including buyer’s commission. This transaction clearly shows the kind of premium that rare and unusual variants of commonly available production cars can command. Now, let it never be said that the garden variety 2CV, or Deux Chevaux, 2-horse- power being the French fiscal power rating for tax purposes (cheval vapeur — steam horsepower), doesn’t have a great deal of appeal in and of itself. The “escargot” on wheels is redolent with the aura of France; not the France of Cannes or the Cote d’Azur, but of the countryside, of fresh baguettes and vin ordi- naire; of, dare I say it, Inspector Clouseau. I don’t recall that Peter Sellers ever drove one of these cars in a Pink Panther movie, but it would have been so apropos. So it is that Citroen 2CVs command a lot of attention, espe- cially in the United States, where their rarity and charm- ing homeliness elicits the kind of effusive Francophilia Rarity from abundance Some 5 million Deux Chevaux were built over the life of the model between 1948 and 1990. Originally conceived in 1938, the car wasn’t introduced to the market until after World War II. Designed as an “umbrella on wheels” with the intention of pro- viding farm-to-market transportation to France’s small farmers, the “Deuche” was arguably the simplest and cheapest — yet practical — motorcar ever produced. Under Michelin Tire’s visionary ownership, the 2CV incorporated a genius level of innova- tion and simplicity that still stands as a target to be emulated by product designers worldwide. The car’s iconoclastic anti-styling, coupled with its snail-like profile, em- bodies in its automotive idiom the same brilliantly reductive industrial arts aesthetic of the great mid-century French designers such as Jean Prouvé, Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret and Charlotte Perriand. Then came the Sahara, the rarest and most phantasmagoric 2CV variant. Introduced to the press in 1958 — but not placed into production until 1960 — the genesis of the Sahara lay in the fore/aft symmetry of the 2CV suspension. In essence, the front suspension and the rear suspension are identical, the front facing forward with leading arms, and the rear to the back with trailing arms. The springing on each side is shared, having one central coil module connecting that side’s front and rear arms. What this all means is that a front-suspension unit with its attendant engine and transmission can be turned around and more or less dropped into the rear of the car, creating an engine-driven rear-suspension module that mirrors the 2CV’s normal front-wheel-drive engine and suspension assembly. Et voilà, such a configuration creates a car with all four wheels driven, albeit requiring a second engine for the rear wheels. Because of the bolt-in nature of the ble niche market ould drive across porting boxes of uspension travel t redesigning for e built between road oil explora- a Civil in Spain, and, and across n other applica- e a small, light -drive vehicle ed, say during r on Block Island. , the conversion 4 was considerably plex than I have , as quite a lot ial Sahara bits d to be designed ake the car a re- . The key identi- of a Sahara are onnet inset spare location, the fan g opening for the hrough the boot d fender openings ew rear engine Sports Sports Car Market Courtesy of Bonhams


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synchronization issues are blithely ignored. The car is usually operated on the front engine like a “normal” 2CV, but when the going gets tough, you engage the rear transmission shifter with a lever, fire up the rear-wheeldrive motor and press ahead, madly gripping the bent steel tubing steering wheel while bouncing around on the lawn furniture-like seats. “Chacun à son goût,” I say. Few made, fewer survive Our subject car is a very fine example of a Sahara. With fewer than 4,000 miles on the clock, and hav- If the front engine (left) is insufficient to the task, simply fire up the rear one for 4-wheel-drive location, fuel tanks were moved beneath the front seats, and fuel filler caps protrude through the bottom of each door. Love at first sight I must confess that I was thunderstruck with these goofy cars when, as a young teen, I visited the New York Auto Show during the early 1960s. Citroën had a promotional film showing a quarry in France that was positively crawling with Saharas moving like enraged ants through all manner of nasty gunk. I have never recovered from the experience. I have had the pleasure of owning two Saharas, and still own one. While they are pretty diabolical to drive on the road, as mechanical confections they supply endless fascination. With 12 horsepower out of the 425-cc, 2-cylinder, air-cooled engine at each end, these are not overly savage power-to-weight-ratio vehicles. The pleasure lies in the casual contemplation of the Dr. Dolittle-esque Push-Me- Pull-You power arrangements. The engines operate totally independently of each other, and nothing beats watching people’s faces when you start up the second engine with its own independent ignition switch while the first is already running. The two engines are coordinated only through the throttle linkage, and any ing never been restored — a particularly big issue with Saharas, as they have so many unique trinkets and bits that restorations usually make do with ordinary twowheel 2CV parts at huge cost to originality — this was a Sahara to have. Like two-headed goats and other such exotica, twin- engine cars are incredibly rare in the history of the motorcar, and even more so in the modern era. Given that a mere 690 or so cars were built, and that reportedly only 28 survive — of which many fewer are good enough to be worth owning, the rarity of this Citroën variant is obvious. If, like me, you just gotta have one of these things, you have to buy them where and when you can. That this car was untouched, with only the bumpers and wheels repainted for the auction, and the inevitable replacement — charitably described — seat cushions, this is a special Citroën. If the happy new owner provides a bit of very careful passivation of the minor surface rust, a little in-painting, he’s sure to be the cynosure at Beaujolais nouveaux tastings. This was a lot of money for a variation, albeit rare, of a car that normally sells for $15,000, but find one as good. Fairly bought. ♦ January 2013 41


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Ferrari Profile 1965 Ferrari 275 GTS Spyder Our subject car appears to be just the right 275 to buy if you can afford to put over $500k into a casual driver by Steve Ahlgrim Details Years produced: 1964–66 Number produced: 200 Original list price: $14,500 Current SCM Valuation: $500,000– $650,000 Tune-up: $3,000–$3,500 Distributor caps: $450, two required Chassis #: Right front chassis rail by top of shock mount, plate on right inner fender Engine #: Right side near starter motor, back of block Club: Ferrari Club of America More: www.ferrariclubofamerica.org Alternatives: 1966–68 Ferrari 330 GTS, 1959–64 Maserati 3500 GT Vignale Spyder, 1961–62 Jaguar XKE roadster SCM Investment Grade: B Comps Chassis number: 06977 Engine number: 06977 T here had been open-top Ferrari road cars before the advent of the 250 Series, but it was, chiefly, Pininfarina’s offerings on the latter chassis that established the convertible as a fixture of the Ferrari range. After the experimentation and variety that characterized the coachwork of the 250 Series cars, the arrival of the 275 in 1964 brought with it standard bodywork, that of the 275 GTS being manufactured by Pininfarina themselves. In Ferrari nomenclature of the period, a model’s designation reflected an individual cylinder’s cubic capacity, so the newcomer displaced 3.3 liters, up from its predecessor’s 3.0 liters. The GTS’s Columbo-type V12 engine produced 260 horsepower. By the mid 1960s, Ferrari’s road cars were beginning to lose some of their rougher edges and take on a more luxurious mien. The 275 GTS interior is notable for its generously sized seats and wood veneer dashboard. The driving experience is the raison d’être of Ferrari ownership, and in this respect the 275 GTS had lost none of its predecessors’ aggressive charm. Car & Driver magazine had this to say: “… it’s only natural that it (the V12 engine) should be the dominating factor in the car’s personality… You can feel it as much as you can hear it. It has a taut, powerful rush of response that comes to you through the seat of your pants, through the steering wheel rim. The instant the clutch is engaged, the chassis takes on life and begins to move as a unit with the engine; it’s an all-in-one-piece sensation that you normally 42 feel only in racing cars…” One of only 200 275 GTS models made, chassis number 06977 was originally finished in Amaranto (Amaranth Red) with beige interior. The car was sold new by Ferrari in Turin, Italy. Subsequently, it went through a couple more owners, including a stay in the United States, before spending the past 26 years in France. Refinished in yellow and with its interior re-trimmed in black, this car is described by the seller as in generally fine condition. Offered with Massini Report, 06977 represents a rare opportunity to acquire a fine example of what many consider the most elegant of all Spyder Ferraris. SCM Analysis This car, Lot 133, sold for $648,709, including buyer’s premium, at Bonhams’ Collector’s Motor Cars Auction at Goodwood, U.K., on September 15, 2012. Exotics tend to be known by their models rather than year model. Ferrari doesn’t even put year models on their brochures. While human nature generally favors the newest car in a series, different year model cars of the same model type usually sell for similar prices. There are exceptions for updates, such as the Lamborghini Miura becoming an S, or new equipment, such as power steering on a Maserati Ghibli, but even then it’s the update rather than the year model that is important. This phenomenon often makes a car ageless 1966 Ferrari 275 GTS Spyder Lot 279, s/n 07655 Condition 2Sold at $445,500 RM Auctions, Amelia Island, FL, 3/14/09 SCM# 119921 Sports Car Market 1966 Ferrari 275 GTS Spyder Lot S654, s/n 07903 Condition 1 Sold at $654,500 Russo and Steele, Monterey, CA, 8/21/11 SCM# 183952 1965 Ferrari 275 GTS Spyder Lot 231, s/n 07293 Condition 1Sold at $826,213 Bonhams, Chichester, U.K., 6/29/12 SCM# 209095 Courtesy of Bonhams


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— and it makes putting a model in its historical perspective necessary to really appreciate its virtues. My first acquaintance with a 275 GTS was in the very early 1980s. High-styled, mid-engine models ruled the Ferrari market at the time, and I was mesmerized with the genre. I was underwhelmed with the 275’s aesthetics. The car was pleasing to look at, but it was devoid of any hint of a “wow” factor. Driving the car was another matter alto- gether. The 275 was tight and responsive, the transaxle worked flawlessly, the sound was incredible, and the engine responded immediately to the slightest movement of the throttle. The car felt much faster than its 6.3-second 0–60 mph times, and while I didn’t test the 145 mph top speed, 100 mph came effortlessly. The car was an absolute pleasure to drive. At the time, I was new to Ferraris and had yet to develop a historical perspective. To me, the 275 GTS was everything an Alfa Spider should be — but seemed insignificant as a Ferrari model. I was way wrong, but it’s taken decades for me to learn the truth. From one era to another Historically, the 275 GTS is one of fewer than 1,000 Classic Era, open-top Ferraris. There are more Shelby Cobras than all the open-top Ferraris built up to 1983. The 275 series followed the 250 series and preceded the 330 series. In particular, the 275 GTS follows the Pininfarina Cabriolet and the 250 California Spyder. The 275 didn’t just update those models — it was a game changer. Immediately preceding the 275 series, most Ferraris had a solid rear axle with lever shocks, drum brakes and 4-speed transmissions. Even the Series II Pininfarina Cabriolet still had a solid axle with lever shocks, but it was offered with an overdrive transmission and disc brakes. Drum brakes were still available if requested. The 275 GTS upped the bar with standard 5-speed transaxle, telescopic shock ab- sorbers, 4-wheel independent suspensions, 4-wheel disc brakes and modern styling. It was more sporting than the Cabriolet and more luxurious than the California Spyder. Historically, the 275 GTS is important as the transition car between vintage Ferrari technology and modern Ferrari technology. Better to drive than collect A 275 GTS is not going to be a collection centerpiece. They just don’t have the panache to take attention away from most other collector cars. They also don’t have the trophy quality of landing a similar — but much rarer — 330 or 365 GTS. They may have good performance, but they won’t make a great track car, either. What they do offer is an incredibly fun drive. The 275 GTS is the car that you leave in the garage with the top down and grab whenever you want to have fun. It’s the car that you drive right past your house so you can listen to the engine a little longer. Need to pick up some milk? Grab the 275 GTS. Going to play golf, you can leave it at the club. People will admire your car, but nobody’s going to bother it. Condition drives prices The spread on 275 pricing is quite wide. As they were mostly built to similar specifications, the price range cannot be attributed to model variations. Condition takes the commanding role in 275 pricing. As they are exceptional drivers, there are a few pigs with lipstick lurking in the shadows — well-worn cars with shiny paint. On the other hand, they are valuable enough that some have been treated to serious restorations. Our subject car appears to be just the right 275 to buy if you can afford to put over $500k into a casual driver. It looks to have been well kept up, but it is not letterperfect. The owner can be quite proud of it but won’t have to worry about getting the first chip. The sales price is not a lot of money for our subject car. The SCM Platinum Database shows that a recent sale topped $875,000, and there have been several sales in the $700k range. The factors holding back buyers on this day may have been the color change — and that it was apparently offered without tools or books. There is a tremendous following for open Ferraris, with many of them selling for millions of dollars. The 275 GTS will never be a superstar, but it will always be highly sought after. Providing there are no mechanical gremlins, the buyer got a great deal. There are few cars to choose from, so time will be kind to him. Changing the funky mirrors and tracking down a set of books and tools will advance his position. The seller didn’t do badly, but I think he’ll miss his old friend. ♦ (Introductory description courtesy of Bonhams.) January 2013 43


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English Profile 1959 MGA Twin Cam This car, in excellent condition and with period competition provenance, sold for the price of a Ferrari engine rebuild by Gary Anderson Details Years produced: 1958–60 Number produced: 2,111 Original list price: $3,345 Current SCM Valuation: $55,000–$73,500 Tune-up cost: $500 Distributor cap: $35.95 Chassis #: Stamped tag screwed to shelf at rear of engine compartment Engine #: Embossed plate screwed to ledge on engine next to spark plugs Clubs: North American MGA Register or MG Vintage Racers More: www.namgar.com, www.mgvr.org Alternatives: 1955–56 Austin-Healey 100M, 1950–65 Porsche 356 roadster, 1959–62 Alfa Romeo Spider Veloce SCM Investment Grade: A Comps Chassis number: YD11580 that had first appeared in the ZA Magnette. Running gear was based on the TF, with independent coil-sprung wishbone front suspension and a live rear axle. Clad in a curvaceous aerodynamic body and capable of topping 95 mph, the MGA proved an instant hit, selling 13,000 cars in its first full year of production. Immensely popular though it was, the MGA faced C stiff competition from the larger-engined Triumph TR3 and Austin-Healey 100-6. Coaxing more power from the standard engine was becoming increasingly difficult, so development concentrated on a twin-overhead-camshaft cylinder head for the B-Series block. Conceived at Cowley by BMC engineer Gerald Palmer and introduced in 1958, the new engine did not disappoint, producing an impressive 108 horsepower at 6,700 rpm. Considerably faster than the stock MGA, the Twin Cam could comfortably exceed 110 mph, and to cope with the increased performance, Dunlop disc brakes were fitted all around, and Dunlop center-lock wheels were adopted. A high price discouraged sales, however, and the model was dropped after just two years. Production totaled 2,111 cars, a mere 360 of which were sold in Great Britain, and today the Twin Cam is one of the most sought-after of post-war MG sports cars. This car, chassis number YD11580, left the factory 44 onceived as a replacement for the traditional T-Series MGs and introduced in 1955, the MGA combined a rigid chassis with the Austin-designed, 1,489-cc B-Series engine on March 16, 1959, for delivery to Leeds dealers Isaac Swires & Sons Ltd. Just over one month later, the car was competing in the first of the two Tulip Rallies in which it would take part in the hands of private owner Harry Mainz. Although not a true Works entry, it ran as Number 30, following the Works cars, Number 28 driven by John Gott and Number 29 driven by John Sprinzel. This lineup is illustrated in a period photograph contained in the history file together with a letter from MG Competitions Department staff member Bill Price. The file also contains the original Tulip Rally timing and results books from 1959 and 1960 — plus the car’s original buff logbook that documents the registration number change from XWU285 to JRD333. Approximately 28 years ago, the car was purchased by Paul Channon, a well-known motor-racing personality and owner of the BMC agency in Bournemouth, who rebuilt it to use in historic rallying. He rebuilt the MGA to a high competition standard, with special camshafts and 9.9:1-compression pistons — plus three-point harnesses, Marchal spotlights, Halda Tripmaster, and so forth. From 1986 to 2005, Channon competed in 46 rallies with much success, achieving 25 class wins, eight 2nd in class and four 3rd in class, including nine top-three overall finishes (and only two DNFs). The current vendor purchased the MG at Bonhams’ Goodwood Festival of Speed sale in 2010 (Lot 335), 1959 MGA Twin Cam Lot F160, s/n YD31212 Condition 1Sold at $61,480 Mecum, Monterey, CA, 8/21/11 SCM# 184010 1959 MGA Twin Cam Lot 602, s/n YM12586 Condition 2 Sold at $42,642 Bonhams, London, 12/3/07 SCM# 48059 1960 MGA Twin Cam Lot 203, s/n YD31436 Condition 3+ Not sold at $35,000 Kensington, Uncasville, CT, 11/5/05 SCM# 39722 Sports Car Market Courtesy of Bonhams


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and it has been used sparingly since. Competition-prepared yet easily tractable enough for everyday road use, this very special MGA is in exceptional condition and ready to compete in any historic rally. It comes complete with FIA/HSCC/ VSCC papers and RAC logbook, and is expected to possess a fresh MoT by time of sale. The sale also included a substantial amount of documentation on the car, including period photographs and related literature, as well as spare and replacement parts. SCM Analysis This car, Lot 105, sold for $60,614, including buyer’s premium, at Bonhams’ Goodwood Revival sale on September 15, 2012. The MGA Twin Cam — or “Twink” as it is affectionately known among Octagon enthusiasts — is that most interesting of all collectibles: rare and desirable enough to be accepted in virtually all invitation-only classic-car events, but still less expensive than even run-of-the-mill restored Austin-Healeys. Witness this example, in excellent and usable condition but with period competition provenance, selling for the price of a Ferrari engine rebuild. Cheap, quick and fun One might ask why MGAs don’t get the respect they deserve, but members of the various and very active organizations that support the marque really don’t mind. Living in the shadow of Jaguars and Austin-Healeys, MGAs have continued to be affordable — not to mention reliable, lovable and fun. Before taking up the arcane nature of the twin-cam engine, let’s talk about the features shared in common with the other models of the MGA. Almost exactly the same size as the “Big” Healey, the MGA nevertheless manages to look smaller, probably because of the longer bonnet and tail sections that compress the cockpit to a snug-butcomfortable fit for two friendly individuals. The design also has minimal chrome — not only are there no door handles, but even the boot releases from inside, so there’s no external handle on that, either. Nevertheless, with adequate trunk space for some soft-sided luggage — supplemented with a factory-style luggage rack if desired — two people can tour in reasonable comfort on a 1,000-mile event. The sturdy chassis and well-sorted suspension in common across the whole MGA lineup are also a positive factor. The car is solid on the road, and it is very predictable in its handling, making it a great choice for competition as well as street use. The yin and yang of the twin cam But there are definite minuses as well as pluses to the twin-cam engine. The obvious plus is that when in good shape, the extra horsepower and pickup makes the car confident in the give-and-take of modern traffic. A realistic top speed in excess of 100 mph and 0–60 mph acceleration under 10 seconds are comparable on the highway with any modern compact economy model. In addition, the four-wheel disc brakes — very innovative for the time on any sports car — gave the car exceptional stopping power. A second advantage is that the twin cam is not rocket-science technology. In com- mon with other British designs, pretty much all the work that needs to be done can be carried out with the tools in the roll in the boot and a small bag of standard replacement parts. No need to trailer the car to the shop of someone named Guido, as Nigel should be able to sort out almost anything in the parking lot while you’re having lunch. So why were the twin cams phased out after only two years and 2,111 cars? Unfortunately, they had a singular problem that BMC wasn’t able to solve at the time. When driven at the high revs they enticed their drivers into, they had a bad habit of overheating and burning pistons, which led to blown engines and expensive rebuilds. Even the expedient of fitting out special buses and sending instructors on the road to teach British car-dealer mechanics how to tune the cars didn’t avert a huge warranty bill. There were a variety of explanations for the problem at the time, including poorly set timing and compression too high for available fuel. Rather than solving the problem, BMC simply phased out the twin cams, moving to an enlarged (1,622-cc) version of the pushrod engine. Today, the handful of smart twin-cam drivers, such as Bill Spohn, in the MG Vintage Racing group, believe they have solved the problem. Spohn notes that rather than being a timing or compression issue, as was thought at the time, the problem was with the carburetor mounts. January 2013 45 Fastened tightly to the intake manifolds, the carbs — which in production weren’t nearly as well balanced as they should have been — vibrated with the engine. As the engine approached maximum power, a harmonic vibration would cause the float on the rear carburetor to bind on its spindle, leaning out the mixture and causing the engine to overheat in short order, often resulting in a hole in the number 3 or number 4 piston. The simple expedients of balancing the engine and flexibly mounting the carburetors with rubber O-Rings in the gaskets have made the few remaining engines almost bulletproof. An excellent buy Taking all of the factors into account, the example that sold at Bonhams was extremely well bought, and any good Twink that appears at auction is a worthwhile purchase indeed. Comfortable on tour, competitive in vintage racing, and above all, probably the most desirable for the price at any invitation-only event, any complete MGA Twin Cam is a good buy today. ♦ (Introductory description courtesy of Bonhams.)


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Etceterini & Friends Profile 2008 Bugatti Veyron EB 16.4 The gearbox is programmed so perfectly that every shift is perfect every time. Ferrari is still trying to figure that trick out by Colin Comer Details Years produced 2005–11 Number produced: 300 Original list price: $1,800,000 Current SCM Valuation: $800,000– $1,366,500 Major service: The price of a Porsche Boxster. If repairs are needed, add a 911 Turbo New tires: $100,000 per set, installed Chassis number: Various locations, including top of dashboard Engine number: Side of block Club: Any one you want to join More: www.bugattiownersclub.co.uk/ Alternatives: 1994–98 McLaren F1, 2002–03 Ferrari Enzo, 2005–06 Ferrari FXX SCM Investment Grade: B Comps Chassis number: VF9SA15C08M795100 • 1,001 hp, 7,993-cc quad-turbocharged W16 engine • 7-speed DSG twin-clutch gearbox • Haldex four-wheel drive • Electrically adjustable independent suspension • 4-wheel carbon-ceramic disc brakes • Top speed of 253 mph • Number 100 of 300 built • One owner from new and less than 700 km from new • Offered from the Zegwaard Collection I 46 ntroduced in 2005, the Bugatti Veyron EB 16V rocketed from rest to 60 mph in a mind-boggling 2.47 seconds. In 2008, the sticker price for the Veyron, named after Pierre Veyron, co-driver of the winning Type 57C Bugatti in the 1939 24 Hours of Le Mans, exceeded $1.8 million. It remains the most expensive production car ever conceived. At the time of its introduction, it was also the fastest production car at any price. The Veyron was based on the Bentley Hunaudieres concept and was built at the Bugatti Atelier in Molsheim, FRA. It was designed by Hartmut Warkuss, with Jozef Kaban responsible for the body and Wolfgang Schreiber directing the engineering. If there is any doubt about the accomplishments of these men, the speed of 253.81 mph that was recorded at the Volkswagen test track was independently duplicated and verified by James May on the television show “Top Gear.” All that speed and forced induction generates heat, and lots of it. As a result, the Veyron requires a total of 10 radiators. Three of the units cool the 1,001-hp engine and another three are for the heat exchangers, while the air conditioning, transmission, differential and engine oil each get one of their own. That heat is clearly a byproduct of the turbocharged power that allowed Road & Track to record 0–60 mph in a mere 2.6 seconds and the quarter mile in 10.2 seconds, at a scorching 143.6 mph. That speed comes despite the significant heft of 4,162 pounds — no doubt in part due to the 8-liter W16, those 10 radiators with plumbing, and the bevy of luxury fitments required by an owner spending a king’s ransom on a supercar that also includes more mundane items such as a stereo and air bags. Finished in silver and dark metallic blue, as ordered by the vendor, who is also the original owner, this example has covered a mere 669 kilometers (415 miles) from delivery, all of which have been accrued exclusively by the Bugatti service team to whom the car was sent for its annual maintenance. Inside, this Veyron 16.4 is as pristine as one would expect, and this supercar comes complete with all service books, handbooks and its original keys, including the all-important top-speed key. All come in the specially made aluminum case, as was delivered new with every Bugatti Veyron. Unquestionably a masterpiece of engineering and design, there can be no better example of what may be the finest, fastest, and most luxurious sporting car ever conceived. Being allowed the privilege of wearing the oval Bugatti badge indicates extraordinarily high standards, all of which the Veyron EB 16.4 has certainly met. 2008 Bugatti Veyron Lot 6580, s/n VF9SA25C18M795080 Condition 1Sold at $770,000 Barrett-Jackson, Las Vegas, NV, 9/23/10 SCM# 166281 2006 Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Lot 2803349350057, s/n VF9SA15B46M795041 Condition 2 Sold at $1,100,000 eBay, 7/7/09 SCM# 120866 2008 Bugatti Veyron EB 16.4 Lot 250328577216, s/n VF9SA25C48M795168 Condition 1 Sold at $1,650,000 eBay, 2/19/09 SCM# 119738 Sports Car Market Simon Clay ©2012, courtesy of RM Auctions


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SCM Analysis This car, Lot 122, sold for 579,600 GBP ($933,814), including buyer’s premium, at RM Auctions’ London auction on October 31, 2012. One can argue that the modern supercar era began with the introduction of the Lamborghini Miura in 1966. So, if the Miura was every schoolboy’s dream in the 1960s — giving way to the Ferrari Boxer in the 1970s, the Lamborghini Countach in the 1980s, and the McLaren F1 in the 1990s — then certainly the Bugatti Veyron wears the poster-over-the-bed crown for today’s youth. Quite frankly, I would have to say whatever car we argue is in second place is a really distant second as well. Look at the Veyron’s specs to see the stuff of dreams: Eight liters. 16 cylinders. 1,001 horsepower. 0–60 mph in 2.6 seconds, with a top speed of 253 mph. And, to answer the second question every gawker asks after you tell them 253 mph, yes, it cost freaking $1.8m when new. Worthy of the Bugatti name But is the Veyron, a product of the reborn Bugatti badge, cut of the same cloth as its namesake’s pre-war Grand Prix cars, or is it more Volkswagen than Bugatti? The answer is clear; the Veyron is indeed a car worthy of the name and a true modern Bugatti, regardless of the brand’s parent company’s modest mainstream offerings. The Veyron simply killed any existing notions of what “fast” was, and that anything truly fast had to be unruly and uncomfortable. The Veyron is anything but. It is a 1,001-hp car that is civilized enough to drive every day, and there are quite a few Veyrons with considerable mileage on their odometers. The engineering within is the new standard to which supercars are now judged. For example, the Veyron’s DSG gearbox is programmed so perfectly that every shift is perfect every time. Seven years down the road, Ferrari is still trying to figure that trick out, and Lamborghini hasn’t even pulled into the figuring-it-out parking lot yet. I quizzed Road & Track’s Senior Editor Jason Cammisa, the Jedi Master of modern supercars, about his thoughts on the Veyron: “The best part about the car is that every single piece is gorgeous and well made. Yeah, so the key is last-generation VW, and the gauges now look 10 years old. But you pull trim pieces and realize that everything is just different. “Look in the rearview mirror at an Aventador and you see a cheap plastic cover on the positive jump-start terminal in the engine compartment with a red “+” on it and a wire hanging out. You can spend three days looking at a Veyron and you’ll see nothing of the sort. Every screw head is perfect (and gorgeous). It’s hard to say it’s ‘worth the money,’ but the more time you spend with a Veyron, the more you see where the money actually went. I think the Veyron is the real deal and always will be. Stupid party tricks like the Aventador are all about their looks and sound and numbers. The Veyron kicked everyone’s ass without calling attention to itself.” Well, is it collectible? But let’s get to what matters to SCMers: Will the Veyron stand the test of time as a collectible, along the lines of cars like the McLaren F1? I sure think so. Like any new exotic car, they have been subject to depreciation from their original $1.8m MSRP. The prevailing market for low-mileage cars, at least at the “ask,” seems to be in the $1.2m range. Obviously, higher-mileage examples — and that one the guy drove into the lake — will sell for less. The most high-profile, low-price Veyron is the (then) 11,800-mile car that sold at no reserve at BarrettJackson’s Las Vegas sale in 2010 for $770k — only to have its Kevin Federline-impersonator high bidder refuse to sign the ticket. B-J CEO Craig Jackson bought it when nobody else stepped up, and he has made it no secret that he loves driving it. Which brings us to our subject car — an essentially new 2008 Veyron that sold at RM for a touch over $900k. I’m not good with math, but that’s about a 50% discount from sticker, which makes the first owner’s cost per mile significantly more than my mortgage payment. For a one-owner “in the wrapper” Veyron, I’m call- ing this well bought, and I think the coming years will prove it. If nothing else, that’s only about $900 per horsepower, or around $3,600 per mph. How can you go wrong with that? ♦ (Introductory description courtesy of RM Auctions.) Dennis Simanaitis compares the Veyron’s heat management system with that of a 1909 steam car in his Under the Skin column, p. 56. January 2013 47


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German Profile Column Author 1928 Mercedes-Benz 36/220 S-Type Open Tourer To meet one as untouched and original as this, 84 years after it was made, is a little spooky by Paul Hardiman Details Years produced 1927–30 Number produced: 146 Original list price: $7,000 (chassis only) Current SCM Valuation: $3,000,000– $4,000,000 Tune-up cost: $4,000 Chassis # Right side of scuttle and various other stampings about chassis Engine # Rear left engine mount Club: Mercedes-Benz Club of America More: www.mbca.org Alternatives: 1930–32 Bentley 8 Litre, 1924–29 Hispano-Suiza H6B/C, 1932–37 Duesenberg Model SJ SCM Investment Grade: A Comps Chassis number: 35906 Engine number: 68657 T his extraordinary S-type has been preserved within its very first family ownership for no fewer than the past 84 years. The original owner was a former military captain who had the rare distinction for a British Army officer of having served throughout (and survived) World War I. He ordered the S-type on February 28, 1928, from The British Mercedes Limited and commissioned Cadogan Motors Ltd. to create and fit a lightweight fabric-skinned body to his specification. It was very similar to the Sindelfingen factory bodies but promised to be lighter, and the captain’s London home (now demolished) was in Curzon Street in Mayfair, so Cadogan’s workshop in Chelsea was just around the corner. The captain made a number of modifications to the car, matching it to his personal preferences. In, we believe, 1931, the standard gearbox was replaced by a British ENV/Armstrong-Siddeley-type Wilson pre-selector gearbox, with gear selection from a neat quadrant control in the center of the dashboard. The mid-ships chassis cross-brace was revised and re-sited to accommodate this change. A steering damper was also adopted, being mounted diagonally beneath the front dumb-irons. The captain decided that such a special motor car deserved and required garaging within a dedicated motor house, and so at his country residence he had such a building custom made for the car. From around 1931 until 2012, this Mercedes-Benz has been accom- 48 modated within this tailor-made building. The captain used this Mercedes-Benz quite spar- ingly during his ownership, seemingly considering it proper transport essentially for high days and holidays. But he died on May 28, 1940, at the tragically early age of 47. Ownership of the Mercedes-Benz then passed to his 10-year-old son. In the 1950s, still with very little mileage completed, the car was put up on blocks, where it rested until 2012, when ownership of the car passed to the captain’s grandson. He revived the old Mercedes-Benz — with typical family discretion, in secret, without his father’s knowledge — to running order, in time for his parent’s 75th birthday. The car was secretly entrusted to specialist Alan Hancock, who had been contacted upon private recommendation from a family friend and collector, and it proved to run incredibly well, ticking over with jawdropping silence and driving very nicely, although the aged exhaust system provides understandably unrefined accompaniment at higher engine speeds. Subsequently, the owner replaced the back-axle drive gear; a German source was located that could machine a new replacement from steel, complying with the periodcorrect grade and treatment. A Daimler-Benz Classic factory engineer conducted a non-invasive, non-destructive inspection of ER 9555 as offered here. The resultant factory report — in which component serials have been checked against original period archive records — confirms the car’s originality. 1928 Mercedes-Benz 26/180 S-type racer Lot 127, s/n 35313 Condition 4 Sold at $3,740,000 Gooding & Co, Pebble Beach, CA, 8/14/10 SCM# 165778 1927 Mercedes-Benz 26/180 S-type Sportwagen Lot 119, s/n 35218 Condition 1 Sold at $5,040,000 Gooding & Co., Pebble Beach, CA, 8/21/11 SCM# 183151 1930 Mercedes-Benz 38/250 SS Lot 640, s/n 36257 Condition 2- Sold at $2,537,000 Bonhams, Carmel, CA, 8/12/10 SCM# 165581 Sports Car Market Simon Clay, courtesy of Bonhams


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SCM Analysis This car, Lot 108, sold for $4,543,394, including buyer’s premium, at Bonhams’ Goodwood Revival sale on September 15, 2012. Bonhams made much of the car’s originality in the catalog, thus: “At the highest level of connoisseurial interest in Vintage, classic and historic cars, it has long been appreciated that restoration is itself a process of obliteration. Once originality has been discarded or painted-over, it can never ever be retrieved. While class is permanent, condition is temporary. As the world’s stock of surviving as-original cars has diminished, so we see an increasingly concerned core of informed and discerning enthusiasts, collectors and institutions seeking surviving cars from this diminishing treasury. By the laws of increasing demand versus diminishing supply, these achingly-rare Mona Lisas of the automotive world are intensely desirable assets.” A few in-period changes We love originality — but this car was almost grungy. That didn’t matter. Neither, apparently, did the fact that the original gearbox had been replaced with a British preselector unit (wherein you move the lever to the next ratio you want but the transmission doesn’t shift until you dip the clutch — very handy for one-armed racers). That necessitated a new crossmember to mount it, and that also meant moving back the starter motor, which sits back on the transmission tunnel on long spacers. The captain also did not care for the outside exhausts, so these were shorn and replaced with a more discreet internal system. He also didn’t like the Mercedes-Benz three-pointed star, which he felt was ostentatious, especially between two World Wars in Europe, the first of which he was party to. And clouds were gathering for the second one, so this was replaced with a small brass duck, which is still on the car. A meticulous man, he also fitted a Tapley brake performance meter, which is still on the back of the windscreen, and felt that the steering would benefit from a damper, which remains on the car. Due to the captain’s early death, the car lay dormant for much if its life. It was road-taxed continuously from 1928 to the end of 1937 — there is a note referring to a Royal Automobile Club Touring Department International Fiscal Permit on April 29, 1937, strongly suggesting touring use abroad, probably in Continental Europe — and its last taxation period prior to its recommissioning expired in September 1952. Most of the instruments are original, including the Junghans clock, but the oil pres- sure gauge is likely not, and it is probably a later, British-sourced replacement. A non-standard British Teleflex damper-adjustment control was another of the captain’s preferences. Otherwise, this car it is almost untouched — thanks to more than 50 years in stor- age, and that includes the metal-cased tools, and spares in velvet-lined boxes. When the car was re-commissioned to run under its own steam, the tires were replaced, and there is evidence that someone has been in the engine, with new plug wires an indication. When Mercedes-Benz came to inspect the car, there was some sympathetic dismantling, where they found that it runs a hotter camshaft from an SS or SSK (beautifully inscribed No 248) in the name of more torque — such that you need with almost seven liters of twin-carbed, supercharged straight six engine on board. S-types, designed by Dr. Porsche, have always had a devoted following, partly due to their exclusive rarity — but also because of their massive performance from elephan- tine grunt, enhanced by that legendary whine when the blower engaged on full throttle. Later, the competition success of the SS and shorter SSK (this car, by the way, was not raced at Brooklands, as the British newspapers had it in the days after the sale, but merely speed-tested there, in the days before motorways or autobahns) also increased their value. So, to meet one as untouched and original as this, 84 years after it was made, is a little spooky, and I’ll bet it’s still a thrill to drive. The body, with its beautiful patina, is all intact; the leather is considerably worn but not actually distressed, and the carpets and seat backs are moth-eaten. The fabric body has survived, but the paint is cracked. The radiator plating would probably polish back, and the beautiful engine-turning is still visible on the cam cover. The fantastic history includes original old-style logbooks and notes from the first owner. This was just about the best of the best, and knocked down to “a representative of a major European collection,” who outbid at least five others to a price almost double the pre-sale estimate. The price would no doubt have been even higher had the 1920s coachwork been made in Sindelfingen, rather than in London by Cadogan. The supercar of its day Remember, this is pretty much a racing car on the road, the McLaren F1 of its day, sharing much of the running gear with the legendary SSK. Except that this car is even rarer. The last of its type to sell, chassis 35218, with a sport- ier body, fetched $5,040,000 in “faultlessly restored”` condition at Gooding’s 2011 Pebble Beach auction. This car fetched just about as much in real terms, in original nick. The question is, what do you do with it now? Restoring it would take away the very originality that makes it so valuable. With under 9,000 miles under its wheels, it’s hardly run in, and it has been gone through to make it a runner. Engineered like a truck, it’s just about indestructible and it can’t get much tattier. It might be a forlorn wish, but the obvious course of action is for the new owner to smoke it around the world for us all to enjoy. Pebble Beach Tour d’Elegance (and, if only we can hope, the Mille Miglia), here it comes. ♦ (Introductory description courtesy of Bonhams.) January 2013 49


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German Profile Column Author The Cumberford Perspective Perfectly proportioned profile By Robert Cumberford W ill this magnificent survivor be preserved — or embalmed during an overzealous “restoration” to a level never attained in its real working life? Whatever its new owner chooses, the car will retain its fabulous proportions, with the leading edge of the radiator behind the front wheel centerline and the driver seated just ahead of the rear tire leading edge. From the windshield base, the hood and cowl are as long as German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr German Pr erman Profile Colu rman Profile Column Author The Cumberford Perspective Perfectly proportioned profile By Robert Cumberford W ill this magnificent survivor be preserved — or embalmed during an overzealous “restoration” to a level never attained in its real working life? Whatever its new owner chooses, the car will retain its fabulous proportions, with the leading edge of the radiator behind the front wheel centerline and the driver seated just ahead of the rear tire leading edge. From the windshield base, the hood and cowl are as long as 10 10 Profile Column Author The Cumberford Perspective Perfectly proportioned profile By Robert Cumberford W ill this magnificent survivor be preserved — or embalmed during an overzealous “restoration” to a level never attained in its real working life? Whatever its new owner chooses, the car will retain its fabulous proportions, with the leading edge of the radiator behind the front wheel centerline and the driver seated just ahead of the rear tire leading edge. From the windshield base, the hood and cowl are as long as 10 Sports Sports Car Market 11 5 3 2 6 4 1 SIDE VIEW 1 The midpoint of the wheelbase actually falls ahead of the ostensible start of the passenger compartment, so the car seems to be all engine. 2 The pointed radiator provides a visual thrust 12 otherwise lacking in a rather static, architectural body design. 3 The windshield base is in the rear half of the overall vehicle envelope, again accentuating the impression of enormous power. 4 One scant element of art in the bodywork is the subtle curve at the front of the rear-hinged door, and it was probably done more for foot 7 entrance room than visual elegance. 5 Front seat backs intrude into the space opened by the tiny rear doors. It must have been nearly impossible to climb in with the top raised. 6 Slightly curved rear bodywork profile parallels forward edge of front doors — the body builder’s small nod to horse-drawn carriage aesthetics. HIGH FRONT 7/8 VIEW 7 What a pity the wind- 8 shield is not presented in a vee form parallel to the radiator face. V-screens were simply not much considered in the 1920s. 8 This cowl ventilator seems anachronistic, but it was probably needed to dissipate engine heat in the footwells. 9 9 There is a trailing curve on the front fender, but it takes no advantage of the length available before reaching the doors. It remains mundane and matter-of-fact. 10 Apart from dumb irons providing a fixing point for the front springs, the car effectively ends at the leading edge of the front tires. 11 The development of the fenders is interesting — but awkward — in that the flat transverse surface gets wider as it descends. 12 Riding in this rear seat must have been hideously uncomfortable, whatever the weather. Wind turbulence, vertical acceleration on hitting a bump and everything else worked against the passengers. INTERIOR VIEW (see previous page) There’s a big difference between patina and cruel neglect, and this cockpit makes that amply clear. Imposing and impressive, the giant steering wheel and its stout spokes seem to have been better cared for than the rest of the interior — or recently refurbished. The leather may be almost beyond recall, but the seats themselves appear to be really comfortable, and effective for lateral location.


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American Car Collector Profile 1909 Stanley Model R Roadster Steam-car competitors stated you were not sure whether you were going straight ahead or straight up by Carl Bomstead Details Years produced: 1901–27 Number produced: 11,000 Original list price: $1,440 Current SCM Valuation: $59,000– $250,000 Club: The Steam Car Club More: www.stanleyregister.net Alternatives: Doble Model B, 1908 White Model K SCM Investment Grade: B Comps 1918 Stanley Model 735 Lot 44, s/n 686 Condition 3Sold at $36,904 RM Auctions, Nysted, DK, 8/12/12 SCM# 209268 Chassis number: 4896 W hoever called this car a Stanley Steamer wasn’t a friend of the Stanley brothers, as they hated that designation. It was a Stanley Steam Car, although Stanley Steamer has become a part of the American language. The brothers were identical twins who went by their initials, F.E. and F.O. They set about building what was, without a doubt, the most famous automobile that used steam power to propel itself down the road. The brothers retired from the company while in their 60s, about 10 years before its demise. The Model R roadster was one of five models listed in the 1909 Stanley catalog, selling for $1,440 with an optional convertible top. Its 20-horsepower, twin-piston engine is a model of simplicity, with just 13 moving parts. It can easily cruise at 40 mph or climb steep grades. Raymond H. Carr purchased this Stanley from Jim Keith of Virginia, who built it between 1995 and 1996. Keith is knowledgeable with the Stanley marque and owns two examples himself; thus, it was faithfully engineered to original specification using as many original parts as possible. At age 71, Carr drove this kerosenefired, 20-horsepower steamer from Anchorage, AK, to Bar Harbor, ME, a distance of 5,340 miles. 52 SCM Analysis This car, Lot 249, sold for $121,000, including buyer’s premium, at RM’s Hershey auction on October 11, 2012. “I used to sell steam-powered automobiles. Until someone went and invented one,” sang con artist Professor Harold Hill in “The Music Man.” And invent them they did, as about 125 American manufacturers put their foot in the emerging steam-powered car market. In the early 1900s, the internal combustion engine was plagued with reliability issues, was difficult to start if not in perfect mechanical order, was noisy, and handcranking the engine often resulted in a broken arm. On the other hand, the steam engine offered simplicity, with only 13 moving engine parts and a total of 37 parts for the entire car. The steam engine offered power on demand without a clutch to worry about. Increased speed was generated by simply setting the throttle. In addition, they were fast, as Fred Marriott set several land-speed records in 1906 driving the “Rocket Steamer.” As an interesting factoid, the first dedicated police car in America was a 1902 Stanley that the Boston Police Department purchased. One problem: Not one cop in the department could drive, so they had to hire a chauffeur to chase the bad guys. Sports Car Market 1907 Stanley EX Lot 483, s/n 3595 Condition 2+ Sold at $128,000 Bonhams, Greenwich, CT, 6/3/12 SCM# 202084 1910 Stanley Model 60 Lot 516, s/m 5491 Condition 2 Sold at $80,516 Bonhams, Beaulieu, U.K., 9/10/10 SCM# 166046 Owen Fitter ©2012, courtesy of RM Auctions


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A slow, risky start The biggest disadvantage to the steam engine was, of course, the starting process, which was stated to be 20 minutes in the Stanley brochure, but 30 minutes or more was more realistic. A blow torch replaced the ignition key, as the pilot light required igniting and the boiler had to be brought up to proper temperature. The pilot light was fed with white gasoline and the boiler with kerosene, so waving a blow torch close to these ingredients was a recipe for disaster. Steam-car competitors stated that you were not sure whether you were going straight ahead or straight up, although there were no reported incidents of steam car boilers exploding. The bodies were constructed of wood, and the pilot light could catch the frame on fire, but as Jay Leno was reported to have stated, “You just drive faster to put out the fire!” A new car with old parts During 25 years of production, the Stanley Motor Carriage Company produced nearly 11,000 vehicles with 85 different models. The early cars had a distinctive coffin nose, as the exhaust steam was vented externally. In 1914, they installed a condenser that looked like a radiator and reused the exhaust steam. However, this was also the era when Cadillac’s electric starter — introduced in 1912 — took hold and spelled the end of the steam car era. As noted in the auction description, the 1909 Stanley Model R offered was constructed in 1995 and 1996 “using as many original parts as possible.” In 2010, RM sold a Stanley Model E2, which has the smaller 10-horsepower boiler, for $63,250. It had been rebuilt in 1973 with a new wood body but was now in need of a new boiler and burner. It had an inappropriate chassis tag, and its origin was unknown. Okay, what is the difference between these two Stanleys? One was recently driven from Alaska to Maine and the other has not been steamed in years — and had a long list of needs. Stanleys often seem to be akin to George Washington’s ax with a replacement head and new handle, so given the choice, the Model R offered here was good to go without additional expense. To my eye, it was the better buy. ♦ (Introductory description courtesy of RM Auctions.) Dennis Simanaitis compares the Stanley’s heat management system with a 2008 Bugatti Veyron’s in his Under the Skin column, p. 56. January 2013 53


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Race Car Profile 1930–31 Maserati Tipo 26 Sport Road Racer Few people really understand these cars, so the market is thin — with resulting lower values by Thor Thorson Details Years produced: 1930–31 Number produced: 15 Original list price: Unknown Current SCM Valuation: $2.5m–$3.2m Chassis #: Tag on left side of dash Engine #: Stamped on head Club: The Maserati Club More: www.themaseraticlub.com/cc.html Alternatives: 1931–34 Alfa Romeo 8C 2300, 1931–35 Bugatti Type 51, 1927–31 Bentley 4½ Litre SCM Investment Grade: A Comps Chassis number: 2518 Engine number: 2518 T his magical Maserati was a direct competitor of the smaller-engined, less-uncompromisinglyrace-bred Alfa Romeo 8C 2300. It should be considered absolutely within the same breath as one of the most illustrious of Italian-made thoroughbred road-racing cars. This extraordinarily well-presented survivor from Maserati’s early history is offered here direct from 57 years in its current ownership, and from 61 years within the same family. It has been restored, maintained and preserved within Anthony Hartley’s supreme Maserati collection and fully reflects his unique combination of admiration for the marque, hands-on engineering capability and deep, deep knowledge of these dynamic machines. This is one of two 2.5-liter Maserati Tipo 26 cars originally imported into the U.K. during the winter of 1930–31. The Tipo 26 cars are normally known as 26Ms or 26Bs, but in the case of these two cars built to special British order, it appears they were classified as 26S. As offered here, 2518 embodies its original chassis — now boxed-in for enhanced rigidity — highly original bodywork and highly original running gear, while Hartley has crafted many new mechanical components to original specification to ensure useable reliability. The engine features its original cylinder head and exhaust and original RAG carburetor body. The original upper crankcase half and block are included, and the starter, dynamo and magneto are original. The gearbox is remade. The torque tube is original, and the majority of the braking system is also original, as are the axle tubes. Among Maserati cars, this is absolutely one of the 54 most original survivors. It is an extremely rare, classical straight-8 supercharged four-seat sports car, offered here in great order. It has excellent provenance, it is accompanied by a comprehensive documentation file plus technical restoration and running notes ... and it has that extra cachet of the Giuseppe Campari racing history. SCM Analysis This car, Lot 128, sold for $2,726,875, including buyer’s pre- mium, at Bonhams’ Goodwood Revival auction on September 15, 2012. Forget about cars for a minute — let’s play a real- estate mind game. Assume that you’ve done well in your life and want to invest in a house at some cool ski resort. You’ve got deep — but not bottomless — pockets and want to both have a lot of fun and invest wisely. So what are the criteria that you’ll use in making your decision? First, you’ll want to select your resort, which will be a function of the kind of experience you want: Alta or Taos are great, but your skills had better be ready for them. Aspen or Vail are less ultimate, but they are far more comfortable and accommodating. Do you want a personality match or to make a statement? Now the investment considerations: Do you want his- tory or performance (or both)? You’re already in a good neighborhood, but do you want the fanciest place, or are you willing to take something funky and different — but still cool — for a lot less money? How much do you care about the architecture and artistry of construction? How much are you going to use it? If you use it a lot, keeping it going can be a big deal, but if you only visit occasionally, issues such as fixing a weird old furnace aren’t that important. Also, how long 1933 Bugatti Type 51 Lot 327, s/n 51153 Condition 3 Sold at $1,285,403 Bonhams, Paris, 2/05/11 SCM# 168811 1933 Maserati 4CM 2000 Lot 233, s/n 2011 Condition 1Sold at $457,200 Bonhams, Chichester, U.K., 9/01/06 SCM# 43014 1932 Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Lot 206, s/n 2211065 Condition 2- Sold at $4,196,927 Bonhams, Chichester, U.K., 6/29/12 SCM# 208027 Sports Car Market Courtesy of Bonhams


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are you going to keep it? Eventually you or your kids are going to want to sell it, and some properties are just easier to sell than others. If you’re worried about liquidity, there are some properties from which it’s best to stay away. Back to race cars Okay, you get the picture — now let’s go back to talking about collectible racers, as the situation really isn’t very different. First you pick the category — the grid — in which you want to play. For example, Formula One and Can-Am are attractive, but you’d better be a very good driver and far more interested in excitement and accomplishment than in comfort and friendliness if you choose to go there. Sports cars from the 1950s are fun, beautiful, and not too likely to hurt you, but your wife’s SUV will turn better lap times. You’ve got to choose the experience you want — and can afford. Next, you need to find the right car on which to spend money — with the understanding that even within a category, good and poor investments exist at all relative price levels. Do you want to pay top dollar for the flavor of the month — or find a well-known — but second-tier — bolide that will serve you well for a bit less money? Or do you want to poke around to find the unknown gem that comes out of nowhere to harass the big guys for a fraction of the cost? These are all valid approaches, tempered by individual attitudes toward practical issues: Do you intend to use it a lot, just occasionally, or as an objet d’art? Does it bother you that a broken part may put you out for months or more while you try to find or re-create a piece that hasn’t been produced since well before you were born? Who lives in this neighborhood? Obviously, practical issues become less important as the cars get newer, but today’s topic is, generally, pre-war racers, and specifically European ones that aspired to run at the front. This is an intimidating, demanding, and highly international group to play in and primarily European — it is the Val d’Isére of the vintage racing world, if you will. The participants tend to split into two groups: the big cars, such as the 4½ and 6 Litre Bentleys and the Mercedes-Benz S and SS, and the smaller cars, such as 8C 2300 Alfas, various Bugattis and the occasional Maserati. There are also a gaggle of under-1,500-cc Austins and MGs, but they are not today’s topic. So let’s wander around the neighborhood and consider the relative merits and values of the possibilities. Aside from the SSK that has become a museum for its sheer rarity, the most impressive — and certainly the flavor of the year — is the 8C 2300 Alfa. As a supercharged straight-8 Italian beauty, it is the perfect combination of artistry, performance, history, reliability and sheer lust. But these cars come with a very hefty price tag: The good ones start at $5 million and go way up from there. A thundering alternative can be found in the 4½ Litre (and occasional 6 Litre) Bentleys: They are big, very long-legged and almost impossible to break, but they are a serious upper-body workout on most tracks and nowhere near as physically attractive as many would like. You can get an acceptable racing bitsa for about a million dollars, but a proper racer with real history will require well above $5 million. S Mercedes are similar — while more beautiful — but there are precious few with any real racing history, and those are seriously precious. The main alternative in the lighter cars is Bugatti, particularly the supercharged, twin-cam straight-8 Type 51 and Type 55. They are effectively French 8C 2300s but don’t carry quite the value, sitting in the $3 million to $5 million range. They are for the most part gorgeous and fun to drive, but a bit more of a problem if something breaks. You can buy anything up to and including a complete new engine for an Alfa, Bentley or Mercedes-Benz, but Bugattis are more of a challenge. This brings us to our subject Maserati. It is an Italian supercharged straight-8 and every bit as fast as the competition. Maserati’s build quality was an easy match for any of the others, and the artistry is real. However, few people really understand them, so the market is thin — with resulting lower values. Maserati built 15 of them, and maybe half of those survive, so finding parts when something breaks becomes a serious consideration if you intend to actually use it. The history is great, but this car was reduced to little more than a frame and miscellaneous pieces before Hartley recovered the missing bits and reassembled it, which always puts an asterisk on the provenance. A bargain in an expensive neighborhood On the other hand, if you are looking to make a wise investment, one of the most basic rules is to buy a lesservalued — but good — property in a great neighborhood. I propose that this is the situation here. This car has the bones and the pedigree of greatness, but it’s hard to keep up, sits on a little-used side street, and doesn’t have the curb appeal of the fancy neighbors — but it sold for half to a third of their value. As such, I think that it was fairly priced in today’s market, but probably has a much greater upside than the ones over which everybody is fighting. It is a very cool car, and I would suggest that it was an astute purchase. ♦ (Introductory description courtesy of Bonhams.) January 2013 55


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Under the Skin Dennis Simanaitis Heating a Stanley and Cooling a Veyron Notes on warming up the past and keeping the present cool Producing 1,001 horsepower, the Bugatti Veyron contains 14 mechanisms for heat exchange well. Indeed, from 1899 to 1905, it outsold all internalcombustion rivals and was beat only by — wait for it —the Columbia Electric. But by 1920, steam had largely had its day. We still use heat engines. And with the 2008 Bugatti Veyron EB 16.4 producing 1,001 horsepower from its quad-turbocharged 8-liter W16 powerplant, proper control of heat becomes all the more important. Noted Bugatti’s Dr. Wolfgang Schreiber, “For 1,000 The simplicity of the Stanley Model R’s steam engine requires only 13 moving parts didn’t like the term “steamer”). Its working fluid is water. The added energy heats this water to the point of steam. This heating is done externally, thus the term “external combustion” as opposed to the internal combustion of more familiar engines. Porting this steam alternately to either side of an enclosed piston drives it first one way, then the other; this, not surprisingly, characterizes what’s called a double-action steam engine. Like other Stanley steam cars until 1914, the 1909 Model R discharged the spent O steam to the atmosphere in an open cycle. Condensers were fitted to later Stanley models to recycle the steam, thus reducing their appetite for water. A steam engine has several clear advantages over other means of propulsion. It’s mechanically simple: The Stanley’s two-cylinder double-acting powerplant has only 13 moving parts. Its immense torque from zero rpm m gearing. And it’s essentially fuel-neutral; that is, anyth burn can fuel its external combustion. Disadvantages? Both water and fuel need freque ishing. The efficiency of an open-cycle steam engine i than 10%; adding the complexity and weight of a con brings this to maybe 25%. (The best of internal com tion exceeds 40%.) And there’s the problem of waiting for the wate boil into steam. The term “chauffeur” comes from French, “one who heats things up,” as in the fellow w prepares a steam car for operation. In the earliest days of motoring, Stanley competed v 56 der the Skin Dennis Simanaitis Heating a Stanley and Cooling a Veyron Notes on warming up the past and keeping the present cool Producing 1,001 horsepower, the Bugatti Veyron contains 14 mechanisms for heat exchange well. Indeed, from 1899 to 1905, it outsold all internal- combustion rivals and was beat only by — wait for it —the Columbia Electric. But by 1920, steam had largely had its day. We still use heat engines. And with the 2008 Bugatti Veyron EB 16.4 producing 1,001 horsepower from its quad-turbocharged 8-liter W16 powerplant, proper con- trol of heat becomes all the more important. Noted Bugatti’s Dr. Wolfgang Schreiber, “For 1,000 The simplicity of the Stanley Model R’s steam engine requires only 13 moving parts didn’t like the term “steamer”). Its working fluid is water. The added energy heats this water to the point of steam. This heating is done externally, thus the term “external combustion” as opposed to the internal combustion of more familiar engines. Porting this steam alternately to either side of an enclosed piston drives it first one way, then the other; this, not surprisingly, characterizes what’s called a double-action steam engine. Like other Stanley steam cars until 1914, the 1909 Model R discharged the spent O steam to the atmosphere in an open cycle. Condensers were fitted to later Stanley models to recycle the steam, thus reducing their appetite for water. A steam engine has several clear advantages over other means of propulsion. It’s mechanically simple: The Stanley’s two-cylinder double-acting powerplant has only 13 moving parts. Its immense torque from zero rpm m gearing. And it’s essentially fuel-neutral; that is, anyth burn can fuel its external combustion. Disadvantages? Both water and fuel need freque ishing. The efficiency of an open-cycle steam engine i than 10%; adding the complexity and weight of a con brings this to maybe 25%. (The best of internal com tion exceeds 40%.) And there’s the problem of waiting for the wate boil into steam. The term “chauffeur” comes from French, “one who heats things up,” as in the fellow w prepares a steam car for operation. In the earliest days of motoring, Stanley competed v 56 ur ur familiar automotive powerplants are all “heat” engines. They confine a working fluid, add energy of some kind, derive motion from a resulting expansion and repeat this cycle. The 1909 Stanley Model R roadster is a steam car (the Brothers Stanley horsepower, the system demands approximately 2,000 horsepower to be generated as heat energy during combustion. Half in each case is dissipated in the exhaust gas and cooling water.” This explains why the Veyron contains a total of 14 means of exchanging heat from one medium to another. Three of these radiators — with a 42-quart capacity — circulate engine coolant. Another radiator of 16 quarts supports four liquid-to-air intercoolers of the engine’s quad turbochargers. (Recall, turbos extract energy from the exhaust but also heat the air they compress.) There are separate radiators for cooling engine oil and fluids in the transmission and differentials. A pair handles heat in the air conditioner system. And, in a final fillip of heat control, the rear spoiler’s hydraulic system gets a radiator of its own. No wonder they’re called heat engines. ♦ The Veyron’s hydraulic system for the rear spoiler has its own radiator


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Market Reports Overview A Few Important Cars Make All the Difference At Bonhams Chichester, sales rocketed from $7.7m last year to $20.1m — an increase of 168% By Tony Piff T his September, sales totals at Bonhams’ annual Goodwood Revival auction in Chichester, U.K., unexpectedly rocketed up from an average yearly total of about $7m to an unbelievable $20.1m — an increase of 168%. The difference this year? Just nine headlining cars, which happened to meet their reserves, cumulatively worth $13.2m. In the top three slots were a 1928 Mercedes-Benz 36/220 S-type tourer at $4.5m, a 1930 Maserati Tipo 26 racer at $2.7m and a 1939 Lagonda V12 Le Mans Team racer at $2.1m. At Classic Motorcar Auctions’ yearly Glenmoor Gathering auction, the same thing happened on a smaller scale. This rapidly growing auction, now in its third year, has seen a consistent average price per car of about $21k. Last year they sold 48 cars for a total just shy of $1m. This year, that number shot forward by more than 50%, due in no small part to a 1937 Cord 812 phaeton, which sold for $162k. RM returned to Pennsylvania for their well-established Hershey sale, held in association with the AACA Eastern Division National Fall Meet. Topping a long list of many six-digit sales were a 1931 Duesenberg Model J Barrelside phaeton at $1.3m, a 1929 Duesenberg Model J sedan at $792k and a 1933 Packard Twelve Model 1005 convertible at $451k. 110 out of 118 cars sold here, for a very impressive sell-through rate of 93%. Bonhams found a new venue for their northeast fall sale at the Simeone Foundation Automotive Museum in Philadelphia. The barn-find-heavy event drew plenty of interested collectors, who bid a 1915 Packard Six Model 3-38 roadster to $220k, followed by a 1932 Aston Martin 1½ Liter Le Mans racer and a 1917 Simplex Crane Model 5 Victoria dual-cowl phaeton, each sold at $209k. This proved to be a barn-find-heavy issue, with the inclusion of the Bennett Collection in Rollinsford, NH. Auctions America by RM was tasked with auctioning SCM 1-6 Scale Condition Rating: 1: National concours standard/ perfect 2: Very good, club concours, some small flaws 3: Average daily driver in decent condition 4: Still a driver but with some apparent flaws 5: A nasty beast that runs but has many problems 6: Good only for parts 60 Sales Totals Barrett-Jackson, Las Vegas, NV Bonhams, Chichester, U.K. RM, Hershey, PA Bonhams, Philadelphia, PA Branson, Branson, MO Classic Motorcar, Canton, OH Auctions America by RM, Rollinsford, NH $842,372 $1,530,954 $2,042,876 off the massive collection, which included 129 automobiles, all offered without reserve. The eclectic assortment of racers, restorations and projects in various states of disrepair followed no theme except Dr. Bennett’s inspiration, and few cars showed evidence of careful preservation. But amid the quirky drivers and non-running projects were a few very significant automobiles. A 1925 Lancia Lambda Casaro roadster took the top slot at $207k, while the one-off Honore Wagner BMW racer — reportedly the winner of the 1952 Eifelrennen at the Nürburgring — sold for $177k. Altogether, the collection totaled $842k. A world away from the barn finds of rural New Hampshire was Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas, where dazzlingly restored muscle cars and hot rods crossed the auction block in front of a crowd of thousands. The top three slots went to a 1967 Shelby GT500 SE Super Snake at $330k, a 1970 Plymouth Hemi Superbird at $297k and a 1967 Ford Mustang custom at $275k. As with years past, Barrett-Jackson had no trouble selling all but one of the 524 cars consigned, for a sales total of $22.8m, right in line with previous years’ results. Sales figures at Branson took a dip from last year’s $2.3m for 123 of 251 cars to $2m for 124 of 233. Poor weather was a factor, but totals were also hurt by some important consignments that failed to sell. But plenty of show-quality drivers still found new homes, such as a 1955 Chevrolet Bel Air and a 1973 Jaguar XKE, both sold at $45k. In the Roundup, we survey highlights from Dan Kruse Classics in Austin and Silver Auctions in Portland, along with a selection of motorcycles from the J. Wood & Company vintage motorcycle auction in Birmingham, AL. Chad Tyson wraps up the market reports with his eBay column. This month, Chad takes a long, hard look at that $20k sweet spot and picks his best buys. ♦ Top 10 Sales This Issue (Land Auctions Only) 1. 1928 Mercedes-Benz 36/220 6.8-liter S-type tourer, $4,543,394—Bon, p. 76 2. 1930 Maserati Tipo 26T Sport roadster, $2,727,010—Bon, p. 76 3. 1939 Lagonda V12 Le Mans Team racer, $2,091,275—Bon, p. 72 4. 1929 Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 SS tourer, $1,782,490—Bon, p. 76 5. 1933 Duesenberg Model J 4-dr Sport Berline, $1,650,000—DKC, p. 116 6. 1931 Duesenberg Model J Barrelside phaeton, $1,292,500—RM, p. 82 7. 1930 Maserati Tipo 26 Sport roadster, $865,215—Bon, p. 76 8. 1929 Duesenberg Model J Sport sedan, $792,000—RM, p. 82 9. 1930 Maserati V4 Sedici Cilindri replica racer, $701,741—Bon, p. 76 10. 1955 Lancia Aurelia B24 Spider, $592,758—Bon, p. 77 1. 1950 BMW “Wagner Special” racer, $177,100—AA, p. 108 2. 1951 Ford Custom sedan, $13,500— Sil, p. 117 3. 1970 Mercedes-Benz 600 sedan, $74,250—RM, p. 80 4. 1929 Essex Challenger phaeton, $26,450—Bon, p. 92 5. 1974 Porsche 914 2 roadster, $10,800—Bran, p. 100 Sports Car Market Best Buys http://bit.ly/ZOf8zr $ 22,752,785 $20,124,043 Scan this code with your smartphone for complete results of each auction covered in this issue, or go to URL listed (left) $9,901,100 $2,576,470


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Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas, NV Barrett-Jackson — Las Vegas Collector Car Auction 68,000 attendees — a reminder that there are more ways to measure an event’s success than just the automobile sales Company Barrett-Jackson Date September 20–22, 2012 Location Las Vegas, NV Auctioneers Tom “Spanky” Assiter and associates Automotive lots sold/offered 523/524 Sales rate 99% Sales total $22,752,785 High sale 1970 Ford Mustang Boss 429 fastback — $247,500 1967 Shelby continuation GT500 SE Super Snake, sold at $330,000 Buyer’s premium 10%, included in sold prices Report and photos by Dan Grunwald Market opinions in italics nual auction was once again held indoors in the gigantic Mandalay Bay Convention Center. Vegas is a totally different market from Monterey, of course — more Caesars Palace than Quail Lodge — but no less exciting. Ultra-rare Mercedes and Astons are supplanted here by American muscle cars and trucks of all description. No million-dollar cars this time around, but six-figure sales were still plentiful. For the full Barrett-Jackson experience, don’t miss F the vendor area and the “ride and drive” opportunities outside, where you can experience hot laps in a Shelby or Corvette, as well as other more mundane drive-it-yourself production cars, too. A Barrett-Jackson event is always much more than just an auction. This auction had more than 68,000 attendees, most of whom were not auction bidders, which should serve as a reminder that there are more ways to measure a successful event than just the automobile sales. Speaking of automobile sales, the numbers this year looked as strong as ever. The $22.8m total was a slight decline from last year’s $24.2m, but 523 cars sold out of 524, which technically rounds up to a sales rate of 100%, 62 ollowing the breathtaking results of Monterey in August, I was eager to see what would happen at BarrettJackson in Las Vegas. The fifth an- and average sold price per car bumped up a notch from $42k to $44k. Aside from a few slightly unusual automobiles, it was mostly your normal auction fare, with American iron the dominant theme. Very nice pickup trucks proved extremely popular, a trend that we’ve seen repeated at auctions all year long. I noted a 1956 GMC restored to perfection, which fetched a strong-butcorrect $39k. A custom-but-driveable 1932 GMC formerly owned by country music legend George Jones earned the right $55k. The top sale this year was a 1967 Shelby Super Snake continuation car that sold for $330k, followed by a 1970 Hemi Superbird at $297k. My personal favorite was a 1962 Impala custom that hammered sold at $100k. It was a full-on hot rod that could’ve held its own at any show or concours. I did not cover the charity sales this time, as the generosity of the bidders on these lots generally pushes prices far beyond the cars’ true values. Barrett-Jackson Sales Totals has the distinction of doing more charity sales in both numbers and dollars than anyone else, and they do it for free. All proceeds go entirely to the designated nonprofit organization, which reflects very well on the Barrett-Jackson organization. Barrett-Jackson raised more than $540k for charity at this sale. What a week! It’s like the simultaneous expe- rience of Mom’s apple pie, the American flag, fast cars, the cutthroat free market, charitable giving and democracy at its finest — all of the elements that make this country great. ♦ $30m $25m $20m $15m $10m $5m 0 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 Sports Car Market


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Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas, NV ENGLISH #337.2-1953 MG TD roadster. S/N TD28037. Green/tan leather. Odo: 80,528 miles. Very nice paint, chrome and interior. Steering wheel shows some cracks. Well detailed engine. Has driving lamps and luggage $11,275. My first car was a Morris Minor. They are cute, unique, fun and usually cheap—although the price paid for this one looked strong. This one would fulfill three of those requirements. #673-1966 AUSTIN-HEALEY 3000 BJ8 convertible. S/N HBJ8L34003. Beige/red leather. Odo: 88,277 miles. New high-level paint and interior. New chrome has some pitting in the grille surround and a small dent on FRENCH #38-1956 CITROËN 2CV 4-dr sedan. S/N 303308. Blue/white/blue/white cloth. Odo: 31,148 miles. Paint shows lots of pinholes and flaws. Soft top is dirty and stained. Windshield and rear glass scratched. Dirty seat covers and scratches on steering wheel paint. 425-cc with 9 hp. Dead-solid metal every- rack. New wiring. Cond: 1. SOLD AT $42,900. Last year of the legendary TD. Car was originally white. Very comprehensive and high-level restoration; ready for concours. The superb condition and level of restoration pushed the price here, not suprisingly. #79.1-1957 TRIUMPH TR3 roadster. S/N 93987. White/black vinyl. Odo: 93,987 miles. Good paint and chrome. New seats and carpet. Some delamination and waviness on windscreen glass. Light bubbling on driver’s the hood intake trim. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $77,000. Body-off restoration to very high level. Considering the caliber of the restoration I have to call this sale fair to both parties. #386-1986 ROLLS-ROYCE SILVER SPUR 4-dr sedan. S/N SCAZN42A2GCX15304. White/tan/tan leather. Odo: 58,141 miles. Original paint just starting to wrinkle and crack. Some lumpiness under fabric at front and rear of top. Interior wood trim where. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $13,750. It doesn’t get much more simple than this. Air-cooled, 2-cycle opposed engine with 3-speed and front-wheel drive. Three-lug wheels with 125400 tires. Seats are springs on frames with thin cloth pads on top. Four doors and a big trunk. Who knew the French could build a simple car? Previously a $30k no-sale at Bonhams’ April 2012 Carmel sale (SCM# 209532). I call this fairly bought. GERMAN #397-1963 VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE 2-dr sedan. S/N 4969413. Cream/watermelon vinyl. Odo: 39,721 miles. Fresh paint. Most chrome good, although one heavy scratch on the rear bumper guard. A few flaws in driver’s side chrome and trim. Dent on hood center side rocker panel. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $24,200. Looks clean and cared-for with a recent freshening. 100 hp won’t win many races but you will look good driving it. Sold right on the money. #12-1959 MORRIS MINOR sedan. S/N MAZS3L679172. Red/tan cloth & vinyl. Odo: 374 miles. Quickie red paint job. Newer cloth and vinyl interior. Windshield has wiper scratches outside and numerous scratches in- starting to show cracks. Wear shows on driver’s seat piping. Chrome showing some scratches. Both front parking and headlight trim misfit. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $18,150. Gross vehicle weight 6,106 lbs. Looks wellkept and honest. Fairly priced for both buyer and seller. #626-2000 BENTLEY ARNAGE 4-dr sedan. S/N SC3BLC31E4YCX04263. Blue/ cream leather. Paint shows well. Bumper trim shows scratches. Light chips on windshield. Alpine stereo, light patina on driver seat. strip. Cracks in plastic horn button and age showing on ashtray paint. New door panels and seats. Looks to have original headliner with light dirt. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $14,300. “Cute” always brings a fair price here at Barrett-Jackson and this was right on the money. #625.2-1963 VOLKSWAGEN TRANS- side. Panel gaps vary and front fender fits wide at door. Holes in both fenders from missing mirrors. Previous repair at right shockmount by firewall brace. Cond: 3. SOLD AT 64 Steering wheel leather shows wear. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $55,000. Still shows class and inspires respect anywhere you drive it. Looks quite nice for a 12-year-old car. Sports Car Market


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Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas, NV PORTER 15-window minibus. S/N 1151547. Light green/green vinyl. Odo: 32,131 miles. Fresh paint in an attractive color showing lots of orange peel. Good chrome and trim. Tiltout front windows. All new interior. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $55,000. The VW bus is another of those vehicles that always does well at Barrett-Jackson. Well restored and bid with gusto to the $50,000 drop of the hammer. ITALIAN #638-1988 FERRARI TESTAROSSA coupe. S/N ZFFSG17A8J0077629. Gold/tan leather. Odo: 3,529 miles. Good paint with only a couple of chips on the front bumper. dry storage in Texas for its whole life. That may explain the dry leather appearance. JAPANESE #359-2001 ACURA NSX-T coupe. S/N JH4NA21681T000067. Silver/black leather. Odo: 49,379 miles. A few stone chips on front paint and windshield. Driver’s seat looks almost new. Light driving shows on the engine. ably buff out. Couple of paint chips on the hood edge. Chrome shows very nicely. Leather interior still looks new. Original dash instrument faces show some age. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $70,400. Car was bid to $80k at Auctions America by RM’s May 2011 Auburn sale but did not sell (SCM# 179444). Well restored in 2004 and well preserved since. Could use a few minor tweaks to bring it up to snuff, but very few needs. #630.2-1951 FORD COUNTRY SQUIRE wagon. S/N B1DL100819. Blue/brown vinyl. Odo: 76,394 miles. New paint and wood with wide and varying door gaps. Some pitting on new front chrome. Steering wheel has cracks and some interior chrome is aging out. Lots of Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $53,900. One of the best sports cars ever built and can be serviced at your local Honda dealer. If they had named it “Hondini,” made it more complicated and temperamental, and built it in Italy, it could easily be worth double today. Some visible wear on on the driver’s seat bolster. The engine is clean with some light dirt in places. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $51,150. Unusual-color V12 Ferrari is a head-turner. Fair deal to both seller and buyer. #644.4-1995 FERRARI 348 SPIDER. S/N ZFFRG43A6S009717. Red/tan leather. Odo: 17,891 miles. A few light paint flaws and chips. One noticeable touch-up below passenger side mirror. Very clean interior. A couple AMERICAN #3440-1932 GMC pickup. S/N 872333. Turquoise/tan leather. 350-ci V8, 4-bbl, auto. Paint flaws and chips on hood. The driver’s door-handle chrome is peeling and the passenger’s handle trim bezel is loose. Custom leather interior with guitar and cowboy boots headliner wrinkles. Oil is leaking out at the hood-to-cowl gap, apparently from blowing out of the breather tube. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $39,600. A recent $38k no-sale at Mecum Monterey 2012 (SCM# 213243). Woodies aren’t easy to restore. Despite some issues, this one had lots of eye appeal; and that was enough to bring spirited bidding. Well sold. #635-1955 CADILLAC SERIES 62 con- vertible. S/N 5562122925. Red/white vinyl/ red & white vinyl. Odo: 16,322 miles. 331-ci V8, 4-bbl, auto. New shiny paint with the trim masked rather than removed. Scratches visible on most of the chrome. Newer seats. Pitting on of light windshield chips. Said to have had engine-out service less than 2,000 miles ago at a Ferrari dealership. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $55,000. Dealer-maintained Ferrari Spider with correct colors and low miles. This was probably the one to buy. #644.5-1999 FERRARI 355 coupe. S/N ZFFXR41A8X0114181. Black/tan leather. Odo: 7,449 miles. A couple of very light paint chips really show up against this black metallic paint. Driver’s seat shows some dry crack- embroidered on seats and music bars engraved on billet steering wheel. Small-block fitted with headers and a/c. Digital gauges. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $55,000. Sharp early mild custom pickup with just enough creature comforts to make it driveable. Formerly owned by country music legend George Jones. Market-correct. #658-1938 PACKARD EIGHT convert- ible. S/N 11992325. Blue/blue canvas/gray leather. Odo: 70,124 miles. 282-ci I8, 1-bbl, 3-speed. Light paint scratches that will prob- dash chrome and steering horn ring. Steering wheel cracked. Engine dirty and smells of fuel. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $52,800. Said to have been restored 30 years ago and put in storage until this year. So the new paint must have been done in 2012. Well bought. #356-1956 CHEVROLET BEL AIR 2-dr hard top. S/N VC56J031280. Light blue & ing. A couple of very light glass chips. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $56,100. Said to have been in 66 Sports Car Market


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Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas, NV dark blue/blue & gray cloth & vinyl. Odo: 1,131 miles. 265-ci V8, 4-bbl, auto. Fresh high-quality two-tone paint and all new chrome and interior. Tinted glass all around with scratches on rear glass. Variable panel gaps on all panels. Optioned with spotlight, traffic-light viewer and period-correct a/c. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $53,900. Beautiful shoebox Chevy with rare a/c that needs some panel alignment and little else. Well bought and sold. #620-1956 FORD C-800 flatbed hauler. S/N C80K6H52063. Cream/brown/black vinyl. Odo: 52,615 miles. 332-ci V8, 2-bbl, 4-speed. Orange peel in paint. A few surface paint bubbles at base of hood. Clean cab with a very basic bench seat. 4-speed with a 2-speed rear end. Bed winch and loading ramps stored under rear of bed. Air brakes. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $49,500. Looks to be very rust-free. A really cool cab-over car hauler with a modern hydraulic flatbed lift. Cool, usable and well bought. #322.1-1956 GMC pickup. S/N 02070862289. Gray/white/blue & white vinyl. Odo: 1,882 miles. 235-ci I6, 1-bbl, 3-speed. Paint color mismatched on driver’s door. Some dents in window surround trim. New dark oak bedwood with chrome strips. Tinted glass all custom leather four-bucket-seat interior, tilt wheel and wonderful custom metalwork on the dash top and front. Cond: 1. SOLD AT $110,000. Unbelievable attention to detail. Even the hood pins have custom-made escutcheons. Concours-level hot rod. A solid #1 any day. My favorite car of this sale. #93.1-1963 FORD GALAXIE 500 2-dr hard top. S/N 3P66XZO5270. Black/red cloth & vinyl. Odo: 35,623 miles. 406-ci V8, 3x2bbl, 4-speed. Paint has some orange peel, scratches and chips. Rear trim has dents between taillights. Rear side panels are a bit wavy. Windshield has wiper scratches and rear around. Highly detailed engine compartment including correct tar-top battery. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $38,500. Beautiful frame-off re- window scratched. Side window chrome pitted. Door sills have lots of dents. Decent interior, with Summit Tach. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $22,000. The 406 Tri-Power had a couple of weak points and was replaced by the 427 after only two years in production. But in early 1963 this was still a car that deserved respect. Well bought and sold. #674-1970 SHELBY GT500 fastback. S/N 0F02R482925. Pastel gray/ black vinyl. tory panel gap issues with nose-piece and headlight bucket fit. Scratches on rear glass. One of only 135 Hemi Superbirds built in 1970. Cond: 1. SOLD AT $297,000. Said to be original, with only 20,849 miles, photo documentation of restoration and Govier docs as well. You won’t find a better one. A deservedly strong price. #25.1-1984 GRAHAM coupe. S/N JB7FP24D8EY800195. Red/tan/brown cloth. Odo: 3,544 miles. 2.6-L I4, 1-bbl, auto. Paint has gloss but also pits, nicks, chips, cracks and prep flaws everywhere. Good chrome except pitting on the trumpet horns. Bland brown cloth interior is clean but smells of smoke. stored California truck. A few years ago I would have called this expensive, but no more. Trucks are hot and this was a nice one. #6300-1962 CHEVROLET IMPALA 2-dr hard top. S/N 21847S300032. Slate green/mushroom leather. 6.0-L fuel-injected V8, auto. Full-on custom ’62 Chevy with incredible paint and laser-straight panels. Slammed to the ground with color-matched 20-inch custom wheels, perfect chrome, full Odo: 53,039 miles. 428-ci V8, 4-bbl, 4-speed. Super Cobra Jet with Ram Air, oil cooler, smog system and dealer-installed Hurst shifter. A couple of light chrome pits on the rear bumper. Power steering and power brakes. Comes with original build sheet, window sticker and Marti Report. Cond: 1. SOLD AT $220,000. Fully detailed to factory-new specs, including all tags and stickers under the hood. Another one out of the ballpark for Barrett-Jackson and the smiling seller. #670-1970 PLYMOUTH SUPERBIRD 2-dr hard top. S/N RM23R0A172586. Yellow/black/black vinyl. Odo: 20,849 miles. 426-ci V8, 2x4-bbl, auto. Recent high-quality restoration completed to factory specifications. Everything factory-new or better. Usual fac- Built from a 1984 Dodge something-or-other and titled as such. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $8,580. Built during an unusual styling-andquality era in American car design history. Think of a SWB Tiffany or Excalibur. Add some roof height, decrease the length, add a really drab brown plastic 1984 Dodge interior, and carry on. Well sold. © 68 Sports Car Market


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Bonhams Chichester, U.K. Bonhams — The Goodwood Revival Total up the top three lots, plus Anthony Hartley’s Maseratis, and you’re already well on your way past the $10m mark Company Bonhams Date September 15, 2012 Location Chichester, U.K. Auctioneers James Knight and Malcolm Barber Automotive lots sold/offered 65/86 Sales rate 76% 1939 Lagonda V12 Le Mans Team Race Car — sold at $2,091,275 Report and photos by Paul Hardiman Market opinions in italics “D an Gurney for President,” the banners read, as motoring and aviation theater played out in front of a record 146,000 visitors over the magical weekend of the Goodwood Revival. A Friday night race meant the Bonhams sale moved from its traditional slot to Saturday this year. The star lot, a very original 1928 Mercedes 6.8- liter S-type, was always going to make big money; but it showed how the market prizes originality, surpassing its $3m top estimate to fetch more than $4.5m from the room. The car’s amazing survival is partly due to being in single-family ownership for the last 84 years. Last taxed in 1952, it has more recently been a runner, riding on new rubber, and is now bound for “a major European collection.” (See the profile, p. 48.) This was the Revival sale, so there was more em- phasis on competition cars than usual. The ex-Lord Selsdon Lagonda V12 team car that finished 4th at Le Mans in 1939 before racing in America with various V8 engines, now restored to original spec, exceeded $2m, and an Alfa Romeo 1750 SS with racing history and wonderful patina made $1.8m against an $800k–$1.3m estimate. Another car with proper history, the former BMC Works Mini racer “Graphic” (GPH 1C), still with its all-aluminium floors and hood, reached $104k. A fantastic history file with the car included the original bill of sale signed by John Cooper. The Austin-Healey 3000 ARX 91B managed $393k, a record for a Works rally Healey at auction — but then it was the only factory car to have been raced and rallied, winning the ’64 Austrian Alpine rally for Paddy Hopkirk and Henry Liddon, and running in two Targas Florio. The ex-Roger Nathan Autosport Championship- 70 winning Lotus Elite was a market-correct $117k, and one of Rae Davis’s former Austin A35 racers, Sales total $20,124,043 High sale 1928 Mercedes-Benz 36/220 S-type, sold at $4,543,394 Buyer’s premium the “Powerful Peanut,” which first appeared at the Goodwood Revival in 2001 driven by Davis and Steve Soper, was $49k. (I’m not certain which one of these sucked the doors off my Alfa Giulia TI in the same race.) An MGA Twin Cam roadster with extensive rally history starting with 1959 and 1960 Tulips in 1959 fetched the right $61k. And although Bonhams had no luck shifting a couple of ’70s 15% up to $48,653, 10% thereafter, included in sold prices ($1.00 = £0.62) Chichester, U.K. muscle cars that had failed to sell at its Beaulieu auction the week before, they sold the perfectly restored (but now 462-ci instead of 427) 1967 Shelby GT500 for a very successful $193k, and a nice Split-Window Corvette brought $59k. A 1968 Ferrari 330 GTC achieved $375k before Bonhams got the 1965 275 GTS away for $649k in a post-sale deal. Two Daimler Darts in not wildly differing condition made $39k and $65k. A fantastic re-creation came from the collection of Anthony Hartley, reluctantly selling his Maseratis. As well as an A6G 2000 coupe ($384k), the 1930 Tipo 26 fourseater racer ($2.7m) and the less-original ex-Eyston 1930 Tipo 26 two-seater ($865k), there was Hartley’s amazing self-built V16 “V4” copy (there aren’t any real ones left). For $702k, it included all the bucks, molds and formers used to construct it. Another replica, a 1:1 “Airfix kit” of the Aston Martin DBR1 that won the 1959 Le Mans 24-Hour Endurance Race, sold for $44k to a telephone bidder. Yet another oddity was the rare Alfa Romeo A12 truck with car transporter body that reached $24k. Bonhams’ Revival sale has hovered in the Sales Totals $20m $15m range of $5m to $7m since 2005. The huge $20m earned this time is due to the fact that pretty much all of the star consignments successfully changed hands. Total up the top three lots, plus Anthony Hartley’s Maseratis, and you’re already well on your way past the $10m mark. When you’re playing at this level, all it takes is a few. ♦ $10m $5m 0 Sports Car Market 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008


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Bonhams Chichester, U.K. ENGLISH TOP 10 No. 3 #152-1939 LAGONDA V12 Le Mans Team Car racer. S/N 14090. Green/ black leather. RHD. Second of the fac- tory V12 team cars. Built for Lords Selsdon and Waleran, and finished 4th behind the Works number 5 entry in 1939. Restored to original form with new engine (the original went into a power boat in New Hampshire) with new distributors and twin fuel pumps and gined in late ’50s with a Jaguar XK 6-cyl, now on triple Webers and 5-speed gearbox. Rides on repro Dunlop Racing alloys, like those used on Jag D-types. Body is straight-ish and has grown bulges over the years, some paint flaking off at the front. Mismatched seat leather taking on some wear. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $144,111. Sold by Brooks for an undisclosed price (Bonhams in an earlier incarnation) in 1994, according to the auction catalog. This time it sold a little under what a stock Silverstone would fetch, which is understandable given its non-standard nature; possibly not Mille Miglia-eligible, but it can race with the VSCC, and, weighing under a ton, would be a fantastic hillclimb weapon. #179-1952 KIEFT F3 MONOPOSTO still racing. Well used (some rust between rear spring leaves), with artfully aged racing numbers, good radiator-shell chrome and leather just taking on some wear. So, speedo, no odo. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $2,091,275. This is the real deal, with a mostly continuous racing history, even running at Indy with Mercury V8 power. It didn’t cost as much as a Bentley with similar Le Mans history, although it was W.O.’s last hurrah. #183-1950 COOPER F3 racer. S/N 54750. Eng. # 75819. Green/gray leather. MHD. Not quite as sharp as its rival, the Kieft a few lots earlier. Once with a 1,000-cc Vtwin, now with a JAP single set up for methanol. Presented on wide-ish tires. Cond: 3+. racer. S/N N/A. Eng. # H11M248452. Maroon/ beige vinyl. MHD. Restored 2001 and unused since, Norton long-stroke single poshly rebuilt with lots of new fittings and set up for methanol. New drive chains. This is the one with rear suspension by chains, sprockets between 1,293 cc and 1,380 cc. Left-hand drive. Titanium rods fitted. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $49,424. One of Rae Davis Racing’s first giant-killing A35s, and still raced regularly at Goodwood and with HRDC. It couldn’t be built again to this standard for this money, so looks a relative turn-key bargain at a marketcorrect price. and rubber bands, likely made for Kieft Works driver Don Parker. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $29,192. Interesting alternative to the ubiquitous Cooper 500, and sold for about Cooper Mk VIII money, which is what you need to spend to be a front-runner in 500s. Sold and bought fairly. #157-1953 SUNBEAM ALPINE road- SOLD AT $29,841. Sold from an estate for a little more than the Kieft, probably because Coopers are robust and a known quantity, but then again, the JAP is not as reliable as the Norton (i.e., you may not finish the race). Well sold. #116-1950 HEALEY SILVERSTONE racer. S/N D48. Green/black leather. RHD. Odo: 7,235 miles. D-type Silverstone re-en- ster. S/N A3012464HRO. Eng. # 3012464. Silver blue/black cloth/red leather. RHD. Odo: 17,688 miles. One of six team cars built for the ’53 and ’54 Alpine Rallies. Restored 1990. Straight, with good paint and chrome. Lightly creased and baggy red leather. Did the 1994 Rallye des Alpes and wears stickers for 2003 #118-1959 AC ACECA Bristol coupe. S/N BE762. Eng. # 100D1055. Red/red leather. RHD. Odo: 94,511 miles. Tiny and shiny. Windows left in for the repaint. Shiny and creased original leather has nice patina, timber door cappings in nice order. Now with rack-and-pinion steering and 15-inch wheels shod with Avon ZZ tires, usually a good sign, #169-1958 AUSTIN A35 “Powerful Pea- nut” 2-dr sedan. S/N A2S5HCS86838. Eng. # XSP14622. Metallic blue/black velour. RHD. Racer in excellent condition with rear arches pulled to clear Dunlop racers. Minimal interior, Tilton pedal box. Built to Goodwood and HRDC regs, so engine may be anywhere but only on one end. Original 16-inchers included in sale. Bumpers not currently fitted, but included with sale. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $127,763. In U.S. 1969–97. Acecas lag far behind the open-topped Ace, but they’re catching up, and the Bristol-engined version is the one to have. Well bought and sold. #145-1959 LOTUS ELITE racer. S/N 1106. Eng. # FWE8076. Green/black vinyl. RHD. Good condition for a racer. Rebodied in 1963 after a big shunt, hence the Costin Le Coppa Milano-Sanremo, plus a 2007 Swiss motorway vignette. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $85,792. This one was driven by rising F1 star Peter Collins but was disqualified from the ’53 event and broke its diff in ’54. It’s been with a U.K. dealer for what seems like ages, and today it finally found a buyer at mid-estimate, about a third under 2011’s asking price. 72 Sports Car Market


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Bonhams Chichester, U.K. Mans-style nose. Now presented with one seat and no odometer. Was 75 hp on twin SUs, now with Stage 5 motor, twin Webers and 100 hp. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $116,865. 1963 Autosport Championship-winning car in the hands of Roger Nathan, and still with his signature under film on the back. Raced since, at Le Mans in 1973, and latterly in historics. Cast-iron provenance and good history help the value here, although even decent road cars are now fetching $100k. #106-1962 DAIMLER SP250 B spec con- vertible. S/N 103909. Eng. # 96665. Blue/red leather. RHD. Odo: 425 miles. Nicer of the two Darts (although the other had the brighter interior). B spec means stiffer chassis and thicker fiberglass. Very straight body with good panel and door fits, very shiny and deep recent paint, chrome is all new. Original and bright. New top and cover. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $39,166. Not quite as sharp as the other Dart in the sale, even though the interior was newer. This would have been strong money for a Dart a couple of years ago, but they’ve been on the up. Market-correct transaction. #151-1964 AUSTIN MINI COOPER S leather is taking on a nice patina, new stainless exhausts. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $65,276. Mileage is presumably since restoration earlier in 2012. Sold quite some way over estimate even though it wasn’t the last SP250 in the sale, topping even the very sharp ex-Metropolitan police car that served for many years as the Goodwood Revival course car, and which sold last year to racer Win Percy. Very well sold. #134-1963 AUSTIN-HEALEY 3000 Mk III racer. S/N HBJ826754. Red/white fiberglass/black & gray vinyl. RHD. Good overall restored condition, with three of its original alloy wings refitted in 2005. This is the car that won the 1964 Austrian Alpine rally for Paddy Hopkirk, his favorite victory. As with all famous rally cars, it’s known by its regis- 2-dr sedan. S/N CA257672084. Eng. # XSP47770. Green/white/blue/gray vinyl. RHD. Odo: 26,871 miles. Really proper Works Cooper, raced in period in various capacities by Hopkirk, Banks, Vernaeve, etc. Now a 1293 S in super order, restored 1,000 miles ago) still tidy and straight, chassis and exhausts good, driver’s leather creasing in, passenger’s side unworn. A couple of tiny dimples in the right front wheelarch lip. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $403,854. Only 27 built like this, of which 20 were right-hand drive. This sold for about the same as a 289 Cobra does at U.K. auction, so the money holds good, even with the slightly flabby-looking body over narrow wheels. Mk IIs are so much crisper... #120-1970 ASTON MARTIN DB6 Mk II 1986–89 and still with all-aluminum doors and original-type wheels, plus Works ignition key extension. Excellent history includes original bill of sale signed by John Cooper. They don’t come much better than this. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $104,150. Only surprise was it didn’t go for a bit more, while this is slap in the middle of proper Works Mini money. #107-1964 FORD CORTINA GT 2-dr sedan. S/N Z77D052460R. Eng. # 122E20767. Red/black vinyl. RHD. Odo: 36,599 tration (which stays with the car for life in the U.K.) and its main claim to fame is it’s the only ex-Works rally car to have raced internationally as well, at the 1965 and 1967 Targa Florio. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $392,955. In the same ownership for 41 years. Although this was a Works Healey record at auction, it looks a comparative bargain against probably the most original ex-Works car, BRX352B, cur74 creased. Original autobox swapped out for a ZF 5-speed in 1970s, and now on three Webers. Cond: 4+. SOLD AT $171,356. Off the road since 2002, and two years ago a garage fell on it (which I think sounds a little careless). Restoring it properly could take twice the purchase price, but still, as we have seen throughout 2011 and 2012, even rough DB6s make good money. Sports Car Market coupe. S/N DB6MK2FI4171R. Eng. # 4004460FI. Gold/beige leather. RHD. Odo: 88,037 miles. Large crease in left front fender is the most obvious problem, but there are dings and bubbles all over it. Rockers have rotted through. Original leather soiled and rently for sale privately, for something north of $550k. #165-1963 DAIMLER DART SP250 con- vertible. S/N 104287. Eng. # 97404. Red/black cloth/black & red leather. RHD. Odo: 76,749 miles. The most developed C model from the Jaguar era, with only 256 made. Restored, straight and shiny but with lightly orange-peeled paint. Leather is new miles. A GT built into period rally spec (so no cage or fire system) by last owner with all the right bits plus big brakes on front. Good overall, shiny newish paint with a couple of small bubbles at bottom of left front fender. Interior as-original with period bucket seats plus trip meter. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $27,976. Slightly cynically marketed as a possible donor for conversion to Lotus Cortina, when GTs are becoming scarce, especially when this nice and put together so thoughtfully. But it sold only about $15k behind a Locort, so perhaps it’ll survive. Hope so. #115-1966 AC 289 Mk III roadster. S/N COB6105. Eng. # 5A563B. Silver/black leather. RHD. Odo: 52,852 miles. AC 289 is a British Cobra, Mk IIIs using coil-sprung chassis and 427-type wide body. Following repair and renovation by Autokraft in 1989 (less than


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Bonhams Chichester, U.K. GERMAN TOP 10 No. 1 #108-1928 MERCEDES-BENZ 36/220 6.8-liter S-type tourer. S/N 35906. Eng. # 68657. Gray/black leather. RHD. Odo: 83,754 miles. Magnificent, imposing... and completely original (read: tatty) aside from swap to preselector gearbox in the ’30s, which necessitated moving the starter motor, and deletion of the side exhausts. English fabric body intact but well cracked, original color indeterminate, rad shell would probably come back with a polish, orig- ter, with ripply body, but fabric parts are in good shape. Has been red. Paint was done Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $2,727,010. 57 years in the present ownership and fantasic history, being the car that placed second to “Tim” Birkin’s Alfa 8C 2300 in the Eirann Cup race in 1931 in the hands of Giuseppe Campari. Didn’t quite hit its bottom estimate, but a healthy figure nonetheless. TOP 10 No. 9 three years ago but looks older and is slightly microblistered. Cracked and worn leather is original. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $1,782,490. Sold post-block at way over estimate for more than a million quid. With its proper history, it will be welcome anywhere. Well bought and sold. inal Carl Zeiss lights. Seat-backs moth-eaten, leather distressed. Sump has been off not too long ago and tires look fresh as it has been running in recent memory. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $4,543,394. Fantastic single-family history is unrepeatable so it was always going to do big money, here around $1m more than Bonhams expected. “Knocked down in the room to a representative of a major European collection,” was the party line, and hopefully it won’t be going in for a full restoration. See the profile on p. 48. #132-1962 MERCEDES-BENZ 220SEB cabriolet. S/N 11102322036268. Eng. # 127984. Gray/dark brown cloth/tan leather. RHD. Odo: 39,313 km. Very good body, paint and chrome. Refinished burr timber is perfect, some nicks and marks in original perforated leather, original Becker radio. Top is good, but used. No speedo or odo. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $865,215. Price here is directly proportionate to the originality: 2518 has a much clearer and provable history, and this car, by comparison, has been to hell and back, with much of it having to be remade. So in the grand scheme of things, this looks right — and note that it still made much more than the fiendishly complicated, but almost new, V4. a couple of its cover poppers are missing. Right-handed but with a km/h speedo. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $102,334. Has been in Italy all its life, ordered RHD by the first owner, who was used to right-handed Lancias. Sold right where expected and at half the money of a 280SE 3.5, these look like a relative bargain. ITALIAN #144-1929 ALFA ROMEO 6C 1750 SS tourer. S/N 0312906. Green/black cloth/red leather. RHD. Odo: 24,033 miles. Ex-Irish Grand Prix Team Car with Brooklands history. (The rules stipulated four seats for cars over 1500 cc.) Restored but looking marvelously used and full of charac- TOP 10 No. 4 76 ing off radiator shell, Bosch lights in good order, new top. Twin SUs instead of original Memini carb. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $165,907. Olympia (London) Motor Show car, owned twice by the seller, once 1956–57 and again from 1995. Sold where expected—for a tenth Sports Car Market #128-1930 MASERATI TIPO 26T Sport roadster. S/N 2518. Eng. # 2518. Maroon/ brown leather. RHD. Odo: 1,215 km. Basically an important racing chassis plus most major components and most of the body restored to its former glory. Once Riley and then Ford V8-powered. Now with a nice patina, some cracks in the paint on fabric parts of the body, lightly burnished leather. TOP 10 No. 2 #129-1930 MASERATI TIPO 26 Sport roadster. S/N 2516. Maroon/ brown leather. RHD. Sister car to 2518, the preceding lot, but looking quite a bit newer because a lot more of it is. Originally a four-seater due to TT rules of the time, rebuilt as a shorter two-seater. Lightly worn leather, the rest of it near-perfect, Blockley tires un- TOP 10 No. 7 #130-1930 MASERATI V4 Sedici Cilindri replica racer. S/N V44001AH. Maroon/ brown leather. RHD. Arch Maserati fancier Anthony Hartley always wanted a “V4” made in 1929/30 but none existed—so he built one, using his knowledge of the Tipo 26B straight-eight engines. A fantastic tool-room copy of a lost motor car, this uses two supercharged “eights” geared together on a common crankcase; although with two cranks it’s technically a U16 rather than a V. A couple of tiny chips and scratches in the paint, leather highly cracked with a heavy patina. No speedo or odo, sold with all bucks and formers just in case you wanted to repeat it. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $701,741. Sold near bottom estimate for much less than the original cars, but seen in context with the other Maseratis offered at this sale, it completes the collection. Unrepeatable... unless you’re very clever. As a note from Hartley said, “For the record, my V4 is a replica built around an 8C3000 clutch... in 50 years’ time someone will be claiming it was found in a shed in Bologna in the ’90s.” #111-1932 ALFA ROMEO 6C 1750 three-position drophead coupe. S/N 10914713. Silver gray/blue cloth/gray leather. RHD. Odo: 43,098 miles. Very original survivor presented with poor paint, showing some cracks at bottoms of windshield pillars. Leather original and well distressed, timber nicely dulled but all there. Some plating com


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Bonhams Chichester, U.K. of the money offered for Lot 144, an SS competition car with good history. #148-1955 LANCIA AURELIA B24 Spider America. S/N 1097. White/ maroon leather. Odo: 35,680 km. Straight and shiny following meticulous restoration (2005–11), including new rockers and new doors fabricated in aluminium. Paint very good, repro side trim pretty good, high-quality bumper rechrome. Perfect underneath with TOP 10 No. 10 29,271 km. Straight body, doors have dropped slightly, fairly recent recent paint. Leather holding up well, more recent carpets. Decent exhausts on recent hangers. Sits right on good Borranis and XWXs. Now with a/c. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $374,792. Originally supplied to Switzerland, sold by Bonhams at its then-annual Gstaad Ferrari auction to Spain in 2005 for $134k, showing 90,526 km, and we said the buyer bought well (SCM# 40204). 275-based 330 GTCs always fetch a bit more than the 250 GTE-based 330GTs and 2+2s, especially the slightly startled-looking Series II cars, and this was right in the middle of the expected price range. Correctly bought and sold. new stainless exhaust. Almost new leather. New repro diamond-pattern floor mats, Borrani bi-metal wheels nice to see. Only deviations from standard are electric fan, windshield washers and Flaminia twin-leading-shoe front brakes. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $592,758. Aurelia Spiders have been climbing in recent years, but this one took me by surprise—that’s twice as much as a Daytona. Well sold. #127-1956 MASERATI A6G2000 Allemano coupe. S/N 2126. Red/black leather. RHD. Odo: 22,682 km. Straight and tidy, a few chips and cracks in paint, bumpers a little pitted under rechrome. Leather lightly cracked, newer carpets. Motor clean but not concours. Converted to right-hand drive, but original steering parts are with the car. Not run #182-1972 ALFA ROMEO A12 car transporter. S/N AR996274. Blue/brown vinyl. Odo: 98,643 km. Very rare anywhere, probably one of only two in the U.K. Imported from Turin in 2008. Has been repainted, but retains original interior, showing a few splits in seat material. Being sold by an Alfa dealer now concentrating more on classics, simply because it doesn’t get used enough. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $24,245. The original 1952 van was called the “Alfa Romeo Romeo,” soon renamed, more clearly, the Romeo 2. Revised in ’67 with new front panel, and renamed the A12 (truck) and F12 (van), all with small Alfa twin-cam power. Good thing Publisher Martin wasn’t at the sale, or he’d be shipping another Alfa home. Price paid seems reasonable, considering rarity and condition. for a while, so seller recommends a brake inspection first. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $383,873. First car from the Hartley Collection, originally supplied to Rome painted gray, in the U.K. from 1961 when blue, with Hartley by 1988. Exquisite and highly sought-after, this was always going to find a buyer, and sold right where estimated. Well bought and sold. #142-1968 FERRARI 330 GTC coupe. S/N 11385. Metallic blue/blue leather. Odo: #160-1972 FERRARI 365 GTB/4 Spyder conversion. S/N 15951. Black/black cloth/red & black leather. RHD. Odo: 5,802 miles. Very low mileage appears genuine, but the roof chop (by Straman) isn’t. Fair underneath, faded mouse fur, lightly creased seats. Originally blue with blue leather. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $320,300. U.K.-supplied but bound for Australia, where it was repainted red, then converted in California in 1978. Repainted black and fitted with Borranis in 2000, in U.K. by 2008. Sold fair at all the money the vendor was looking for, reconfirming that chops aren’t as valuable as original coupes. © January 2013 77


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RM Auctions Hershey, PA RM Auctions — Hershey Lodge 2012 An incredible Packard Twelve Victoria convertible in original condition sold for $358k, proving there is no shortage of interest in good-quality barn finds Company RM Auctions Date October 11–12, 2012 Location Hershey, PA Auctioneer Max Girardo Automotive lots sold/offered 110/118 Sales rate 93% 1933 Packard Twelve Convertible Victoria — sold at $357,500 Report and photos by John Lyons Images courtesy of RM Auctions Market opinions in italics A long with the changing of leaves and carving of pumpkins each autumn, the Hershey Auction pre- sented by RM has become an annual tradition of its own sort. Hardcore collectors and fans of the hobby alike make the annual pilgrimage and descend on this fantasy-like chocolate town each October to attend the auction and AACA swapmeet, in search of that coveted automobile or hard-to-find part. The crowds packed into the Hershey Lodge confer- ence room to watch as 113 vintage cars crossed the block over two nights, along with several motorcycles and lots of memorabilia. Bidders from 17 countries and all over the United States bid in person and by phone, pushing totals to $9.9m and a 93% sales rate. The diverse offerings ranged from several concours-ready cars to some in original barn-find condition. Auctioneer Max Girardo worked the room with his usual flair and charm, often alternating between several different languages on the block to accommodate foreign bidders. While the crowd on Thursday night was a bit smaller and less energetic, the Friday night crowd more than made up for it with spirited bidding on several lots. The top seller was the 1931 LeBaron Barrelside Dual-Windshield Duesenberg from the Ray Bowersox collection. This older restored Duesenberg drew lots of attention for its incredible design — it was the only dual-windshield Barrelside built — but more importantly, for the fascinating, documented story of its win over a Model S Mercedes on a personal bet between two wealthy gentlemen. When the dust settled on Saturday, 78 Hershey, PA the new owner forked over $1.3m to become the proud owner of J-299. The car now heads to a prestigious West Coast collection and likely Sales total $9,901,100 High sale 1931 Duesenberg Model J Barrelside phaeton, sold at $1,292,500 Buyer’s premium 10%, included in sold prices restoration. Its stablemate from the Bowersox collection, a 1929 Murphy Sport Sedan, sold for an all-in bid of $792k to an undis- closed bidder. At the other end of the condition spectrum, an incredible barn-find Packard Twelve Victoria convertible in totally original condition with less than 20,000 miles sold for $358k, nearly 35% above estimate, proving there is no shortage of interest in good-quality barn finds. A fabulous 1903 Ford from the O’Quinn Estate was one of the Thursday night highlight cars. With commissions, this incredibly important Ford (the third one ever built by Henry’s company) sold for $264k. Of significant note in the not-quite-automotive category was the sale of an 1894 Silsby Fourth Size horse-drawn steamer pumper. Restored over the course of many years, this incredible work of firefighting art was breathtaking in both its execution and presentation. Apparently, several others thought the same thing, and spirited bidding pushed it to a final sales price near $400k. Several cars sold under the money or failed to meet reserve, reminding consignors that preparation for a sale is the key to satisfactory results. A number of cars were no longer show-quality but were ready for touring. Of those, the ones that had clearly been maintained and prepared for the sale sold for substantially more money relative to estimate than the cars that smelled of bad gas and overall neglect. Auction companies are not responsible for mechanical preparation for sale, and some consignors learned the hard way that cutting that corner can be costly. With sales rates over the past six years consistently above 90% and totals in the $10m range, the future for RM’s Hershey sale looks solid. Let the tradition live on. ♦ Sales Totals $10m $8m $6m $4m $2m 0 Sports Car Market 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008


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RM Auctions Hershey, PA ENGLISH #292-1934 MG PA police roadster. S/N PA0441. Eng. # 670AP. Black/black vinyl/ gray leather. RHD. Odo: 19,340 miles. Beautiful little MG with nice cosmetic restoration done as needed. Mechanically well sorted. Excellent interior with nice brightwork and materials. Clean engine bay and undercarriage. Foldable main windshield reveals two sporty of replacement. Average leather and brightwork inside. Clean engine bay with obvious signs of long storage. Bad gasoline. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $49,500. Another O’Quinn car sells at auction. Actually a nice little Renault, but the color left a lot to be desired. I thought it looked like a bathtub until a member of the auction staff noticed and put the top up, which helped slightly. Sold under the $50k–$70k estimate and probably a fair deal for all. GERMAN #178-1932 FORD MODEL 18 Convert- individual wind screens. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $49,500. Recently sold for $34k at Auctions America by RM’s Auburn sale in June (SCM# 202160). I know this car well because I actually once purchased it for a client and had the good fortune to get to drive it a bunch. The non-matching engine was really no issue of concern, and bidders understood this, pushing the car beyond the $38k high estimate. A fair deal for both buyer and seller. #257-1961 JAGUAR XKE convertible. S/N 875769. Old English White/black cloth/ red leather. Odo: 61,584 miles. Early flat-floor model. Jaguar Heritage Trust Certificate included. Average door fit. Nearly flawless paint. Likewise for the chrome and exterior brightwork. Minor wear on canvas top. Detailed ible Victoria. S/N 1871738. Burgundy/tan cloth/red leather. Odo: 57,881 miles. Absolutely spectacular restoration of an exportmarket Ford, custom bodied by Drauz Karosserie of Germany. Perfect paint, chrome and trim. Gaps far better than new. Interior equally well cared for and engine bay detailed to the highest concours standards. Reportedly miles. Stunning car restored in stages with paint and trim approximately 12 years ago and then full mechanicals four years ago, and an overall freshening this year. Superb execution and preservation. Nearly flawless paint and beautiful trim. Equally spectacular interior. Engine bay show-detailed. Mirror-quality underside. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $74,250. Even done in stages, I am guessing the restoration cost far over what was finally bid here. It was stunning in every aspect. Possibly the only thing holding it back was the color combination. Exceptionally well bought; perhaps the deal of the auction. AMERICAN #247-1902 NORTHERN RUNABOUT Gentleman’s roadster. S/N 1476. Red/black vinyl/black leather. MHD. Ten-time London to Brighton Veteran Run participant. Older restoration with very good wood and paint. Tiller drive. Very well-known history includes sev- one of only three Fords recognized as a Full Classic by the CCCA. Pebble Beach appearance to its credit as well. Cond: 1. SOLD AT $154,000. This car had been in current owner’s hands since the early 1970s, and I can only imagine how tough it was to say goodbye. It drew a crowd throughout Hershey week. Even within the estimated $150k–$200k range, I have to call this car well bought. #291-1954 MESSERSCHMITT KR175 engine bay. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $96,250. Recently seen at Bonhams’ Carmel sale this past August, where it was listed as a ’62 and failed to sell at an undisclosed high bid (SCM# 212576). The flat floor with welded louvers would seem to confirm that it was in fact a ’61. Anyway, sold for low end of estimate, and correctly, I believe. FRENCH #260-1919 RENAULT TYPE EU Torpedo phaeton. S/N 1154. White/tan cloth/red leather. RHD. Odo: 90,441 miles. Unusual Renault, restored many years ago, with chips along most of the door edges. Average panel fit. Original door wood separating and in need microcar. S/N 08125. Gray/red & white vinyl. MHD. Odo: 53,414 Loveable design and color scheme. Bubble top adds to the cuteness and desirablity. Older trim restoration in good shape. Rubber door seal sticking out on entry side. Interior mostly original with minor resto- eral prestigious collection owners. Lovely old leather with a shiny, cared-for patina. Newer top. Very clean and oil-free engine. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $66,000. Well bought. London-toBrighton qualification immediately adds significant value to any car. A 10-time participant —even from a lesser-known marque such as Northern—is worthy of much more. #173-1909 PIERCE-ARROW MODEL UU runabout. S/N UU149. Eng. # 30149. Green/black leather. RHD. Very sporty-looking car. Restoration completed approximately 10 years ago. Replacement body. Excellent prep and paint work. Nice accessories. Carefully maintained to borderline-show condition. Clean engine with tons of brass accents. ration as needed. Original handlebar steering mechanism pitted. Seats a bit tired and dirty. Runs nice, but sounds and smokes like a 2-stroke. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $41,250. The ideal live auction piece with just the right “it” factor. A nice promotional piece for RM’s upcoming microcar auction. Well sold as usual. BEST BUY 80 #256-1970 MERCEDES-BENZ 600 sedan. S/N 10001212001628. Burgundy/ brown leather. Odo: 24,783 Mother-in-law seat in rear. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $192,500. This was as impressive an automobile as any at the auction. If original Sports Car Market


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RM Auctions Hershey, PA coachwork, the car would sell for many times what was spent here. While eligible for many important events, the most prestigious shows may not take it, and that no doubt thinned the market substantially for this car. That said, I still have to call it well bought. #170-1913 SIMPLEX A-2 tourer. S/N 1326. White/tan cloth/red Leather. RHD. Odo: 5,280 miles. Older restoration to factory standards, as evidenced by 1993 AACA badge. Well maintained since, with many edge chips in the paint and wear marks on the brightwork. Several accessories to enhance drivablility include Rushmore mountain lights, electric start, Moto-meter and electric brass horn. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $214,500. Sold within the $200k–$240k estimate, as the car was well presented and accurately portrayed. Bidding was robust right down to the end, with the new owner earning himself one heck of a touring car. #275-1915 PEERLESS MODEL 48 seven-passenger tourer. S/N 152023. White/ black cloth/black leather. RHD. Odo: 24,520 miles. Spectacular restoration of imposing and important motorcar, completed less than two years ago. Believed the lone surviving example. Flawless paint and detailing. Outstanding color choice. Equally impressive interior with German silver instruments and perfect patterned leather seats. Breathtaking engine bay with gigantic T-head six draped with per- prepared. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $792,000. Said to be one of only two known; the other sold in August at RM Monterey for $990k (SCM# 209462). I was able to give this car a thorough inspection and test drive. It started easily, handled beautifully and was a joy to drive. Mr. Bowersox had this car prepped to the point that I would have been confident driving it home from Hershey. I can’t explain why it sold for so much less than J151 except to say that it was a bargain. TOP 10 No. 6 #258-1931 DUESENBERG MODEL J Barrelside phaeton. S/N 2318. Eng. # J299. Sand Beige & maroon/tan cloth/brown leather. Odo: 10,869 miles. Grand design. One of seven Barrelsides, and believed to be the only one without cowl in rear. Excellent older restoration with proper attention to detail. Good door and panel fit. Nice paint with some touring wear evident. Very sexy “blind quarters.” Brilliantly restored car from the Bowersox Collection. Minimal documentation. Beautiful paint, chrome and trim. Fraying wind lacing on windscreen. Interior perfect but spartan. Highly detailed engine bay just below concours quality. Very well sorted and visual distraction. Engine bay poorly maintained and reeks of bad gas. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $154,000. An interesting, rare and fairly important car, but very poorly maintained and not prepped for auction. The plugs were fouled, and the wonderful RM staff worked very hard to sort the car while on site. It eventually ran, but not well—I actually turned down the opportunity to test drive it, for fear of breaking down. I am hoping the engine issues turn out to be storage-related and not mechanical problems. Before auction, I advised someone that I thought $115k was a fair price. #252-1932 LINCOLN MODEL KA coupe. S/N 71252. Beige/black vinyl/brown leather. Odo: 42,802 miles. Factory panel fit, with each door sticking out a bit at the bottom. Original paint cracked, flaking, dull and worn through to primer in spots. Unrestored chrome and trim with pitting throughout. Interior completely original with lots of wear evident. Cond: 4. SOLD AT $79,750. Last seen at RM’s 2008 Rochester sale, where it did not sell at a high bid of $75k (SCM# 117376). The car has been out and about a bit, with most of the miles coming from crossing the auction block. A Cadillac of this style would sell for substantially more but then again, this is not a Cadillac. Fair deal for both buyer and seller. fectly polished brass. Cond: 1. NOT SOLD AT $215,000. This was easily the best restored car in the sale, with meticulous attention to everything. The Peerless market is fickle, with prices all over the map. This one was fully prepared for Pebble Beach (or any other event) and should be expected to win awards wherever it goes. I can’t imagine the cost of the restoration, but high bid was likely not close to covering it. Ownership was right to hold on and might have better luck in Monterey. #272-1929 DUESENBERG MODEL J sport sedan. S/N 2163. Eng. # J139. Gray/black leather/blue cloth. Odo: 2,000 miles. Delightfully sporty Murphy Duesenberg with sleek windscreen and giant TOP 10 No. 8 82 raked windscreen. Great story of winning a legendary race on a bet in 1932 against a Model S Mercedes, with lots of documentation and photos. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $1,292,500. The LeBaron Barrelside Duesenbergs are already some of the most attractive and desirable of all Js built. This was a true one-off, both as the only non-dual cowl phaeton built in this style, and for its rich and colorful history involving the right characters and told by the best historians. Well bought. #271-1931 STUTZ SV-16 convertible. S/N MB461325. Red/tan cloth/tan leather. Odo: 81,673 miles. Very well-done old restoration. Poor auction prep, however. No noted rust or rust repair, average fit and finish. Very nice paint scheme gives it a strong presence. Well done interior with minimal use. Accessory horns drilled into hood are the only major #195-1933 FORD Model 40 V8 woodie wagon. S/N 311632. Brown/black vinyl/black vinyl. Odo: 9 miles. Very well done factory restoration. Correct color combination throughout. Occasional minor fish-eyes. Excellent wood with correct and consistent staining. Very nice interior with correct seats, materials and instruments. Correct vinyl top. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $69,300. These have softened in recent years, with asking prices still in the $90k range but sale prices realized substantially lower. This very nice car was a great example of where the market has gone in the past six or so years. A fair deal for all. #190-1933 PACKARD TWELVE Model 1005 Convertible Victoria. S/N 901140. Eng. # 901136. Black/tan cloth/black leather. Odo: 18,420 miles. 20,000 original miles, one-fam- Sports Car Market


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Fresh Meat by Chad Tyson RM Auctions Hershey, PA Online sales of contemporary cars 2011 Porsche 911 Carrera GTS cabriolet ily ownership from new. Entirely original car with no preparation for sale except to make it run. Seriously cracked and flaking paint. Chrome and trim original and likely not cleaned in 60-plus years. Torn top, for a sunroof-like effect. Flaking and torn front driver’s Cond: 3. SOLD AT $137,500. Previously offered in 2007 at the now defunct Hershey Kruse auction, where it failed to sell at a high bid of $175k (SCM# 47306). These come up for sale every so often and always seem to disappoint, as the interesting coachwork has a limited appeal. This was no exception, hammering below the $200k low estimate. It was purchased by a smart and respected Packard expert from the Northeast who I am sure will give the car a good home and perhaps realize a future profit. Well bought. Date sold: 10/30/12 eBay auction ID: 330816220341 Seller’s eBay ID: shoegame64 Sale Type: Used car with 4,800 miles VIN: WP0CA2A94BS740340 Details: Gray over black leather; 3.8-liter H6 rated at 408 hp, 6-sp manual, RWD Sale Result: $65,600, 15 bids, sf 58 MSRP: $112,900 (base) Other current offering: The Auto Gallery Porsche in Woodland Hills, CA, asking $131,890 for a Carrera White cabriolet with 99 miles. 2013 Chevrolet Camaro ZL1 coupe #246-1939 CHRYSLER IMPERIAL se- seat. Original dirty instruments. Loud “taptap-tap” from engine while running. Cond: 4. SOLD AT $357,500. One of the most lookedat and talked-about cars of the auction. Buyers were really excited about that 1933 air in the tires, and the result proved this point. Sold for current market concours-restored money and the work hasn’t even started yet. Very well sold. #280-1933 PACKARD TWELVE Model 1005 convertible. S/N 901027. Eng. # 901239. Gray/gray cloth/black leather. Odo: 67,623 miles. Carefully maintained Stone Barn restoration completed seven years ago. Paint, chrome and trim without flaw. Fit and finish equally as well done. Lots of accessories including Pilot Rays, wind wings and sparemounted mirrors. Interior flawless with seats Date sold: 10/29/12 eBay auction ID: 200837061805 Seller’s eBay ID: hareauto Sale Type: New car with 0 miles VIN: 2G1FZ1EP8D9802666 Details: Yellow over black leather; 6.2-liter V8 rated at 580 hp, 6-sp manual, RWD Sale Result: $58,175, Buy It Now, sf 183 MSRP: $54,350 (base) Other current offering: Criswell Auto in Gaithersburg, MD, asking $60,269, for a black over black leather coupe with 24 miles. 2013 Shelby GT500 fastback dan. S/N 6748427. Coffee/gray cloth. Odo: 82,019 miles. Restored specifically for rallies and long-distance runs, not for show. Successfully campaigned in the East African Safari Rally in 2003. Factory-quality gaps and panel fit. Average paint with mild orange peel. Good chrome and trim. Original glass. Nice interior with incorrect gauges and aftermarket radio. and all brightwork far better than factory. Engine bay spectacularly detailed. Cond: 1. SOLD AT $451,000. One of the top two cars here condition-wise, with incredible workmanship and maintenance since. I expected the replacement motor to hold it back a bit, but bidders were unfazed and enthusiastically bid the car far beyond the $375k high estimate. I’m curious to see what it would have done with the original engine intact. Date sold: 10/27/12 eBay auction ID: 251173385641 Seller’s eBay ID: covertfordaustin Sale Type: New car with 81 miles VIN: 1ZVBP8JZ2D5259322 Details: Black over Charcoal Black leather; 5.8-liter V8 rated at 662 hp, 6-sp manual, RWD Sale Result: $69,090, 1 bid, sf 64 MSRP: $67,090 (as equipped) Other current offering: Champion Dealers in Katy, TX, asking $43,992 for a 17,126-mile, black over black leather coupe. ♦ 84 #267-1938 PACKARD TWELVE Model 1608 Collapsible cabriolet. S/N A600416. Black/black cloth/gray cloth. Odo: 10,158 miles. Presents as a very original and correct car with original paint, chrome and trim. Well cared for, likely showing actual mileage. Some minor touch-up and restoration as needed throughout life. Original Brunn coachwork. Slight stain on rear seat. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $22,000. I struggled writing the market commentary about this car, as the changes listed above were made for logical safety and performance reasons and certainly not to cut any corner. The car hammered at half the $40k low estimate, showing that perhaps the bidders weren’t familiar with the importance of the rally or the purposeful nature of the modifications. The high bidder got a great deal on a fully prepped and sorted car to use however he wishes, and with total confidence. #253-1948 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY woodie sedan. S/N S71003849. Navy blue & wood/burgundy leather. Odo: 40,191 miles. 250-ci I6, 2-bbl, 3-sp. Original paint, chrome and trim with touch-ups and maintenance evident. Very nice original wood. Entirely original interior with separating seat covers. Clean engine. Clean original under- side. Cond: 4+. SOLD AT $60,000. Last seen at RM’s 2008 Rochester sale, where it sold for $93,500 (SCM# 117378). 270 miles, four years and $33,500 later, and you have yourself a market correction. Part of the loss can indeed be attributed to changes in the economy, but buyer perspective has changed, too, with the focus on either freshly discovered barn finds or 100-point concours restorations. ’Tweeners like this one get left in the dust, which explains the price. © Sports Car Market


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Bonhams Philadelphia, PA Bonhams — Simeone Automotive Museum Auction The $209k Aston was a true barn-find far beyond any notion of “preservation,” but considering the rarity and significance, it was definitely a car worth saving Company Bonhams Date October 8, 2012 Location Philadelphia, PA Auctioneer Rupert Banner Automotive lots sold/offered 50/62 Sales rate 81% Sales total $2,576,470 High sale 1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona coupe, sold at $357,000 Buyer’s premium 1932 Aston Martin Le Mans roadster — sold at $208,500 Report and photos by John Lyons Images courtesy of Bonhams Market opinions in italics auction often featuring interesting and important barn finds. With no concours scheduled for 2013 (the concours is seeking a venue better suited to their needs), Bonhams decided to offer its North American East Coast sale at the Philadelphiabased Simeone Foundation Automotive Museum, founded by respected neurosurgeon Dr. Frederick Simeone. Bonhams aptly titled the sale, which focused heavily on pre-1950 cars and barn finds, “Preserving the Automobile.” The 628 automobiles consigned included cars from B several respected estates and collections. Starting off the car portion of the sale were 26 cars from a respected Pennsylvania collection that were mostly in original barn-find condition. Another collection of note was from the estate of Nathan Clark, the famous shoemaker. Like the earlier collection, these cars were all barn-find originals. Bonhams took advantage of both the federal holiday and the annual pilgrimage of collectors to this part of the country, holding the sale on Monday of Hershey week. Hershey was just a three-hour drive up the road, 86 onhams partnered with the Fairfield County Concours d’Elegance several years ago, and the result was a high-quality Philadelphia, PA 17% up to $100k; 10% thereafter, included in sold prices and indeed, several folks heading there took an extra couple of days to make it to Simeone. Rupert Banner conducted the festivities, working the room with a large crowd that remained attentive throughout the event. When the dust settled, $2.6m was paid for 50 cars that sold, resulting in an 81% sell-through rate. Several cars sold for over $100k, and a 1973 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona coupe found a new home for $357k. Dr. Simeone got into the auction action, bidding on the 1915 Packard Model 3-38, which eventu- ally sold for $220k. A 1917 Simplex Crane Victoria phaeton tied for the third-place slot at $209k, the same price paid for the ex-Nathanial Clark Aston Martin 1.5-liter Le Mans roadster. The Aston was a true barn-find far beyond any notion of “preservation,” and at the price paid, I can’t foresee the investment in a restoration leading to a profit anytime soon. But considering the rarity and significance, it is definitely a car worth saving. There were numerous good deals to be had as well. My pick for best buy of the auction was a 1929 Essex Challenger phaeton, bought for just $26k. It was once an AACA show-winner and is now a very clean, correct, useable tour car acquiring a fantastic patina. One of the notable no-sales was Lot 431, the 1929 Pierce-Arrow Model 125. This car reminded me of the critical importance of pre-sale preparation — even for dilapidated, dust-laden barn finds. The car had obviously served as home to a family of rodents for many years, and it absolutely reeked. If the seller puts some effort into a delicate, strategic cleaning, and perhaps gives the car a few days to air out, I have no doubt that the result will be very different. The sale was a successful one by any measure, and indeed, shortly following, Bonhams was already talking about a sequel in 2013. I will be there. ♦ Sports Car Market


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Bonhams Philadelphia, PA ENGLISH #454-1931 ROLLS-ROYCE 20/25HP coupe. S/N GNS29. Eng. # A4H. Silver/black vinyl/red leather. RHD. Odo: 16,421 miles. Stunning older restoration very well maintained. Nearly perfect paint and chrome with wax and cleaning marks. Stately faux-cabriolet top. Slightly dated but minimally used interior. Excellent wood on dash and door panels. 14,056 miles. The catalog cover car and heavily promoted. Incredibly handsome Lancefield run out of money halfway through it, here’s your answer. On the positive side, some of the heavy lifting is already done, like the complex P-III engine and some of the sheet metal, wood and interior. But with unknown parts missing, no clear inventory and a made-up car to begin with, a bold price paid. Spotless engine bay could be brought up a bit with a fresh detailing. Rear- and side-mounted spares. Accessory lights on fenders. Titled as a 1930. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $86,250. I think this is one of the most expensively done 20/25s I’ve ever seen. Surely the cost of the restoration today would greatly exceed the price realized. Fair deal for buyer and seller alike. #433-1932 ASTON MARTIN LE MANS roadster. S/N G2213. Eng. # G2213. Black/ red leather. Odo: 35,009 miles. From the Nathan Clark estate. Fascinating early Aston with significant history and full Mille Miglia eligibility. Original frame and body shell in barnfind condition. Flaking paint and minor surface rust. Original fenders hastily attached for auction. Original instruments in very good #439-1960 MGA 1600 roadster. S/N GHNL73395. Eng. # 16GAU4662. Silver/ black vinyl/red leather. Odo: 36,127 miles. Original car including paint, trim, wheels, and bumpers. Interior likewise totally original. Some minor rot on passenger’s rocker and rear quarter-panel. Paint chipped and worn through to primer in many areas. Interior leather flaking and cracking. Dash all there and in good coachwork. Older repaint in original color. No rust. Terrible panel fit; doors sag a couple of inches when opened. Dual sidemounts. Charming original interior with lovely patina on leather seats. Original dash and instruments. Cond: 4+. SOLD AT $186,500. This car drew a lot of very serious interest from multiple parties. The engine appeared fit, but rumors of engine issues persisted, with several attendees (including myself) recalling this car on display in New London, CT, with a blown engine. The concerns kept bidding well below the estimated $200k–$250k. #442-1960 FACEL VEGA EXCELLENCE sedan. S/N B068. Rose/black leather. Odo: 58,567 miles. Original and neglected car with old repaint. Poor door alignment and panel fit. Faded and dented chrome and trim. Factory a/c. Door handles missing. Tattered carpeting, flaking old seat leather. Power windows click but fail to proceed. Missing roof shape. Correct instruments and controls. Cond: 4. SOLD AT $12,075. Seen at auction about a year ago at Bonhams’ 2011 Westport sale, where it failed to sell at an undisclosed high bid (SCM# 189781). In spite of its cosmetic needs, this car had all the charm and charisma one could ask for from a barn-find MGA. The worn-out color combination was superb, and anyone I talked to indicated they would enjoy driving it exactly as it sat. A fair deal for all. condition. Original transmission and motor in unknown disposition. Interior mostly missing. Cond: 4-. SOLD AT $208,500. An important motorcar with all the right bits still there. While I think the restoration effort will be worthwhile, at the price paid, the new owner will be very much upside-down likely for years to come. Still, good luck finding another. Well sold. #458-1937 ROLLS-ROYCE PHANTOM III shooting brake. S/N 3BU144. Eng. # Z58C. Black/walnut wood/gray leather. RHD. Partially restored P-III with frame, engine, some wood and seats done. Partially constructed reproduction body. Many parts inside car, but no clear inventory list. Original chassis. Detailed engine only test-fired. Cond: 5+. SOLD AT $28,750. In case you’ve ever wondered what a restoration looks like when you 88 #445-1970 JAGUAR XKE coupe. S/N 1R27810. Red/black leather. Odo: 38,142 miles. Barn-find condition, with checking and cracking in paint. Original chrome and trim with plenty of garage sores. Factory gaps and panel fit. Very good original glass. Original interior with nice patina on the leather seats. liner. Dirty engine bay. Cond: 4. SOLD AT $159,000. A true fright pig in need of virtually everything. These cars were coachbuilt in France using Chrysler running gear, and the only thing not daunting about the needed restoration was the engine and transmission. Very well sold. #456-1965 CITROËN SAHARA sedan. S/N 0688. Eng. # 05300059/05300056. Gray/black vinyl/black rattan. Odo: 6,700 km. Poorly maintained original car in long storage. Faded paint with dirt and dust everywhere. Poorly aligned bumpers. Original glass. Very spartan and original interior. Equipped with Aftermarket radio the only real distraction. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $15,000. A correct example that will clean up for a very nice touring car. Well bought post-block by an astute buyer. FRENCH #435-1931 ISOTTA FRASCHINI TIPO 8A faux cabriolet. S/N 1677. Eng. # 1677. White/black vinyl/brown leather. RHD. Odo: two engines from new, with a gas tank under each front seat, but not run in years. Cond: 4+. Sports Car Market


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Bonhams Philadelphia, PA SOLD AT $142,500. 6,700 kilometers from new, although with two engines, I’m not sure if I should split that number or double it. Result was huge at more than twice the $60k high estimate, but where are you going to find another? See Collecting Thoughts on p. 40. ITALIAN #444-1972 FERRARI 365 GTC/4 2+2 coupe. S/N 15199. Eng. # 15199. Red/tan leather. Odo: 83,856 miles. Original car with factory paint, chrome and trim never removed. Some cracks, wear and areas of touch-up. Original interior worn. Original engine clean but not detailed. Late saleroom notice dis- ration. Sold well below the $75k–$125k estimate, when most London-to-Brighton-eligible cars are selling for over $100k. I’m not sure why, as the car clearly appeared authentic. Well bought. closes clutch slipping under load. Cond: 3+. NOT SOLD AT $95,000. These were very capable performers but appeal to a different audience than the GTBs do. The slipping clutch and unknown engine disposition were further detractors resulting in this car failing to find a new home. #440-1973 FERRARI 365 GTB/4 Daytona coupe. S/N 16221. Red/tan leather. Odo: 26,516 miles. Original car with likely original mileage. Original paint with cracking and minor checking. Also original chrome and trim in good aged condition. Borrani wire wheels. Very nice, correct and untouched interior. Nicely cracked leather. Original dash and in- #413-1904 BUCKMOBILE TWIN-CYLINDER runabout. S/N 244. Wood/black leather. Nicely restored and preserved original car. Very correctly done to known original specifications. Possibly the only surviving example in this spec. Excellent wood with nice finish. Dead-on correct seat pattern. Rear seats likely original. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $32,200. Nice car hastily prepared for the sale. Sold at high end with a somewhat conservative $20k–$30k estimate. Hopefully a careful cleaning and rehabilitation will ensue for new owner. #412-1913 WOODS MOBILETTE TAN- DEM roadster. S/N 404. Green/tan cloth/ black leather. RHD. Weighs no more than a reported 500 pounds. Very old restoration with average prep and paint. Very nice top likely never down since installation. Clean interior with correct-looking patterns. No gauges of any sort. Clean engine bay. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $48,300. OK, lest anyone start writing Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $46,000. Lots of unique features including fenders and step plates for ingress and egress. Perhaps my favorite was the factory air holes in the under-seat storage bin for... livestock? With the London-to-Brighton less than a month off, the car sold for substantially more than the somewhat cautious $20k–$30k estimate. A fair deal, provided no issues with the Royal Automobile Club. #408-1910 MCINTYRE MODEL B-1 struments. Factory radio and a/c. Full set of tools and manuals. Clean and correct engine bay, but mechanically unknown. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $357,000. Nice car with good documentation and low miles, but unknown mechanical condition a little scary. Hopefully the high bidder insisted on a thorough test-drive and inspection prior to bidding. Well sold. AMERICAN #406-1903 KNOX MODEL C Stanhope. S/N 177. Wood/black vinyl/black leather. MHD. Very original body with re-varnished (and mostly newer) wood. Original seat appears frail but complete. Newer surrey top. Original chain-drive engine said to be running and operational. Interesting collapsible front passenger’s seat. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $69,000. The varnished wood suggested replacement, although owner was thoughtful enough to retain an unrestored fender to show the original condition of the car prior to resto- 90 was an interesting car and at first glance could get the heart pumping a little for someone thinking London-Brighton. Upon closer inspection, however, it’s obviously a much later car with a bit of a dated design. McIntyres rarely come to market, but this one sold at high end of the $20k–$30k estimate. Not unreasonable for any highwheeler-style car of the era. Sports Car Market runabout. S/N B589. Black/red leather. A highwheeler-style buggy with a dated design for the year. Good older restoration with original wood. Leather running boards a rare sight. Nicely restored seat with incorrect pattern on bolster only. Recently serviced with minor gas leak noted. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $37,950. This letters to the editor, the car has an innovative steering setup, with the wheel located on the left center of the car but pointed toward the right-hand-side seat. The steering column actually penetrates the firewall on the left side (from the driver’s position) of the car, but it is driven from the right side. I guess that is what a “subcompact” of the day will offer you. Well sold. #409-1915 PACKARD MODEL 3-38 roadster. S/N 76306. Eng. # 76440. Blueblack/black vinyl/black leather. Odo: 1,351 miles. One of the stars of the sale, reportedly #410-1913 METZ SERIES 22 runabout. S/N 22684. Black/black vinyl/black leather. Odo: 22,585 miles. Nicely preserved original car with some minor mildew in spots. Original paint with touch-up on fenders and hood. Front seat re-covered at some point in leather.


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Bonhams Philadelphia, PA one of only two surviving (the other in the Hill and Vaughn Collection). Outstanding 1960s restoration exceptionally well maintained. Very clean interior with nice older leather. Engine bay clean and tidy. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $219,500. There was almost no history about this car either at the auction or in the catalog description. Having personally owned a Hill and Vaughn-restored Packard of this era, it sure looked like a Hill and Vaughnrestored car to me. The car sold at the low end of the $200k–$300k estimate, purchased by none other than Mr. Simeone himself, and will become part of his world-famous collection. Very, very well bought. #438-1917 SIMPLEX CRANE MODEL 5 Dual-Cowl Victoria Phaeton. S/N 2333. Rose/tan cloth/black leather. Odo: 62,940 miles. Big imposing later Simplex. Original coachwork; later repaint flaking and peeling in areas. Original glass with later beveled glass wind wings. Mechanic’s seat on driver’s side running board. Recent radiator repairs quickly line with a spartan Model T than a more robust (but now orphaned) Hupmobile. Well bought. #411-1926 BUICK STANDARD SIX Model 20 2-dr sedan. S/N 1587490. Purple/ black vinyl/gray mohair. Odo: 1,254 miles. Another from the Pennsylvania collection of 26 cars. Very nice older repaint with original trim. Chromed radiator-surround and headlights a little glitzy for the era. Correct bumpers. Original interior with minor wear and big Packard and the price tag of a Ford or Chevy of the day, and had it carried an 8-cylinder engine from new, I would think it could have sold for many multiples of what it brought here. Perhaps the bargain of the sale. use evident. Clean engine bay. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $6,900. This car looked just quickly prepped for sale and did not want to start for an inspection I observed. It was also a lessthan-exciting design. But it sold well under the $10k–$15k estimate—about a third of what I expect the astute buyer could realize with a little detailing and mechanical investment. Very well bought. #404-1927 HUDSON SIX Model O road- done. Original interior with well-preserved seat leather and instrumentation. Clean original engine bay. Fully ready for touring of any distance. Ex-Cameron Bradley and Robert Valpey. Very long known history including photographs from as early as 1940. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $208,500. Not exactly a lot of comps, but this car had the right ownership and history file. Fair deal for all. #417-1922 HUPMOBILE SERIES R five-passenger tourer. S/N R72703. Black/ black vinyl/black vinyl. Odo: 17,442 miles. Original car with cosmetics tended to as required. Older checked and cracked paint. Very good door and panel alignment. Beautiful beveled glass wind wings. Headlamps and bumpers from later era. Original floors. Incorrect ster. S/N 78593. Eng. # 473112. Maroon/tan cloth/black leather. Odo: 37,053 miles. Original car wearing an old repaint. Lots of fisheyes and checking. Stained old top (possibly original) still a decent fit. Rear-mounted spare. Nice original interior with vinyl seat bolster only departure from factory. Original instru- dusty original engine with signs of fairly good long-term storage. One of the biggest of the closed cars offered by Auburn in the era. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $27,600. A Full Classic and a rare ACD survivor. Many of these had important parts pirated from them to restore open cars, so the survival rate is very low. With minimal rehab, this car would be the belle of the ball at any ACD event. Very well bought. #414-1936 LINCOLN MODEL K limou- ments and dash. Minor mold on floor and inside top. Clean engine bay with recent service evident. Wears incorrect bumpers of unknown origin. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $20,700. Hudsons of this age rarely come up for sale, and there just isn’t a huge market for them. This car had some issues, but with a little help will be a wonderful little parade and tour car. Well bought. BEST BUY and unappealing vinyl seats. Original tool set. Original engine bay. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $12,650. Very nice and correct. It had not appeared to run in years, perhaps scaring off some buyers here. The price paid was more in 92 #405-1929 ESSEX CHALLENGER phaeton. S/N 1126406. Tan/tan cloth/ brown leather. Odo: 44,109 miles. AACA winner in the distant past with show days far behind it, but still very correct. Newer paint and poorly fitting top. Older restored chrome and trim. Very good panel fit. Interior original or very correct older restored, showing splendid patina. Nice instruments and otherwise tidy. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $26,450. A very impressive car. It had the presence of a significant styling cue. Clean original engine bay. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $48,300. Stated to be special-order for a businessman to do lots of work in his car, it featured an enclosed cabin for the driver and a large seat and work desk for the owner. The original owner might have had excellent business acumen, but he had no taste in design. Very well sold. © Sports Car Market sine. S/N K5820. Eng. # K70I3. Teal & black/ black vinyl/blue leather. Odo: 89,010 miles. Nice older restoration with good gaps and panel fit. Very tidy interior with beautiful leather door panels and nice materials throughout. Driver compartment reminiscent of a London taxi. Wraparound doors the only #453-1931 AUBURN 8-98 brougham. S/N 898247608. Eng. # GU59819. Black/ white cloth/brown cloth. Odo: 86,721 miles. Barn-find very rare Auburn. Remarkably good sheet metal and paint beneath dust and dirt. Very good panel fit. Original glass. Totally original and well-kept interior with dust and a couple of very small moth holes. Perfect roof liner. Clean original gauges and controls. Very


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Branson Branson, MO The Branson Auction Since Carroll’s death, bids for Shelbys have gone from low market to sub-market, and owners aren’t letting the cars go Company Branson Auctions Date October 12–13, 2012 Location Branson, MO Auctioneers Tom “Spanky” Assiter, Amy Assiter and John Nichols Automotive lots sold/offered 124/233 Sales rate 53% Sales total $2,042,876 High sale 1964 Shelby Cobra 289 roadster, sold for $513,000 Buyer’s premium 8%, included in sold prices 1935 Packard Eight Series 1201 Club Sedan — $39,960 Report and photos by B. Mitchell Carlson and Dean Merrell Market opinions in italics M 94 urphy’s Corollary of Collector Car Auctions dictates that on the one day that the consignments are outdoors, it will rain. And it proved true during the Branson Auction on October 12 and 13. Although the staff was able to dry off those soggy Friday cars for the most part upon entry into the building — with plenty of time before hitting the auction ring — it did shorten the amount of time available for vehicle inspections. Results nonetheless looked in line with previous years, and the auction itself went off without a hitch. Despite 18 fewer cars consigned here than in fall 2011, Branson actually sold one more car than last year, up to 124/233 from 123/251. The catalog cover car — a 1935 Packard Eight Club Sedan freshly awakened from an old restoration — sold for $40k, but five Shelby Mustangs failed to change hands. There’s been plenty of speculation about what would Branson, MO happen to the Shelby market after Carroll’s death in May. The five Shelby Mustangs offered at this event confirm what I’ve been seeing — supply is outpacing demand and actually keeping bids below market. Owners aren’t letting the cars go, of course, so perhaps we’re not going to witness the expected boost in value after all. Not this year, anyway. What did fare very well here was the $15k-to-$45k market. A 1958 Triumph TR3 brought a fair $26k, and a 1971 Jaguar XKE Series III convertible made a strong-but-fair $45k. A 1967 Beetle changed hands for a proper $11k, and a familiar 1972 Super Beetle sold for $14k, netting its owner a quick and tidy profit. And in the sub-$5k category, a 1966 MGB convertible with a title issue and a 1979 Midget convertible with lots of spares were both well bought at the same $4,320. April 12 and 13 next year should hope- fully see some improvement in sales — and the weather — for this otherwise enjoyable, classy event. ♦ Sales Totals $500k $1m $1.5m $2m $2.5m $3m $3.5m $4m 0 Sports Car Market 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008


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Branson Branson, MO ENGLISH #594-1954 JAGUAR XK 120 roadster. S/N 678270. Cream/black vinyl/brown vinyl. Odo: 90,661 miles. Parked in a garage for two decades after powertrain was rebuilt. Same mechanic who originally rebuilt it checked it out after the car was awakened and gave it a clean bill of health. Rest of car, however, is a mess. Old repaint has semigloss finish and plenty of overspray. Several larger scrapes show that it was previously red and possibly “Full restoration done,” but dingy, original, untouched undercarriage. Excellent paintwork, although a darker maroon would seem more correct. Ditto the interior: Good upholstery Newer top. Painted wire wheels, with heavily worn radial tires. Radio-delete plate. Aftermarket steering wheel and shift knob. Older reproduction seat upholstery and carpeting lightly worn. Dingy engine compartment. Recent complete brake job. Offered at no reserve. Cond: 4+. SOLD AT $4,320. A ready-to-go driver, and solid enough for a restoration project once you get bored playing with it. Otherwise, darn near disposable if title issues arise in the future and you just want to run it into the ground. #253-1969 AUSTIN-HEALEY SPRITE workmanship, but brothel red is a bit out of character. Most of brightwork replated. ’70s Motorola FM radio converter beneath the well-restored dash. Older radials on the stock steel rims. Optional power window lifts. Cond: 3+. NOT SOLD AT $22,750. Seen here last spring, then a no-sale for $24k (SCM# 201405). Not getting much better or worse, just exhausting bidders. #592-1960 AUSTIN-HEALEY 3000 BT7 also black. Loose, horrid door fit. Rust blisters along rockers. Dull and pitted chrome. Hubcap missing. Seats reupholstered crudely in old industrial-grade vinyl. Cond: 4-. NOT SOLD AT $27,500. While the locals failed to acknowledge the seriousness of the rust blisters in the door sills, as a denizen of the Salt Belt I know all too well that there is a lot more lurking under the surface. Even if the powertrain is still good, add about $70k to get this ragbag-Jag right. Plenty bid. #551-1958 TRIUMPH TR3 roadster. S/N TS78424L. Red/black vinyl/black vinyl. Odo: 2,526 miles. Newer repaint and seat reupholstery. Newer carpeting and top, with original side curtains in trunk. Light pitting and scuffing on plating. Broken driver’s-side hood hinge, with paint wear at trunk edges. Other body panel gaps not great either. Crack in roadster. S/N HBT78943. Red/black vinyl/ black vinyl. Odo: 68,990 miles. Decent repaint, now with light polishing scratches. Chrome trim nicely redone for the most part, with some lightly pitted original. Period accessory headlight grilles. Doors function well, even if gaps aren’t the greatest. Engine bay original paint and chrome, with minimal light scuffing. Excellent original interior, with some wrinkling from foam compression with age. Very tidy under the hood. Rattle-can touch-up on original muffler. Cond: 2-. NOT SOLD AT $10,500. While this is still a low-mile original, the 3,100 miles driven in the past few years burned up the difference between the bid here and the $15k he had as a reserve. seems mostly in order. Tidy reproduction interior soft trim with minimal wear. Equipped with electric overdrive and chrome knockoffs. Also includes matching hard top. Cond: 3+. NOT SOLD AT $30,750. Not at all bad, but still more a driver than a show car. High offer was not far out of line, but still a tad shy. right taillight lens. Original paint under the hood, with minimal engine detailing and lessthan-expert wiring. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $25,650. Too rough around the edges to show, but with a stated engine and transmission rebuild by the previous owner, this should make for a good tour car. Fair deal for both parties. #578-1959 BENTLEY S1 sedan. S/N B497LFD. Gray & red metallic/red leather. Odo: 92,393 miles. Typo on MO title, with corrected title guaranteed to the new owner. 96 #510-1966 MGB convertible. S/N 1A27342. Red/black vinyl/black vinyl. Odo: 96,669 miles. Iowa-assigned VIN, with tag starting to peel in door jamb. Piecemeal repaint over the years. Dull original trim and chrome, with holes drilled in top of front bumper. Rattly doors, poorly fitting trunk lid. ate wrinkling, light wear, and typical bagginess from age. Period 23-channel CB built into center console armrest; late ’70s Pioneer tape deck in dash. With 4-speed, a/c and wire wheels shod with older Dunlop radial whitewalls. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $45,360. While Jag purists pooh-pooh the Series IIIs, they’ve held their own in the market in recent years. A respectable deal for both parties on this one. Sports Car Market #582-1971 JAGUAR XKE Series III convertible. S/N UD1S22484. White/black vinyl/ black leather. Odo: 3,412 miles. Older trim-off repaint is presentable and almost comes off as original. Light pitting on some pot metal trim. Acceptable panel fit for a driver. Relatively tidy under the hood. Serviceable original leather interior, with moder- Mk IV convertible. S/N HAN9U84386G. British Racing Green/black vinyl/black vinyl. Odo: 3,649 miles. Said to be the last AustinHealey registered under warranty in the U.S., kept by the dealer until 2008 with 148 miles on it. All original except tires, battery and fluids. On dealer-installed wire wheels. Excellent


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Branson Branson, MO #566-1971 MCLAREN MK 8 F replica racer. S/N n/a. McLaren Orange/black vinyl. RHD. Custom fabricated circa 1980, with no serial number. Recently taken out of long-term storage and put into service. Freshly repainted, with plenty of orange peel on most surfaces. Very authentic bodywork, with good fit for a race car. Powered by an iron-block big-block Chevy with GM Winters Forge aluminum heads and Lucas-Mackay fuel-injection. This and the Hewland 4-speed are believed, by the consignor, to have originated from period windshield frame wood. Heavier fading on tops of seats, which don’t have the same grain or workmanship as the door panels. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $26,460. Not too many 250SLs come up on the market (especially Euro-spec cars), partly because they were only made from 1967 to mid-1968. Not spectacular but not horrid, and if you prefer the look of the single-piece headlights, not such a bad deal. #635-1967 VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE missing. Modern stereo with speaker behind the seats. Two boxes of MG stuff on passenger’s seats. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $4,320. Pretty much your textbook driver-grade Spridget from the last year of production. Not a bad deal for a driver, with the courtesy of supplying some spares to boot. #265-1990 JAGUAR XJS V12 convert- Can-Am competitor Don McAtely, due to components being stamped with his name. All systems have been gone through, and car is fully functional. Cond: 3+. NOT SOLD AT $85,000. There was a lot of uncertainty regarding most aspects of this. One thing for certain: It was very accurate and well built, making for a good historic racer replica that you don’t have to worry that much about scrubbing the wall with. However, as a wannabe, its value is far from certain. Final bid may prove to be all the money in the world. #583-1971 ROLLS-ROYCE CORNICHE convertible. S/N DRX10829. White/ black cloth/maroon leather. Odo: 20,798 miles. Sold new in Miami. Miles claimed actual. Seems to be original paint. Engine bay and undercarraige dusty but generally original aside from service items. Original leather inte- ible. S/N SAJNW4849LC166220. Burnt Gold Metallic/black cloth/tan leather. Odo: 41,522 miles. Miles claimed actual. Well-cared-for original paint and chrome. Dealer-grade detailing under the hood. The hood struts are shot, so get a broomstick. Heaviest interior wear is the steering-wheel rim. Optional 2-dr sedan. S/N 117383124. White/black vinyl. Odo: 61,975 miles. Recent driver-grade restoration. Original-quality repaint; wheels painted body color and fitted with repro hubcaps and modern radials. New fender welting and body seals. Decent door and panel fit. Period-accessory backup lights. Very tidy motor and tidy underneath. Authentic repro seat up- chromed alloy wheels, period aftermarket fixed cell phone with hard mount and antenna on windshield. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $9,180. Even with low miles and a paper trail of regular maintenance, this was still plenty paid for a Jag that hasn’t seen significant improvements under the then-recent Ford ownership. GERMAN rior dried out and heavily wrinkled. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $39,960. The seller turned down $35k for this car here at Branson a year ago (SCM# 201343). I thought that offer seemed generous enough then, but the seller was fortunate to get a little more this time around. Well sold. #212-1979 MG MIDGET convertible. S/N GANBUL225745G. British Racing Green/black vinyl/tan vinyl. Odo: 50,188 miles. Average repaint done in 2007, with light battle damage since. Top likely also replaced at that time. Moderate sun fade on bumper cladding. Seats and tops of door panels replaced at a different times. Pedal pads 98 #600-1967 MERCEDES-BENZ 250SL convertible. S/N 11304310000698. Offwhite/off-white hard top/brown vinyl. Odo: 71,172 km. European market car, including the headlight covers. Mostly original paint, with resprayed front fenders showing light overspray under hood. Dirty under the hood. Dull original chrome. Side marker lights likely added when it crossed the pond. Original radio holstery and door panels with minimal wear. Aftermarket under-dash shelf and tape deck in the dash. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $11,070. Originally ran on Friday as Lot 229 and declared sold on a $7k bid, but the buyer thought he was bidding on the next lot, as that had rolled onto the turntable. Instead of backing things up, they elected to re-run it late on Saturday as Lot 635, where it recovered nicely. #520-1972 VOLKSWAGEN SUPER BEETLE convertible. S/N 1522138455. Orange/black vinyl/black vinyl. Odo: 20,188 miles. Miles claimed actual. Well kept original paint and trim, with only a few pieces showing light pitting. Excellent solid door fit. Top slightly weathered. Original carpet, door panels and seats. Only the driver’s seat bottom blanking plate still in place; ’90s tape deck mounted beneath. Several cracks in the original steering wheel; few light cracks in lower shows appreciable wear. Engine bay looks stock. Old, possibly original bias-ply tires. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $13,770. Sold here in the spring for $11,556, which I called “bought well, even if a tick above the market” (SCM# 201427). This sale would seem to confirm that, netting the seller a modest profit. #224-1973 VOLKSWAGEN THING 4-dr convertible. S/N 1832421208. White/black Sports Car Market


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Branson Branson, MO vinyl/red & white cloth. Odo: 46,739 miles. Older fairly average repaint, with overspray on wiring harnesses. Mostly newer weatherseals and fender welting. Heftier, non-stock almost a foregone conclusion, but doors function well otherwise. Moldy smell pervasive inside. Dingy unkempt engine bay. Undercarriage corroded. Converted to R134a a/c. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $22,500. The peanut gallery speculated that the mildew smell and undercarriage corrosion were flood damage. At best, it was the victim of lousy storage. Very well sold. ITALIAN #633-1989 FERRARI MONDIAL t cab- painted bumpers. Newer replacement top. Non-stock cloth seats and plush carpeting. Generally stock motor. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $9,072. While this first-year example was not pristine by any means, it does show that Thing values still seem to be holding their own. Well sold. BEST BUY #634-1974 PORSCHE 914 2.0 roadster. S/N 4742900154. Olympic Blue/black fiberglass/black vinyl. Odo: 11,864 miles. Porsche Certificate of Authenticity confirms factory spec, with rear window defroster the only option. Claimed to riolet. S/N ZFFFC33A5K0081914. Red/black cloth/tan leather. Odo: 20,409 miles. Ferrari Owners Club of America decal in windshield. Extensively documented by owner; engine-out service performed a year and 2k miles ago. Ferrari racing-shield decal added to the front fenders. Less paint wear than expected for a 23-year-old car. Far more wear on driver’s seat than expected. Holes from an old brick phone in seat divider console. Frankenstein leather be generally original, but masking lines, overspray and excellent condition confirm it has been resprayed. Window trim has heavier fogginess and scuffing. Original vinyl seats now have newer cloth inserts, along with cloth-insert door panels. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $10,800. Olympic Blue certainly looks like Gulf Racing Blue to me. Considering that 914s have been going for this much money since I was in high school in the late 1970s, this was market price for a repainted 2.0 in a pretty color. IRISH #619-1981 DELOREAN DMC-12 gullwing coupe. S/N SCEDT26T2BD005725. Stainless steel/gray leather. Odo: 14,931 miles. Early series, with fuel filler at cowl under the trunk lid. Includes original invoice, dealeraccessory graphics and stainless steel cleaning kit. Generally free of excessive dings and scuffing, with a semi-polished finish. A bit unkempt in trunk and interior, with leaves in rear quarter-windows. Weak door struts are seam repair on the driver’s door armrest. Tread worn below 50%. Cond: 3+. NOT SOLD AT $25,000. The owner’s record-keeping was actually a bit over the top, logging when, where and how many miles he put on the car each time it was taken out. Not at all a bad plan, but better if it was on a Ferrari that was actually worth something. With 308s and even 400s consistently doing better in value, Mondials are pretty much the bottom of the pecking order, so perhaps the consignor would be better off to list it with the F.O.C.A. JAPANESE #251-1966 NISSAN PATROL SUV. S/N L6007673. Light blue & white/brown, gray & black vinyl. Odo: 49,403 miles. Manual transmission swapped for a GM auto; gas engine now a Chrysler/Nissan 6-cyl diesel. Decent older repaint, some rust seepage from windshield frame bolts. Gaping hole in front fender from missing antenna. Rear jump seats and driver’s seat back likely original. Diamond plate aluminum decking added on cab floor. Lots of modern black plastic innerduct used in the engine bay. Aftermarket alloy wheels and 100 Sports Car Market


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Branson Branson, MO tires; the stock split rims on the attached trailer, built out of another Patrol. Cond: 3. NOT SOLD AT $13,500. Not too many Patrols have come up to auction lately, but with the increasing interest in vintage SUVs, this offer seems to be in the zone. The consigning dealer bought it at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale in January for $12k (SCM# 193546). AMERICAN #555-1935 PACKARD EIGHT Series 1201 Club sedan. S/N 816398. Centennial Blue/maroon broadcloth. Odo: 86,300 miles. Old restoration, recently awakened and put back into use. Replacement windshield, yellowed edges on original vent windows. Presentable old repaint, with a few small chips on panel edges and cowl. Recently repainted stock wire wheels, with no regard to masking on back side of wheels and tires. Steering chanicals generally as discharged from the Army, aside from added GM power steering. Cond: 4. SOLD AT $5,400. Branson seems to garner one M-37 per event, although this one just reaffirmed every bad stereotype of the Ozarks. Zero military vehicle collector value here aside from a running parts donor. Well sold. #584-1956 CONTINENTAL MARK II 2-dr hard top. S/N C56D2624. Black/white leather. Odo: 81,574 miles. 368-ci V8, 4-bbl, auto. Older repaint with good sheen and a few light scratches on right side. Older replated bumpers and most trim. Most glass yellowing along edges. Door fit is both a bit off and feels loose. Reupholstered seats and door panels minimally worn. Faded original carpet retains wheel incorrectly painted body color. Good original reupholstery work, done in the stock pattern, although I doubt Packard would’ve signed off on maroon in a dark blue car. Dual sidemounts. New radiator. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $39,960. Tacky as it looks, the all-chrome front fascia was a factory special-order option. A decent old Packard, but not without a few issues, which was a decent enough buy that a dealer picked it up. #208-1953 DODGE M-37 military truck. S/N 80049106. Tan bedliner/green canvas/ seafoam green vinyl. Odo: 34,050 miles. Every metal surface coated in pickup bedliner material, with no attempt at rust removal beforehand. Super Swamper tires on non-stock wheels. Converted into a winch truck with a modern electric unit up front. Easy-Rider rifle rack mount in the cab, along with stock seats covered in incorrect but functional vinyl. Claimed to have a recently rebuilt motor. Me- door panels, in non-stock gray vinyl and velour. Generally kept up under the hood, but showing some soiling. Modern radials on stock steel wheels, wearing 1963 wheelcovers. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $2,160. I saw this here last fall, where it no-saled at $3,900 after it dropped a valve seat en route to the auction (SCM# 187784). It had the blocked-off carburetor ports then, too. Not much wrong here that can’t be fixed by someone fluent in Corvair, so it was a decent buy. #244-1966 CHEVROLET CORVAIR 500 2-dr hard top. S/N 101376W131011. White/red cloth. Odo: 97,812 miles. 164-ci H6, 2x1-bbl, auto. Although I can’t see the body tag because a period-accessory trailer towing brace is bolted over it, peeling paint on bottom of engine cover reveals original light blue metallic paint. Since we’re in here—and a Corvair is about the engine—it’s been topi- over original Ermine White to used-car standards. Decent original brightwork, but half of the emblems are missing. Newer seats and badge on transmission hump, indicating that the original owner was one Hazel M. Edman. Cond: 3+. NOT SOLD AT $35,000. Owned by country music performer Keith Urban, with a photocopy of the title displayed as proof. Bid to market value for the car on its own, but not cut loose due to the implied celebrity status. If it didn’t work in Branson, it won’t work anywhere else. #226-1962 CHEVROLET CORVAIR Monza coupe. S/N 20927O131860. Silver/ gray vinyl & velour. Odo: 56,009 miles. 164ci H6, 2x1-bbl, auto. Originally had an optional 102-hp motor, but now has a 140 with the ports for the secondary carburetors blocked off with aluminum plates. Repainted cally cleaned off and generally stock. Older air ducts are cracking and it has a new tractor battery. Most trim has been shaved off. Aftermarket plus-one sized wheels. Plain interior upholstery job. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $4,860. Last seen here in the spring, when it no-saled at $5k (SCM# 201532). Pretty much nothing has changed since, except the consignor’s comprehension of what a driver-grade Corvair is worth. Well bought and sold.© January 2013 101


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Classic Motorcar Auctions Canton, OH Classic Motorcar Auctions — Grande Salon Classic Car Auction at the Glenmoor Gathering Sales topped $1.5m, besting CMA’s previous high by more than a half-million dollars Company Classic Motorcar Auctions Date September 15–16, 2012 Location Canton, OH Auctioneer Dennis Wisbey Automotive lots sold/offered 73/154 Sales rate 47% Sales total $1,530,954 High sale 1937 Cord 812 SC phaeton, sold at $162,000 Buyer’s premium 1912 Ford Model T speedster — sold at $145,800 Report and photos by Kevin Coakley Market opinions in italics T he old axiom “third time’s the charm” proved true at the 2012 edition of Classic Motorcar’s annual collector-car auction, held in conjunction with the Glenmoor Gathering of Significant Automobiles. Sales topped $1.5m, besting CMA’s previous high by over a half-million dollars. Bob Lichty and company extended the sale to two days this time around, with the second day focused on an unbelievable collection of memorabilia. Strong interest and traffic through the tent gave Glenmoor attendees the chance for another look at cars still for sale. Day one was a beautiful late summer day in a tent packed shoulder-to-shoulder. Lead auctioneer Dennis Wisbey worked the cars hard, coaxing reluctant bidders to up their offers as the pit men prowled the crowd. The high sale of the weekend was a beautiful supercharged 1937 Cord 812 phaeton — a bargain at $162k. Other lots of note included a very well-done 1959 BMW Isetta with matching scale model, sold at $27k, and a custom-bodied Austin American Bantam with coachwork by Count Alexis de Sakhnoffsky that made $36.7k. A 1912 Ford “Six” Speedster once owned by Edsel himself sold strong at over $145k. An expensively built 1965 Ford Falcon vintage racer sold for $11k, which was probably the cost of the engine alone. The well-used car 102 Canton, OH featured plenty of battle scars, including a rear window nearly popping out of its frame — a testament to the latent horsepower that now awaits the new owner. Yet another Ford that caught my eye was the clean-but-driveable ’38 pickup that sold for just $17k. Four display engines on stands from the Pettit collection sold individually at no reserve for over $75k total — a 1922 Duesenberg straight eight, a 1929 Rolls-Royce Phantom six, a 1932 Stutz DV-32 eight and a 1934 Packard V12. Notable no-sales included a rough 1934 Packard Eight coupe, bid to $66k, and the best 1958 Nash Metropolitan on the planet. You might think I’m crazy, but I believe the seller was Sales Totals right to hold out for more than the $28k offered. Now in their third year at Glenmoor, Lichty and his team are out to prove they’re in this for the long haul. There is currently an archaic law in Ohio limiting auction companies to two auto auctions per year within the state. As such, CMA has been working hard to expand their business, adding dates in Novi, MI, and twice-annual memorabilia auctions at their home base in Canton, OH, and they are actively scouting sites and dates for further expansion. With each event showing improved results, the staff is hard at work acquiring interesting, desirable offerings and working out the formula for future success. ♦ $1.5m $1.2m $900k $600k $300k 0 Sports Car Market 2012 2011 2010 8%, included in sold prices


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Classic Motorcar Auctions Canton, OH GERMAN #547-1959 BMW ISETTA 300 sunroof microcar. S/N 573252. Maroon & tan/maroon Haartz cloth/maroon plaid. Odo: 58,126 miles. Reportedly restored a few years ago. Paint holding up nicely but does show some cracking around the door hinge. Brightwork shows well, as does interior. Equipped with luggage #515-1931 FORD MODEL A pickup. S/N 4521148. Brown/black vinyl/brown & black vinyl. Odo: 1,643 miles. Good paint in an attractive color combination. Brightwork in excellent condition. Clear glass, good weatherseals. Clean engine compartment, nothing to installed eight years ago. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $65,880. The catalog made no mention of maintenance records, but if all is in good working order, a market-correct result—if not a bit of a bargain, considering the twin turbo upgrade. SWEDISH #594-1971 SAAB SONETT coupe. S/N 71500184. Sonnet White/tan vinyl & cloth. Odo: 92,168 miles. Paint looks fresh. Clean engine bay, although hood is hard to open due to support catching on the body. Good glass rack, wide whitewalls and U.S.-only bumpers. A radio-controlled scale model done in the matching color scheme comes with the car. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $27,000. Bid to $22,500 on the block, the deal was closed post-sale at this slightly higher price. Looks market-correct if not a bit of a bargain. #543-1961 PORSCHE 356B T5 Super notchback. S/N 200880. Black/biscuit leather. Odo: 93,348 miles. Paint looks exceptional, as does the engine compartment and interior. Windshield starting to show some delamination at edges. Includes original tool kit and documentation. Reported to have won numerous awards at Porsche Club of North America gripe about with the interior. Cond: 3+. NOT SOLD AT $19,000. Said to have been recently treated to a frame-off restoration done to a respectable standard. I can’t fault the seller for holding out for more than this. #558-1934 PACKARD EIGHT Model 1101 rumbleseat roadster. S/N 71889. Black/ gray cloth. Odo: 13,658 miles. Paint shot, brightwork shot, roof insert shot, running board rubber shot. Glass severely delaminating, body rusted through left front fender and cowl. Interior ripped and worn. Chevy spotlight installed. On the bright side: reported to be recently serviced and mechanically sound and soft bits. Doors fit poorly, interior wear commensurate with age. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $9,288. Offered at no reserve with photo documentation of the restoration. A quirky car with its own cult following, this nice example was well sold. AMERICAN events and at the Dayton Concours d’Elegance. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $59,400. Bodied by Karmann, many of these were hacked into cabriolets. The Notchback Registry estimates fewer than 100 survivors. The SCM Pocket Price Guide gives them a value range of about $19k to $25k for a #2 condition car, making this look expensive, but #1 Porsches can easily double the #2 price, and this car with great paint, documentation and a tool kit probably is most properly priced in today’s frothy market as a #1. ITALIAN #533-1988 FERRARI 512 TR coupe. S/N 2FFSA17A1G0065851. Red/tan leather. Odo: 18,200 miles. Nice original paint and body gaps. Interior looks good, as does the engine compartment. Equipped with HRE alloy rims, Brembo brakes. Turbonetics twin-turbo kit 104 #540-1912 FORD MODEL T speedster. S/N Black/tan canvas/black vinyl. Fresh paint and pinstripes show well. Naugahyde inserts between fenders and body. Freshly polished brass all around. Natural wood finish looks fresh. Equipped with racing tires. Offered at with new tires. Cond: 4-. NOT SOLD AT $66,000. Reported sold in 2008 at Kruse Ft. Lauderdale in 4- condition, selling for $58k (SCM# 48252), then two months later a nosale at Russo & Steele in Hollywood, bid to $65k (SCM# 116174). This car has loads of style and potential; unfortunately, it will take loads of money just to bring it to driver quality. Factoring in the buyer’s premium on top of the high bid would have brought it in at the low estimate, and that would have been a fair result all around. no reserve. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $145,800. This was Edsel Ford’s hot rod, part of the Henry Ford Museum collection from the 1920s until 1985, when it was sold to reduce inventory. Being one of one, there’s nothing in the market to compare it with. But given the provenance and history, I believe this was well bought and sold. #544-1937 CORD 812 convertible. S/N 2184H. Cigarette Cream/off-white cloth/green leather. Odo: 2,203 miles. Beautiful paint and bright bits, door fit off a bit. Clean, well detailed engine bay. No issues with the interior. Recent First in Class at the CCCA Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens annual meet. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $162,000. Reportedly driven 1,500 miles since a comprehensive restoration Sports Car Market


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Classic Motorcar Auctions Canton, OH record and looked well worth the premium just to be able to say “coachwork by Count Alexis de Sakhnoffsky.” Well sold indeed. #610-1941 STUDEBAKER CHAMPION sedan. S/N G154824. Two-tone green/gray cloth. Odo: 61,601 miles. Restored a decade ago and holding up well. Paint and brightwork show well. Clean engine bay. Nice interior, cracked steering wheel. Options include fog completed five years ago, this car still looked fresh and well done—and it was a bargain at the price. #517-1938 FORD pickup. S/N 4541407. Blue & black/black vinyl. Odo: 53,069 miles. Paint in pretty good shape except for a few chips and scratches. Freshly finished bed wood. Brightwork shows some dings. Cracked Still, a strong result for a pickup truck that had some needs. Well sold. #532A-1958 NASH METROPOLITAN coupe. S/N 41276. Turquoise & white/black & white houndstooth. Odo: 6,294 miles. 91-ci I4, 1-bbl, 3-sp. Show quality all around. New everything done to the highest standard, no detail overlooked. Cond: 1. NOT SOLD AT lights, fender skirts, bumper ends and guards, trim rings and wide whitewall tires. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $14,688. In an attractive color combination and in great condition, this was a solid buy at a market-correct price. passenger’s window. Clean engine compartment and interior. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $16,740. Trucks have been strong of late, and given the age and condition of this one, it looked like a great buy. Well bought. #556-1940 AUSTIN AMERICAN BAN- TAM speedster. S/N 65276. Maroon, cream & black/black canvas/maroon vinyl. Odo: 48,753 miles. Original paint shows some chips, scratches and buff-through, brightwork shows some ripples and wear. Otherwise good. Presentable engine bay. Interior looks good with analog wind-up clock in dash. Cond: 3. glass all around. Nicely detailed engine compartment and chassis, nothing to fault with the interior. Cond: 2+. NOT SOLD AT $80,000. An AAC Senior National first prize winner in ’03 and Grand National in ’04. The car is holding up very well and was surely worth more than the high bid. SOLD AT $36,720. This was one of three Austin Americas offered here at no reserve from the Pettit estate. The others (a sedan that sold for about $10k and a convertible that sold for just shy of $29k) were both nice cars and well sold. This lot with coachwork by Count Alexis de Sakhnoffsky might be an auction January 2013 #506-1952 FORD F-1 pickup. S/N F1R25R17223. Metallic silver/red & gray vinyl. Odo: 59,210 miles. 239-ci V8, 2-bbl, 3-sp. Paint looks OK in non-stock metallic color. Driver-quality engine compartment with no heater hoses present and a solder patch in radiator. Glass shows wiper scratches. Bed wood showing some weathering. Interior looks good, with some cracks in the steering wheel. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $21,600. Lifting the rubber floor mat in the cab revealed body filler patching, which makes one wonder how much more goop was waiting under the paint. #529A-1949 BUICK ROADMASTER woodie wagon. S/N 53254997. Royal Maroon & wood/maroon leather. Odo: 52,407 miles. 320-ci I8, 2-bbl, auto. Beautiful paint and brightwork. Wood showing some minor joint cracking, but otherwise holding up well. Clear $28,000. I’m not very generous with handing out #1s for condition, but this has got to be the nicest Metropolitan on the planet. You’d think the high bid would have got it done, but I’d agree with the consignor that this one is worth more. Take it to Scottsdale or Monterey and get another $10k. #512-1965 FORD FALCON racer. S/N N/A. White & blue/black racing bucket. 347ci V8, 4-bbl, 4-sp. Rough paint shows many battle scars, some cracking and chips. Full roll cage and race-prepped interior. Motor built by Woods brothers, with T-10 toploader 4-speed, heavy-duty custom-built Ford nine-inch rear end with Moser axles. Provided with SVRA and VDCA logbooks. Cond: 4. SOLD AT $11,070. The rear window popped out at one corner confirmed the car’s frame-torquing horsepower. Offered at no reserve, this was a full-on proper race car sold for the cost of the motor build. There’s a lot of fun yet to be had vintage-racing this car. Well bought indeed. © 105


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Auctions America by RM Rollinsford, NH Auctions America by RM — The Bennett Collection Phone bidders battled for 10 minutes over a barn-fresh 1925 Lancia Lambda Casaro Spider, which finally changed ownership at a whopping $207k Company Auctions America by RM Date September 21–22, 2012 Location Rollinsford, NH Auctioneers Brent Earlywine and Mike Shackleton Automotive lots sold/offered 129/129 Sales rate 100% Sales total $1,072,913 High sale 1925 Lancia Lambda Casaro Spider, sold at $207,000 Buyer’s premium Think it runs? 15%, included in sold prices Report and photos by Adam Blumenthal Market opinions in italics other vintage memorabilia. The total number of individual lots offered at this one-time auction: 1,100, all at no reserve. Auctions America by RM spent an intense two months preparing, and considering the sheer volume of stuff on offer, I was honestly surprised it didn’t take longer. AA paced the goings-on in efficient fashion, and the auction went off without a hitch. O ver the course of two decades, Dr. Terr Bennett amassed an incredibly diverse rang of motorcars, automobilia, motorcycle boats, bicycles, architectural pieces an Rollinsford, NH For the car enthusiast, the collection comprised a broad range of marques and ras, including a handbuilt Honore Wagner BMW race car that finished 1st at the 1952 Eifelrennen at the legendary Nürburgring in Germany. Proudly on display at the front of the tent, this one-off beauty generated strong interest from two off-site bidders, who took the price to a crowd-pleasing $177k. Top sales honors went to a rare 1925 Lancia Lambda Casaro Spider with side-by-side rumble seats. The subject of a back-and-forth battle between two phone bidders that lasted more than 10 minutes, the Lambda finally transferred ownership at a whopping $207k on Saturday. The car looked great in two-tone blue, visible through heavy layers of dust accumulated over the years of barn storage. A few notches down, there was a vast selection of decent, affordable vehicles, such as a well-sorted 1974 Peugeot 404 cabriolet for $14k; a 1979 Mercedes-Benz G240 diesel SUV for nearly $16k; two Alfas in the $11k–$12k range and another in an appealing blue/black livery that topped $20k; and an attractive 1977 Sunbeam Hillman Imp (with disheveled interior) that yielded just a tad under $3k. Then there was the long list of head-scratchers, such as the utterly shot 1974 Lamborghini Urraco, 1969 Lotus Elan 2+2 and 1978 Ferrari 308 GTS (sold at $7k, $4k and $8k, respectively). And I’d be remiss if I were to leave out the hoard of 14 Mazda 323s baking in the sun behind the makeshift auction office, some with their mechanical entrails violently exposed for all to see, or the many heavily damaged late-model Benzes. As desirable as many of the cars were, I was perhaps even more fascinated by Dr. 1950 BMW “Wagner Special” racer — sold at $177,100 106 Bennett’s collecting choices and the picture it painted of him as a person. Like any collection, the cars and their state were a reflection of the individual behind it. I can only conclude that Dr. Bennett was an adventurous collector, motivated by a unique set of tastes, and who loved the thrill of acquiring cars as much as the cars themselves. ♦ Sports Car Market


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Auctions America by RM Rollinsford, NH ENGLISH #2287-1964 AUSTIN MINI 2-dr sedan. S/N XC252546633A. Yellow/black faux leather. RHD. Odo: 66,851 miles. Rally-style car with decent paint, glass and chrome. Some pitting on trunk. Cibié driving lights, blackrimmed wheel flares. Interior has paint chips, peeling on B-pillar. Aftermarket Corbeau front seats upholstered in what feels like fake leather, with “Mini 40 Years” embroidery. Aftermarket OMP steering wheel and Clarion radio. Kangol seat-belt fasteners. Drilled #2275-1970 LOTUS ELAN convertible. S/N 459336. Orange/black canvas/black vinyl. Odo: 70,703 miles. Unrestored with decent paint. Top support structure missing. Colormatching front bumper not original. Panasport knockoff wheels. Trunk light not original. Trim mostly in place, but drab. Wood dash not original except glove compartment. Seat upholstery sun-baked. Passenger’s seat torn. Tears in center console. Door panels tattered hood latches. Dent on underside of front fascia. Doors improperly aligned. Wipers miss- Sparco gas pedal. Passenger’s door missing JVC speaker. Plain cloth rear seat holding up well. Rear side panels coming loose. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $6,440. A couple with knowledge of Minis looked over this car with me. Roll-up windows and British Leyland badging were among the clues this was not a 1964 model, and the “J” on the European license plate strongly pointed to late ’90s production. Still a decent Mini with nifty add-ons, and all things considered, a market-correct price. #2289-1968 MINI TRAVELLER wagon. S/N MAW61128304A. Two-tone blue & wood/gray & blue vinyl. RHD. Odo: 53,546 Luxury model has decorative, non-structural woodwork. Decent wood with only minor imperfections. Barn-style rear doors. Minor scuff marks on roof. Paint cracked on hood. Hood not aligned. Hood latch stuck, can’t view engine. Chrome bar on grille has come undone. Minor dents on rear bumper. Passenger win- and coming loose. Carpets filthy. Aftermarket radio. Battery relocated from trunk to behind passenger’s seat. Engine bay looks stock, but heavily soiled. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $8,850. Elan values have been steadily climbing in recent years. Add in the model’s 50th anniversary, and values could go higher. While the price seemed high, the new owner can likely put a few grand into restoring it and still come out ahead. #2280-1972 FOERS NOMAD beach car. S/N XA2S2686927A. White/black canvas/ black cloth. RHD. Odo: 25,369 miles. Presented in unrestored, seemingly original condition. Dirty inside and out, but salvageable. Aging paint in need of a refresh to repair chips, peeling, rust spots. Hood latches fit loosely and not aligned. Door panel fit good. Spartan interior, damaged glove compartment, Radio missing. Small tear in leather steering ing. Both front seats torn, filthy carpet needs to be replaced, door lining water-stained and nearly detached. Quarter-window latches not working. No radio. Reportedly runs well, but brakes need to be bled. Cond: 4+. SOLD AT $2,875. Compared with most of the run-down lots here, this looked decent and pretty complete. Fair price paid. FRENCH #2302-1974 PEUGEOT 404 C convert- ible. S/N 7A8E7050799599251. Red/black hard top/tan leather. Odo: 4,085 km. Full restoration 10 years ago, driven little since. Paint cracked and chipped in places, minor pitting on bumpers. Poor trunk fit. Interior retains understated elegance. Trim mostly intact. Chrome rocker panels heavily smudged, but in good condition. No radio, clock not working. Passenger’s seatbelt missing. Chrome on dash has rust spots. Carpets need cleaning. Engine shows use. With hard top. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $14,375. This model doesn’t appear at auction very often. Price paid looked reasonable, and investing in some of the “to-do” items could net a profit, or turn it into a very nice driver. GERMAN dow slightly open, doesn’t close properly. Clean interior. Ceiling fabric stained, dash lining untethered. Claimed to run well. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $6,670. A welcome change of pace from the other Minis for sale. Love-it-orhate-it styling is either too derivative and unbecoming to the Mini brand or makes this a must-have collectible. Either way, it’ll be the center of attention wherever its diminutive four wheels go. A fair price for fun, utility, and standing out in the crowd. 108 wheel. Canvas top filthy with makeshift patch. Stated to run and drive well. Cond: 4+. SOLD AT $6,670. The auction company described this as an Austin Morris Nomad, but later revised it to be a product of British-based Foers Engineering. Fact-finding reveals a possible variant of the better-known Mini Moke that Foers made available as kit cars. Considering the continued demand for all things micro, this rugged-looking beach car was well bought. #2288-1977 SUNBEAM HILLMAN IMP 2-dr sedan. S/N B411048976LSX. Red/tan vinyl. Odo: 27,521 miles. Mostly rust-free exterior presents well. Minor scratches, rust streaks and pitting on chrome. Chipping on Sports Car Market #2299-1950 BMW “Wagner Special” racer. S/N HY17A43. Gray/ black vinyl. Year unknown, but believed built in early 1950s. Described as a “one-off, hand-built race car... bodywork fash- BEST BUY


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Auctions America by RM Rollinsford, NH ioned from surplus U.S. aircraft wing-tanks... built at Honore Wagner’s uncle’s workshop in Luxembourg.” Bears a strong resemblance to the Veritas BMW Rennsport Spyders of the same era. Beautiful inside and out. Reportedly finished 5th at the 1952 Eifelrennen at Nürburgring. Stated to have a clear history, but no documentation displayed. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $177,100. A star car with two phone bidders waging a battle for the prize. Would appear to be a coup for the new owner if the real deal. #2320-1979 MERCEDES-BENZ G240 SUV. S/N 460433117001774. Green/green & blue leather. Odo: 57,254 miles. Unrestored example with a rebuilt diesel-powered engine. Chock full of goodies: Recaro front seats, Michelin off-road tires, Koss radio with Kenwood speakers, Micronta indoor/outdoor thermometer, Thule roof rack, Hella fog lamps, plus factory headlamp and turn-signal guards. Newer Gelandewagen wheels. Few years ago. Said to run and drive well. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $207,000. A star of the show. Not well documented, but that didn’t stop intense interest from two phone bidders, who pushed it into the stratosphere. Considering that Bonhams sold a 1930 Lambda in 1- condition for $110k at their September Beaulieu sale (SCM# 213212), price paid leaves no room for restoration. #2283-1960 ALFA ROMEO GIULI- ETTA Spider. S/N AR167608. Red/black vinyl. No model identified by the auction company, but chassis number codes out to a 1960 Giulietta. Reportedly restored some time in the past but not driven after being prepped for racing. Sky-high roll bar. Decent repaint, traces of white on headlight bezel. Alfa logo missing from center grille, other grilles miss- seemed high, but accelerating sale prices could make this a wise investment down the road. Well bought and sold. #2282-1963 ALFA ROMEO GIULIA Spider. S/N AR372584. Blue/black racing buckets. Odo: 68,403 miles. Restored at unknown date and reportedly in good running condition. Paint holding up well. Giulietta hood with misaligned panel fit and some flaking. Brightwork faded but serviceable. Wire wheels reportedly belong to an earlier Alfa. Interior cheerless, but most trim in place. Competition-style seats and belts installed. minor paint blemishes suggest off-road adventures were rare for this “go anywhere” Benz. Reportedly runs. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $15,813. Perched in a highly visible location, this drew a lot of eyeballs. The diesel engine heightened interest, as did its all-business profile in green paint. This was definitely a few notches above many of the other cars presented. I’d say a great buy. ITALIAN #2301-1925 LANCIA LAMBDA Casaro Spider. S/N 13278. Two-tone blue/brown canvas/black leather. RHD. Odo: 3,607 miles. Three-owner car, in this ownership for about 10 years. Reportedly purchased from Paul Tullius, then president of the Lancia Owners Club of America, who identifies it as a Lancia Lambda Casaro Spider, but no documents to confirm. Repaint from white holding up well, although difficult to to see in light-deprived main tent. Interior has character, but drab due ing. Two round holes where fog lights are located. Hood panel fit slightly off. Doors open and close well. Competition-style interior shows wear with rust on floorboard. Reported to have a balanced engine with ported head installed, fuel cell, and Accusump. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $11,213. This Alfa didn’t present as well as the others in the collection, and the price paid reflected that. A fair purchase. #2272-1961 ALFA ROMEO GIULI- ETTA Sprint Speciale . S/N AR1012000460. White primer. Odo: 69,946 km. Body shell mounted on chassis with wheels. Has windshield and rear window. Fiberglass hood not correct. All trim removed. Gaping hole in transmission where shifter is located. Accelerator, brake and clutch pedals intact, along with three-spoke steering wheel, speedometer Racing gloves come with car. Trunk dirty and has spare tire. Engine bay dirty. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $20,700. The auction company described this generically as an Alfa Romeo Convertible, but an on-site marque aficionado identified it as a Giulia with a Giulia engine and Veloce carburetors. Despite its mix-andmatch pedigree, all the modifications left the lovely Giulia body untouched. No awards here, but a nice driver for everyday driving pleasure. Well bought and sold. #2281-1964 ALFA ROMEO Spider racer. S/N AR1020402479. Red/black vinyl. Odo: 58,845 miles. A heavily modified gentlemen’s racer with aftermarket roll bar, seats and gauges. Equipped with Dell’Orto carbs and not Webers per auction company. An Alfista in attendance claims the car is a cast-iron 2000 Spider with incorrect engine. Gaping circular hole in hood to accommodate larger modified engine. Leather hood tie-down strap probably to inattention. Dual-cowl with side-by-side rumble seats in rear. Engine shows signs of use. Head machined, gasket replaced about six 110 cluster binnacle, other switches. Supposedly correct engine resting on ground in front of car. Cond: 6. SOLD AT $40,250. Another attendee claimed the engine was meant for a Giulietta Veloce, but that correct engine was “somewhere on the property.” Winning bid added to conceal hole. Alfa grille intact, but empty spaces where other grille covers are missing. Trim in place, but drab. Trunk won’t open. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $12,075. The bodywork was decent, it reportedly ran and drove, and it looked race-ready in nice colors—all factors that the owner couldn’t pass up. He can look forward to a whole lot of weekend racing fun without breaking the bank. Well bought. Sports Car Market


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Auctions America by RM Rollinsford, NH #2337-1972 FIAT 850 Spider. S/N 100GBS10126237. White/black hard top/black vinyl. Odo: 77,389 miles. Paint mediocre, but most of it survives. Brightwork decent. Front and rear bumpers show signs of corrosion. Front left bumper partially detached. Turn Body structure and black rear window louvers in surprisingly good condition. Pieces of front and rear bumpers removed from car and resting on ground. Various parts missing, vacant holes throughout. Door handles gone, doors don’t open, so interior inaccessible. Decent clear glass reveals partially intact dash and driver’s seat, but rest of the space is a disaster. Cond: 6. SOLD AT $6,900. Called an unrestored barn find and who could argue? A ghastly interior wrapped in rakishly aerodynamic sheet metal. Truly, yin and yang in the flesh. For a parts car, the price paid was high enough. AMERICAN signals missing, although housing is intact. Hard top scuffed and chipped. Poor door panel fit. Dreadful interior in shambles. Grimy engine bay. Cond: 5-. SOLD AT $1,150. It could be restored, and I suppose there’s no harm done at the price paid. #2305-1974 LAMBORGHINI URRACO coupe. S/N 9R30227. Yellow/tan leather. sion. Eddie Sachs was driving a Ford-powered version when he fatally crashed at the 1964 Indianapolis 500. Claimed to be one of just 10–12 copies of the Halibrand Indy car produced 1964–65. Cond: 6. SOLD AT $28,750. Tough to put a value on something like this without documentation. The final bid seemed high, so hopefully the buyer has a plan. © #2303-SWARTLEY racer. S/N N/A. Bare metal. Unrestored body on rolling chassis with engine. Reported to be designed and built by Jim Troy of Burbank, California, for J.N. “Skip” Swartley, winner of the 1955 SCCA National Sports Car Championship in the G Modified class. Named the “Osca Special” for its use of an 1,100-cc Osca engine. Cond: 6. SOLD AT $11,500. A project car for the truly ambitious. The crowd applauded when the hammer fell—a show of appreciation for the racer itself or a price that exceeded expectations? Perhaps a little bit of both. More exciting to ponder is how the new owner will transform this heap of metal. It’ll probably be a few years before we find out. #2284-1964 HALIBRAND SHRIKE AMERICAN RED BALL racers. S/N N/A. Gray. One disassembled car, one partially assembled car. Both have 2-speed transaxles and can accept Offenhauser or Ford 4-cam engines from the period. Lloyd Ruby won the 1965 Phoenix Indy race in an Offy-powered ver- January 2013 111


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Roundup Selected Sales Combined in One Comprehensive Report Highlights from from Dan Kruse Classics Austin, J. Wood Birmingham and Silver Portland Hill Country Classic ENGLISH #38-1948 VINCENT-HRD RAPIDE mo- torcycle. S/N R2415. Eng. # F10AB1416. Chrome/black. A real time-warp bike. May have come out of Cuba in the late ’50s or early ’60s. Homemade straight pipes and twin Dell’Orto carbs. Tank was chromed. Fitted with H-D side stand and high bars. Motor was 1933 Duesenberg Model J Franay Sports Berline sedan — sold at $1,815,000 Company: Dan Kruse Classics Location: Austin, TX Date: September 15, 2012 Auctioneers: Dan Kruse, Jim Richie Automotive lots sold/offered: 58/174 Sales rate: 33% Portland Fall 2012 Sales total: $3,174,710 High sale: 1933 Duesenberg Model J Franay Sports Berline sedan, sold at $1,815,000 Buyer’s premium: 10%, included in sold prices Report and photos by Phil Skinner stuck from storage. Some suspicion the number may have been restamped, as the bike had been in an accident at one time. Cond: 5+. SOLD AT $30,800. Always a lot of interest in a barn-find Vincent. This had a great period look. When the bidding started it shot right up to $30,000. Well sold. J. Wood & Co., Birmingham, AL, 10/12. #160-1951 MG TD roadster. S/N XPAGTDLHX9698. Red/black vinyl/black vinyl. Odo: 77,126 miles. Older economy restoration dates from the 1980s. Underhood is in order but far from a show car. Exterior paint showing scratches from hood being opened incorrectly. Seats were tight and with a patina of use, top in good condition but needs some Jerry Wood’s Cyclemarket & Auction 1965 Corvette 327/300 convertible — sold at $40,500 Company: Silver Auctions Location: Portland, OR Date: September 21, 2012 Auctioneer: Mitch Silver Automotive lots sold/offered: 57/120 Sales rate: 48% Sales total: $510,597 High sale: 1965 Chevrolet Corvette 327/300 convertible, sold at $40,500 Buyer’s premium: 8%, included in sold prices Report and photos by Jim Pickering 112 1936 Indian Four — sold at $29,700 Company: J. Wood & Company Location: Birmingham, AL Date: October 12–14, 2012 Auctioneer: Jerry Wood Motorcycles sold/offered: 59/85 Sales rate: 69% Sales total: $282,810 High sale: 1948 Vincent-HRD Rapide, sold at $30,800 Buyer’s premium: 10%, included in sold prices Report and photos by Somer Hooker wrinkles removed. Original wheels have proper hubcaps. No extras such as a heater, clock or radio for this sports car. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $13,716. Seller thought long and hard before letting this car go. He paid about $9k, and drove the car less than 1,000 miles in the past 11 years. He may have been hoping to cash in on inflation, which for this car at this time just wasn’t there. Dan Kruse Classics, Austin, TX, 09/12. #76-1957 JAGUAR XK 140 roadster. S/N S812485. Red/tan pleated leather. Odo: 2,708 miles. Professional restoration looked about a decade old. Paint a bit cloudy and needs a good rubbing out. Soft trim in excellent condition, but never saw the top. Detailed under the hood. No oil or fuel seepage, fire- Sports Car Market


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Roundup wall clean. Straight body panels, tight-fitting doors and deck lid. Otherwise, and simply put, very nice. Cond: 2+. NOT SOLD AT $77,000. Post-sale interest was there for this car, but seller’s desire of something closer to $90k wasn’t about to happen. It’s still a buyer’s market and this was out of the current asking range of similar examples. I think for the condition the offer was fair. As well, this car recently sold for $63k in April 2012 at a Plymouth, MI, sale (SCM# 209068). Dan Kruse Classics, Austin, TX, 09/12. #103-1958 MATCHLESS CS motor- cycle. S/N A65047. Eng. # 58G12CS07730. Burgundy/ivory. Odo: 1,980 miles. Burgundy paint is fading. Original seat has a tear in it. All decals still intact and in good shape. Alloy fenders showing no evidence of stress cracking. Exhaust system is OEM and solid. All chrome, nice panel gaps throughout. Tires look new on chrome wire wheels. Interior is clean and looks completely stock aside from modern CD stereo mounted in center console. Interior wood trim shows very well. Engine, power steering, generator, regulator, and washer pump all rebuilt last year. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $22,680. Sold new in Santa Monica, CA. Condition-wise, this Jag had a lot going for it, aside from the suffering window trim. The so-so color and the automatic gearbox weren’t pluses here, but the rebuilt engine and other components were. Like a lot of the other cars here today, it should be a great driver, and I think the price was right. Silver Auctions, Portland, OR, 09/12. #104-1967 NORTON ATLAS motor- cycle. S/N 20121416P. Eng. # 20121416P. Green/black. Odo: 4,136 miles. A tired but very complete example. Paint on tank is very good—probably a repaint. Seat has been redone. Original mufflers and original chrome fenders in good shape. The Atlas “Featherbed” tion, as is the nickel plating. This one has the 500 cc Triumph motor, long considered one of the best motors of the ’60s. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $9,350. This was well bought. I’ve seen nice ones in the five-figure range. This one was nice. J. Wood & Co., Birmingham, AL, 10/12. #113-1975 TRIUMPH T-160 motorcycle. Lucas components are there. Bike started and ran. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $10,450. This was one of approximately 240 built. May have been U.S.-market only. It is extremely rare to find a unit designed for on- and off-road in this kind of condition. Bought in one shot by an absentee bid from an overseas buyer. Well bought. J. Wood & Co., Birmingham, AL, 10/12. #194-1967 JAGUAR MK II saloon. S/N J67P1808348W. Beige/red leather. Odo: 84,283 miles. Shiny driver-quality vehicle. Smooth paint, pitted and crazed window frame was the frame of choice for special builders; it was derived from the Norton Manx. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $7,150. Good money for this bike but then a dealer bought it, so there has to be a market somewhere. That being said, an original Atlas like this is extremely difficult to find. J. Wood & Co., Birmingham, AL, 10/12. #40-1971 TRIUMPH BONNEVILLE motorcycle. S/N DT175380. Eng. # DT175380T120. Gold/black. Odo: 1,333 miles. Good original example of what was considered one of the worst Triumphs ever built. Factory tooling problems in the early ’70s caused many quality control issues. This bike has but 1,333 miles and is very original down to the tires. A small dent in the tank was the only major flaw. electric start and different tank styling. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $7,150. Well bought. The Triumph triples are very smooth bikes. With the aging of the Baby Boomers, electric-start versions are now fetching a premium. Very correct example. J. Wood & Co., Birmingham, AL, 10/12. #126-1975 TRIUMPH TR6 convertible. S/N CF35495U. Red/black vinyl/black vinyl. Odo: 44,127 miles. A splendid little sports car S/N T160BK01443. Eng. # T160BK01443. White & yellow. Odo: 10,852 miles. Very nice specimen. Colors are correct. Cadmium plating was redone and good attention paid to all of the running gear. One-year-only model with Rust is breaking through the paint and chrome is deteriorating. Engine is stuck. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $3,190. Well sold. Any stuck motor has risk. It was purchased by a dealer. Will a good detail improve it? It still carries the stigma of being a 1971 Triumph. J. Wood & Co., Birmingham, AL, 10/12. #133-1973 RICKMAN METISSE motor- cycle. S/N N/A. Eng. # TR5TXH20929. Green. Odo: 7,145 miles. This is a great example of the Rickman Metisse. These were sold as kits by the Rickman brothers in the U.K. The fiberglass is in exceptional condi- January 2013 113


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Roundup with lots of eye appeal. Factory paint with Union Jack decal on rear quarter showing no fading. Top is older, but rear window is clean and clear with only a few scratches. Typical alignment issues on deck lid, doors open and close neatly, minor detailing issues under the hood. Jolly good fun, we would say. Cond: 3+. NOT SOLD AT $11,500. A number of people looked this car over before the sale. But the bid offer was short, and it would likely have sold if the bid had gone up just another grand or so. With prime examples knocking down close to $20k on a regular basis, this one didn’t need much to turn it into a cash cow, and would also be fun to drive in the interim. Dan Kruse Classics, Austin, TX, 09/12. GERMAN #15-1964 VOLKSWAGEN KARMANN GHIA cut-down roadster. S/N 6171387. Lime green metallic/black fabric/black vinyl. Odo: 16,475 miles. Custom lift-off top is water-stained in its center. Basic VW power with heavy-duty alternator to power the megawatt stereo, huge speakers filling the rear compartment. Over $6k in the paint, which showed well, while the body work retained all of the ing work. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $8,640. Bitters were sold through GM dealers in the 1980s, but they’re a rarity today, with only about 500 built in total. They had that 1980s supercar look, but featured pedestrian Opel parts underneath. This one needed some work, but despite its rarity, it shouldn’t be too tough to make it right. Market-correct price for condition. Silver Auctions, Portland, OR, 09/12. original design themes, but smoothed out. Stax transmission and shifter. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $7,020. One couldn’t duplicate this vehicle for twice this price even if you got the car for free. And perhaps as a gift to a deserving kid who lives for hip-hop at its loudest and wants to be noticed, not a bad ride; offers peace of mind for worried fathers, as there is no backseat. Dan Kruse Classics, Austin, TX, 09/12. #149-1966 AMPHICAR 770 convertible. S/N 101738. Light aqua/white Colortex/whiteorange vinyl. Odo: 63,275 miles. Restored to 100 points, but has been used a bit and is showing a little patina. Driven from San Antonio to the sale, about 70 miles. Paint, body and chrome all look new, interior tight and dry, engine bay well done with upgraded Triumph Spitfire engine. Coast Guard-certified for day or night operations. Cond: 2. NOT SOLD AT #51-1985 PORSCHE 944 coupe. S/N WP0AA0942FN456813. Slate metallic/beige leather. Odo: 90,800 miles. Offered by an SCMer. Smooth paint, good panel fit. Resealed rear glass. Recent work includes new water pump, balance shaft belt, timing belt, tune-up, windshield, and more. Two owners from new, no alterations from stock. Claimed to have no $61,000. Seller had at or near $100k on the paper, announced he would take $80k, but the price on these has tapered out over the past couple of years. Seller can continue to use it for a while until the market catches up to his aspirations, or he can lower the asking price and move on to his next project. The bid here was the market for this example. Dan Kruse Classics, Austin, TX, 09/12. #67-1982 BITTER SC coupe. S/N W09526Z19CSB09011. Silver/tan leather. Odo: 38,588 miles. A three-owner car originally sold new in Portland, OR, for $51,902. Wear and tear commensurate with mileage. Aftermarket wheels, comes with stock rims and stock Bitter bumpers, plus factory road kit and some spare parts. Weak a/c said to need a charge; brakes and transmission listed as need- all-original, showing 91k miles. Recent work includes rebuilt heads, new timing chain and tensioner, new injectors, factory-style muffler, rear accumulator, sway bar links, motor mounts, water pump, power steering pump and box, and 4-wheel alignment. Body and paint show no issues, interior spotless. Doors shut with a satisfying click. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $13,068. Normally I’d be a little scared by a Benz of this vintage with these miles, but this car had a good original look, it came with service records and a CARFAX, and the recent work inspired confidence. I bet it’s a great driver, and at this price, I’ll call it well bought and sold. Silver Auctions, Portland, OR, 09/12. ITALIAN #72-1989 FERRARI TESTAROSSA coupe. S/N ZFFSG17A9K0081707. Red/ medium tan leather. Odo: 24,418 miles. Rarely driven since new, and overall condition seems to confirm this. Seller did state a recent “engine-out” $40,000 servicing had been conducted. If poor storage habits resulted in this much service on a low-mileage car, it might create concerns for things like brakes, fuel interior water leaks. Said to need an a/c recharge. Cond: 3+. NOT SOLD AT $4,250. You don’t see as many nice driver 944s as you used to, and this one had a lot of the typical 944 issues already resolved. I pegged this car at about $5k in its current condition, and I think it’ll get there with the right buyer. Silver Auctions, Portland, OR, 09/12. #144-1989 MERCEDES-BENZ 560 SEC coupe. S/N WDBCA45E4KA495983. White/ gray leather. Odo: 90,945 miles. Said to be 114 tank and suspension components. Still, the car looks great. Cond: 2. NOT SOLD AT $61,000. With the number of TRs on the market right now, may be too much to expect more than this offer; of course, a recent $40k expense plus original purchase price might drive one to try and recoup more of their investment. Possibly one of the best Testarossa coupes out there, but I think bidding more would not have been prudent. Fair offer turned down, in my opinion. Dan Kruse Classics, Austin, TX, 09/12. JAPANESE #39-1968 SUZUKI T-500 motorcycle. S/N 11773. Eng. # 11775. Copper/black. Odo: 1,745 Nice original example that suffered from poor storage. Engine is stuck. The first Sports Car Market


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Roundup year of these were called Cobras, next year they changed to Titan. Chrome deteriorating this was one of the largest sport bikes built. This bike’s condition is in line with the indicated mileage. A very presentable and obviously well-cared-for example. Only real indicator of wear is the original muffler, which is starting to bubble due to moisture. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $4,510. Hammered down at $4,100. A dealer bought it so that kind of sums it up. Many of these bikes lived a tortured life. This is a clean example. Seller had priced it and another (blue) one to sell. Other one sold for $2,900. Both were well bought. J. Wood & Co., Birmingham, AL, 10/12. SWEDISH #130-1973 VOLVO P1800ES 2-dr but not lifting. Exhaust and seat are intact and good, which is a big plus for an early Japanese bike. Some discoloration on tank from gas running over. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $3,300. Probably well bought. A thorough detailing would really bring this bike up. I think it was on the edge as far as going over the cliff cosmetically. Nice, complete early Japanese bikes are rare. J. Wood & Co., Birmingham, AL, 10/12. #7-1979 TOYOTA 2200 ½-ton long-bed pickup. S/N RN42035277. Yellow/tan cloth. Odo: 94,756 miles. Unrestored and lightly abused. Shows mild hail-storm damage on hood and roof. Bed has a plywood liner, interior showed signs of use, and phrase “normal wear and tear” applies. That said, it really isn’t a bad old truck; no accidents, rust-out or major body damage, and ran well without smoke or unusual noises. Cond: 4. SOLD AT $2,052. Pure stock Japanese vehicles are really starting to gain traction in the collector market. This 33-year-old pickup was decent and could be a real collectible. Similar vehicles in top condition have pushed the $20k limit. Dan Kruse Classics, Austin, TX, 09/12. #107-1983 HONDA CB1100F motor- cycle. S/N JH2SC1005DM005897. Red & white/black. Odo: 24,224 miles. In the ’80s a clean driver for sure. Cond: 3. NOT SOLD AT $10,000. Never understood why these cars don’t have a larger following: great styling and handling and quite safe. For those who can’t think of a Volvo as a “sports car,” try one of these out. Due to its condition, the seller was probably right to hold onto this wagon; it should really be able to command at least 50% more than was bid, even more on a good day. Dan Kruse Classics, Austin, TX, 09/12. AMERICAN TOP 10 No. 5 #65-1933 DUESENBERG MODEL J 4-dr Sport Berline. S/N 2385. Eng. # J365. Strawberry metallic/light tan pleated leather. Odo: 1,550 miles. 420-ci I8, 1-bbl down-draft, 3-speed. Known as the “Queen of Hearts,” this car has a well-documented history. Chassis was sent new to Paris and fitted with Kellner Town Car body. Went wagon. S/N 1836353007551. Bronze/brown cloth. Odo: 27,392 miles. Well-preserved original car. Doors, hood and rear hatch appear unaltered from their factory installation. Some minor facing on the paint—expected after 39 years. Interior showing wear that matches the miles shown. Underhood in order, no alterations from stock. No oil leaks or other issues, unsold for two years, then refitted with this body by Franay. Soft trim materials could be upgraded to add just a little more “pop,” in my opinion. Under the hood, the overall appearance is up to museum quality. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $1,650,000. This was the star of the seller’s exclusive sale in Rosanky, TX, March 2012, where an offer of $1.9 million was refused. At this price, this was very well bought indeed. Comparatively, in 2009 this car was sold in Branson, MO, for $777,000 (SCM# 120259), and for $380,000 at Pebble Beach in 2001 (SCM# 23283). Dan Kruse Classics, Austin, TX, 09/12. #37-1936 INDIAN FOUR motorcycle. S/N 46801. Eng. # DCF801. Blue & cream. Indian Four, aka, “Upside-down four.” Socalled because of the way the carb hangs down. This one was once painted with house paint and has a fabricated straight-through exhaust. Engine stuck from sitting. Speedometer is missing and this can be a $1,500 proposition. Cond: 4-. SOLD AT $29,700. Everyone wanted this to be a $25k bike. Auctioneer wanted it to be a $30k bike. This was good for all parties. It had been a runner when parked (weren’t they all?). J. Wood & Co., Birmingham, AL, 10/12. #133-1946 WILLYS JEEP ½-ton pickup. S/N 4WD24844. Medium blue & dark blue/ aqua vinyl & tan tweed fabric. Odo: 8,509 miles. 134-ci I4, 1-bbl, auto. Non-factory color combo pleasing to the eye. Noted a few shortcuts, such as welding the hinge point for the tailgate and door adjustments. Engine ran well, but in gear made some odd noises. Interior not too exciting, but seats appear to be comfy and all the lights seem to work. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $7,830. In top condition, a truck like this should be in the mid $20k region. This one could stand about $2k of cosmetics and be brought up to the mid-teens, once its issues are solved. Successful bidder raised his hand one 116 Sports Car Market


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Roundup time, reserve was announced lifted, and the old guy and his dog seemed quite pleased with their purchase as they drove away. I say well bought. Dan Kruse Classics, Austin, TX, 09/12. #163-1949 PACKARD STANDARD EIGHT sedan. S/N 19618. Maroon/beige cloth. Odo: 19,618 miles. 288-ci I8, 2-bbl, 3-sp. Engine rebuilt and exterior repainted 14 years ago. Said to be an estate car from northern Idaho, where it’s been in storage since the previous owner’s death. Brought out this past spring and currently runs. Chrome dull in spots, interior in good shape and claimed orig- inal, with musty smell to prove it. Vintage Montana plates. When the seller found this car, it apparently still had the previous owner’s fly-fishing gear in the trunk. Cond: 4+. SOLD AT $7,344. It apparently runs OK, but how does it drive? Granted, you won’t see cars like this on the road often, but it’s not at the top of many Packard collectors’ lists. All things considered, a fair price paid. Silver Auctions, Portland, OR, 09/12. #124-1951 FORD CUSTOM sedan. S/N B1RH132979. Green/green cloth. Odo: 83,699 miles. 239-ci V8, 2-bbl, 3-sp. Complete restoration. Light green paint shows no issues, all chrome and stainless restored and looking new, aside from some scratching at rear bumper. Engine compartment mostly stock. Original wheels fitted with Coker wide whitewalls and original-style hub- BEST BUY WHAT’S YOUR CAR WORTH? FIND OUT AT caps and beauty rings. Interior like new. Comes with two sets of original keys. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $13,500. This was said to be a twoowner Portland car from new, and even though the restoration dated from 2002, it still looked really good. There were at least two people looking at it all night on Friday, so I expected it would do well. Price paid was a little under the money, so call this one well bought. Silver Auctions, Portland, OR, 09/12. © January 2013 NOW FREE! The world’s largest collector car price guide based on over 500,000 sold transactions from . Updated weekly. collectorcarpricetracker.com 117


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eBay Motors Online Sales Best eBay Buys Around $20k Inexpensive and easy ways to get in the game I regularly hear people talking about where the collector car market will be when the Baby Boomers are no longer the driving force. The only way it can go is younger. Gen Xers have worked hard and long enough to acquire the disposable income necessary to collect cars, and some Gen Yers have too. These newbie gearheads are the collectors who will save old cars from crushers or museums. While the Baby Boomers grew up in the golden years of automobiles, the younger groups grew up during the nadir of American autos — K-car, anyone? Many were able to develop social lives without falling in love with cars. The best way to keep collector cars alive is to make sure the next generation finds accessible and affordable cars. This month’s drive through eBay Motors looks at good deals around $20k. These cars are cheap, so new collectors can take a fling with at least one collectible car. And we all know that a fling can turn into a lifelong love affair. Condition inferred from seller’s descriptions; cars were not physically examined by the author. All quoted material taken from the eBay listings. (sf=seller’s feedback) by Chad Tyson Market opinions in italics #221142066616-1969 JAGUAR XKE Series II 4.2 convertible. S/N 1R9701. Silver/black leather. Odo: 61,876 miles. 25 photos. Seattle, WA. “Originally from the Bay area. Has areas of collision damage but no rust. Stored inside since 1994. No soft top or tonneau cover, but instead has a rare factory hard top with all the chrome trim and hardware. Car runs and will move under its own bles at the front of the driver’s front fender. Also, brake fluid, oil, and coolant were all just changed. This car starts, runs and drives but does need work to be reliable and driven often.” 31 bids. sf 67. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $19,900. Pretty car, with some work needed after sitting for seven years. That said, there is a lot of wiggle room considering +2 condition cars start at mid-$50k. Excellent buy. #130787002569-1970 OLDSMOBILE power, although not street-legal. The bonnet will need a new lower valance and LH fender. We are suppling a good RF fender, LF door shell and LR bumper blade with the car. Interior is decent with nice seats and door panels. The floors have no rust.” 37 bids. sf 1902. Cond: 5+. SOLD AT $18,101. The car can run and move, so it’s possibly salvageable. But the key piece here is the hard top. I’ve seen those sell for $5k–$6k just by themselves. So make that $13k for a ’69 E-type project. Darn good deal. #221142168373-1973 VOLKSWAGEN TRANSPORTER camper. S/N 2332166352. White & red/tan leather. Odo: 59,644 miles. 24 photos. Santa Monica, CA. “Excellent condition, exceptional look. Engine was completely redone with all-new parts. New starter, fuel pump, filters and spark plugs. Transmission was completely redone with all new parts. New brake pads. New electric wiring. Newly painted in and out. Straight body with no rust. 118 Factory a/c. Refrigerator/cooler, stainless steel sink, Brazilian cherry hardwood floor, new door panels. Van is currently in the last stage of work and will be completed before new owner takes it.” 49 bids. sf 455. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $19,200. There are more desirable years, but this is complete and working properly. It sold as a +2 condition for a 3 condition price. Well bought. #170927193634-1957 LINCOLN PREMIERE convertible. S/N 57WA15327L. Red/white vinyl/red & white vinyl. 24 photos. Frederick, MD. “As solid as you will find for a ’57 with all-original body panels, floors and trunk. The most rare and desirable of the Premiere’s production run. Power steering, brakes, windows, seats, antenna, and top. Was originally a white car. A few very small bub- 442 W-30 replica convertible. S/N 342670M228026. Matador Red/black vinyl/black vinyl. Odo: 85,518 miles. 24 photos. Kenosha, WI. “Driver’s quality paint job with four coats of base, then stripes were painted on, followed by four coats of clear. Convertible top replaced. Prior owner said he completely rebuilt the original engine and transmission two years ago. New dual exhaust with headers and Flowmaster mufflers. New alternator, water pump, voltage regulator, master cylinder, fan, belts, brake lines and fuel lines. New heavy duty radiator installed this week. Starts right up every time. W-25 ram air hood, spoiler, and one-year-only clam shell sport mirrors. Power steering, brakes, windows, top, and tilt wheel. Front seats just reupholstered. Driver’s floor replaced, but the rest of the floor is original.” 23 bids. sf 124. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $20,100. A Cutlass Supreme replicating a 442 W-30. As such, the $20k splits the values of a decent Cutlass Supreme and a driver 442. Missing the red fenderwells. Good deal for the buyer, as long as they realize they aren’t getting a factory 442 W-30. Just drop the top and enjoy that V8 rumble. © Sports Car Market


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Mystery Photo Answers I told you nobody walks in L.A. — Joe Amft, Evanston, IL RUNNER-UP: Ach der lieber! When the Shepherd’s in the car, there’s no room for me. — Peter Zimmermann, Bakersfield, CA In an effort to give his pres- ervation Porsche an edge at the next concours, Hans thought a vintage East German alarm system was a fun addition. — James S. Eubanks, Marietta, GA This is California, where even the blind can drive! — Robert Canepa, Diablo, CA So, I took my master for his daily drive. He’s getting better at keeping up with me, but he has trouble following the path. — Gary Francis, Chico, CA Which came first: the tow truck or the Porsche? — Leslie Dreist, Troy, MI Due to the car’s rapidly in- creasing value, Franz refused to use his Porsche without security protection. — Stephen Gizzi, Benicia, CA October Surprise: Long before Mitt Romney strapped a dog to the roof of his car, he was a beatnik who liked to take a dog for walks. — Erik Olson, Dublin, CA Celebrating 50 years of service in 2013: Guide Dogs of Germany. — Ric Tiplady, Sunriver, OR Fido’s gas problems led to drastic measures. — Jim Graham, New Canaan, CT Hans replaces the velvet ropes with the Doberman. — Norman Vogel, San Francisco, CA Will someone please help me? Mitt’s going to tie me to that luggage rack and drive us all to Canada! — Dennis Thalmann, Husseren les Chateaux, FRA Ferdinand, after you walk the pooch in your Porsche, tie him to the front porch. — Phil Schroeder, Platte City, MO Bob figured that using Spike would be cheaper than calling in a tow truck. — Jack Frankel, Silver Spring, MD Both PETA and the ASPCA stepped in to prevent this Porsche owner from going on Letterman and doing the “Stupid Human Tricks” segment. — David Libby, West Des Moines, IA Porsche engineers were able to This Month’s Mystery Photo Response Deadline: December 25, 2012 Our Photo, Your Caption Be the author of the most accurate, creative or provocative response and receive a Sports Car Market cap. Ties will be arbitrarily and capriciously decided. Fax your response to 503.253.2234; email: mysteryphoto@sportscarmarket.com; snail mail: Mystery, P.O. Box 4797, Portland, OR 97208-4797. Please include your name and contact information. Send us your mystery photo. If we use it, you’ll also get an official SCM cap. Email photos at 300 dpi in JPEG format. overcome the technical challenges of their revolutionary approach to hybrid automobiles. But the increasingly bitter protests from the ASPCA ultimately spelled the end of the 356 Canine. — Fred Schmidt, Silver Spring, MD Beware of inexpensive on-line performance modifications for your 356. — Randy Rutherford, Greensboro, GA More evidence that the hybrid dog trend has really gotten out of hand: a Doberman Porscher. — Chris Racelis, LaGrange, IL Joe Amft wins a slightly chewed SCM hat for talking — and walking — the truest statement about the world’s most car-crazed city. © Comments With Your Renewals You’re doing fine! — Ed Chappell, Elkin, NC My favorite auto read since 1998! Keep up the good work! — Bob Fennell, Red Hook, NY Still don’t need any of the Big Iron and Full Classics. More sports cars. Oh well. — Alfa Ward Witkowski, Marietta, GA The best read every month. — Carl Sanger, Houston, TX Keep up the coverage of a full range of cars — Japanese, Mopar, etc. Thanks. — Pete Robinson, Victoria, BC Profiles on collectors’ collections needed — and not just the “Jay Lenos”! — Scott Zieske, Rapid City, SD More coverage of afford- able cars! — David Keninitz, Lorton, VA More motorcycles! — Walt Mainberger, Sarasota, FL The one mag that gets read. More cheap (under $30,000) stuff, please. — C.J. Johns, Santa Teresa, NM Sports Car Market is the perfect car mag. I enjoy every page, even the ads. — Richard E. Lynch, San Pedro, CA More BMWs! Love your magazine. — Dennis K. Brown, Greenwood, IN Best car magazine ever! — Brian Balladares, Rancho Palos Verdes, CA Always excellent. — S. Howard Banaszak Jr., Fort Lauderdale, FL More Alfa! — Dale Hoff, Tacoma, WA And thanks to all of you for your thoughtful comments and your renewals. — Keith Martin 120 Sports Car Market


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SCM Showcase Gallery Sell Your Car Here! Includes SCM website listing. Showcase Gallery Full-Color Photo Ad Just $66/month ($88 non-subscribers) Text-Only Classified Ad Just $15/month ($25 non-subscribers) 4 ways to submit your ad: Web: Visit sportscarmarket.com/classifieds/place-ad to upload your photo (300 dpi jpg) and text, or text only. Secure online Visa/MC payments. Email: Send photo (300 dpi jpg) and text, or text only, to classifieds@sportscarmarket.com. We will call for your VISA/MC. Fax: Attention Showcase, to 503.253.2234 with VISA/MC. Snail mail: Showcase, PO Box 4797, Portland, OR 97208-4797, with VISA/MC or check. 25 words max, subject to editing. Deadline: 1st of each month, one month prior to publication. Advertisers assume all liability for the content of their advertisements. The publisher of Sports Car Market Magazine is not responsible for any omissions, erroneous, false and/or misleading statements of its advertisers. S/N DB51593R. Black/black Leather. 84,221 miles. 5-speed. Black with original black leather interior, five speed, right-hand drive. A beautiful rust-free example, an opportunity to own one of the rarest and most desirable GT cars, runs and drives superbly. $378,000. Contact Solange, Heritage Classics Motorcar Company, 310.657.9699, Email: sales@ heritageclassics.com Web: www.heritageclassics. com (CA) 1966 Jaguar XKE Series 1 4.2 OTS English 1935 Aston Martin 1½ Liter Mk II 1961 Jaguar XK 150 3.8 drophead coupe 1964 Aston Martin DB5 coupe is located in the U.K. Engine, GM LS6 all-aluminum 5,665-cc V8. Transaxle Getrag gears six plus reverse. Chassis — carbon composite-type monocoque front and rear subframes. $119,000. Contact Scott, Email: Boxer365@gmail.com French 1982 Renault R5 Turbo Series 1 hatchbback Third series, s/n A5/541/L. Owned by one Texas family 1955 to 2010. Runs extremely well. Solid, complete and correct. $165,000. Contact Chris, Fantasy Junction, 510.653.7555, Email: sales@fantasyjunction.com Web: www.fantasyjunction.com (CA) 1935 Rolls-Royce 20/25 Body by Wendover limousine Spectacular Imperial Maroon/Biscuit color combo with a no-expense-spared restoration by Jaguar professionals, this XK 150 is a JCNA national champion, scoring 100 points in 3 consecutive 2011 shows. Excellent opportunity for the serious collector. Classic Showcase, 760.758.6100, Email: sales@classicshowcase.com Web: www.classicshowcase.com (CA) 1961 Rolls Royce Silver Cloud II drophead coupe Restored by Classic Showcase, this matching-numbers XKE is a current JCNA national champion, scoring 100 points in 3 consecutive shows in 2011–12. This example presents a rare opportunity for the discerning collector ready for competition. Classic Showcase, 760.758.6100, Email: sales@classicshowcase.com Web: www.classicshowcase.com (CA) S/N GXK-1. Light blue/royal blue. 62,000 miles. 3.5-L, 6-cyl., 4-sp manual. Right-hand drive. Impeccable condition. Motor redone by Cooke. New clutch, suspension. Interior like new. Brooks trunk. Original tools. “Best In Show.” $65,000. Contact Peter, 450.451.6518, Email: info@peternicoll.com (QC) (CANADA) 1957-61 Triumph TR3A wheels Four excellent tires, very low mileage, plus 4 steel rims with hubcaps. $750. Contact Michael, 540.678.0183, Email: michaelrea509@gmail. com (VA) 1959 Jaguar XK 150S 3.4 OTS S/N LSVB451. Black/black Leather. 79,621 miles. Automatic. Matching everflex top and leather tonneau boot, absolutely spectacular left-hand-drive model with automatic transmission, factory air conditioning, power windows, Blaupunkt am/fm radio, altimeter, complete with tools and handbook, one of only 75 left-hand dropheads ever built. The rarest and most desirable four-seat open cars of the post-war era, runs and drives beautifully. $295,000 OBO. Contact Solange, Heritage Classics Motorcar Company, 310.657.9699, Email: sales@heritageclassics.com Web: www.heritageclassics.com (CA) 1962 Jaguar XKE Series 1 3.8 coupe 1971 Lotus Elan +2 coupe Fresh all-steel 1600 cc engine, less than one hour run time, JE pistons, H-beam rods, Weber carbs, MSD ignition, Tilton dry sump pump, Peterson oil tank, 13.5:1 compression, 162 hp at the wheels. 7.25” quarter master clutch, BD flywheel, New Quaife LSD not installed, full roll cage, Kirkey road race seat. Show car quality, ready to race. A very complete restoration. $35,000. Contact Julie, Ignite Performance, 720.542.3762, Email: gregjjacobs@yahoo.com 2008 Mosler MT900S A factory-built 150S roadster in Old English White, with Biscuit interior. The subject of a comprehensive documented nut-and-bolt restoration by Classic Showcase. Fantastic opportunity for the discerning collector. Classic Showcase, 760.758.6100, Email: sales@classicshowcase.com Web: www.classicshowcase.com (CA) This beautiful matching-numbers, flat-floored, welded-louver bonnet E-type has been recently elevated to show level by Classic Showcase with a gorgeous Bronze and Red color combo. An early XKE example ready for the competitive collector. Classic Showcase, 760.758.6100, Email: sales@classicshowcase.com Web: www.classicshowcase.com (CA) 4,900 miles. Finished in metallic silver with dark gray quilted Alcantara interior. Air conditioning, electric windows, electric wing mirrors, tracker, alarm and immobilizer and servoed brakes. First registered (U.K.) August 2010. 1-owner, full Mosler service history and recent ECU update by Mosler. Car 122 S/N 4310197. Silver/red leather. 55,977 miles. 6-cyl with triple webers, 4-spd manual. Rust free California/Arizona car. Sunroof, manual 4-spd, factory air, red leather in excellent condition, wood trim excellent, all gauges perfect. Upgraded engine with triple Webers, upgraded ignition and cooling systems. Approximately 305 hp. Silver paint is excellent with a few tiny chips. Alpina wheels with Pirelli tires. $35,000. Contact Philip, 406-329-2945, Email: paropermd@msn.com (MO) Sports Car Market S/N 19804210002756. Red/Black. 38,000 miles. 3.0-liter I6, manual. Late drum-brake car fitted with factory hard top, Euro headlamps, original Becker radio and tool roll. Vehicle has been in the same collection for the past 30-plus years. Excellent history. Absolutely stunning. $765,000. Contact Tyler, Precision Motorcars, 513.271.5565, Email: precisionmotorcars@gmail.com (OH) (UNITED STATES) 1974 BMW 3.0 CS coupe 1951–55 Mercedes-Benz 220 Cabriolets and coupes (Type 187) cars, parts, manuals and consulting. Contact Bob, Cabriolet Enterprises, 310.801.1443, Email: bob@mbzcabrio.com Web: www.mbzcabrio. com (CA) 1960 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster A crowning achievement, this E-type is a show-level champion and subject of a no-expense-spared restoration. One of the finest XKE examples available in the world today. An amazing opportunity for the discerning collector. Classic Showcase, 760.758.6100, Email: sales@classicshowcase.com Web: www. classicshowcase.com (CA) 1967 Jaguar XKE Series 1 4.2 OTS S/N 822000C0001520. Pearl Nacre/Sable. I4 turbocharged, 5-spd. One of the last aluminum-panel rally cars made by Alpine in 1982. One owner from new with stage 1 engine, Gotti three-piece wheels and all updates. All-original, including paint and interior. Never damaged. FIA homologation number 1303 from series one production. This car is well known in the U.S., as featured on SPEED Channel and several magazine articles. A long list of spares are included. A “giant killer” in its day. $70,000 OBO. Contact Bill, 818.981.6595, Email: bspeed1@sbcglobal.net (CA) German 1951–55 Mercedes-Benz 220


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SCM Showcase Gallery 1985 Porsche 911 Carrera coupe 1958 Alfa Romeo 1900 Super 4-dr sedan 1990 Ferrari Testarossa coupe Red/tan, under 20k miles, includes detailed history, books, tool, etc. It’s my fourth 12-cyl Ferrari since 1982. $65,000. Contact Robert, 317.255.2350, Email: showcase@sportscarmarket.com (IN) 2007 Ferrari F430 F1 coupe 28,000 miles. Original panels, floor, interior and drivetrain. With Fuchs wheels and sun roof. Documentation. $40,000. Contact Dexter, 204.510.3399, Email: vintagecarguy@mts.net (MB) (CAN) 1989 Porsche 930 Turbo cabriolet Highly original example showing only 53,325 miles. One owner until 2008. Successful 2010 California Mille participant. Unbelievably cool and fun. $49,500. Contact Chris, Fantasy Junction, 510.653.7555, Email: sales@fantasyjunction.com Web: www.fantasyjunction.com (CA) 1967 Maserati Mistral coupe Silver/black. Chevy straight-6, 3 Webers, Corvette 4-speed, new tires, nice driver. $35,000. Contact Willy, 949.650.6260, (CA) 1983 Ferrari 308 GTSi Quattrovalvole S/N WPOEB0932KS070104. Venetian Blue/Ivory. 14,700 miles. 3.3-L H6 F1 Turbo, 5-spd manual. Just 250 of the G50 were manufactured. This rare classic 930 Factory Turbo Cabriolet is a fantastic example of an immaculate car. In extraordinary condition inside and out, with an excellent history, this car has been expertly maintained and cared for. All original with the exception of soft top. $109,000. Contact Alex, 310.500.7295, Email: alex.sarkissian@sbcglobal. net (CA) 1999 Porsche Boxster convertible 1986 Ferrari 328 GTS coupe Mahogany Mica. 48k miles. Leather seats, 6-speed, Nardi, Bose, vinyl top, cold a/c, new battery. Always garaged, limited use only on nice, sunny days. Excellent condition. Contact Chuck, 281.351.6743, Email: chazrhodes@sbcglobal.net (TX) 31,000 miles. Primrose Yellow convertible with hard top, navy soft top/interior. Garaged, full service records, new battery. PA inspected, insured. Hard top with garage mount included. $11,000. Contact Richard, 215.272.3098, Email: spanishmoonz@ gmail.com (PA) Italian 1947 Fiat 500A Topolino Historic vintage Japanese Car! Excellent original driving condition, earliest Skyline in USA, one of the first Japanese cars sold in USA. $19,500. Contact Walter, 315.247.2388, Email: info@autolit. com (NY) 17,000 miles. Spectacular original Blue Sera Metallic paint with blue interior. Fully serviced, complete books and tools. One of the nicest 308s I have seen. Ready to be driven or to win preservation trophy at an FCA show. $46,000. Contact Stephen, Resoration and Performance Motorcars, 802.877.2645, Email: rpm@rpmvt.com Web: www.rpmvt.com (VT) 2000 Mazda Miata Special Edition S/N 6232191984. Green and white/63,559 miles. green, Street/Strip car. Original 318 car turned drag machine. 500-ci Indy Maxx aluminum Hemi, full manual 727 pushbutton trans, 3800 stall, Dana 60 with minitubs, 4:10s and spool. Custom headers, full 8-pt cage, 93-octane friendly. Runs 10s in the quarter and can idle in traffic at 180 degrees. Spare wheels with drag slicks included. $48,500 OBO. Contact Jim, 503.261.0555 Ext. 208, Email: jim.pickering@sportscarmarket.com Web: http://bit.ly/UGCoQV (OR) 1989 Chevrolet Corvette coupe S/N 1G1YY2183K5123950. Flame Red/Flame Red. 91,000 miles. 3.5-L, Automatic. Glass Targa top, Firestone Firehawk tires. $8,500 OBO. Contact Thomas, 605.348.4857, Email: tandszeller@ rushmore.com (SD) 1993 Cadillac Allante convertible 41,000 miles. Black with tan interior. Original car, Ferrari dealer serviced with records. All books and tools. Tubi exhaust, new tires. Looks new. $38,900. Contact Dave, 516.946.7771, (PA) 1986 Fiat X 1/9 Bertone targa Parker Bros. Gun Metal Blue, low miles, Northstar V8. Perfect. $24,000. Contact Robert, 317.255.2350, Email: showcase@sportscarmarket.com (IN) © Long-term ownership by president of Belgian FOC. New paint, interior and rebuilt engine. Runs and drives very well. Sure to attract friendly crowds everywhere it goes. $39,500. Contact Chris, Fantasy Junction, 510.653.7555, Email: sales@fantasyjunction.com Web: www.fantasyjunction.com (CA) 1949 Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 SS S/N ZBBS00AXG7157264. Silver & black/black & maroon. 57,000 miles. 1.5-L, 5-sp. Nice original example. Well maintained and a good driver. New rear calipers, clutch slave and master. Cromodora wheels. $7,400 OBO. Contact Allen, 516.770.7455, Email: destunk@aol.com (NY) Two-seat Pininfarina Cabriolet, s/n 915871. Elegant Pininfarina design with unique details. Restore and show at premier events worldwide. MM eligible. $295,000. Contact Chris, Fantasy Junction, 510.653.7555, Email: sales@fantasyjunction.com Web: www.fantasyjunction.com (CA) 124 US Postal Service Statement of Ownership and Circulation (Required by USC). 1. A. Title of Publication: Sports Car Market 2. Publication number: 011-578 3. Date of Filing: 11/1/12 4. Issue of Frequency: Monthly 5. Number of Issues Published Annually: 12 6. Annual Subscription Price: $65 U.S. 7. Complete Address of Known Office of General Business Office of Publisher: 401 NE 19th Ave, Ste 100, Portland, OR 97232-4801 8. P.O. Box 4797, Portland, OR 97208-4797 9. Publisher: V. Keith Martin, P.O. Box 4797, Portland, OR 97208. Editor: Chester Allen, P.O. Box 4797, Portland, OR 97208. Managing Editor: James Pickering, P.O. Box 4797, Portland, OR 97208 10. Owner: Automotive Investor Media Group, P.O. Box 4797, Portland, OR. V. Keith Martin, P.O. Box 4797, Portland, OR 97208 11. Known Beholders, Mortgages and Other Security Holdings Owning or Holding 1 Percent or More of Total Amount of Bonds, Mortgages or Other Securities: None 12. N/A 13. Publication Title: Sports Car Market 14. January 2012 15. Extent and Nature of Circulation. Average Number of Copies Each Issue During Preceding 12 Months/ Actual Number of Copies of Single Published Nearest to Filing Date. A. Total Number of Copies (Net Press Run): 20,089/17,182. B1. Paid and/or Requested Circulation: 10,929/10,928; B3. Sales Through Dealers and Carriers, Street Vendors and Counter Sales: 6,402/4,879. B4. By Other Classes of Mail through USPS: 66/62. C. Total Paid and/or Requested Circulation: 17,397/15,869. D1. Free Distribution by Mail (Sample, Complimentary and Other Free): 12/0; D3. Free Distribution at Other Classes of Mail through USPS: 0/0; D3. Free or Nominal Rate Copies Mailed at Other Classes through the USPS: 0/0; D4. Free Distribution Outside the Mail: 2,073/695. E. Total Free Distribution: 2,113/763. F. Total Distribution: 19,510/16,632. G. Copies Not Distributed: 579/550. H. Total: 20,089/17,182. I. Percent Paid and/or Requested Circulation: 89/95. 16. January 2012 17. I certify that the statements made by me are complete and correct, Keith Martin. Sports Car Market Scuderia Red/Black. 12,500 miles. V8, F1. Rare colors, full carbon fiber. Perfect condition with fresh service. No stories, all records, needs nothing. $145,900 OBO. Contact Bill, 770.375.6642, Email: bill@bricksrkids.com (GA) Japanese 1959 Prince Skyline American 1938 Bantam Boulevard Delivery S/N 60365. Dark cherry & light cherry/red leather. 45-ci I4, 3 speed. 2009 Amelia Island Class Winner, 2010 AACA Grand National. Of 72 produced, only five are known to exist. Runs and drives like new. $65,000. Contact Mark, 904.262.5683, Email: nmbecker@comcast.net (Fl) 1963 Dodge 440 2-dr hard top


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Advertise in the SCM Resource Directory. Call 877.219.2605 Ext. 218 for information, e-mail: scmadvert@sportscarmarket.com. Auction Companies Artcurial-Briest-Poulain-Le Fur. 33 (0)1 42 99 2056, 33 (0)1 42 99 1639. 7, Rond-Point des Champs-Elysées, 75008 Paris, France. Email: motorcars@artcurial.com. www.artcurial.com/motorcars. (FR) block. Hundreds of muscle cars, antique, collector, and special-interest cars, trucks and motorcycles. Real Cars. Real Prices. www.carlisleauctions.com. (PA) eBay Motors. List your car for sale. $0 insertion fee. $60 listing fee if vehicle sells for under or at $2,000, $125 if it sells for over $2,000. Visit the “Services” section on www.ebaymotors.com for more details. try, RM’s vertically integrated range of services, coupled with an expert team of car specialists and international footprint, provide an unsurpassed level of service to the global collector car market. www.rmauctions.com. (CAN) Leake Auctions. 800.722.9942, Auctions America. 877.906.2437, Formed in July 2010 as a subsidiary of RM Auctions, the Auctions America by RM team, led by collector car expert Donnie Gould, specializes in American classics, Detroit muscle, hot rods, customs and vintage motorcycles. Consign With Confidence. www.auctionsamerica.com. (IN) Exoticars USA. 908.996.4889, Wil de Groot’s Exoticars USA has serviced and restored Ferrari, Maserati and Lamborghini in the NJ, PA, NY region since 1979. We’re passionate about keeping your car fast, reliable, beautiful and authentic. Our mechanical, paint/ body, electronic, machining and fabricating work is unsurpassed and awardwinning. We have specialized equipment and knowledge to service newer and vintage models and everything in between. www.exoticars-usa.com. (NJ) Barrett-Jackson Auction. 480.421.6694, 480.421.6697. For nearly four decades, the Barrett-Jackson Auction Company has been recognized throughout the world for offering only the finest selection of quality collector vehicles, outstanding professional service and an unrivaled sales success. From classic and one-of-a-kind cars to exotics and muscle cars, BarrettJackson attracts only the best. Our auctions have captured the true essence of a passionate obsession with cars that extends to collectors and enthusiasts throughout the world. A television audience of millions watches unique and select vehicles while attendees enjoy a lifestyle experience featuring fine art, fashion and gourmet cuisine. In every way, the legend is unsurpassed. N. Scottsdale Rd, Scottsdale, AZ 85251. info@barrett-jackson.com. www.barrett-jackson.com. (AZ) Join Leake Auction Company as they celebrate 40 years in the collector car auction industry. Their unsurpassed customer service and fast-paced twolane auction ring makes them a leader in the business. Leake currently operates auctions in Tulsa, Oklahoma City, Dallas and San Antonio. Visit them online at www.leakecar.com or call 800.722.9942. Russo and Steele Collector Auto- mobile Auctions. 602.252.2697, Fax: 602.252.6260. Specializing in the finest European sports, American muscle, hot rods and custom automobiles; Russo and Steele hosts two recordbreaking auctions per year; Monterey, CA, every August and Scottsdale, AZ, every January. As one of the premier auction events in the United States, Russo and Steele has developed a reputation for its superior customer service and for having the most experienced and informed experts in the industry. www.russoandsteele.com. (AZ) Mecum Auction Company. Gooding & Company. 310.899.1960, 310.899.0930. Gooding & Company offers its international clientele the rarest, award-winning examples of collector vehicles at the most prestigious auction venues. Our team of well-qualified experts will advise you on current market values. Gooding & Company presents the official auction of the famed Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in August, the recordsetting Scottsdale Auction in January and a world-class auction at the Omni Amelia Island Plantation in Florida in March. www.goodingco.com. (CA) H&H Classic Auctions. +44 8458 334455, +44 8458 334433. The Motor House, Lyncastle Road, Warrington, England. WA4 4BSN www.handh.co.uk. (U.K.) Bonhams. +44.207.228.8000, +44.207.585.0830. Montpelier St., Knightsbridge, London, SW7 1HH. www.bonhams.com. (U.K.) Bonhams. 415.391.4000, 415.391.4040. 220 San Bruno Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94103. www.bonhams.com. (CA) Branson Collector Car Auction. 800.335.3063, 417.336.5616. 1316 W. Hwy. 76, Suite 199, Branson, MO 65616. www.bransonauction.com. (MO) Hollywood Wheels Auctions & Shows 800.237.8954, Hosting two auctions a year in beautiful Palm Beach, FL, March & December. Offering quality collector cars and personalized service, all in a climate-controlled, state-of-the-art facility. Come be a part of the excitement! Check us out at www.hollywoodcarauctions.com. Where Collectors Collect! See You On The Block! Carlisle Collector Car Auctions. 717.243.7855, 1000 Bryn Mawr Road, Carlisle, PA 17013. Spring and Fall Auctions. High-line cars cross the 126 RM Auctions, Inc. 800.211.4371, 519.351.1337. With over three decades of experience in the collector car indus- Palm Springs Auctions Inc. Keith McCormick. 760.320.3290, 760.323.7031. 244 N. Indian Canyon Drive, Palm Springs, CA 92262 A family-run auction house producing two large classic cars auctions per year. McCormick’s Palm Springs Auctions has been in business for over 25 years, and each auction features over 500 classics & exotics. www.classic-carauction.com. (CA) Worldwide Auctioneers. 800.990.6789 or 1.260.925.6789, Worldwide Auctioneers was formed over a decade ago by vintage motorcar specialists Rod Egan and John Kruse. The sale and acquisition of classic automobiles is our core business, and no one is better qualified. Worldwide is unique in having owners who are also our chief auctioneers, so you deal directly with the auctioneer, and we are wholly invested in achieving the best result for you. Our auctions are catalogue-based, offering a limited number of higher-end consignments, with an emphasis on quality rather than volume. (We don’t limit ourselves to only selling the most 262.275.5050,. The Mecum Auction Company has been specializing in the sale of collector cars for 25 years, now offering more than 12,000 vehicles per year. Mecum Auctions is the world leader of collector car, exotics, vintage motorcycles and road art sales. Auctions are held throughout the United States and broadcast live on Velocity, Discovery Network. For further information, visit www.Mecum.com. 445 South Main Street, Walworth, WI 53184 MotoeXotica Classic Cars & Auc- tions. 866.543.9393, After 24 years of selling classic cars, MotoeXotica has branched out with classic & exotic car auctions. MotoeXotica currently has auctions in St. Louis, MO; Springfield, MO; and Phoenix, AZ. Combining some of the industry’s lowest entry fees and commissions MotoeXotica is poised to keep expanding while maintaining superior customer service. Contact MotoeXotica today at 866-5439393 or online at www.motoexotica. com. Worth the trip! Silver Auctions. 800.255.4485, Silver Auctions isn’t successful because we auction the most expensive cars, we’re successful because we auction the cars that you love. Silver Auction’s staff, bidders and consignors are everyday people with a passion for Nostalgic and Collector cars. Come see the difference at Silver Auctions. 2020 N. Monroe, Spokane, WA 99205. Email: silver@silverauctions.com, www.silverauctions.com. (WA) Specialty Auto Auctions and Sales. 800.901.0022, Established by Bruce and Helen Douglas in 1987. Based in Colorado and doing auctions in Colorado, Nevada and South Dakota. This year we will join forces with Hot August Nights and B & T Custom Rods for two sales in Nevada. We will also be working with Automania for sales in South Dakota. For personalized service contact us. www.saaasinc.com. (CO) Sports Car Market RESOURCE DIRECTORY


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expensive cars in the world, but do ensure that every car we consign is the very best of its type.) In addition to helping collectors buy and sell cars at auction, we offer specialist-appraisal, estate-management and collection-consultancy services. Our dedicated private sales division serves the needs of individual collectors who seek privacy or to acquire vehicles that may not be available on the open market. www.worldwide-auctioneers.com. (IN) Alfa Romeo we are able to assist you. www.goodingco.com. (CA) road, creating a one-stop shop for the avid car enthusiast. www.brightonmotorsports.com. (AZ) West Coast Auto Appraisals. 310.827.8400, Pre purchase, diminished value, total loss settlements, expert witness. Let us be your eyes and ears, friendly and very knowledgeable car experts, muscle cars, street rods, Europeans, Full Classics, modern-day and more. Servicing all of California, nationwide for larger car collections. Member of IAAA and AMA. Check out our web site for a full list of services. www.thecarappraiser.com. (CA) Centerline Products. 888.750. ALFA, Exclusively Alfa Romeo for over 30 years — rely on our experience to build and maintain your dream Alfa. Restoration, maintenance and performance parts in stock for Giulietta through 164. Newly developed products introduced regularly. Check our web site for online store, new arrivals, tech tips, and special offers. www.centerlinealfa.com. (CO) Automobilia Coachbuilt Press. 215-925-4233, Coachbuilt Press creates limited edition automotive titles for the discriminating motoring enthusiast. We present exceptional material on the most significant collections, museums and marques with a balance of authoritative writing, precise research, unique historical documents and the modern photography of Michael Furman. Please visit our website to view our latest titles and order. www.CoachbuiltPress.com (PA). Steve Austin’s Automobilia & Jon Norman’s Alfa Parts. 800.890.2532, 510.525.9519. 1221 Fourth Street, Berkley, CA 94710. Large selection of parts from Giulietta to 164. Efficient, personal service. www.alfapartscatalog.com. (CA) Appraisals Vintage Auto Posters. Since 1980, Auto Appraisal Group. 800.848.2886, Offices located nationwide. Pre-purchase inspection service, insurance matters, charitable donations, resale vales, estates, expert witness testimony. On-site inspection. Certified, confidential, prompt, professional. “Not just one man’s opinion of value.” See web site for locations and service descriptions. www.autoappraisal.com. Everett Anton Singer has been supplying international collectors with the most diverse selection of authentic vintage automotive posters. The vast inventory runs from the late 1890s through the 1960s; featuring marque, event and product advertising. Please visit us at: www.VintageAutoPosters.com. Buy/Sell/General Paul Russell and Company. 978.768.6092, www.paulrussell.com. Specializing in the Preservation and Sales of European Classics, pre-war through the 1970s, since 1978. You can rely on our decades of experience with Mercedes-Benz, Ferrari, Porsche, Bugatti, Alfa Romeo and other fine collectibles. Repeat customers are the lifeblood of our business. Contact us today to join them. Car Sales Manager, Alex Finigan: Alex@paulrussell.com. (MA) Barrett-Jackson is proud to endorse Brighton Motorsports. Gooding & Company. 310.899.1960, Gooding & Company’s experts are well-qualified to appraise individual automobiles as well as collections and estates. Whether it is the creation of a foundation, living trust or arrangement of a charitable donation, January 2013 480.483.4682, Brighton Motorsports, Scottsdale, AZ, is a unique dealership specializing in Vintage European and American Collector Cars with their Sales/Showroom and Mechanical Repair facility in the heart of Scottsdale’s legendary auction arena. They also have a state-of-the-art paint & body shop specially equipped to do all levels of repair and restoration just down the a new breed of insurance for classic, antique, exotic, special-interest, contemporary classic and limited-edition cars. To get a quote is even easier with our new online improvements. Go to www. barrett-jackson.com/insurance/, select Get a Quote, enter in a couple of key pieces of information about your vehicle and get an estimated quote within seconds! It’s that easy. Don’t be caught without the right insurance for your vehicle. In the unfortunate aftermath of damage to your vehicle, learning that your insurance won’t restore your prized possession to its former glory, or appropriately compensate you for your loss, is the last thing you want to hear. To get a quote by phone, call 877.545.2522. The Last Detail. 847.689.8822 North Chicago / Kenilworth, IL, As “Trusted Advisors” for over 35 years, we have been helping enthusiasts make critical decisions before creating costly mistakes. Whether servicing, buying or selling, your one stop destination for all of your automotive needs, Down to.... The Last Detail! www.thelastdetail.com. (IL) 127 Great Vacations. 800.452.8434, European Car Collector tours including Monaco & Goodwood Historics, private collections, and car manufacturers. Automobile Art importer of legendary artists Alfredo de la Maria and Nicholas Watts. www.steveaustinsgreatvacations.com. Woodies USA. 949.922.7707, 949.412.8812, We buy and sell great woodies — hundreds to date. If you are buying or selling give us a call. We can help. Woodies are fun! Every car collection should have at least one. Located in Laguna Niguel, California. www.woodiesusa.com. (CA) Classic Showcase. 760.758.6100, restoration 760.758.6119. Always buying: Offering top dollar for your European classics. Always selling: 3 showrooms with an excellent selection to choose from. Always Restoring: We feature an award-winning, world-class restoration facility, with the expertise to restore you car to any level, including modifications. Super craftsmanship; attention to detail; knowledgeable staff; servicing all of the collector’s needs. Located in San Diego County. Email: sales@classicshowcase.com, www.classicshowcase.comm. (CA) Hartek Automotive, 319.337.4140, Hartek Automotive is a division of Hartwig Motors Inc., one of the oldest automotive retailers in the Midwest since 1912. Hartek Automotive specializes in the maintenance and sale of sports and prestige automobiles. Their reputation for service continues with a very personalized approach to maintenance of an individual’s daily driver, to the restoration of that special automobile. Hartek Automotive also offers pre-sale or post-sale inspections. Located in Iowa, we are equally accessible for the enthusiast from anywhere. Drive in or fly in...you will find us most accommodating. www.hartek.org (IA) Classic Car Transport Motor Auto Express, Inc. 360.661.1734, Enclosed Transport. MAX cares for what you care for. We offer Personal, Private, Professional services with liftgate loading for your vehicles. Please contact Randy McKinley, Owner. maxiet@gmail.com. (WA) Passport Transport. 800.736.0575, Since our founding in 1970, we have shipped thousands of treasured vehicles door-to-door with our fully enclosed auto transporters. Whether your prized possession is your daily driver, a vintage race car, a classic, a ’60s muscle car or a modern exotic, you can depend on Passport Transport to give you the premium service it deserves. We share your appreciation for fine automobiles, and it shows. www.PassportTransport.com. Collector Car Insurance


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Advertise in the SCM Resource Directory. Call 877.219.2605 Ext. 218 for information, e-mail: scmadvert@sportscarmarket.com. Value Coverage in the continental U.S., and Alaska. Drive Through Time With Peace of Mind with J.C. Taylor Insurance. Get a FREE instant quote online at www.JCTaylor.com. Chubb Collector Car Insurance. 1.866.CAR.9648, The Chubb Collector Car Insurance program provides flexibility by allowing you to choose the agreed value and restoration shop. Broad coverage includes no mileage restrictions and special pricing for large schedules. For more information, contact us at 1(866)CAR-9648 or www.chubbcollectorcar.com. English oil change to a concours-winning restoration, we do it all. Modern upgrades for power steering, window motors, fuel systems and more. Feltham Fast performance parts in stock. We also cater to all British and European cars and motorcycles. www.kevinkayrestorations.net. (CA) need a comprehensive parts selection for both vintage and contemporary Ferraris, you can count on a single-source leader in the Ferrari parts business…T. Rutlands. Call us Toll Free 800.638.1444, Internationally 770.493.8852. Email: Sales@ trutlands.com. www.trutlands.com Finance www.wirewheel.com, 772.299.9788. Aston Martin of New England. Grundy Worldwide. 888.647.8639, Grundy Worldwide offers agreed value insurance with no mileage limitations, zero deductible*, and high liability limits. Our coverages are specifically designed for collectible-car owners. From classic cars to muscle cars, Grundy Worldwide has you covered. (*Zero deductible available in most states.) 888.6GRUNDY (888.647.8639). www.grundyworldwide.com. (PA) 781.547.5959, 85 Linden Street, Waltham, MA 02452. Proudly appointed Aston Martin Heritage Dealer for the USA. New and pre-owned Aston Martins are our specialty. Please contact us when buying, selling or restoring. www.astonmartin-lotus.com. (MA) British Sports and Race Cars BoughtSold-Traded. Located in Beautiful Vero Beach, Florida. In business for over 25 years, specializing in Lotus, TVR, Griffith, Jaguar, Austin Healey, MG, Marcos, Panoz, Lola, and more. Over 50 sports and race cars always in stock. Please check our website for our latest inventory offerings: www.wirewheel.com. (FL) Ferrari/Maserati/Lamborghini AUTOSPORT DESIGNS, INC. 631.425.1555, All Aston Martin models welcome regardless of age, as new inevitably become old! Routine servicingcomplete mechanical restorations/rebuilds — cosmetic repair/paintwork to complete frame-off restoration. Large inventory of parts. All services as well as our current unventory of automobiles for sale can be seen at www.autosportdesigns.com. (NY) Hagerty Insurance Agency, LLC. 800.922.4050, is the leading insurance agency for collector vehicles in the world and host to the largest network of collector car owners. Hagerty offers insurance for collector cars, motorcycles and motorcycle safety equipment, tractors, automotive tools and spare parts, and even “automobilia” (any historic or collectible item linked with motor vehicles). Hagerty also offers overseas shipping/touring insurance coverage, commercial coverage and club liability coverage. For more information, call or visit www.hagerty.com. (MI) German Carobu Engineering. 949.722.9307, Ferrari specialist. Engine rebuilding/ development, dyno-testing, parts and service. Your source for high-performance brakes, suspension, gaskets, engine parts, wheels and exhaust. Dealer for Tubi, Brembo, Koni, Razzo Rosso, Sangalli, Zanzi, Novitech Rosso and X-Ost. WWW.CAROBU.COM. Classic Showcase. 760.758.6100, Classic Showcase. 760.758.6100, restoration 760.758.6119. World class full service restoration facility. Creating show/show drivers, and driver restorations. Specializing in British, German and Italian classics. Superb fit; attention to detail; great craftsmanship; knowledgeable staff; passionate on quality. Located in San Diego County. sales@classicshowcase.com www.classicshowcase.com. (CA) RPM Classic Sports Cars. 802.877.2645, With over 25 years of experience in Classic Italian Sports cars, we know how to make your car perform as new. Please visit our web site showing numerous cars for sale and a frequently updated blog to see what is going on in our busy shop, including video links of engines being run on a test stand and on a chassis dynamometer. Our two-car enclosed transporter makes getting your car to our shop within the Northeast a breeze. www.rpmvt.com. Heacock Classic. 800.678.5173, We understand the passion and needs of the classic-car owner; agreed value, one liability charge, 24-hour claim service and paying by credit card. We provide classic car insurance at rates people can afford! Instant quotes at www.heacockclassic.com. (FL) Fourintune Garages Inc. 262.375.0876, www.fourintune. com. Complete ground-up restoration on British Marques – specializing in Austin-Healeys for 35 years. Experience you can trust, satisfied customers nationwide. Visit our website for details on our restoration process. Located in historic Cedarburg since 1976 – just minutes north of Milwaukee, WI. restoration 760.758.6119. World class full-service restoration facility. Creating show/show drivers, and driver restorations. Specializing in German, British, and Italian classics. Superb fit, attention to detail, great craftsmanship, knowledgeable staff, passionate on quality. Located in San Diego County. sales@classicshowcase.com www.classicshowcase.com. (CA) Premier Financial Services is the nation’s leading lessor of vintage and exotic motorcars. Our Simple Lease Program is ideal for those who wish to own their vehicle at the end of the term, as well as for those who like to change cars frequently. Our Simple Interest Early Termination Program allows you the flexibility of financing with the tax advantages of leasing. Contact Premier at 877.973.7700 or info@pfsllc.com. www.premierfinancialservices.com (CT) European Collectibles, Inc. T. Rutlands & T. Rutlands West J.C. Taylor Insurance. 800.345.8290, Antique, classic, muscle or modified — J.C. Taylor Insurance has provided dependable, dynamic, affordable protection for your collector vehicle for over 50 years. Agreed 128 Kevin Kay Restorations. 530.241.8337, 1530 Charles Drive, Redding, CA 96003. Aston Martin parts, service, repair and restoration. From an provides international service from one of the world’s largest Ferrari parts inventories coast to coast. We have more Ferrari parts, more Ferrari parts experience and better Ferrari parts prices than most anyone. Since 1981 T. Rutlands has been building valuable partnerships with the Ferrari industry’s most respected repair shops, professionals and car owners seeking to provide a one-stop shopping experience for Ferrari parts, tools and accessories. Ferrari parts are our only business and we are true product and service specialists in every sense of the word. When you 949.650.4718, European Collectibles has been buying, consigning, selling and restoring classic European sports cars since 1986. We specialize in Porsche (356 and 911) 1950s to early 1970s along with other marks including Mercedes, Aston Martin, Ferrari, MG, Austin Healey & Jaguar with 40 vehicles in stock to choose from. European Collectibles also offers complete mechanical and cosmetic restorations to concours level along with routine service. Located in Orange County, CA, between Los Angeles and San Diego. Sales@europeancollectibles.com or visit our website www.europeancollectibles.com. (CA) Mercedes-Benz Classic Center. 1.866.MB.CLASSIC, The center of competence for classic Mercedes-Benz enthusiasts — for vintage car sales, Sports Car Market RESOURCE DIRECTORY


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meticulous restorations by manufacturer-trained technicians and the widest selection of Genuine Mercedes-Benz Classic Parts, we are the source. www.mbclassiccenter.com. (CA) Import/Export Bob Smith Coachworks Inc. Griot’s Garage. 800.345.5789, Cosdel International Transportation. Since 1960 Cosdel International Transportation has been handling international shipments by air, ocean and truck. Honest service, competitive pricing and product expertise have made Cosdel the natural shipping choice for the world’s best-known collectors, dealers and auction houses. If you are moving a car, racing or rallying, or attending a concours event overseas, Cosdel is your comprehensive, worldwide resource for all of your nationwide and international shipping needs. We are your automobile Export Import Experts. 415.777.2000 carquotes@cosdel.com. www.cosdel.com. (CA) Italian Griot’s Garage celebrating over 21 years as your best source for a full line of car care cleaners, polishes, waxes, sealants and detailing accessories. You’ll also find garage organizational products, premium automotive accessories, tools, clothing and more. Call to receive a full-color handbook/catalog or enjoy the easy-to-use website for fast, fun and easy ordering. Sign up for weekly email specials. Have fun through our blog, Inmygarage.com or join us on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, where you’ll find numerous howto videos for proper car care tips and tricks. Our number one goal is to ensure that you always... Have fun in your garage! www.griotsgarage.com. (WA) 940.668-8622, 960.665.4657 (fax). Complete exotic and vintage automobile restoration performed by master craftsmen to the highest standards of excellence. Bob Smith Coachworks Inc., 1600 Floral Dr., Gainesville, TX 76240. Email: bsmith@bobsmithcoachworks.com. (TX) RPM Classic Sports Cars. 802.877.2645, With over 25 years of experience in Classic Italian Sports cars, we know how to make your car perform as new. Please visit our web site showing numerous cars for sale and a frequently updated blog to see what is going on in our busy shop, including video links of engines being run on a test stand and on a chassis dynamometer. Our two-car, enclosed transporter makes getting your car to our shop within the Northeast a breeze. www.rpmvt.com. Classic Restoration. 303.761.1245, WeatherTech® Automotive AcHamann Classic Cars. 203.918.8300, with more than 30 years in the industry and worldwide clientele in dealing in European race and sports cars, specializes in classic Ferraris of the ’50s & ’60s. www.ferrari4you.com Literature cessories. 800.441.8527, MacNeil Automotive Products Limited providing Automotive Accessories for your vehicles for over 20 years. MacNeil has defined high-quality vehicle protection with the WeatherTech® line of Automotive Accessories. Choose from allweather floor mats, extreme-duty floor liners, cargo/trunk liners, side window deflectors, no-drill mudflaps, many different options of license plate frames and more. We have products available for virtually every make and model. To see and buy everything, go to www.WeatherTech.com. Restoration — General Via Corsa Car Lover’s Guide- books. Travel the world with guidebooks written for car enthusiasts! We cover car museums, factory tours, race tracks, auctions, and major events. Exclusive interviews with Alice Cooper, Hans-Joachim Stuck, Derek Bell, Mario Andretti, and more! Our guidebooks are available at motorbooks.com and amazon.com. Museums Alan Taylor Company Inc. LeMay—America’s Car Museum, opened in June 2012 in Tacoma, WA, explores how the automobile has fulfilled a distinctive role at the core of the American experience and shaped our society. The spacious museum with rotating exhibits is designed to be the centerpiece for automotive history as well as an educational center and library. The campus also contains a 3.5-acre show field, theater, café, banquet hall and meeting facilities. To become an ACM member, volunteer or make a donation, visit www.lemaymuseum.org. (WA) January 2013 760.489.0657, is a full-service automotive restoration and repair facility that specializes in Pre and Post-War European and American Automobiles. With an emphasis on French Marques including Bugatti & Delahaye and over 50 years of experience in the automotive field, we have proven to be a leader in the automotive industry. Our facility provides a full-array of services including Fabrication, Metal-Shaping, Engine & Transmission Rebuilding, Machine Shop, Award-Winning Upholstery, Paint Shop and Pattern Making & Castings. Providing these services in-house has proved to be highly efficient and has enabled us to provide our clients with the highest level of old-fashioned quality workmanship, professionalism and client services. www.alantaylorcompany.com JWF Restorations Inc. Special- izing in AC restoration from street to concours, U.S. Registrar AC Owners Club (U.K.). Jim Feldman, 11955 SW Faircrest St. Portland, OR 97225 503-706-8250 Fax 503-646-4009 The world’s largest organization of AC owners and enthusiasts. AC ownership is not required. Monthly magazine. Email:jim@jwfrestoration.com (OR) Classic Restoration by Country Club Auto, located in Colorado, is a large facility that offers world-class restoration, repair and fabrication services. Highly organized, fiscally responsible and providing biweekly detailed billing, we keep you abreast of the rapid progress of your project in every way. Check out our excellent web site for details. Email doug@classicrestodenver.com. www.classicrestodenver.com. (CO) Parts and Accessories ity services from basic maintenance to full frame-off restorations. www.thelastdetail.com. (IL) The Guild of Automotive RestorHigh Mountain Classics. 970.532.2339, World-class restoration, repair, and maintenance. Many Pebble Beach Class wins and Best of Show evidence our pursuit of restoration excellence. We service and maintain blue-chip collectibles, race cars, and other investment-grade cars, and provide vintage race track support. We have particular excellence with Bugatti and other pre-war marques. www.HighMountainClassics.com ers. 905.775.0499. The Guild is one of the most recognizable names in the business of restoring antique and classic cars, and with good reason. We are a multi-service facility, which means that your car is fully restored under one roof and the process is under full control at all times. Projects are carefully managed through all tasks, and owners are kept informed with weekly email reports, phone calls and photographs. We are skilled in all aspects of the craft of restoration and are as comfortable coach building a car from scratch as we are doing light maintenance on rare and valuable cars or tune-ups on the family’s original heirloom Model T. If you want your car worked on by a company that still maintains their passion of the hobby and provides you with the accountability of good friends, give us a call. We look forward to hearing from you. David Grainger/Janice Stone, proprietors. www.guildclassiccars.com. (CAN) Sports and Competition RM Auctions, Inc. 800.211.4371, The Last Detail. 847.689.8822 North Chicago / Kenilworth, Il., As “Trusted Advisors” for over 35 years, we have been assisting enthusiasts make critical decisions before creating costly mistakes. Whether servicing, buying or selling, TLD is your one stop destination providing the highest qual- 519.351.1337. Celebrating 30 years in the collector car industry, RM Auctions and its associated companies are responsible for acquisitions, restorations and sales of the world’s rarest and most valuable vintage automobiles, including record-breaking sales in Maranello, Italy and London, U.K. RM’s restoration division achieved unprecedented accolades in 2006, when the company earned “Best of Show” honors at the world’s top three collector car events in a single year. www.rmauctions.com. (CAN) © 129


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Carl Bomstead eWatch Former Junk — and Two Hot Pistols Bonnie and Clyde’s pistols bring $504k, making the prices for a Bugatti model and Steve McQueen poster seem reasonable Thought Carl’s Two pistols found on the bodies of the famed outlaws Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow after they were killed by a posse in 1934 were taped, and there were very few women police officers. That move did not work very well for Parker, but here are a few items that the buyers did not have to get ambushed to own: the internal workings of the engine. There was a plaque on the display stating that it had been donated by Chrysler for educational use. The seller stated that the engine did not turn over. How cool would this be displayed in the car barn next to a period performance Plymouth. This very complex Bugatti model would be 20 inches in length when completed. It comprised 1,635 individual parts and pieces that had not been opened. The box had been wrapped in dark plastic to protect it from light, and it was in exceptional condition. A challenging model and certainly not a father-son bonding project. EBAY #251157056866— ORIGINAL 1970 STEVE MCQUEEN DRIVES PROSCHE POSTER. Number of Bids: BuyIt-Now. SOLD AT: $2,950. Date: 10/1/2012. This was the full-size 41-inch-by-29-inch version of the iconic Steve McQueen Porsche poster. It features McQueen with the Porsche 908 that he piloted to three victories in 1970. Period Steve McQueen memorabilia is priced at what the market will bear. With quality original items, the market will bear a lot, so who can say this was not a reasonable buy. ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPH OF ENZO FERRARI WITH HIS ALFA ROMEO 6C 1500 SS. Number of Bids: 12. SOLD AT: $325. Date: 10/1/2012. An original period photograph is one printed from the original negative at or about the time the photograph was taken. This photograph was about 80 years old and was taken by Franco Zagari. The price was up there for a period photo, but it was of Enzo — and it was original — so what the heck. recently sold at auction for $504,000. The snub-nosed .38 Special found attached to the inside of Parker’s thigh with white medical tape fetched $264,000 of the total. She had taped the gun to her thigh because no gentleman officer would search a woman where she had it EBAY #130265806489— FISK DEALER TIRE DISPLAY. Number of Bids: 24. SOLD AT: $950. Date: 9/17/2012. The Fisk “Time To Re-Tire” boy with the candle has been a distinctive logo since 1907, and this dealer display dated from the late 1950s. It measured 33 inches in height and was in original condition. It was made of fiberglass, and it is thought that about 300 were produced, with about 200 of them going to K-Mart tire departments. Cool piece, and it sold for a fair price considering the condition. EBAY #130756094779—1948 TUCKER ASHTRAY AND CIGARETTE CASE. Number of bids: Buy-It-Now. SOLD AT: $2,425. Date Sold: 9/2/2012. As Tucker went through its trials and tribulations, the company attempted to appease their buyers with various trinkets. This combination ashtray/cigarette case had a gold-plated Tucker on a simulated brick road. This ashtray showed signs of use, and the gold plating was worn. A very desirable piece, but the price was up there, considering the less-than-pristine condition. EBAY #330788782294—1966 PLYMOUTH 426 COMMANDO CUTAWAY DISPLAY ENGINE. Number of Bids: 21. SOLD AT: $3,500. Date: 9/11/2012. This appears to have been a dealer display of the legendary 426 Commando V8 that had been opened up to show EBAY #290766352908—1930 BUGATTI 50T POCHER MODEL. Number of Bids: 29. SOLD AT: $1,225. Date: 9/1/2012. EBAY #380476416347— SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION Sports Car Market (ISSN #1527859X) is published monthly by Automotive Investor Media Group, 401 NE 19th Street, Suite 100, Portland, OR 97232. Periodicals postage paid at Portland, OR, and at additional mailing offices. Subscription rates are $65 for 12 monthly issues in the U.S., $95 Canada/Mexico, Europe $105, Asia/Africa/Middle East $115. Subscriptions are payable in advance in U.S. currency. Make checks to: Sports Car Market. Visa/MC accepted. For instant subscription, call 877.219.2605, 503.261.0555; fax 503.253.2234; www.sportscarmarket.com. 130 MORFORD AUCTIONS LOT 40—MOUNTAIN MOTOR OIL ONE-GALLON CAN. SOLD AT: $1,925. Date: 10/26/2012. The Mountain Tire and Gas Company, a rather obscure firm, was located in Colorado Springs, CO. The can was very presentable. Even though oil cans are off their high of a few years back, the rare and unusual still attract buyers. Price paid was aggressive for a one-gallon can, but then again, it was the first one we have seen from Mountain Tire and Gas. ♦ POSTMASTER Send address changes to: Sports Car Market PO Box 4797, Portland, OR 97208 CPC IPM Sales Agreement No. 1296205 Sports Car Market