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$7.6m ABLE TO LEAP RECORD PRICES IN A SINGLE BOUND Sports Car Market Keith Martin’s The Insider’s Guide to Collecting, Investing, Values, and Trends GULLWINGS Glide on Value 1955 300SL: $1.1m Market Pauses, But Long-Term Investment Potential Remains Strong. Cumberford Says the Styling Still Can’t Be Beat ™ July 2015 www.sportscarmarket.com Miles Collier: Why Low Mileage Isn’t Always a Bonus Legal Files: Pitfalls to Avoid When Selling a Classic Car As Original As It Gets: One-Family ’59 XK 150S, $336k


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“Like” us on Sports Car Market Keith Martin’s The Insider’s Guide to Collecting, Investing, Values, and Trends July 2015 . Volume 27 . Number 7 FERRARI PROFILES This Month’s Market Movers Up Close ENGLISH by Paul Hardiman 60 1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica SWB Cab $7,645,000/ RM Sotheby’s A car built for royalty brings a king’s ransom ETCETERINI by Donald Osborne 62 102 1959 Jaguar XK 150S 3.4 Roadster $334,940 / Bonhams One-family car rightly brings all the money GERMAN by Alex Finigan 64 1977 Maserati Khamsin $137,500 / Auctions America Rising appeal for this rare ’70s express AMERICAN by Carl Bomstead 68 112 124 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing $1,136,080 / Bonhams Well bought while the market holds a beat RACE by Thor Thorson 70 1935 Packard Twelve Sport Coupe $2,200,000 / RM Sotheby’s One of the most striking Packards ever made NEXT GEN by Jeff Zurschmeide 72 by Steve Ahlgrim 58 AUCTIONS What Sold, and Why 205 Vehicles Rated at Nine Sales 78 90 AUCTIONS AMERICA Fort Lauderdale, FL: A 1959 Ferrari 250 GT PF coupe tops the charts at $715k, leading 368 of 495 cars to $21.3m total — Pierre Hedary BONHAMS Stuttgart, DEU: 33 of 43 cars at The Mercedes-Benz Sale sell for more than $14m combined — Leo Van Hoorick LEAKE Dallas, TX: When 269 out of 422 consignments find new garages, the dollars add up to $6.3m — Cody Tayloe BONHAMS Chichester, U.K.: The last Nash to race the 24 Hours of Le Mans sells for $693k, 49 of 64 lots go to new homes, and sales total $6.4m — Paul Hardiman BRANSON Branson, MO: Sales total $2.3m in the Missouri Ozarks, and 124 out of 172 cars change ownership — B. Mitchell Carlson 134 ROUNDUP Highlights from CCA in Northamptonshire, U.K.; Silverstone in Birmingham, U.K.; Mecum in Houston, TX; and Premier in Punta Gorda, FL — Paul Hardiman, Cody Tayloe, Robert Malke acebook and look for updates and offers! 1955 Frazer Nash Le Mans Coupe $693,148 / Bonhams Rare racer with limited investment appeal 12 1981 Renault 5 Turbo $50,400 / Auctions America Why the big discount for an R5 Turbo? Cover photo: 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing; courtesy of Bonhams Sports Car Market NEW Feature!


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54 Cavallino Classic COLUMNS 16 Shifting Gears Most drivers don’t understand the joys of driving, so manufacturers build cars that just about drive themselves Keith Martin 40 Affordable Classic The rugged Mercedes-Benz Unimog belongs on any surface — except a high-speed highway B. Mitchell Carlson 42 Collecting Thoughts Is low mileage really an asset to any car? Miles Collier 44 Legal Files How to protect yourself when you’re selling a car John Draneas 46 Simon Says Filling up on passport stamps and amazing car talk during a globe-trotting excursion through the car world Simon Kidston 66 The Cumberford Perspective The legendary Mercedes-Benz 300SL is one of the greatest automotive facelifts all of time Robert Cumberford 162 eWatch A Wool’s Syrup dispenser will stick you for about $60k Carl Bomstead 42 Collecting Thoughts FEATURES 50 La Jolla Concours d’ Elegance: A rookie judge takes to the show field — Alexandra Martin-Banzer 52 Kuwait Concours d’Elegance: Amazing cars and car people at this invitation-only event — Steve Linden 54 Cavallino Classic: This event celebrates much more than Ferraris — Bill Rothermel DEPARTMENTS 20 Auction Calendar 20 Crossing the Block 24 Concours and Events: Northwest Passage, Hillsborough Concours, Concours d’Elegance of America at St. John’s 26 Contributors: Get to know our writers 28 You Write, We Read: Rusty barn finds in Paris, Keith’s latest Alfa adventure, diminished value for damaged cars 30 Display Advertisers Index 34 Time Pieces: The Hewlett-Packard HP-01 34 Neat Stuff: Cocoon and collage your collector car 36 In Miniature: Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing 36 Speaking Volumes: By Brooks Too Broad For Leaping 86 Glovebox Notes: 2015 Audi 2.0T Allroad Quattro wagon 106 Rising Sun: Selected sales of Japanese collector cars 130 Fresh Meat: 2014 Mercedes-Benz CLS550 sedan, 2014 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 coupe, 2014 Maserati GranTurismo coupe 150 Mystery Photo: “Those boar-hair detail brushes really brought out the negative space between the tchotchkes” 150 Comments with Your Renewals: “Somehow in my busy lifestyle I find time to read every issue” 152 Showcase Gallery: Cars for sale 156 Resource Directory: Meet your car’s needs 14 Sports Car Market Bill Rothermel


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Shifting Gears Keith Martin Bad Driving Is Here to Stay Even though they are behind the wheel, today’s drivers are really just passengers in their own cars an exit ramp across traffic lanes? Or merge badly from an on-ramp? Or if you are entering the freeway, how often have you encountered someone who simply refused to give way and forced you to improvise to get into the traffic flow? Cars better, drivers worse Nearly every improvement in the user interface with our automobiles has come as a replacement for driver responsibility. Drivers won’t check their tire pressures, so we now have warning lights. Drivers won’t check their mirrors, so we have sensors to tell us if someone is in the lane next to us. Autonomous cars are just an evolutionary — not revolutionary — step in this process. Many of today’s drivers don’t want to really truly drive, so cars will drive for them. I view all of this as an inescapable and not unwelcome part of prog- So many gauges to keep track of ... C so. Some say this is related to texting while driving and cell phone usage. According to a study published by the Cohen Medical Center, texting while driving is now the largest cause of teen-age driver’s deaths, surpassing alcohol abuse. But I think there is something else going on here. I think that we have new generations of drivers who are simply not connected to their cars. People who grew up driving cars with automatic transmissions, good brakes and reliable engines don’t need to pay any attention to the care, feeding and operation of their machines. Even though they are behind the wheel, they are really passengers in their automobiles. My observations are based on anecdotal experience; simply look at how the people around you drive. When I’m driving an old car in modern traffic, I am ultra-alert. Everyone else on the road can start and stop better than I can. And what might be a fender-bender for them would send a steering column through my chest. During the past couple of years, I have had a chance to drive some vintage sports cars to and from the San Francisco Bay area from Portland on two-lane roads. I was surprised to find that on two-lane roads, I was passing everyone with my puny 96-cubic-inch engine. I came to the conclusion then that most of today’s drivers are “expressway born” and simply don’t know how to pilot their cars skillfully on back roads. They don’t how to downshift to be in the right gear for passing. They don’t know how to look ahead at a traffic pattern see where there’s a chance to step out, pass and slide back in. In general, they drive along obliviously at the posted limit, waiting for a stretch of four- or-six-lane highway where they can go really fast. When the two-lane resumes, their brains shift back into neutral and it’s back to lumbering along. Let’s consider driver behavior on the freeway. How often do you see cars in the fast lane going slower than the flow of the traffic, so that everyone has to change lanes to get around them? Or watch people dive for 16 ars are safer than ever. The fatality rate per million miles traveled in 2013, the most recent year for which data are available, was 1.1 — a nearly 25% decline since 2004, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Not only do cars handle and brake better than ever before, they are also loaded with safety features including airbags, anti-lock brakes and stability control. However, as cars have become safer, their drivers have become less ress. Nearly every machine becomes more foolproof and simpler to use over time. We no longer load ice into our freezers or have to get up to change the channels on our televisions. However, the art of driving is vanishing. Having a car simply for the visceral pleasure it provides as you run through the gears is something that appeals to a smaller and smaller group of people — we call them enthusiasts. A lot of the joy of motoring is vanishing as well. I’ve driven modern cars and vintage cars on the same two-lane roads. New cars lack emotional and technical challenges. They are faster and more comfortable, but they are really like sitting on a four-wheeled couch as you go through the countryside. They require very little skill from drivers to get them to perform well, and consequently few drivers derive satisfaction from their performance. By contrast, old cars, generally underpowered and with suspect han- dling, skinny tires and terrible brakes, offer you a dollop of satisfaction every time you properly execute a shift or hit the apex of a turn. With an old car, the concept of mastery includes knowing just how the car should “feel” when it goes down the road. Or how many times you have to pump the throttle when starting it — or not pumping the throttle at all if your car is fitted with SU carburetors. As you watch the needle on the temperature gauge climb, you anticipate just how much better your car will run as it gets into its operating range. You’ve watched it do this hundreds of times, and you know exactly what to expect. A well-tuned car rewards your involvement. Mastery of archaic cars is fast becoming a quaint skill, like knowing how to put a bridle on a horse. We enthusiasts pride ourselves on getting our old cars to do tricks like start and stop, and we are excited when we have wipers that wipe and heaters that heat. If our gas gauges function, we believe a miracle has occurred. Because modern cars do so much on their own, many drivers today will never develop a situational awareness of driving. Few will understand their responsibilities to others on a crowded freeway. They won’t be able to sense when they are going too fast for conditions. They exist as loners, not community members. This isn’t going to change for the better. In some ways, it makes self- driving cars a blessing, for no self-driving car would behave as poorly as many of the drivers we see on the road today. Farewell, Denise Racer, author and good friend Denise McCluggage died on May 6, 2015. She was 88 years old. I met her when I was a wet-behind-the-ears journalist reviewing cars for the New York Times, and she was always warm, supportive and helpful. She was a positive, thoughtful force for the entire motoring community, and she will be missed. ♦ Sports Car Market Dirk de Jager, courtesy of Bonhams


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Crossing the Block Tony Piff Images courtesy of the respective auction companies unless otherwise noted Star Cars: 1938 Alta Supercharged Voiturette, 1951 Jaguar XK 120 roadster and 1926 Frazer Nash “Fast Tourer” at H&H Droitwich, U.K. Silver — Jackson Hole Where: Jackson Hole, WY When: July 4–5 More: www.silverauctions.com Smith’s Where: Paducah, KY When: July 10–11 More: www.smithsauctioncompany.com Vicari Where: New Orleans, LA When: July 10–11 More: www.vicariauction.com Coys — Blenheim Palace Where: Woodstock, U.K. When: July 11 More: www.coys.co.uk H&H — Chateau Impney Where: Droitwich, U.K. When: July 11 Featured cars: • 1951 Jaguar XK 120 roadster. Homemarket car with period competition history • 1938 Alta Supercharged Voiturette. Raced at Brooklands, Crystal Palace, Silverstone and Goodwood • 1926 Frazer Nash “Fast Tourer.” Continuous ownership history since 1933. Restored by Ian Lock More: www.classic-auctions.com Silver Where: Spokane, WA When: July 11 Last year: 105/153 cars sold / $1.5m More: www.silverauctions.com Petersen — Roseburg Graffiti Weekend Where: Roseburg, OR When: July 11 More: www.petersencollectorcars.com Shannons — Melbourne Winter Classic Auction Where: Melbourne, AUS 20 When: July 13 More: www.shannons.com.au Brightwells Where: Herefordshire, U.K. When: July 15 More: www.brightwells.com Auction Calendar Email auction info to: chad.tyson@sportscarmarket.com. JUNE 2—CCA Silverstone, U.K. 5–6—MECUM Seattle, WA 5–7—LEAKE Tulsa, OK 5–7—RUSSO AND STEELE Newport Beach, CA 6—VANDERBRINK Spring Grove, IL 10—BRIGHTWELLS Herefordshire, U.K. 12—MOTOSTALGIA Indianapolis, IN 12–14—ELECTRIC GARAGE Calgary, AB, CAN 13—SILVER Williston, ND 16—BARONS Surrey, U.K. 19–20—RALEIGH CLASSIC Raleigh, NC 20—BONHAMS Oxford, U.K. 20—H&H Stamford, U.K. 20—SILVER Coeur d’Alene, ID 22—ARTCURIAL Paris, FRA 26—BONHAMS Chichester, U.K. 26–27—MECUM Denver, CO 27—SOUTHERN CLASSIC Murfreesboro, TN 27—VANDERBRINK Brandon, SD JULY 4–5—SILVER Jackson Hole, WY 10–11—SMITH’S Paducah, KY 10–11—VICARI New Orleans, LA 11—COYS Woodstock, U.K. 11—H&H Droitwich, U.K. 11—SILVER Spokane, WA Auctions America — California Where: Santa Monica, CA When: July 17–18 Last year: 252/399 cars sold / $17.2m Featured cars: • European-specification 2004 Ferrari Enzo. Driven approximately 12,000 All dates listed are current at time of publication. Contact information for most auction companies may be found in the Resource Directory at the back of this issue. Please confirm dates and locations before attending any event. 11—PETERSEN Roseburg, OR 13—SHANNONS Melbourne, AUS 15—BRIGHTWELLS Herefordshire, U.K. 17–18—AUCTIONS AMERICA Santa Monica, CA 18—COLLECTOR CAR PRODUCTIONS Chatham, ON, CAN 23–25—GAA Greensboro, NC 25—RM SOTHEBY’S St. John’s, MI 25—VANDERBRINK Beresford, SD 25–26—SILVERSTONE Northamptonshire, U.K. 28—BARONS Surrey, U.K. 29—H&H Buxton, U.K. 30–AUGUST 1—MECUM Harrisburg, PA AUGUST 6–8—BARRETTJACKSON Reno, NV 8—COYS Nürburgring, DEU 8—VANDERBRINK Tea, SD 10—SHANNONS Sydney, AUS 12–15—JR AUCTIONS Monterey, CA 13–14—BONHAMS Carmel, CA 13–15—RICK COLE Monterey, CA 13–15—RUSSO AND STEELE Monterey, CA 13–15—MECUM Monterey, CA 14–15—RM SOTHEBY’S Monterey, CA 15–16—GOODING & CO. Pebble Beach, CA 21–22—SILVER Shelton, WA 29—VANDERBRINK Minot, ND Sports Car Market


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Crossing the Block Tony Piff Images courtesy of the respective auction companies Star Cars: 2004 European-spec Ferrari Enzo and 1967 Ferrari 330 GTS with Borrani wire wheels at Auctions America in Santa Monica, CA kilometers. Converted in California to conform to all California EPA, DOT and smog regulations (Auctions America estimate: $1.6m–$2m) • 1960 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster. Numbers-matching example, presented in strong mechanical and cosmetic condition ($1.1m–$1.4m) • Star Car: 1967 Ferrari 330 GTS. With excellent brightwork and Borrani wire wheels ($2.3m–$2.7m) More: www.auctionsamerica.com Collector Car Productions — Maple City Classic Car Auction Where: Chatham, ON, CAN When: July 18 More: www.collectorcarproductions.com GAA — Classic Cars At the Palace Where: Greensboro, NC When: July 23–25 Featured cars: • 1994 Porsche 911 Speedster. Two-owner car with 18k actual miles. All books and records included • 1969 Ford Mustang Boss 302. One of two as optioned • Star Car: 1970 Dodge Challenger R/T 440 Six Pack. Frame-off rotisserie restoration of a documented, numbers- matching car. With Shaker hood, one of three in green More: www.gaaclassiccars.com RM Sotheby’s — Motor City Where: Plymouth, MI When: July 25 Last year: 60/78 cars sold / $7.4m Featured cars: • Star Car: 1930 Packard Deluxe Eight dual-cowl sport phaeton. Formerly a part of several noted collections (RM Sotheby’s estimate: $275k–$350k) • 1988 Lamborghini LM002. Desirable carbureted example finished in its original color combination of white over a black interior ($140k–$180k) • 1952 Mercedes-Benz 300 Cabriolet D. With original owner until his passing in 1999. Now restored to concours awardwinning standard ($275k–$375k) More: www.rmsothebys.com VanDerBrink — The Hove Collection Where: Beresford, SD When: July 25 More: www.vanderbrinkauctions.com The Silverstone Classic Sale Where: Northamptonshire, U.K. When: July 25–26 More: www.silverstoneauctions.com Barons — Classic Collector and Sports Car Auction Where: Surrey, U.K. When: July 28 More: www.barons-auctions.com H&H — The Pavilion Gardens Where: Buxton, U.K. When: July 29 More: www.classic-auctions.com Mecum — Harrisburg 2015 Where: Harrisburg, PA When: July 30–August 1 Featured cars: • Star Car: 1965 Plymouth Belvedere I Super Stock racer • 2006 Lamborghini Gallardo Spyder • 1969 Chevrolet Yenko Chevelle More: www.mecum.com ♦ Star Car: 1970 Dodge Challenger R/T 440 Six Pack at GAA Greensboro, NC 22 Star Car: 1930 Packard Deluxe Eight dual-cowl sport phaeton at RM Sotheby’s Motor City Sports Car Market


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Concours and Events Alexandra Martin-Banzer Send news and event listings to insideline@sportscarmarket.com JULY CALENDAR 10–12 Portland Vintage Racing Festival, Portland, OR; www.portlandraceway.com 19 Keeneland Concours d’Elegance, Lexington, KY; www.keenelandconcours. com 19 Hillsborough Concours d’Elegance, Hillsborough, CA; www.hillsboroughconcours.org 26 Misselwood Concours d’Elegance, Beverly, MA; www.endicott.edu/ concours A Shady Event — But in the Best Possible Way The picturesque, tree-shaded lawns of Pacific University in Forest Grove, OR, will welcome more than 300 sports and classic cars to the 43rd Annual Forest Grove Concours d’Elegance on July 19. The special classes for this year’s show are “Modern Supercars” and “60 Years of the Ford Thunderbird.” The concours is also hosting a Classic Car Club of America Grand Classic, which will feature classics built from 1925 to 1948. Publisher Martin and SCM Contributing Editor Donald Osborne will return as emcees. Advance tickets for adults are $17, and children younger than 13 are admitted free. For more information, visit www.forestgroveconcours.org (OR) Maseratis, motoring and much more The handsome grounds of the Inn at St. John’s in Plymouth, MI, will welcome the 37th Annual Concours d’Elegance of America from July 24 to 26. A legendary 1957 Maserati 250S will grace the lawn, continuing a concours tradition of showcasing rare and magnificent automobiles. The concours will honor Bruce Meyer with the “Enthusiast of the Year” award. Weekend events include a mo- toring tour, a Friday night Concert in the Park, a Saturday Cars and Coffee, and a gala Saturday night party. Everything leads up to the Concours d’Elegance of America on Sunday, July 26. Publisher Martin returns as the emcee. www.concoursusa.org (MI) 24 Automotive Beauty by the Bay The Hillsborough Concours, one of the Bay Area’s top car events, rolls beautiful cars onto the gorgeous fairways of the Crystal Springs Golf Course in Burlingame on July 19. This year’s featured categories are “60 Years of Ferrari in North America” and “The Magnificent Machines of Auburn, Cord and Duesenberg.” Admission is $25 for adults; children younger than 13 are admitted free of charge. www.hillsboroughconcours.org. (CA) Look for ACC’s Dodge Viper on the Northwest Passage A Trip Through Two-Lane Heaven Oregon’s Coast Range will crackle with European revving as Northwest Passage drivers explore Oregon from July 9 to 12. Spectacular two-lane drives through the beautiful Clackamas and Willamette River valleys and on to the Pacific Ocean are the main attraction, but the event also includes gourmet food and luxurious accommodations. A team of SCMers is already registered and ready to play cat and mouse: Publisher Martin will drive his Porsche 911 Turbo, writer Paul Hardiman will fly in from England to pilot American Car Collector’s Dodge Viper, and Thor Thorson with his wife, Donna, will drive their Alfa GTV. SCM returns as a title sponsor. Cost is $550 per car, and the tour is limited to 50 cars. This year is sold out. To be put on the mailing list for 2016, contact Jim North at james.north@morganstanley. com. Visit www.oregonpca.org for more information. (OR) Sports Car Market


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Sports Car Market EDITORIAL Publisher Keith Martin keith.martin@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 210 Executive Editor Chester Allen chester.allen@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 203 Art Director David Tomaro david.tomaro@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 202 Managing Editor Jim Pickering jim.pickering@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 208 Digital Media / Art Director Jeff Stites jeff.stites@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 221 Auctions Editor / Photographer Tony Piff tony.piff@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 206 Senior Associate Editor Chad Tyson chad.tyson@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 207 Editors at Large Colin Comer , Simon Kidston, Donald Osborne Copy Editors Yael Abel, David Tomaro Senior Auction Analysts B. Mitchell Carlson, Carl Bomstead, Dale Novak Paul Hardiman (Europe), Jack Tockston Auction Analysts Daniel Grunwald, Doug Schultz, Michael Leven, Cody Tayloe, Kevin Coakley, Adam Blumenthal, Joe Seminetta, Travis Shetler, Leo Van Hoorick, Jeremy Da Rosa, Pierre Hedary, Andy Staugaard, Mark Moskowitz, Gary West Contributing Editors Steve Ahlgrim (Ferrari), Gary Anderson (English), Robert Cumberford (Design), John Draneas (Legal), Prescott Kelly (Porsche), Thor Thorson (Race Cars) Contributors John Apen, Diane Brandon, Marshall Buck, Dale Novak Miles Collier, Martin Emmison, Jay Harden, Paul Hardiman, Alex Hofberg, Ed Milich, Stephen Serio, John L. Stein, Bill Rothermel CORRESPONDENCE Email service@sportscarmarket.com Customer Support www.sportscarmarket.com/helpdesk Fax 503.253.2234 General P.O. Box 4797, Portland, OR 97208 FedEx/DHL/UPS 401 NE 19th Ave., Suite 100, Portland, OR 97232 DIGITAL AND BUSINESS Lead Web Developer Scott Correy scott.correy@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 212 Information Technology Brian Baker brian.baker@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 215 SEO Consultant Michael Cottam me@michaelcottam.com; 503.283.0177 Financial Manager Cheryl Ann Cox cheryl.francisco@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 205 Special Operations Reid Trummel reid.trummel@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 209 Strategic Planner Bill Woodard Print / Promotions Manager Wendie Martin wmartin@enthusiastmediagroup.com; 206.427.1652 Intern / Blogger Alexandra Martin-Banzer Executive Producer, SCM Television Roger Williams roger_williams@earthlink.net ADVERTISING Display Advertising Account Executives Darren Frank darren.frank@sportscarmarket.com; 877.219.2605 x 214 Cindy Meitle cindy.meitle@sportscarmarket.com; 877.219.2605 x 213 Steve Kittrell steve.kittrell@sportscarmarket.com; 877.219.2605 x 211 Advertising / Events Manager Erin Olson erin.olson@sportscarmarket.com; 877.219.2605 x 218 Classified Advertising classifieds@sportscarmarket.com SUBSCRIPTIONS Customer Service Coordinator Ethan Bradford ethan.bradford@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 217 To order new subscriptions or for questions about current subscriptions 877.219.2605, x 1; service@sportscarmarket.com, fax 503.253.2234 M–F 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. PST @SportsCarMarket www.sportscarmarket.com The information in Sports Car Market magazine is compiled from a variety of reliable sources. However, we disclaim and deny any responsibility or liability for the timeliness, use, interpretation, accuracy, and completeness of the information presented. All material, data, formats and intellectual concepts in this issue © 2015 by Sports Car Market, Inc., Automotive Investor Media Group and Automotive Investor in this format and any other used by Sports Car Market magazine. Copyright registered with the United States copyright office. Canada Post Publication Agreement #41578525 PRINTED IN USA SCM Contributors SIMON KIDSTON, SCM Editor at Large, is from an old British motor racing family. He started his career at Coys, leaving to co-found Bonhams Europe in Geneva. Over the next decade, he staged high-profile auctions around the world, branching out on his own in 2006 to found Kidston SA, a consultancy responsible for some of the larger deals you rarely hear about. He also judges at Pebble Beach and is “the voice” of the Villa d’Este Concours and the Mille Miglia. His column, “Simon Says,” is one of SCM’s most popular features. Turn to p. 46 for Simon’s latest adventure with some very good car friends. STEVE AHLGRIM, SCM Contributing Editor, taught high school auto shop before moving to Atlanta, GA, where his love of sports cars led him to FAF Motorcars, the former Ferrari dealer where he served as General Manager and Vice President. He has been a self-proclaimed “one-trick pony,” coveting the Ferrari marque. He has been involved in concours judging for over 25 years and is a member of the IAC/PFA, an international committee overseeing high-level Ferrari concours judging. He is chief judge of the Celebration Exotic Car Show in Celebration, FL. Please turn to p. 58 for his take on RM Sotheby’s sale of a 1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica SWB cabriolet. CODY TAYLOE, SCM Auction Analyst, joined the team in 2013, and his clean, timely copy quickly endeared him to the editorial staff. As a member of Generation X, Tayloe represents the fast-growing segment of car collectors whose interests in vehicles doesn’t stop at 1972. He has a passion for Porsches, and his daily driver is a 1983 911SC coupe. Tayloe worked as a disc jockey and as a television writer and producer before landing in the building-products industry. He is also a licensed car dealer, buying, selling and representing cars at auction regularly. Tayloe is a native of East Texas, where he resides today along with his wife and son. Check out his coverage of Leake’s Dallas Auction on p. 102 and Mecum Houston in the Roundup, which begins on p. 134. 26


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You Write We Read All letters are subject to editing. Please address correspondence to SCM, P.O. Box 4797, Portland, OR 97208. Fax 503.253.2234, e-mail: youwrite@sportscarmarket.com Vive la France (and dust and rust) To the Editor: This whole “barn find” wave of irrational exuberance has to stop. I was stunned upon reading the article in your May issue regarding the Baillon Collection in Paris (Artcurial Rétromobile Market Report, p. 68). For the most part, these cars are not time capsules, but unloved rusty metal that buyers will spend a fortune restoring to better-thannew condition. This makes them non-original, restored cars — no matter how much money you throw at them. I will admit some are better restoration candidates than others, but my core question regarding barn finds is what happened to common sense and basic logic? Especially when it applies to nonbespoke, production cars. Rust and dust don’t reflect true value. Remember, these cars have to first be purchased before they are restored, and this cost added to the price of the restoration for a total cost — something that is not generally discussed even in your editorial about being “immortal” (May 2015, “Shifting Gears,” p. 14). Unless the car is given to you, and your sunk cost is zero, a restoration of any sort commands a prudent, realistic plan and a sharp pencil. If this is not done, you are only kidding yourself, or worse, you are delusional. As an example, I have owned a Porsche 356C/SC for 30 years that is as much a part of the family as any other part. It is my baby, well loved, and will be passed on to my son when the time comes (and no sooner, in case he is reading this). I would view it as a 3+ or 2- car. Imagine my shock when I turned to p. 76 and saw a ’63 SC coupe that looked like an abandoned hobo sitting in a homeless camp waiting to be warmed by a fire. In walks its savior who heroically raised his bidding paddle for a jaw-dropping all-in price of $102,336. Viva La France! For that #4 car? Really! Based on this logic, if I shipped my car from California to Paris, kicked the crap out of it with my boot to the front end and left it to rust 28 outside over the course of a year or so (it doesn’t take long) and then sold it, I would still be about $20,000 ahead based on relative value. But, of course, I must be crazy because my last name is not Baillon. Does his name really command this sort of premium for a production car? The article’s author seems to have been drinking from a fountain of flawed logic as well. He states; “Rust repair needed, but this looks like a relatively easy restoration.” “With a full restoration on order, there is at least another hundred grand to spend.” Delusion appears to have taken yet another victim, as common sense in Paris seems to have dimmed with the daylight. This hobby is getting out of control. “Bubble” anyone? — Doug McDonald, via email What was Keith thinking? To the Editor: It seems likely to me that a large majority of Keith Martin’s readers will feel his pain (June 2015, “Shifting Gears” p. 14). You are of an age that you might remember the musical play “Oklahoma!” The tinker, Ali Hakim, is compelled by circumstances to make the high bid for Ado Annie’s ... ah, basket of goodies. You remember, she’s the “girl who cain’t say no.” I, too, am certain the pistons in the lovely blue Sprint Speciale are just a little “stuck,” and that you cannot possibly be underwater after the necessary restoration. Fortunately for us, in the Sports Car Market Universe there is no reason to explore the emotional and psychological underpinnings of our certainty. On the other hand, this is the only way for persons of relatively modest means — who like our retirement accounts intact — to acquire one of these. Remember that there is a corollary to the old saw that a buyer cannot pay too much, only too soon. Best wishes Imagine my shock when I turned to p. 76 and saw a ’63 SC coupe that looked like an abandoned hobo sitting in a homeless camp… — to Keith Martin, the magazine, and the Giulietta SS. — Jackson Lyons, Jackson, MS Keith Martin responds: Jackson, thanks for your note. The “stuck pistons” were really stuck — the engine is now out and completely apart. New 1,422cc pistons and liners are ordered, as well as modern grind cams — and everything else necessary for a complete mechanical overhaul. My only hope is that the rising market forgives all sins. Astonished — but not speechless To the Editor: On p. 142 of the April 2015 edition of your fine magazine, you make note of the sale of a “2007 Sports Speciale” Spyder, and I simply had to comment on the self-evident fact that the maker of this one-off has perfectly captured the spirit of custom Italian coach building which so distinguished the competition cars of Ferrari and Maserati and Sports Car Market


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Ad Index 356 Registry ...................................................155 American Car Collector .................................110 Artcurial ...........................................................51 Aston Martin of New England .........................41 Auctions America .............................................49 Authentic Classics ..........................................151 Auto Kennel ...................................................141 Automobilia Monterey ...................................151 Automotive Restorations Inc. ........................131 Autosport Designs Inc ....................................123 Autosport Designs Originals ..........................105 Barrett-Jackson ................................................37 Bennett Law Office ........................................149 Beverly Hills Car Club ...................................139 BMW Car Club of America, Inc. ...................140 Bonhams / SF ...................................................35 Bonhams / UK..................................................33 Canepa ............................................................121 Carmel Artomobilia .......................................125 Cars, Inc. ..........................................................53 Centerline Alfa Parts ......................................149 Central Classic Cars ....................155 Chantilly Arts & Elegance Richard Mille ........32 Charles Prince Classic Cars .............................97 Chequered Flag International .........................127 Chubb Personal Insurance ................................47 Classic Assets Motor Sports Center .................57 Classic Investments ........................................133 Classic Showcase ...........................................119 Collector Car Price Tracker ...........................149 Collector Studio .............................................147 Concorso Italiano .............................................18 Cooper Classic Cars .......................................133 Copley Motorcars .............................................75 Copley Motorcars ...........................................151 Cosdel ............................................................152 DC Automotive ..............................................120 DeLorean Motor Company Florida ...............155 Dragone Classic Motorcars Inc. .....................163 Dresser Leathers .............................................140 Driversource Houston LLC ............................ 6-7 E-Type UK USA ............................................115 European Collectibles ....................................129 Evans Cooling Systems Inc. ............................25 Exotic Classics ...............................................144 Fantasy Junction ...............................................83 Ferrari Financial Services ..............................143 Fourintune Garage Inc ...................................139 Gooding & Company .........................................2 Gooding & Company .........................................3 Greensboro Auto Auction ................................85 Grundy Worldwide .........................................123 GTO Engineering LTD ....................................56 Gullwing Motor Cars, Inc. .............................143 Hamann Classic Cars ..................................... 8-9 Heritage Classics ..............................................55 Hillsborough Concours ..................................117 Hyman, LTD ..................................................107 Intercity Lines ..................................................45 Investment Motorcars, Inc. ..............................99 J Chadwick Co Engraving .............................122 JC Taylor ........................................................105 Jeff Brynan .....................................................151 JJ Best Banc & Co .........................................195 JR-Auctions......................................................39 Kevin Kay Restorations ...................................93 Kidston .............................................................11 Kidston .............................................................13 Legendary Classic Center ................................29 Legendary Motorcar Company ......................111 LeMay - America’s Car Museum .....................39 Luxury Brokers International .........................145 MacNeil Automotive Products Ltd ..................48 Maxted-Page Limited .......................................91 Mercedes Classic Center ..................................31 Mershon’s World Of Cars ................................81 Miller’s Mercedes Parts, Inc ..........................140 Motostalgia ......................................................15 P21S ...............................................................137 Park Place LTD ................................................67 Paul Russell And Company .............................43 Pebble Beach RetroAuto ..................................10 Porsche Club of America ...............................113 PORsport.com ................................................129 Pro-Team Corvette Sales, Inc.........................109 Putnam Leasing ..............................................164 QuickSilver Exhausts Ltd. .............................101 Raymond James & Associates .........................79 Reliable Carriers ..............................................77 Rick Cole Auctions ..........................................23 RM Auctions ....................................................19 RM Auctions ....................................................21 Robert Glover LTD ........................................125 Ron Tonkin Gran Turismo .............................137 Russo & Steele LLC ...................................... 4-5 Silver Collector Car Auctions ..........................75 Sloancars ..........................................................27 Sports Car Market ..........................................121 Suixtil USA ....................................................145 Swissvax USA, LLC ........................................87 Symbolic Motor Car Co ...................................17 The Stable, Ltd. ................................................89 The Werk Shop .................................................82 Tony Labella Classic Cars..............................149 Vintage Car Research .....................................151 Vintage Motors of Sarasota ..............................95 Vintage Rallies ...............................................127 Watchworks ....................................................155 West Coast Classics, LLC ..............................147 30 You Write We Read It was a source of astonishment to me that someone paid $132k for this car … OSCA during those golden 1950s and 1960s. And he (I assume) has man- aged to accomplish this feat without employing the purity of line, the balance, the beauty, the sexiness and the ferocity, the very soul, spirit, beauty and artistry of the original cars bodied by Scaglietti, Pininfarina, Vignale, Fantuzzi and other Italian tin bashers. It was a source of astonish- ment to me that someone paid $132k for this car. However, that emotion quickly morphed into a state of gob-smacked incredulity upon learning that not only had someone bid $410,000 for it at a previous auction, but that said bid had been declined. Truly a collision between abysmal taste and monumental chutzpah, probably resulting in both sides saying something along the lines of “Aw, snap!” While I confess to never hav- ing seen said Sports Speciale in the aluminum, I have seen many pictures, all of which attest to my above observations about creation’s aesthetic. this From anteater nose to tacky plastic hood scoop to bolt-upright wind screen to undersized tires to bulbous derriere, this car is a compendium of badly thought out, poorly executed shapes. As to the claimed top speed of 251 miles per hour and 3.3-second 0–60 mph, why even throw that in? Why add to the farce with ridiculous performance figures? If you agree with any or all If not, no of my points, swell. worries. I have long been afflicted with good taste insofar as automotive styling is concerned, and with sharing strongly held opinions. That’s just how it is. — Rich Henry, Prescott, AZ Beware diminished value To the Editor: The article on insurance was very informative (May 2015, “Legal Files,” p. 40). However, John Draneas left out a very important aspect of auto insurance: “diminished value.” When a car is damaged and repaired, it may not have the same value as an undamaged car. Most collector car insurance policies do not have a diminished-value clause, while most street-car policies do. While vintage cars are nor- mally restored/repaired to better than new, it may pertain more to late-model collectibles. Cars produced in 1981 or later have standardized 17-digit VINs, which has made vehicle histories easier to track. When accident damage is re- ported by insurance companies, auto dealers, and police departments, it creates an entry on CARFAX-type reporting. A car with an accident notation definitely has diminished value over a non-damaged car. — Norbert Bries, Northshore Sportscars, Lake Bluff, IL John Draneas responds: Keith only allows me 1,500 words, so I had to leave something out! Seriously, you make a very good point. Diminished value is a very real consideration. I’ve written about it before several times, but doing so again probably makes sense. Thanks so much for reading. Especially reading closely. ♦ Sports Car Market


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Time Pieces by Alex Hofberg The Smartest Watch from the Days of Disco Back in the dark ages of the early 1970s, when engineers, scientists and students still wore slide rules on their belts, the HewlettPackard Company of Palo Alto, CA, whose business for the previous 30 years was making fine oscilloscopes and other electronic test equipment, introduced the world’s first pocket-sized calculator that could perform trigonometric and transcendental functions and display scientific notation. Known as the HP35, as it had 35 keys, this device oversold Hewlett-Packard’s sales projections of 10,000 units in the first year by a factor of 10 (or 102 ) — even with a staggering price tag of $395. Then they made a watch. The HP-01 wristwatch calculator was the most sophisticated watch of its day. It combined an amazingly accurate quartz oscillating circuit with a four-function (addition, subtraction, multiplication, division) calculator capable of displaying seven digits, with internal programming to include 1/100th-second chronograph, alarms, timers, and a 200-year perpetual calendar. The watch could perform mathematical processes on numbers — and on other data formats, such as the time or date. For example, the displayed time could be used as a data point so that a distant time zone could be compared with it. Another breakthrough was the use of standard algebraic notation where prior devices employed “Reverse Polish Notation,” which put the operator after the operands to reduce keystrokes. For example: (5 - 3) x 5 would be notated and keyed as 5 3 - 5 x... RPN, as it was known, confused and annoyed some users, and the HP-01 did away with it. Consisting of a blocky steel case, Details Production date: 1977 Best place to wear one: To your 40th high school reunion while packed into your three-piece corduroy suit. We know you saved it.... Ratings ( Rarity: Durability: Parts/service availability: Cool factor: Neat Stuff by Tony Piff Bubble Wrap A framework of inflatable pillars supports the CarCapsule ShowCase, protecting your car from door dings, fingerprints and dust. The pillars air up in three to four minutes with the included pump, and zippered end panels and side panels allow drive-in and walk-in access. Once sealed, CarCapsule’s Evaporative Storage System technology filters the air continually, eliminating risk of condensation and mildew. $1,495 from www.carcapsule.com 34 is best): (gold plated on the more expensive models) attached to a matching bracelet or lizard strap, the HP-01 featured a synthetic ruby crystal, making it highly scratch resistant. The watch also had a 28-key control panel on which only five of the buttons were raised: D (Date), A (Alarm), M (Memory), T (Time) and S (Stopwatch). All of the other buttons were re- cessed, requiring the use of a stylus which was concealed in the clasp. Users could also use the double-ended pen accompanying the watch. One end was a ballpoint pen and the other end was a hard nylon stylus. The case back threaded onto the body in a typical fashion employed by most water-resistant watches (HP guaranteed water resistance to 10 meters). However, HP was concerned about battery life, so the watches were easy to open and shut, and they arrived with a tool to open and close the case back. One of the remarkable aspects of the HP-01 is the internal build. The main board of the watch is not the typical wafer material but a ceramic block for the components. The six integrated circuits are joined by gold contacts and conducting paths that are naturally resistant to corrosion. Together, the integrated circuits combined have the equivalent computing power of 38,000 individual transistors, which by the standards of the day was remarkable as the HP35 calculator had only 25% as much power and was far larger. An interesting side note is that HP did not sell the HP-01 through the typical channels established to sell their other technical products. They sold their watches in jewelry stores. One could speculate that the selling price of the watch ($400–$800, depending on finish and bracelet choice) was the reason for selling to jewelers. The watch was at least as expensive as many complicated Rolexes. Training programs were established on the use of the watch as well as battery changing, bracelet sizing and navigating the 100-page instruction booklet. It is easy to find these watches for sale on eBay. The sharks out there have them listed for a very wide range of prices, and they can top $5,000. However, many are now selling for $1,500 to $1,800. As in all collectibles, condition matters, but in this case the box and accompanying goodies really matter. Compare listings and find one that has all of the stuff. Then make sure the seller represents it as a functioning watch, as it will be rather difficult to repair. Layers of Meaning Artist Heid Mraz layers torn shreds of automotive magazines to create photorealistic images of classic cars. Mraz works closely with the owner for each piece, integrating the car’s personal story into the final composition. Commissions range from $10k to $12k, depending on ject, and ur to six ks to com. www. dimraz. m ♦ Sports Car Market


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In Miniature by Marshall Buck Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing A few cars enjoy iconic status in the collector car world, and the 300SL Gullwing belongs in that elite group. A 300SL is a must-have car in any high-end sports car collection these days — and it seems one is in every high-end auction. A similar situation exists if you collect models — especially collections geared toward classic or significant sports cars. Want a good Gullwing model? Well, the choices are countless. So many variations of scale, quality and detail level have been produced. It is enough to make your head spin. I’ve always wanted a Gullwing — a real one — but I have settled for a very good 1:12-scale model from Premium ClassiXXs of Germany. The model shown is one of seven color combinations produced. Gray with red is shown. The model also comes in black with red, cream with red, cream with blue, red with tan, and of course, silver — with red or black interiors. Talk about getting every penny’s worth out of your tooling investment! I would have loved to see dark blue with gray. Regardless of color, all come with chrome-rimmed Rudge wheels that match the body color. Even though so many were made, Premium Model Details Production date: 2013 Quantity: 3,500 to 4,500 total combined colors SCM five-star rating: Overall quality: Authenticity: Overall value: Web: www.premiumclassixxs.de ClassiXXs probably hit it about right, as available models are limited now, and some colors such as the gray dealer edition (shown) have disappeared from the market. It appears that most color combinations were limited to 500 of each, with silver being the exception at 1,000 of each — or maybe in total. Who knows? To buy one, your best bet is to shop on eBay and/or with any model dealers you may know. Speaking Volumes by Mark Wigginton By Brooks Too Broad For Leaping by Denise McCluggage, Fulcorte Press, 284 pages, $98.88, Amazon Reaching into the pile of new car books can be a dispiriting exercise. The wave of tech manuals, one-marque fan fiction and lavish fender porn crests and recedes month after month. Reach in anywhere, and you find mostly competent creations of automotive generalists, specialists, photographers and historians. What you rarely find is a writer. Sometimes I just need clean, crisp prose with my automobilia. To wash the bitter taste of last month’s Mercedes F1 book out of my mouth, I grabbed an unread book from the shelf of forgotten tomes — and found bliss. My salvation came in the prose of Denise McCluggage, who died on May 6, 2015. By Brooks Too Broad For Leaping was a 1994 compendium of McCluggage’s columns from the pages of AutoWeek, complete with a forward by Phil Hill. And it’s a lovely drive down memory lane. McCluggage was in the thick of racing throughout the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. She also was a friend, co-driver and drinking buddy of legends of the period. She was an accomplished racer and rally driver, a lifelong sports car enthusiast, and she generally sounds like one of the people you should invite to the perfect dinner party. Her friendship, for instance, with Juan Manuel Fangio in his Mercedes-Benz days brings a depth to her profile of him 30 years later that comes from history, 36 personal knowledge, good reporting and a fluid writing style. In one column after another, McCluggage takes you back to the glory days, and intimate moments parade one after the other. Whether it’s about her first MG TC, or how that car led to friendship with a struggling, unemployed actor named Steve McQueen, or tales of pit walls and the men who she raced with and against, each column is another smile-generating 800 words. Her passing leaves all of motorsports and journalism a little less fun, a little less charming. By Brooks Too Broad For Leaping is the perfect palate cleanser when you’ve had your fill of routine automotive writing. Out of print, it might be a hunt to find a copy, but so is a pre-war Alfa, and you know what those are worth. Provenance: McCluggage shares her vast storehouse of memories in each chapter. Fit and finish: It’s a simple collection of columns, with the odd illus- tration. Nothing pretentious here; the design is almost antidesign. It’s just about getting out of the way of the words. Drivability: The title comes from A.E. Housman. McCluggage quotes Kierkegaard and Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. She writes like she drives and skis — hellbent for fast fun. And every page demonstrates why, at least in racing, the past probably was more fun. The joy in these pages is that she takes you along for the ride. ♦ Sports Car Market This is a great model — espe- cially for the price. Once again, due to high volume and very low labor costs in China, we have a model that gives a lot of bang for the buck. It is pretty accurate overall, and the list of working features is surprising when considering the price point. Lift open the hood, flip down the little hinged prop rod, and a well-detailed engine bay with all the major components appears. The look is very good, considering the extensive use of plastic. The well-scaled parts with many different finishes really pull it off. The trunk is the same, and it houses the spare tire, filler tubes, a hammer and jack. The famous Gullwing doors open easily and have simu- lated functional struts. The vent windows in the doors also pivot open. To help fit your Gumby — or other doll — inside, the steering wheel also flips down just as on the real car. The sun visors pivot. The steering works, but it’s marginal. The dash is completely detailed and gauges are legible, surrounded by chrome bezels. I don’t like the luggage behind the seats, which looks just like what it is — cheap plastic. The windows are clear, and the simulated-metal trim with rubber gaskets is convincing. There is good detailing inside and out. The paint finish, while very good, is just not up to the standards of many other manufacturers these days. This is one of my favorite models. It is so inexpensive that various quality flaws and corners cut can be forgiven. Depending on the color and where you find one, expect to pay from a low of $200 (a screaming deal) to around $500.


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Affordable Classic Mercedes-Benz Unimog A Mercedes for the Farm, Woods or Battlefield Thousands were built for the West German military, NATO allies and the global military market by B. Mitchell Carlson as the model 70200. By 1951, Daimler-Benz took over production, and the Unimog became the model 401. Under Daimler-Benz, the basic design changed very little. First off, the original logo on the grille of a stylized set of ox horns forming a U became the Mercedes-Benz three-pointed star in a circle. Next, a longer-wheelbase version was introduced as the model 402. All Unimogs were open-cab vehicles, with a rudimentary soft top available, until 1953, when a full cab was introduced. As the German economic miracle took root in the early 1950s, farmers were able to buy dedicated farm tractors and trucks, so agricultural interest in the Unimog began to wane — although it’s still used on farms to some extent today. At the same time, utility and governmental interest in the little trucks grew. Cities needed new emergency and work vehicles, and the Unimog fit the bill. A line of equipment was developed for municipal and utility work — including post-hole augers, snow plows and street sweepers. 1977 Mercedes-Benz Unimog, sold for $58,667 in March at Bonhams’ sale in Stuttgart, Germany I n the United States, Mercedes-Benz Unimogs are rare enough to qualify as mild curiosities, but these tough, fear-no-road trucks are also inching up on the cool meter, especially with military-vehicle buffs. You’ll see them scattered around the countryside — often in the mountain areas of the western United States — but few know their long, fascinating history. For example, Unimogs were originally designed as farm vehicles. Let’s jump into the Wayback Machine for a little Unimog history. Out of the rubble After World War II, when the new West Germany was rebuilding from the rubble, one major need was working vehicles. West Germany especially needed tractors to work the fields and trucks to move the harvest to market. Although the Allied forces had not yet allowed German industry to build vehicles, engineers associated with Mercedes-Benz designed a vehicle that could be a truck and a tractor. Some of the design concepts actually pre-dated World War II but were set aside as the Nazi high command preferred larger offroad equipment — especially six-wheelers. The new post-war vehicle was designed with a drop-side cargo box for hauling light loads. The design also included full-time four-wheel drive, good ground clearance, power take-offs, and an implement hitch when it was used as a tractor. In its intended role in agriculture, form followed function and it was designed with a track of 1.75 meters (5.74 feet) center to center — the standard width of two rows of potatoes. A prototype was ready by late 1946. However, as Daimler-Benz was not yet allowed to build four-wheel-drive vehicles, Unimog production was at Boehringer in early 1947 initial 40 Details Years produced: 1951–current (Model 406s were built from 1963 to 1986) Current SCM Valuation: $8,500–$40,000 Pros: Rugged go-anywhere capability, and you’ll always be able to find where you parked it, whether in a cornfield, a Walmart parking lot or a concours lawn. Cons: Some components can be pricey to repair. It can be difficult to get in and out of. It is a slow, loud, rough-riding truck, and the climate controls are rudimentary (what, no air conditioning?). If you don’t like diesels (most are), you may shop for a while to find one with a gas engine. Best place to drive one: Anywhere you want — aside from the express lane on the freeway. A typical owner: Is either bored with restoring 190SLs or bored with wussy little Jeeps. Club (German language): Unimog-Club Gaggenau e.V. Website: unimog-club-gaggenau.de Club (United States): Rocky Mountain Moggers Website: www.rockymountainmoggers.com/ links.html Sports Car Market A tough military transport The West German military also needed trucks. By 1955, West Germany joined NATO and was now able to re-arm and re-equip. Mercedes-Benz introduced the Unimog 404S, which was more of a highway truck with 4x4 capabilities than a tractor with a cargo box. It fit the bill to a tee for the Bundeswehr — the new West German Army — and thousands were built not just for the West German military, but also for NATO allies and the global military market. Specialty models for military sales were developed. While the refined Model 406 has supplanted the 404S, the Model 406.145 was equipped with a crew cab (or double cab). Since most uses of Unimogs rarely required carrying anybody more than the operator, double cabs were rarely built. However, as some Unimogs were built as aircraft tugs, the need to carry the crew chief, mechanics and technicians required more seating. A tough go in the United States The Unimog was a runaway success in Europe, but they never fared well in the United States as new vehicles. Courtesy of Bonhams


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Case (then part of corporate conglomerate Tenneco) imported them from 1975 to 1980 as the MB4/94 to augment their tractors and farm equipment line, but they sold poorly. In 2002, DaimlerChrysler tried marketing Unimogs through their U.S.-based Freightliner division, but the effort failed. Reportedly, only 184 were sold over five years The early attempts at marketing the post-war Jeep CJ as an agricultural truck and tractor show why Unimogs failed in the U.S. When American farmers want a tractor, they buy dedicated tractors. If they want a truck, they buy a dedicated truck. Typical farms in North America have larger tillable acreage and are farther outside of towns — many times a long drive away. It just made sense to have a tractor working in the field and a truck for trips to town. By the time of the prosperous post-war era in the United States, well-refined trac- tors and light-duty trucks — including factory-built four-wheel-drive versions — were so ingrained in the American mindset that combining a truck and a tractor was, well, completely foreign. The Unimog market Today, most Unimogs in the U.S. are former military units imported after they were decommissioned. The majority of those are from Austria and Switzerland. As such, most Unimog enthusiasts fall into one of two camps: hardcore off-roaders or military vehicle collectors. Let’s take a look at a recent sale: A 1977 Mercedes-Benz Unimog sold for 54,050 euros ($58,667) at Bonhams’ Mercedes-Benz Sale in Stuttgart, Germany, on March 28, 2015. This truck is a rare Model 406.145 double-cab originally built for the German Luftwaffe. If it were it to cross the Atlantic, it would likely go over better with the military vehicle collectors, due to its armed forces provenance. Its show-quality condition all but guarantees that it won’t rock hop on a mountain trail. A Unimog is an interesting addition to any military vehicle collection, and it would get lots of attention at Mercedes-Benz car club events, but it would probably be more of a curiosity. All of this also means that Unimogs haven’t seen outlandish pricing in the United States. As most of the Unimogs the U.S. are retired military, they are relatively afford- able. They generally start not far below $10k for a decent runner, and they enjoy a devoted following, which helps keep parts plentiful. All this said, if Land Rovers, Broncos, Scouts and Jeep CJs continue to increase in value, it’s likely that Unimogs will follow suit. Our subject Unimog, while not an over-the-top restoration, has had top-notch work, including the colorchange repaint. I don’t see that affecting the value a whole lot — it certainly didn’t hurt at this venue. However, repainting and re-marking the vehicle back into military colors and insignia — as far as it is legally possible — would bring more money if it were sold again. The new owner had to step up a bit to get a rather unique piece, so this Unimog wasn’t silly money. Time will tell if the vintage off-roader market will continue to escalate, but, for now, I’m calling this market-correct for a Mercedes that stands taller than most. ♦ July 2015 41


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Collecting Thoughts Is Low Mileage an Asset? The Heavy Price Paid for a Pickled Car No one will drive this Ferrari 328, as enjoying it will kill the car’s ultra-low-mileage status by Miles Collier 1989 Ferrari 328 GTS with 775 miles, sold for $140k A 1989 Ferrari 328 GTS sold for $140,000 at the Auctions America sale in Fort Lauderdale, FL, on March 28, 2015. The car showed a mere 1,248 kilometers (775 miles) on the odometer, which was the focal point of this extraordinary transaction. Now, does it make any sense to pay well over the odds for a rather mundane au- tomobile — assuming we can call any Ferrari mundane — just because it has hardly been driven? The implication is that somehow, due to lack of use, this car will perform as a useful financial asset. First, a little history The British license plates shown in the auction catalog on this left-hand-drive car have an August 1989 to July 1990 date code supporting an original-registration-fromnew history. Our subject was consigned for sale by the Cayman Motor Museum, an 80-car collection in West Bay, Cayman Islands, that opened its doors in May 2010. Known for its replica of the George Barris Batmobile, the museum appears to have a variety of celebrity-owned, Cayman Island and general-interest automobiles. We can only speculate as to the reasons for selling our subject. The Ferrari 328 was the culmination of the 308 series of mid-engine, transverse V8 cars. Built from model years 1986 to 1989, it was succeeded by the 348, a distinctly different car with a longitudinally positioned V8 engine. Updated with rounder front-end styling, the Ferrari 328 was the culmination of the 308 series of mid-engine, transverse V8 cars. The 328s are drivers’ cars, and get special praise for their power and handling — and their Toyota-like reliability. The market at the time must have liked this model, as 6,068 GTS targa-top versions, and 1,344 GTB “tin-top” coupes were produced, a five-to-one ratio of open to closed cars. Clearly, Ferrari knew their buyers wanted plenty of exposure at the wheel of their new cars. Back to the present If we consider that the going price for a decent 328 ranges from, say $70k to $110k, our buyer paid a 28% premium for a car with essentially no use in 26 years. Based on photographs, this car presents as-new. Assuming you like Ferrari Giallo as a color, it is an immaculate example and comes equipped with all the manuals, tools and accessories in equally pristine condition. There are probably two reasons to buy a no-mileage car like this: The first is for “investment.” The idea is that there are probably few — if any — 328 Ferraris as unused as this one. The “best in the world” bragging rights and impec- 42 Sports Car Market cable originality are the motives behind this approach. Clearly, the best of the best will financially outperform lesser examples, or so the thinking goes. The second possible reason to buy an unused car like this would be the desire to drive a new 328 Ferrari 25 years later. The new owner could enjoy an essentially brand-new 25-year-old car, thereby experiencing the model exactly as it would have been in 1989 when it left the dealership. If I had to guess, I’d place my bet on the first rationale rather than the second. Pickled often carries a premium We have all seen undriven cars sold at auction for major price premiums over conventionally used versions. The archival, reference-example idea seems to reso- nate with the market — perhaps in ways similar to the desire for uncirculated, mint-quality coins in the field of numismatics. The difference, of course, is that cars aren’t coins. Automobiles are extraordinarily complex assem- blages of hundreds of components pieced together just so in order to perform their transportation function. While the “uncirculated” automobile is indeed “mint” Darin Schnabel © 2015 Auctions America


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and perfect cosmetically, such may not be the case beneath the skin. Our subject Ferrari has been averaging approximately 30 miles per year under its own power. I would hazard the guess that those miles were not accumulated equally every year, but were front-end-loaded back when the car was new. Bottom line, this car hasn’t run a lick in 25 years. Complex aggregations of parts like an automobile, especially ones with cooling fluids, air conditioning and fuel injection, do not do well when forced to sit. The auction write-up is silent as to whether this car was prepared for unlimited static display through a “pickling” process, or whether it was just shut off and parked. My money lies on the latter. If so, this car has sat for years with old gas, old coolant, old brake fluid, and, by now, no air conditioning refrigerant. While it presents beautifully, we don’t know what storage conditions it experienced over the years. The Cayman Islands are humid and the air is loaded with salt. I would infer from the car’s appearance that the museum was air conditioned, which would go a long way to keeping visible, but not internal, corrosion under control. Lack of driving equals decay Based on the condition of long-term-storage cars recently sold from the Violati Collection, I would expect substantial cooling-system problems caused by the loss of anti-corrosion properties in the coolant, and extensive brake corrosion due to the hygroscopic nature of brake fluid. The fuel should be well on its way to turning into an epoxy-like varnish despite the sealed nature of fuel injection. The fuel, brake and coolant hoses would be suspect, and we would probably find age-related deterioration of timing belts. No doubt this car was started and run at the auction, perhaps even test driven. Nevertheless, the cooling, brake and fuel issues can lie quiescent until a little mileage is accumulated and then appear as problems. Seals, belts, electronics and instruments: Everything goes bad after too much sitting. A low-mileage garage queen isn’t much fun Perniciously, quite a lot of this stuff seems to be on a time fuse after recommis- sioning, and the problems only show up after a few thousand miles of driving. But, of course, our buyer won’t plan to drive this car, because using it will kill the biggest asset it has: no mileage. car? Is low-to-no mileage really an asset for this or any We get the new, unused-in-a-box and shrink-wrapped mentality, but what does it get the buyer in the end? Consider a similar 328 Ferrari with, say, 25k miles that has been immaculately maintained and sympathetically driven by a skilled and caring owner. This car will also present as-new, or virtually so, and will offer the prospect of being ready to go with no hidden disasters in the making. It has few enough miles to retain the new-car feel, but has been used enough to be in fine operable shape. The new owner need not worry about a few thousand, even 10k or 20k more miles. He or she will be able to really enjoy the car and do with it what it was intended for — spirited open-top driving on some sinuous back road through the dappled shade of 100-year-old maples. The 328 was neither built in limited quantity nor rep- resents anything particularly interesting in the trajectory of Ferrari to have much hope of performing as a collectible any time soon. It does offer the prospect of mighty fine driving now. Our “preservation, mint and boxed” owner is missing the whole point. Well sold. ♦ July 2015 43


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Legal Files John Draneas Selling Cars Without Worry How to keep a sold car sold — and free of legal problems Rust-free! Never wrecked! L Misrepresentation The seller’s statements about the car can also be the basis for a legal claim of misrepresentation. Misrepresentation arises when the seller makes untrue statements about the car that the buyer relies upon and suffers harm as a result. However, the buyer must establish two things to have a good claim: 1. He actually relied upon the statement. eliance was reasonable. uting actual reliance requires some degree of getting in- Most pristine example in the country! Be careful what you say about the car — statements can have consequences ast month, “Legal Files” focused on ways that a buyer can protect himself in a collector car purchase transaction. This month, we are focusing on how the seller can protect his interests. In today’s hot collector car market, the seller’s main problem is not getting the car sold, but keeping it sold — that is, not having to buy it back when the buyer complains that the car is not “as it was represented to be.” Watch what you say and write Be very careful about how the car is described and what is said about its nature, condition, authenticity, provenance and so on. Your statements about the qualities and condition of the car are given effect as warranties. If the car fails to live up to your statements, the buyer can bring a claim to unwind the deal (rescission), or recover damages based upon the reduced value of the car or the cost to make the car conform to the description. How you phrase yourself can make a huge difference. For example, “rust-free” is a much more dangerous statement than, “To the best of my knowledge, no significant rust issues.” Under the former, you are making an unconditional statement about the condition of the car, which is wrong if the buyer can find any rust anywhere after the purchase. Under the latter, you have not said that there is no rust, but only that you are not aware of any. For that to be wrong, the buyer must show that you knew, or had good reason to know, about the rust. Also, a tiny rust speck wouldn’t cause problems, as it would have to rise to the level of a “significant” rust issue to support a legal claim. Of course, those terms are imprecise and subject to interpretation, which is what makes for a good lawsuit, but it’s a much better position for the seller than the promise of a “rust-free” car. The seller is allowed some leeway in this regard. The law allows sellers to make broad generalized statements about the car, referred to as “puffing.” You can safely tell the buyer that your car is “the most pristine example in the country” without ever having actually seen another example. Everyone should know you have absolutely no way of ever knowing that and just write it off as sales talk. 44 the head of the buyer, but it can be done. For example, the yer may not have relied upon the seller’s statements about e condition of the car if the buyer obtained a pre-purchase nspection. However, that isn’t an absolute, as “accidentee” cannot be relied upon if only a mechanical inspection s obtained. Whether reliance is reasonable is determined by the judge jury — would a reasonable person have relied upon the ement? The answer can depend on the exact words used, of voice, body language, the breadth of the statements, the hood that the seller could actually know anything about what he is saying and so on. Another thing to watch is that the seller does not necessarily have to know that what he is saying is false. Misrepresentations can be negligent as well as intentional. You can get yourself into trouble by saying or writing things that you don’t really know anything about. Inspections are important The careful seller will be wary of a buyer who wants to buy the car sight unseen or without a pre-purchase inspection. Even though inspections create the risk of losing the deal, it is often better to be sure everyone is fully informed, as the buyer will soon find out about all of the car’s problems and could try to unwind the deal later. That can be expensive. For example, unhappy out-of-state purchas- ers often think they should be able to get all their money back — the purchase price, transport in both directions, sales taxes and registration fees paid. In many cases, the cost of defending even a bogus legal claim leaves the seller with little practical choice but to negotiate some sort of settlement. Disclaimers It is possible to disclaim warranties about the car and have the buyer acknowledge that he is not relying upon any statements made by the seller. Such disclaimers should be in writing, in a well-designed contract. However, disclaimers that directly contradict strongly worded and precise statements may find trouble actually getting enforced. And, as “Legal Files” has previously pointed out (March 2014, p. 32), an “as-is” provision is not a get-out-of-jail-free card — they may cancel warranties, but they don’t usually sidestep misrepresentation or negligence claims. Use a good contract It’s a very good idea to have a good written contract. From the seller’s standpoint, the key elements of a good contract are: • Identify the car properly — make, model and chassis number. • Identify specifically what comes with the car — including spares, wheels, books and records. • State clearly that the car is being sold “as-is,” but that the buyer has Sports Car Market


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either obtained a pre-purchase inspection or had the opportunity to do so and decided against it. • Identify all representations, if any, that you are making about the car, that there are no further representations, and that the buyer is not relying upon any statements made by you but has formed his own opinions about the car and its value. All this makes it seem like you will need to hire an attorney to do this for you. Yes, that is probably true. Just remember that it is money well spent. Get the money first Never give up the car without having the money safely in the bank. You may never see the money or the car again. “Safely in the bank” means collected funds. The best way to be sure of that is to require that the funds be wired into your (or your escrow’s) account. Cashier’s checks are easily fabricated these days, and there are innumerable scams that are based upon fraudulent versions of them. Many sellers believe they are covered by holding the title until all of the money has been safely received. That is just not true. Under the Uniform Commercial Code, a sale is complete even though formal title has not transferred — the retention of title is viewed as the retention of a security interest. If the buyer fails to pay, you have to sue to foreclose your security interest and recover the car. If the car has been resold, you still have to chase after it. It is usually best to use an escrow — much like a real estate deal. It doesn’t have to be overly complicated, and you can usually have your attorney act as the escrow agent. The funds are wired to the attorney’s trust account, and you give your signed-off certificate of title (or bill of sale) to the attorney. The attorney releases the title to the buyer, you release the car to the buyer, and the funds are released to you. That doesn’t complicate the transaction or cost very much, and both parties are protected. Brokers Using a broker is a way to achieve a hassle-free sale at market price, but be clear about how much the broker is being paid. We’ve encountered situations in which a percentage commission has somehow morphed into a “net to seller” payment, with a hidden and higher-thanagreed commission. Ask to see the actual sales contract with the buyer. Also, be aware that the broker’s statements about the car are legally attributable to you. Any broker misrepresentations can become your misrepresentations, with legal exposure to the buyer. You have legal recourse against the broker, but you can get into a debate about exactly what you authorized to be said, so be clear about the information provided. Auctions Auctions can be a great way to sell your car, and they pose relatively few legal risks for the seller. But be aware of one unfortunate little detail. It doesn’t happen often, but cases do arise where the successful bidder fails to actually pay for the car. Read your consignment agreement carefully to see what will happen in such a situation. It will likely be your obligation to sue the buyer, so try to ensure that your expenses reduce the amount payable to the auction company. If partial payments are made by the buyer, try to ensure that they are divided between you and the auction company in an equitable manner. If the sale fails, see if you get a refund of your consignment fees, or credit against the next auction. Most major auction companies are good about working those things out when they arise, but it’s worthwhile to get it into the contract when you have a significant enough car to be able to customize the consignment agreement. ♦ JOHN DRANEAS is an attorney in Oregon. His comments are general in nature and are not intended to substitute for consultation with an attorney. He can be reached through www.draneaslaw.com. July 2015 45


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Simon Says Simon Kidston Move Over, Young-Timers A timely escape from the festival of greed to meet fast friends puts real history into perspective around the world to enjoy the spectacle from up close. Rob and Maz from LA-based Singer are proud to see one of their “re-imagined” 911s in pride of place outside the Royal viewing tower. Over dinner, Jackie Stewart regales me with anecdotes about the hard-charging, lesser-known ’50s Scottish sports car drivers he admired before beginning his own career (remember Ron Flockart?). Debonair invitee King Juan Carlos of Spain is an unexpected connoisseur with a high speed motoring CV to his credit. Former F1 aces Gerhard Berger and Martin Brundle both want the inside track on the classic car market. Finally, collecting royalty is represented by the likes of Lord Bamford and Chip Connor, who know all the answers already: They read SCM... On to Switzerland Back at Geneva HQ the telephone rings: “Simon, I know it’s late notice, but how about lunch tomorrow with a couple of old friends?” I arrive at the lakeside inn to find my dapper host, well into his seventh decade and charming as only a prince can be, kissing the waitress’ hand as he inquires after her family and is shown to our table. Zourab Tchkotua (don’t ask me to pronounce his name Those were the days... Hands up, which current Ferrari owner would invite his merry buddies to pose on his old Ferrari? D ashing back to Europe from India after judging duties at Cartier’s exotic “Travel with Style” concours, there’s barely time for quad-biking in Marrakech and lunch at an auberge outside Geneva with a motor racing prince, a baron and a count — more on that later — before the annual pilgrimage to what’s probably the most commercial gathering in the classic car calendar: the Techno Classica colossus in Essen, Germany. In the unlikely event you’re arranging your European tour dates for next year and can’t decide between this and Rétromobile, let me help. Paris it most certainly isn’t, due in part to the efforts of the Royal Air Force from 1942 to ’45, but it’s the complete dominance of trade stands hawking everything from sausages to lederhosen (although they were rather stylish...) and assorted “young-timers” in every shape, size, color and price that tends to leave you feeling rather overwhelmed. The latter refers to that quaint Teutonic expression coined to include anything four- wheeled that is stuck in limbo between “classic” and “second-hand.” If proof were needed that the Greater Fool theory is alive and well, 10 minutes spent among row after row of rubber-bumper 911s and Clinton-era Italian exotica (am I alone in thinking the Ferrari F512M looks more Manga comic than Michelangelo?), all proudly for sale at twice what last month’s price guides tell you, should have convinced even the most hardened market bull. And bull was in plentiful supply... From Essen to Bahrain As I stepped from a Gulf Air flight just a few hours later, the warm night air and bright lights of Bahrain provided the perfect antidote. If you’ve never attended a Grand Prix in the Middle East, you’re in for a treat. Impeccable hospitality, great weather and far more access than you’re likely to expe- rience elsewhere make a welcome change if you’re used to muddy Silverstone (“Soggy bacon sandwich, mate?”) or the gridlocked streets of sunny Monte Carlo (“Would Monsieur care to mortgage that beer?”). My host is generous to a fault, inviting a diverse array of gearhead friends from 46 before lunch) has raced with the greats, partied with the stars and lived a life worthy of a Slim Pickens coffee table book. His fellow guests are equally colorful and from the same jet-set era: Baron Jean Lascar, a Francophile double for Aristotle Onassis whose Wayfarers are omnipresent even indoors, and the outspoken Count Giovanni Volpi, the aristocratic Venetian founder of Scuderia Serenissima whose backing of fledging ATS caused Enzo to take offense and renege on his promise to sell him the first two GTOs. Discretion prevents me from recounting all the tales, but encounters like these are a window into a past which we’re rarely afforded — and which you just know won’t happen again. All I can reveal is that Bardot is fondly remembered, Agnelli appears to have been the culprit in more than a few scrapes, Gunther Sachs is probably still wanted by the Gendarmerie if they can prove how fast he was driving, and Volpi’s opinion of Ferrari hasn’t been tempered by the intervening 50-plus years. He shows me a photograph on his iPhone of the beauti- ful black 250 GT Spyder he bought new in ’58. I expect fond memories. “Looked great, no brakes, and no horses either.” The Ferrari 250 LM he used on the road? “A death trap. Drove it once, then put it away.” Were any of them any good? “The 250 Testa Rossa — a TRi61, in fact, with which we won at Sebring (in place of our absent GTOs) — ran like a VW. Giotto Bizzarrini fitted a cooling fan when we retired it from racing. I used it around Rome and across the continent, drove it to parties and dinners, rain or shine, and in almost 25 years it never let me down.” Call me old-fashioned, but no matter how fast the divorced orthodontist drives his F512M to the country club, the story’s not going to sound that good in 50 years’ time… ♦ Sports Car Market Courtesy of Count Giovanni Volpi


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Feature 2015 La Jolla Concours d’Elegance Learning to Pan for Car Gold The definition of elegance is key when you’re wearing a straw hat and standing among world-class cars by Alexandra Martin-Banzer every judge starts somewhere. A comforting thought as we walked up to the line of 911s built from 1970 to 1986. As we checked the rubber window lining on a 1986 Turbo coupe, and made sure the door panels matched up on a 1970 Targa, my judging team slipped me little bits of knowledge, such as that 911s never came with polished chromed wheels. When we sat down to grade the 911s, we discussed the definition of “elegance,” for which cars could receive extra points. They defined elegance as long, swooping body styles, like on a Duesenberg. I agreed with them that Duesenbergs are elegant cars, but what about the car that sparks giddiness when you look at it? A ’73 Porsche 911RS coupe may not have the same curves as a concourswinning Mercedes, but it does instill the unique desire to drive like a bat out of hell on empty roads. To me, that deserves a few extra points. In the end, the Most Elegant award went to Frederick M. Lax’s 1930 Cadillac V16 roadster. Our team awarded the Porsche 911 Class win to Joseph DeMeo and his amazing 1986 Turbo coupe. Yes, I wanted to drive it off the lawn. Best in Show went to SCMer Peter Mullin’s 1937 Peugeot Darl’mat cabriolet. When standing around a classic car, listening to the Green grass and world-class cars in an oceanside setting A fter 23 years of attending countless concours around the world, I became an official, straw-hat-wearing judge. I’m hooked. Dr. Cy Conrad, Chief Judge for the 2015 La Jolla Concours d’Elegance, invited me to join the judging world a few months prior to the April 12 event. My plane tickets were booked that afternoon. When I walked into the 7 a.m. Judges’ Meeting, the butterflies in my stomach re- minded me of the first day at a new school. I was ready to learn the secrets of picking out the Best of Class. After the meeting concluded, Cy asked what my 911 experiences were. Apparently, “I know how to drive them” was the response they were looking for. I joined the 911 judging team along with Tom McBurnie and Thomas Hoffman. We walked through the sea of cars on the lawn of La Jolla’s Ellen Browning Scripps Park. I apologized ahead of time for being a newbie. My teammates responded that Details Plan ahead: The 12th Annual La Jolla Concours d’Elegance is scheduled for April 10, 2016 Tour: The Motor Tour takes place on the Saturday before Concours Sunday Where: Ellen Browning Scripps Park, La Jolla, CA Cost: Admission is $40 in advance; $50 at the gate Number of entries: 150 in the concours Web: www.lajollaconcours.com Don’t judge — the hat comes with the gig 50 Elegant, yes, but 911s also should be judged by the thrill factor Sports Car Market language of an enthusiast, I’ve always wondered how they were able to pull out gold nuggets of information on the car they are discussing. Being a judge at a concours d’elegance is a way for newbies to pan for their own treasured tidbits of car information. You walk off the green grass a little richer in classic car knowledge. Best of all, this knowledge will only keep growing with each future event. The La Jolla Concours d’Elegance, on a green lawn overlooking the Pacific Ocean, is one of the most beautiful I’ve ever attended. There’s something special about the mix of green grass, sunshine, world-class cars and a surging blue ocean in the background. It was great to hear my dad — aka Publisher Martin — over the speakers as he served as emcee for the fourth time. I can’t wait to come back next year — as a judge or a spectator. ♦


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Feature 2015 Kuwait Concours Très Sheikh Notable cars in this desert oasis included a 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 once owned by Eric Clapton Story and Photos by Steve Linden S-type, a 1934 Aston Martin Mk II, a 1935 Bugatti Type 57 Aérolithe Electron coupe, and a 1935 Mercedes-Benz 540K Special roadster. Post-war cars included a 1940 Packard Super 8 convertible coupe, a 1951 Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 SS Villa d’Este that won second place in its class, and a 1953 Ferrari 625 TF Vignale Spyder which won Most Elegant Sport Racer. A 1953 Fiat 8V Supersonic won Best Closed Car, and I had the privilege of driving this car in the concours parade. What concours would be complete without at least three Mercedes-Benz 300SL coupes, including the 1955 300SLR Uhlenhaut coupe that was on loan from the Mercedes Museum. Other notable cars included a 1967 Ferrari Best of Show — the 1965 Lamborghini 350 GTS spider that made its debut at the 1965 Turin Auto Show H ow can one turn down an invitation that begins with “The Kuwait Historical, Vintage & Classic Cars Museum is honored to invite you to participate in the Kuwait Concours d’Elegance 2015, that will take place from February 11th to 14th, 2015, under the patronage of the His Highness Sheikh Nasser Al-Mohammed Al-Ahmed Al-Jaber Al-Sabah”? The assortment of approximately 100 invited cars offered some- thing for everyone, ranging from a 1965 Volvo 1800S that was brought from Lebanon, to a 1960 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder from Switzerland, which won Best Open Car in the Concours. Cars from the early part of the 20th century included a 1915 Ford Model T, and a 1919 Pierce-Arrow Model 48 4-passenger roadster that won first place in its class. Notable pre-war cars included a 1931 Cadillac Fleetwood phaeton that was brought by SCMer Jim Taylor, a 1933 Invicta low-chassis 4.5-liter 275 GTB/4 once owned by Eric Clapton, and a 1971 Lamborghini Miura P400S once owned by Rod Stewart. Both cars were brought from the U.K. by SCMers Niall and Sally Holden. The Ferrari went on to win Best Sport GT, and the Lamborghini Best Innovative Design. American muscle cars, a favorite of collectors throughout the Middle East, were represented by no fewer than 15 entrants, with this year’s winner a 1972 Buick GSX Stage 1. Best of Show was awarded to a prototype 1965 Lamborghini 350 GTS spider that made its debut at the 1965 Turin Auto Show. Many vehicle owners are drawn by the opportunity to meet the dis- tinguished panel of judges that are assembled from all over the world and included Head Judge Leonardo Fioravanti, Dr. Andrea Zagato, Chris Bangle and Sandra Button. This was my third time at this concours, which is unlike any other event that I’ve ever attended. If you are fortunate enough to be invited, all expenses are paid, including transportation for not only you and a guest — but for your car as well. This concours takes place in an oasis of culture, education and good will — all made possible by a common love of classic cars. ♦ Best Sport GT — 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 once owned by Eric Clapton and that was brought from the U.K. by SCMers Niall and Sally Holden 52 The rare 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SLR Uhlenhaut coupe was on loan from the Mercedes-Benz Museum Sports Car Market


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Feature 2015 Cavallino Classic More Than a Ferrari Fest Cavallino’s cachet carries over to automotive enthusiasts of every stripe Story and Photos by Bill Rothermel In a feast of Ferraris, Best of Show Competition went to this 1965 Dino 166P/206P Saturday’s winners Saturday’s Best in Show for the finest Competition Bugatti was the featured marque at Classic Sports Sunday W hat is it about Ferraris for so many of us? We are captivated with their looks, exclusivity, and the sounds emanating from those glorious V12s, V8s and V6s. We never seem to get enough, and we certainly never tire of seeing and hearing them. Rest easy. We are not alone. Each and every year, the Ferrari faithful gather for an annual pilgrimage to Palm Beach and the Breakers Hotel for a wintertime fix like no other. Cavallino Classic celebrated its 24th birthday on January 21–25. This year’s Ferrari Lovefest celebrated the 60th anniversary of the 375 Series, with special classes for Berlinetta, Spider, Coupe, Speciale and America cars — along with one-off variants — at Saturday’s Concourso d’Eleganza. Classic Sports Sunday at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago featured 120 pre- and post-war (to 1970) classic sports cars (not just Ferraris) — just in case you didn’t get your car fix during the previous four days. Track time, anyone? Track events began with a private test day Wednesday, and the Cavallino Classic Historics at nearby Palm Beach International Raceway Thursday and Friday. A driving tour conveniently ending at Thursday’s Jet Reception on the tarmac at Palm Beach International Airport was also on the agenda. If all this sounds expensive, it is. Bring your credit cards. This is Palm Beach, which is a winter playground of the rich and famous. If your husband or wife is not into cars, don’t fret. There is plenty to see and do, starting with the resort and spa at the lovely Breakers Hotel. Don’t miss cocktails at HMF (named for Henry M. Flagler); venture out for shopping on Worth Avenue (the Rodeo Drive of the East); or dine at The Palm Beach Grille, Taboo, Café Boulud, or Pizza al Fresco. Take a water-taxi tour of the Intracoastal Waterway, where your captain will provide you with a tour of homes dotting the shoreline. Visit Whitehall, the Gilded Age home of Henry Flagler, or just enjoy the spectacular local architecture of Addison Mizner and Maurice Fatio. And the people-watching opportunities are endless. The best show in town is free. Arrive early or stay late Saturday to watch the contents of the show field and the valet lot enter and exit the Breakers onto South County Road. You’ll not only see but hear these magnificent machines in action. 54 Details Plan ahead: The 25th Annual Cavallino Classic is scheduled for January 20–24, 2016 Where: The Breakers Hotel, Palm Beach, FL Admission: General admission tickets to Saturday’s Concorso d’Eleganza is $75 More: www.cavallino.com Best of Show — 1938 Talbot-Lago T150 Sports Car Market Ferrari was Andreas Mohringer’s 1965 Dino 166P/206P. The 1954 250 Europa 250 GT Vignale from the collection of Jaime and Cecilia Muldoon was honored with Best in Show for the finest GT Ferrari. “Antiques Roadshow” favorites Leigh and Leslie Keno received the Vintage Preservation Cup pre-1975 for their 1955 250 Europa GT PF coupe. The Classic Preservation Cup 1976–95 went to the 1988 328 GTS of Leland Cross. Despite perfect sunshine, Sunday’s crowd was greeted with temperatures in the low-50-degree range, which was positively shocking by South Florida’s standards. However, by early afternoon, Mother Nature cooper- ated with ideal 70-degree conditions. Bugatti was the featured marque at Classic Sports Sunday, and many of the cars on display were raced at Palm Beach International Raceway on Thursday and Friday. J.W. Jr. and Donna Marriott’s 1938 Talbot-Lago T150 took Best of Show honors, and Peter Mullin’s 1937 Delahaye 145 received the award for the Finest Competition Car. The Finest GT was presented to David Blumenfield’s 1966 Ferrari 275 GTB. Most Elegant went to the 1938 Delahaye 135, Figoni et Falaschi owned by Jeffrey Fisher. The award for Most Unique went to G. Larry Wilson’s 1967 Austin Moke. 2016 marks the 25th rendition of Cavallino Classic, so no doubt John Barnes and the staff and volunteers of Cavallino Magazine will have something special to celebrate. Check out www.cavallino.com for a complete list of winners and details on the 2016 celebration. ♦


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Ferrari Profile 1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica SWB Cabriolet by Pininfarina The bodies were built to perfection, with narrow shut lines, exceptional panel fit, and a jeweler’s attention to detail by Steve Ahlgrim Details Years produced: 1960–64 Number produced: 11 Original list price: $17,800 Current SCM Valuation: $4,000,000– $6,000,000 Tune-up cost: $3,500 Distributor caps: $450 (two required) Chassis # location: Left frame by steering box Engine # location: Right rear above motor mount Club: Ferrari Club of America Website: FerrariClubofAmerica.org Alternatives: 1957–63 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster, 1957–59 BMW 507 roadster,1960–63 Ferrari 250 SWB California Spyder SCM Investment Grade: A Comps Chassis number: 3309SA Engine number: 3309 C hassis 3309SA’s tale started in 1962. This Ferrari 400 Superamerica cabriolet would be the last short-wheelbase model built. It was finished in Red Metallic and fitted with cov- ered headlights and a factory hard top. This was perhaps the ultimate example of its breed. Its first destination would be the Geneva Motor Show, where it was displayed on Ferrari’s stand. Later, after being air-freighted to Luigi Chinetti Motors in Greenwich, CT, it was displayed at the New York International Auto Show. In 2005, the car received a no-expense-spared full restoration with a team of California’s best restorers. The project was managed by noted Ferrari restorer Patrick Ottis, who was also responsible for restoring the car’s mechanical components. The body was finished in black paint by Brian Hoyt of Perfect Restorations. The interior was trimmed in red leather by Ken Nemanic. Its first outing following its restoration was to the 2009 Cavallino Classic, where it was awarded Platinum and a feature in the April/May 2009 issue of Cavallino magazine. Next was the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in August, where it earned 98 points in judging. More recently, it was shown at the 2011 Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance. The Ferrari 400 Superamerica, perhaps the most exclusive automobile in the world when new, was a vehicle 58 fit for royalty. The acquisition of such an automobile is to be taken seriously, as there is no limit to what 3309 can do for its next owner. The car is accompanied by its Ferrari Classiche cer- tification binder, tools, a jack and an original owner’s manual. SCM Analysis This car, Lot 222, sold for $7,645,000, including buyer’s premium, at RM Sotheby’s auction of the Andrews Collection on May 2, 2015 in Fort Worth, TX. Long before the 288 GTO, F40, F50, Enzo and LaFerrari, there was a different type of Ferrari supercar. Rather than an ultra-performance sports car, these super Ferraris were high-performance Grand Touring cars of the highest quality built to rule the highway and the Riviera. They were built in quantities so small they make modern “limited” numbers look huge. The buyers were business tycoons, celebrities and royalty who didn’t need vetting at their local dealer. No one bought these supercars to make a profit. Depreciation was almost a certainty, and the person ordering bought out of passion rather than profit. The origin of this super line can be traced back to the early 1950s with the introduction of the Americas, as in 340 America, 342 America, and 375 America. The Americas were built in parallel with Ferrari race Sports Car Market 1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica Series I Aerodinamico Lot 132, s/n 3221SA Condition 2 Sold at $4,070,000 Gooding & Company, Scottsdale, AZ, 1/17/15 SCM# 256813 1960 Ferrari 400 Superamerica SWB cabriolet by Pininfarina Lot 145, s/n 1945SA Condition 1- Sold at $6,380,000 RM Auctions, Amelia Island, FL, 3/14/2015 SCM# 264363 1961 Ferrari 400 Superamerica SWB Lot 115, s/n 2841SA Condition 1- Sold at $2,750,000 RM Auctions, Monterey, CA, 8/17/13 SCM# 227280 Darin Schnabel ©2014, courtesy of RM Sotheby’s


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and dual-purpose cars, but they were built to a higher standard. The Americas were fitted with powerful, race-bred, Lampredi-designed V12 engines. They featured a variety of open and closed bodies from the best Italian coachbuilders of the time. As Ferrari’s production car business evolved, so did these special cars. The Americas gave way to 410 Superamericas, the 400 Superamerica, and the Superfasts. The commonality of the line was incredibly powerful engines of large displacement often unique to the model. Additionally, the bodies were built to perfection, with narrow shut lines, exceptional panel fit, and a jeweler’s attention to detail. A 500 Superfast has lived within a couple hundred feet of my desk for most of the past three years. A second 500 Superfast is stored in our shop. When I show off the cars, I point out a thin piece of chrome trim that surrounds the rear window. It is a handmade piece that finishes off the hole that the rear window fits in. The piece fits absolutely perfectly. It is flush with the body with no deviation. I explain that this piece of trim and the hole it goes in might have taken the body builder two days to fit. This detail may seem insignificant, but it is indicative of the craftsmanship found throughout the car. The cars are simply the pinnacle of Italian coachwork. The best of the best Paul Andrews made a fortune in the electronics business. He started his company from scratch to help support his family after being laid off from his previous job. His company was so well run that Warren Buffet brought it into his Berkshire Hathaway fold in 2007. About 15 years ago, Paul and his son started the Panther City Auto Collection. They rapidly built a 150car collection that ranged from sports cars to Grand Classics. The Andrews bought the best of the best — as seen in the 2012 Best of Show win at Pebble Beach with their Mercedes-Benz 680S. They also regularly used their cars, with the Colorado Grand being one of the favorite family events. This auction pared the collection down to a more manageable 15 or so cars. Seeing the incredible cars that were sold begs the question: What was kept? The Andrews 400 Superamerica July 2015 cabriolet is the perfect example of the quality of car they collected. While any Superamerica ranks among the most important cars on the planet, this one was the final SWB cabriolet version. It is the only cabriolet to feature covered headlamps. It was shown at the Geneva Salon in 1962 — and then displayed at the 1962 New York Auto Show. The ownership succession following the show reads like the Who’s Who of the Ferrari world. The condition is exceptional; the documentation is impeccable. Running at Bonneville No owner added more to the car’s bio than J.A. “Gus” Stallings. The colorful Mr. Stallings was a car dealer from Phoenix with a lust for speed. He took the Superamerica along with his Mercedes 300SL to Bonneville to test the top speeds. The Superamerica’s 145 mph fell short of Ferrari’s published number, but the car was immortalized by Road & Track magazine coverage and photos. No surprises, huge money There were no surprises when 3309SA crossed the block at RM Sotheby’s Andrews sale. The presale estimate was $7,000,000 to $8,500,000. There were several determined bidders, and the final price came in at an expected $7,645,000. The sale was the highest ever for a 400 Superamerica — eclipsing the $6.38 million RM got for 1945SA, another 400 Superamerica cabriolet, just over a month before. For the Andrews, it was their second-highest sale, as they sold their Mercedes 680S for $8,250,000 at a previous RM auction. 3309SA is about as blue chip as you can get. It will remain one of the most desirable cars in the world and is a star of any collection. In 2005 it had reportedly sold for $2m. The Andrews acquired the car in 2010 at an RM auction in Monaco for $3.8 million. Now it brings over $7.5 million. Obviously, this was a welcome result for the Andrews. The buyer got one of the great cars of the world at a value that was spoton for the day it was sold. 3309SA will always be a great Ferrari, and it was fairly bought at this sale. ♦ (Introductory description courtesy of RM Sotheby’s.) 59


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English Profile 1959 Jaguar XK 150S 3.4 Roadster An original, unmolested car that’s correct in every detail — and doesn’t need or want restoration by Paul Hardiman Details Years produced: 1958–60 Number produced: 888 (all 3.4S OTS) Original list price: $5,120 Current SCM Valuation: $150,000– $200,000 Tune-up cost: $650 Chassis # location: Plate on firewall Engine # location: On block above oil filter Club: The International XK Club Website: xkclub.com Alternatives: 1951–54 Nash Healey, 1956–59 BMW 507, 1961–65 Jaguar S1 3.8 Open Two Seater SCM Investment Grade: A Comps Chassis number: T820030DN Engine number: VS18739 T he final glorious incarnation of Jaguar’s fabulous XK series of sports cars arrived in 1957. The XK 150 was a progressive development of the XK 120 and XK 140, retaining the same basic chassis, 3.4-liter engine and 4-speed Moss transmission of its predecessors while benefiting from a new, wider body that provided increased interior space and improved visibility — courtesy of a single-piece wrap-around windscreen that replaced the XK 140’s divided screen. Cleverly, the new body used many XK 120/140 press- ings, the increased width being achieved by means of a four-inch-wide central fillet. A higher front wing line and broader radiator grille were other obvious differences, but the new model’s main talking point was its Dunlop disc brakes. Fade following repeated stops from high speed had been a problem of the earlier, drum-braked cars, but now the XK had stopping power to match its prodigious straight-line speed. Introduced in the spring of 1957, the XK 150 was available at first only in fixed and drophead coupe forms, the open roadster version not appearing until the following year. At 190 brake horsepower, the engine’s maximum power output was identical to that of the XK 140, so performance was little changed. Special Equipment and S versions came with 210 and 250 brake horsepower respectively. Overdrive and a BorgWarner automatic gearbox were the transmission options, while a Thornton Powr-Lok limited-slip differential was available for the XK 150S. Steel wheels remained the standard fitting, although 60 XK 150s so equipped are a great rarity, as most were sold in SE (Special Equipment) specification with center-lock wire wheels. The much-admired chromed Jaguar mascot was made available as an optional extra on an XK for the first time. “The Jaguar XK 150 is undeniably one of the world’s fastest and safest cars. It is quiet and exceptionally refined mechanically, docile and comfortable... we do not know of any more outstanding example of value for money,” declared The Autocar. A much-sought-after S model, this XK 150 roadster comes with a Jaguar Heritage Certificate confirming that it left the factory in March 1959 equipped with the 3.4liter engine and desirable manual/overdrive transmission. The car was delivered via Mann Egerton and finished in Carmen Red with matching leather interior and black soft top — its present color scheme. Retaining matching chassis/engine numbers and its original Norfolk registration, 7228AH has been in singlefamily ownership from new and comes with its original old-style buff logbook, the latter erroneously recording the engine capacity as 3,781 cc. We are advised the XK has been driven mostly in the dry, is not corroded in the usual places and is generally sound; last taxed in 2004 and garage stored since then, it will have been recommissioned prior to sale. The car is offered with the aforementioned logbook and Jaguar Heritage Certificate, sundry service invoices, V5 registration document and its original toolkit, PDI form, price list and owner’s handbook. An electric windscreen 1961 Jaguar XK 150 3.8 drophead coupe Lot 200, s/n S838809DN Condition 2+ Sold at $192,500 RM Auctions, Amelia Island, FL, 3/14/15 SCM# 259324 1959 Jaguar XK 150S 3.4 roadster Lot 355, s/n T831532DN Condition 1Sold at $203,500 Bonhams, Greenwich, CT, 6/1/14 SCM# 244064 1960 Jaguar XK 150S 3.8 roadster Lot 245, s/n T820076DN Condition 3Sold at $488,538 RM Auctions, London, U.K., 9/8/13 SCM# 243592 Sports Car Market Courtesy of Bonhams


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washer and twin 12-volt batteries are the only notified deviations from factory specification. SCM Analysis This car, Lot 56, sold for $334,940, including buyer’s premium, at Bonhams’ first sale at the 73rd Members Meeting at Goodwood on March 21, 2015. This was a nice old XK: It looked very original, with decent door gaps, a nicely preserved interior and original toolkit — and the early, original transmission tunnel overdrive lever, which is a curiosity today, especially as so many old Jags have received modern 5-speed transmissions. The paint had slightly dulled in places, so some of it might not be as old as the rest of the car, and the leather was well creased and patinated with one small tear — but there are such things in this world as T-Cut, Hide Food and what used to be called elbow grease. A one-family original Originality has an increasingly important place in today’s collector car world, and the market currently prizes it above all else. But what made this car really special is that it had been in one-family ownership from new. This means that, even if it hadn’t been loved and cherished all of its life and been dormant for the past decade, it hadn’t been through the motor trade, hadn’t been dolled up or blown over for sale or generally messed about with. That the door fit was so good (they’re usually not on XKs at auction) was probably down to the fact that it had never been apart in its life, and all the better for it. Even if the new owner plans to obliterate all that lovely patina with a restoration, they know they’re starting with an original, unmolested car that’s correct in every detail. The top XK at this sale Our subject car compares with the car SCM originally asked me to write about, Lot 19, a nicely restored — but otherwise unremarkable — gray XK 150SE coupe. Nothing wrong with it, and at $111,399 it washer an washer an washer an twin 12-volt batteries are the only notified deviations from factory specification. SCM Analysis This car, Lot 56, sold for $334,940, including buy- er’s premium, at Bonhams’ first er and twin 12-volt batteries are the only notified deviations from factory specification. SCM Analysis This car, Lot 56, sold for $334,940, including buy- er’s premium, at Bonhams’ first sale at the 73rd Members Meeting at Goodwood on March 21, 2015. This was a nice old XK: It looked very original, with decent door gaps, a nicely preserved interior and original toolkit — and the early, original transmission tunnel overdrive lever, which is a curiosity today, espe- cially as so many old Jags have received modern 5-speed transmissions. The paint had slightly dulled in places, so some of it might not be as old as the rest of the car, and the leather was well creased and patinated with one small tear — but there are such things in this world as T-Cut, Hide Food and what used to be called elbow grease. A one-family original Originality has an increasingly important place in today’s collector car world, and the market currently prizes it above all else. But what made this car really special is that it had been in one-family ownership from new. This means that, even if it hadn’t been loved and cherished all of its life and been dormant for the past decade, it hadn’t been through the motor trade, hadn’t been dolled up or blown over for sale or generally messed about with. That the door fit was so good (they’re usually not on XKs at auction) was probably down to the fact that it had never been apart in its life, and all the better for it. Even if the new owner plans to obliterate all that lovely patina with a restoration, they know they’re starting with an original, unmolested car that’s correct in every detail. The top XK at this sale Our subject car compares with the car SCM originally asked me to write about, Lot 19, a nicely restored — but otherwise unremarkable — gray XK 150SE coupe. Nothing wrong with it, and at $111,399 it much much older restoration and, peering through the door and panel gaps, you could see rust lurking in the structure, confirmed by more on the steering column, which should have been easy enough to clean off. How much corrosion there is within will determine how much of the car has to come apart, and this is no doubt why potential buyers suddenly developed short arms and long pockets and it sold cheap for any open 120 at $95,387. It was cheap for a good reason. Try to find another one This brings us back to our subject roadster — or Open Two Seater, to give it its proper title. Very original cars like this just don’t come along very often, especially in right-hand-drive, home-market form. Most domestic-market cars were coupes and dropheads, and only 76 home-market XK 150 roadsters of all kinds were made against 2,187 for export, although the base 3.4 is thought to be rarest variant, outnumbered by SEs. This is an early car. S roadsters started at chassis T820001; this is 820030. (T signifies S, S prefix on early cars signifies SE.) Quite rightly, the market snapped it up at top dollar — three times the pre-sale estimate, though I suspect Bonhams always knew it would go for much more. This is an S roadster, after all, with a claimed 250 brake horsepower instead of the SE’s 210 — and whose values are only eclipsed by the 3.8S version, which uses the same motor that went into the E-type, with an alleged 265 bhp (yeah… right; all these claimed outputs were maybe achieved on a test bench with no ancillaries and optimized timing). As an aside, the last digit of the engine number on Jags of this vin- tage indicates the compression ratio, in this case 9:1. Someone’s got a cracker, and if the decision were mine, it wouldn’t be restored. The catalog promised it would be recommissioned before sale, so after a change of rubber and fluids — plus a damn good service including a compression test and very careful check of the motor before attempting to start it — I’d continue to wipe it over periodically with an washer an washer an washer an sher and twin 12-volt batteries are er and twin 12-volt batteries are the only notified deviations from factory specification. SCM Analysis This car, Lot 56, sold for $334,940, including buy- er’s premium, at Bonhams’ first sale at the 73rd Members Meeting at Goodwood on March 21, 2015. This was a nice old XK: It looked very original, with decent door gaps, a nicely preserved interior and original toolkit — and the early, original transmission tunnel overdrive lever, which is a curiosity today, espe- cially as so many old Jags have received modern 5-speed transmissions. The paint had slightly dulled in places, so some of it might not be as old as the rest of the car, and the leather was well creased and patinated with one small tear — but there are such things in this world as T-Cut, Hide Food and what used to be called elbow grease. A one-family original Originality has an increasingly important place in today’s collector car world, and the market currently prizes it above all else. But what made this car really special is that it had been in one-family ownership from new. This means that, even if it hadn’t been loved and cherished all of its life and been dormant for the past decade, it hadn’t been through the motor trade, hadn’t been dolled up or blown over for sale or generally messed about with. That the door fit was so good (they’re usually not on XKs at auction) was probably down to the fact that it had never been apart in its life, and all the better for it. Even if the new owner plans to obliterate all that lovely patina with a restoration, they know they’re starting with an original, unmolested car that’s correct in every detail. The top XK at this sale Our subject car compares with the car SCM originally asked me to write about, Lot 19, a nicely restored — but otherwise unremarkable — gray XK 150SE coupe. Nothing wrong with it, and at $111,399 it much older restoration and, peering through the door and panel gaps, you could see rust lurking in the structure, confirmed by more on the steering column, which should have been easy enough to clean off. How much corrosion there is within will determine how much of the car has to come apart, and this is no doubt why potential buyers sud- denly developed short arms and long pockets and it sold cheap for any open 120 at $95,387. It was cheap for a good reason. Try to find another one This brings us back to our subject roadster — or Open Two Seater, to give it its proper title. Very original cars like this just don’t come along very often, especially in right-hand-drive, home-market form. Most domestic-market cars were coupes and dropheads, and only 76 home-market XK 150 roadsters of all kinds were made against 2,187 for export, although the base 3.4 is thought to be rarest variant, out- numbered by SEs. This is an early car. S roadsters started at chassis T820001; this is 820030. (T signifies S, S prefix on early cars signifies SE.) Quite rightly, the market snapped it up at top dollar — three times the pre-sale estimate, though I suspect Bonhams always knew it would go for much more. This is an S roadster, after all, with a claimed 250 brake horsepower instead of the SE’s 210 — and whose values are only eclipsed by the 3.8S version, which uses the same motor that went into the E-type, with an alleged 265 bhp (yeah… right; all these claimed outputs were maybe achieved on a test bench with no ancillaries and optimized timing). As an aside, the last digit of the engine number on Jags of this vin- tage indicates the compression ratio, in this case 9:1. Someone’s got a cracker, and if the decision were mine, it wouldn’t be restored. The catalog promised it would be recommissioned before sale, so after a change of rubber and fluids — plus a damn good service including a compression test and very careful check of the motor before attempting to start it — I’d continue to wipe it over periodically with an July July 2015 61


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Etceterini & Friends Profile 1977 Maserati Khamsin After spending another $100k on restoration work, could our Caribbean museum escapee be a best-in-show candidate? by Donald Osborne Details Years produced: 1974–82 Number produced: 421 Current SCM Valuation: $100,000– $125,000 Tune-up cost: $1,500 Chassis # location: Plate on left-hand wheelwell in engine compartment Engine # location: Same as chassis Club: Maserati Club International Website: www.maseratinet.com Alternatives: 1972 Ferrari 365 GTC/4, 1967–73 Maserati Ghibli, 1974 Citroën SM SCM Investment Grade: C Comps Chassis number: AM1200214 W ith production of the Maserati Ghibli ending in 1972, Maserati started to develop a new front-engine vehicle. The replacement Khamsin was styled by Marcello Gandini, and it debuted in 1972 at the Turin Auto Show, but it was not sold until 1974. The Khamsin would be Maserati’s first front-engine car with full independent rear suspension. Powering this Maserati is a sleek V8 engine that is backed by a 5-speed manual gear box. The car is loaded with AM/FM radio, power windows, alloy wheels, rackand-pinion steering, and disc brakes all around. The maroon paint on the exterior appears to be original to the car. The interior is finished with tan leather and accented with a wood-grain dash and console. The carpet, door panels and headliner are all in very nice condition. This distinctive Maserati would benefit from a freshening. Of late note, it is disclosed that even though this car is left-hand drive, it was sold new in the U.K. It is further acknowledged that this combination is both “highly unusual and very cool.” It was not unheard of for people living in the U.K. — but who traveled a lot in mainland Europe — to order a left-hand-drive car. It was sold new in November 1976 by Modena Concessionaires in London in Rosso Rubino (Ruby Red) with Senape (mustard) interior. It is still presented in its original colors. It is further stated that this is the first time in approximately 15 years that the ultimate Khamsin-spec, a European 5-speed version, is being offered at auction in the United States. 62 SCM Analysis This car, Lot 458, sold for $137,500, including buyer’s premium, at Auctions America’s Fort Lauderdale, FL, sale on March 28, 2015. In a market known for new world records and disap- pearing “bargains,” the concept of “rising tides lift all boats” is often cited when a previously chronically undervalued vehicle shows significant value appreciation in what seems to be a short period of time. Longtime readers of my work — and faithful sufferers you are — have noted that I have put myself squarely in the “Maseratis are underappreciated and hence undervalued” camp for decades. Even the really expensive examples of the marque still seem discounted when compared with some of their competitors from Maranello or Newport Pagnell. Soldiering on with the Khamsin At a time when Ferrari had run from the United States market with its tail tucked between its ample flanks and offered only the 308 GT4 in place of its main 12-cylinder offerings, Maserati soldiered on, sailing forward in the face of adversity. Replacing the well-loved and popular Ghibli was no small matter. Marcello Gandini’s finely detailed and elegant design for Bertone was the first Maserati clothed by the Torinoarea firm. In original European trim, it is every bit the design equal of Giugiaro’s masterful Ghibli. Note that I mentioned the European trim. While Maserati soldiered on under the increasingly annoying U.S. car regulations, Sports Car Market 1977 Maserati Khamsin Lot 47, s/n AM120359 Condition 3 Sold at $94,036 H&H Auctions, Duxford, U.K., 4/24/14 SCM# 243493 1977 Maserati Khamsin Lot 63, s/n AM120234 Condition 2 Sold at $244,131 Bonhams, Spa, BEL, 5/18/14 SCM# 243941 1978 Maserati Khamsin Lot 395, s/n AM120US1218 Condition 2Sold at $128,380 Bonhams, Beaulieu, U.K., 9/6/14 SCM# 252306 Darin Schnabel © 2015, courtesy of Auctions America


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they did have consequences. The federal government brain trust decreed that the really clever rear fascia glass panel which Gandini designed for the Khamsin could not hold the taillight units. Why? Who remembers? For U.S.-delivery models, the taillights moved down to where the bum- pers were, and the bumpers moved down to where, well, nothing was. The overall effect was less than wonderful, and it’s small wonder that many U.S.-delivery examples have now been modified to conform to the original design. This is not a simple job, but it can be accomplished for under $5,000. A great driver — if maintained Nonetheless, the driving dynamics of the Khamsin, regardless of bumpers, are superb. It delivers everything you’d expect of Maserati’s flagship model. Contrary to conventional wisdom, the Citroën hydraulic assists are not onerous to maintain — if they have been regularly cared for. A substantial discount must be taken for a car fitted with the automatic transmission, although it does suit the relaxed, grand-touring nature of the Khamsin. The Khamsin is also a rare car, with only 421 built, compared with 1,170 Ghibli coupes. The survival rate has been high, but still there are very few around. As has been the case with the market as a whole, the impressive rise in Khamsin prices hasn’t been a uniform occurrence. In addition, a sale at $91k is noted in the SCM Platinum Auction Database back in 2010, with another the next year at $19k — which was called “well sold.” This market is as stratified as all the others, and it’s very much a case of a particular car in a certain place at an exact time. You can still get an inexpensive example — which will prove in no short time not to be cheap at all — or you can spend what seems to be an outrageous sum and get the best one available. A museum refugee with needs Based on the catalog description and photos, this particular car seems to inhabit an area somewhere in between inexpensive and outrageous, which is not necessarily a place one might want to be at this point. This Maserati came from the collection of the Cayman Motor Museum on Grand Cayman Island, which has been closed for renovations. From the catalog images, the bodywork appeared relatively straight, although the left door fit was a bit off, and the interior showed wear somewhat in excess of the indicated 40,000 km (24,854 miles). What really spoke of its inactive museum life were the photos of the engine compartment, which showed a distinct resemblance to a recently unearthed Egyptian tomb. It’s likely that the recommissioning will be a lengthy and expensive one. So, the price for this car sits just below the middle between the most recent high-water mark of $244k achieved at Bonhams Spa, Belgium, in May 2014 (SCM# 243941) and the low of $94k for an example sold at the H&H Duxford, U.K., sale in April 2014 (SCM# 243493). The Bonhams car was described as the best seen at auction, and the H&H Duxford Khamsin was a pretty dodgy — but RHD — model. So after spending another $100k on restoration work, could our Caribbean museum escapee be a best-in-show candidate? Maybe. A very good example should be available at around $120k in the U.S.. However, most dealers advertising Khamsins for sale in Europe have them listed as “inquire,” which indicates that the market changes daily. Think of the Khamsin as a vessel in a canal lock being filled with water — it is sure to rise — but be sure to check to see if the bilge plugs are tight on the one you choose. Nightmares still lurk, but the appeal of this rare 1970s express is finally showing through — and it’s about time. ♦ (Introductory description courtesy of Auctions America.) July 2015 63


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German Profile Column Author 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing Buy the best or most original 300SL you can find, and you’ll be fine in the long run by Alex Finigan Details Years produced: 1954–57 Number produced: 1,400 Original list price: $7,463 Current SCM Valuation: $925,000– $1,150,000 Tune-up cost: $2,000 to $3,000 Chassis # location: Left front frame (stamped) and center firewall Engine # location: Right front of engine, below cylinder head Club: Gullwing Group Website: www.gullwinggroup.org Alternatives: 1958–63 Aston Martin DB4, 1956–59 BMW 507, 1962–64 Ferrari 250 GT Lusso Comps Chassis number: 1980405500049 Engine number: 1989804500209 much to the contemporary Mercedes-Benz 300 luxury saloon. A 2,996-cc overhead-camshaft inline six, the 300SL’s engine was canted at 45 degrees to achieve a low bonnet L line and produced 215 brake horsepower at 5,800 rpm using Bosch mechanical fuel injection. A 4-speed, all-synchromesh manual gearbox transmitted power to the hypoid bevel rear axle. Suspension was independent all round: by wishbones and coil springs at the front, with swing axles and coil springs at the rear. A production 300SL (W198) was tested by Road & Track magazine in 1955, accelerating from 0 to 60 mph in 7.4 seconds on its way to a top speed of 140 mph. The 300SL remains a thoroughly practical car, as civi- lized in city traffic as it is exhilarating on the autobahn. By the time 300SL coupe production ceased in 1957, some 1,400 examples had found customers. Today the model is both rare and most sought after by connoisseurs of fine automobiles, as it guarantees entry into all of the most exclusive motoring venues and events: Goodwood, the Mille Miglia, Villa D’Este, Pebble Beach and so on. This magnificent, matching-numbers Mercedes- Benz 300SL Gullwing was completed on January 27, 1955, and shipped immediately to Mercedes-Benz Distributors Inc. in San Francisco, CA. The car stayed 64 Sports Car Market 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing Lot 111, s/n 1900405500368 Condition 1- Sold at $2,530,000 RM Auctions, Monterey, CA, 8/16/14 SCM# 244956 aunched in 1954, the production 300SL retained the space frame chassis and lightweight aluminum-alloy bodywork of the W194 racer, while its mechanical underpinnings, like the latter’s, owed 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing Lot 112, s/n 1980405500545 Condition 1- Sold at $1,375,000 Bonhams, Scottsdale, AZ, 1/15/15 SCM# 256902 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing Lot 238, s/n 1980405500594 Condition 2+ Sold at $1,485,000 RM Auctions, Phoenix, AZ, 1/16/15 SCM# 257057 Courtesy of Bonhams


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in the United States for most of its life and had several owners in California, including James S. Long and Jan Henner Matthias. In 2003, the Mercedes was exported to Europe, where it formed part of the collection belonging to the well-known collector Mr. Pierre Mellinger. According to Anthony Pritchard’s definitive work on the model, Gullwing, The Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Coupé, this car formed part of a Swedish collection at some time. More recently, it was owned by a collector from Monaco. The current owner bought the car in 2012. The accompanying copy build sheet states that this Gullwing was originally fin- ished in white/gray with blue cloth/vinyl interior, and was delivered equipped with the optional Becker Mexico radio and single external mirror. Extensively restored, it has been fully repainted in silver metallic, while the interior has been completely retrimmed in blue leather with matching carpets and beige muslin roof lining. Other noteworthy features include overhauled electrics, original white steering wheel (mildly patinated), four new Dunlop tires and an unused spare wheel. Currently displaying a total of 81,700 miles on the odometer, the car shows no signs of corrosion or accidents and is presented in generally good condition with excellent interior and very good chrome. It has been driven only occasionally by the current private owner while being kept very well stored and serviced with the other cars in his collection. Offered with the aforementioned build sheet, two expert condition appraisals (2007 and 2014) and French Carte Grise, this most iconic of all post-war sports cars is worthy of the closest inspection. SCM Analysis This car, Lot 117, sold for $1,132,731, including premium, at Bonhams’ auction at the Mercedes-Benz Museum in Stuttgart, Germany, on March 28, 2015. Executive Editor Chester Allen asked me to review this sale and give my opinion of the state of the 300SL market. I have written many evaluations on 300SLs, so instead of rehashing their history and singing their virtues, I will focus on the sale of this car and where I think the market is going. A solid car It is always risky to give an opinion on a car you’ve never seen or driven, but this seems like a solid, no-stories car. This is a complete numbers-matching car that seems to have never been apart. The original color, DB158 White Gray with Blue Tex, has been changed to DB180 Silver with Blue leather, and frankly, that has no effect on its value. My 38 years with Paul Russell & Co. have given me a unique perspective on the 300SL timeline. When I started as a mere lad, Roadsters were selling for half of a Gullwing’s price. That has changed dramatically over the years, and some Roadsters, especially original Rudge-wheel cars and disc brake/alloy cars, can bring as much as — or more than — their Gullwing brothers. The 300SL, however, has always been the slow, steady appreciating one, compared with period Ferraris, for example. 300SL cars are still undervalued If you step back and look at the chart over the past 40 years, post-war European sports cars have had an amazing ride. Sure, there have been downturns, such as 1989–90, but the upswing has usually been fast and dramatic. I think the 300SLs have always been undervalued compared with almost all of their 1950s counterparts. For this Gullwing to sell for $1.1m while a similar-condition Ferrari 250 PF II cab can sell for almost a million dollars more is insane to me. Production numbers aside, the looks, build quality and performance of the two cars have nothing in common. The Gullwing is so iconic — even non-car people know what it is. The car was truly leading-edge in its day. A great investment in the long term Now, where is it going from here? Well, that’s a good question. I have seen a slight leveling off in 300SL prices since last summer. I get calls weekly from people asking me where the market is going. Well, if I knew exactly what the market was going to do, I’d be sitting on an island with a Caribe, instead of penning this in 40-degree weather in Massachusetts. These cars can’t continue up forever, but they can still be a great investment. Buy the best or most original car you can find, and you’ll be fine in the long run. Almost anything you buy today and sell within a year, you’re going to lose money on. If you keep that car five or more years, you’re going to be fine. Certain late-1950s and early 1960s Ferraris seemingly have no end in sight. There July 2015 65 are more people out there with fabulous wealth than there are cars. The GTO club is never going to want for members. I’ve been advising my clients to divest themselves of their pre-war cars. Barring some Bugattis, 8C Alfas and a few other low- production cars, that market is dwindling. Go to a pre-war club event and look around. On aver- age, the members are 70 years old or older. It is difficult to find people in their 40s or younger who are fans and buyers of most pre-war cars. These cars just don’t appeal to younger collectors. The rule of thumb I use is, “You like what you liked in high school” for the most part. I think post-war European sports cars up to the mid-1970s have another 20 to 25-plus years left in the spotlight. I know most people reading SCM are car junkies, but I don’t see a lot of people in their 20s or 30s following in our footsteps. At events such as Pebble Beach or the Colorado Grand, there is a disproportionate number of older (my age), rich folks. Why? Because this is a very expensive hobby to break into. We have to find a way to be more inclusive for younger enthusiasts. I hope I’m wrong, but that’s my two cents, Harry. To get back to the 300SL market, I still think they’re undervalued, and they will continue to appreciate. I see the current leveling off as the market just catching its breath. Oh, by the way, this Gullwing was very well bought. ♦ (Introductory description courtesy of Bonhams.)


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German Profile The Cumberford Perspective Was the Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing the best restyling of all time? By Robert Cumberford 4 T he original 1952 Mercedes racing sports cars were light, 3 2 aerodynamic — and bloated. While they were not exactly ugly, they were certainly not beautiful, as were contemporary Ferraris and Jaguars. Transforming the erman Profile The Cumberford Perspective Was the Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing the best restyling of all time? By Robert Cumberford 4 T he original 1952 Mercedes racing sports cars were light, 3 2 aerodynamic — and bloated. While they were not exactly ugly, they were certainly not beauti- ful, as were contemporary Ferraris and Jaguars. Transforming the 5 5 fat W194 form into an iconic design that has remained one of the most admired automotive shapes of the past six decades — without denying its initial conception — demanded what must be one of the greatest facelift jobs of all time. Key was keeping the characteristic five-window upper with its magic doors, sucking lower body skins inward and adding six linear elements to the balloon-like surfaces. Two elements were those wonderful bumps on the exceptionally low hood, one barely clearing the canted engine, the other giving pleasing symmetry. The four others are “eyebrows” over all wheel openings. They allow swing axlemounted rear tire tops to pass outside the nominal original skin, as do front tires at full lock and full jounce. The total frontal area was reduced, and a single long chrome s made the sides seem l tall. Punctuating tau flanks with outlet gri completed a brilliant p file composition. Reducing the he diameter lamps’ ofile The Cumberford Perspective Was the Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing the best restyling of all time? By Robert Cumberford 4 T he original 1952 Mercedes racing sports cars were light, 3 2 aerodynamic — and bloated. While they were not exactly ugly, they were certainly not beauti- ful, as were contemporary Ferraris and Jaguars. Transforming the 5 fat W194 form into an iconic design that has remained one of the most admired automotive shapes of the past six decades — with- out denying its initial conception — demanded what must be one of the greatest facelift jobs of all time. Key was keeping the characteristic five-win- dow upper with its magic doors, sucking lower body skins inward and adding six linear elements to the balloon-like surfaces. Two elements were those won- derful bumps on the ex- ceptionally low hood, one barely clearing the canted engine, the other giving pleasing symmetry. The four others are “eyebrows” over all wheel openings. They allow swing axle- mounted rear tire tops to pass outside the nominal original skin, as do front tires at full lock and full jounce. The total frontal area was reduced, and a single long chrome s made the sides seem l tall. Punctuating tau flanks with outlet gri completed a brilliant p file composition. Reducing the he diameter lamps’ thrusting thrusting them forw squaring up grille si and bottom, and add bumpers made the c slim and svelte, yet s clearly Germanic. It a masterful job of conv ing a technical tool into a aesthetic treasure. ♦ 11 66 12 erman Profile The Cumberford Perspective Was the Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing the best restyling of all time? By Robert Cumberford 4 T he original 1952 Mercedes racing sports cars were light, 3 2 aerodynamic — and bloated. While they were not exactly ugly, they were certainly not beauti- ful, as were contemporary Ferraris and Jaguars. Transforming the 5 fat W194 form into an iconic design that has remained one of the most admired automotive shapes of the past six decades — with- out denying its initial conception — demanded what must be one of the greatest facelift jobs of all time. Key was keeping the characteristic five-win- dow upper with its magic doors, sucking lower body skins inward and adding six linear elements to the balloon-like surfaces. Two elements were those won- derful bumps on the ex- ceptionally low hood, one barely clearing the canted engine, the other giving pleasing symmetry. The four others are “eyebrows” over all wheel openings. They allow swing axle- mounted rear tire tops to pass outside the nominal original skin, as do front tires at full lock and full jounce. The total frontal area was reduced, and a single long chrome s made the sides seem l tall. Punctuating tau flanks with outlet gri completed a brilliant p file composition. Reducing the he diameter lamps’ thrusting them forw squaring up grille si and bottom, and add bumpers made the c slim and svelte, yet s clearly Germanic. It a masterful job of conv ing a technical tool into a aesthetic treasure. ♦ 11 66 12 6 6 FRONT 3/4 VIEW 1 The leaned-back, VW- style lamps were brought upright and pushed forward. 2 A huge corporate logo fixed the identity with unmistakable clarity. And pride. 3 The twin aerodynamic fairings, only one of which was necessary, established something for Harley Earl to copy for the ’56 Corvette. 4 Ah, the doors! Barely practical, they’re what once made the early coupes worth so much more than the mechanically superior Roadsters that followed. 5 Without these fairings, the whole body would have German Pr erman Profile Th erman Profile The Cumberford Perspective Was the Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing the best restyling of all time? By Robert Cumberford 4 T he original 1952 Mercedes racing sports cars were light, 3 2 aerodynamic — and bloated. While they were not exactly ugly, they were certainly not beauti- ful, as were contemporary Ferraris and Jaguars. Transforming the 5 fat W194 form into an iconic design that has remained one of the most admired automotive shapes of the past six decades — with- out denying its initial conception — demanded what must be one of the greatest facelift jobs of all time. Key was keeping the characteristic five-win- dow upper with its magic doors, sucking lower body skins inward and adding six linear elements to the balloon-like surfaces. Two elements were those won- derful bumps on the ex- ceptionally low hood, one barely clearing the canted engine, the other giving pleasing symmetry. The four others are “eyebrows” over all wheel openings. They allow swing axle- mounted rear tire tops to pass outside the nominal original skin, as do front tires at full lock and full jounce. The total frontal area was reduced, and a single long chrome s made the sides seem l tall. Punctuating tau flanks with outlet gri completed a brilliant p file composition. Reducing the he diameter lamps’ thrusting them forw squaring up grille si and bottom, and add bumpers made the c slim and svelte, yet s clearly Germanic. It a masterful job of conv ing a technical tool into a aesthetic treasure. ♦ 11 66 12 6 FRONT 3/4 VIEW 1 The leaned-back, VW- style lamps were brought upright and pushed forward. 2 A huge corporate logo fixed the identity with unmis- takable clarity. And pride. 3 The twin aerodynamic fairings, only one of which was necessary, established something for Harley Earl to copy for the ’56 Corvette. 4 Ah, the doors! Barely practical, they’re what once made the early coupes worth so much more than the me- chanically superior Roadsters that followed. 5 Without these fairings, the whole body would have 8 8 the production coupe. 6 Can you magine a steel wheel with button hubcaps on any superior car these days? No way, yet they were expected and accepted in the 1950s. REAR 3/4 VIEW 7 The slim-line bumpers were not worth very much as protection, but they finish off the forms of the car beautifully. 8 The flow-through outlets on the back of the roof derive from the racers, where they were crude and adjustable. The whole upper body was retained in shape, though. 9 The elegantly sinuous fender profile line is negative through the side-of-body portion of the door, making a really complex surface. 10 The side grilles are carefully placed, with the leading edge parallel to the front wheel cut and the rear edge aligned with the rear tip of the “eyebrow” appendage. 11 The single-side chrome strip serves, along with the bumpers, as a datum line, with surfaces above and below — apart from headlamp nacelles — turning away from the horizontal plane so defined. 12 The single most oldfashioned detail is the size of the taillights — adequate, but only just so. Today’s larger expanses are genuinely safer. INTERIOR VIEW (see previous page) Weak ergonomically in today’s terms, the 300SL cockpit was truly handsome in presentation and properly driver-focused, with big tach and speedometer dials centered on the steering column. The wide sills made entry difficult, but once seated, the driver is held snugly and comfortably in appropriately German Pr erman Profile Th erman Profile The Cumberford Perspective Was the Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing the best restyling of all time? By Robert Cumberford 4 T he original 1952 Mercedes racing sports cars were light, 3 2 aerodynamic — and bloated. While they were not exactly ugly, they were certainly not beauti- ful, as were contemporary Ferraris and Jaguars. Transforming the 5 fat W194 form into an iconic design that has remained one of the most admired automotive shapes of the past six decades — with- out denying its initial conception — demanded what must be one of the greatest facelift jobs of all time. Key was keeping the characteristic five-win- dow upper with its magic doors, sucking lower body skins inward and adding six linear elements to the balloon-like surfaces. Two elements were those won- derful bumps on the ex- ceptionally low hood, one barely clearing the canted engine, the other giving pleasing symmetry. The four others are “eyebrows” over all wheel openings. They allow swing axle- mounted rear tire tops to pass outside the nominal original skin, as do front tires at full lock and full jounce. The total frontal area was reduced, and a single long chrome s made the sides seem l tall. Punctuating tau flanks with outlet gri completed a brilliant p file composition. Reducing the he diameter lamps’ thrusting them forw squaring up grille si and bottom, and add bumpers made the c slim and svelte, yet s clearly Germanic. It a masterful job of conv ing a technical tool into a aesthetic treasure. ♦ 11 66 12 6 FRONT 3/4 VIEW 1 The leaned-back, VW- style lamps were brought upright and pushed forward. 2 A huge corporate logo fixed the identity with unmis- takable clarity. And pride. 3 The twin aerodynamic fairings, only one of which was necessary, established something for Harley Earl to copy for the ’56 Corvette. 4 Ah, the doors! Barely practical, they’re what once made the early coupes worth so much more than the me- chanically superior Roadsters that followed. 5 Without these fairings, the whole body would have 8 the production coupe. 6 Can you magine a steel wheel with button hubcaps on any superior car these days? No way, yet they were expected and accepted in the 1950s. REAR 3/4 VIEW 7 The slim-line bumpers were not worth very much as protection, but they finish off the forms of the car beautifully. 8 The flow-through outlets on the back of the roof derive from the racers, where they were crude and adjustable. The whole upper body was retained in shape, though. 9 The elegantly sinuous fender profile line is negative through the side-of-body portion of the door, making a really complex surface. 10 The side grilles are care- fully placed, with the leading edge parallel to the front wheel cut and the rear edge aligned with the rear tip of the “eyebrow” appendage. 11 The single-side chrome strip serves, along with the bumpers, as a datum line, with surfaces above and below — apart from headlamp nacelles — turning away from the horizontal plane so defined. 12 The single most old- fashioned detail is the size of the taillights — adequate, but only just so. Today’s larger expanses are genuinely safer. INTERIOR VIEW (see previous page) Weak ergonomically in today’s terms, the 300SL cockpit was truly handsome in presentation and properly driver-focused, with big tach and speedometer dials cen- tered on the steering column. The wide sills made entry difficult, but once seated, the driver is held snugly and comfortably in appropriately 9 9 7 10


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American Profile 1935 Packard Twelve Sport Coupe A blend of styling influences — and leather-covered rear windows — makes this rare car very special by Carl Bomstead Details Year produced: 1934 Number produced: Four Original list price: $7,746 Current SCM Valuation: $1,750,000– $2,500,000 Tune-up cost: $650 Distributor cap: $450 Chassis # location: Metal firewall plate Engine # location: Boss on upper left corner of block Club: Classic Car Club of America More: classiccarclub.org Alternatives: 1934 Packard 1108 Dietrich Convertible, 1933 Pierce Silver Arrow SCM Investment Grade: A Comps Chassis number: 750795 shell, more deeply skirted fenders, and vee’d headlamp lenses. The 12-cylinder models of this series were the ultimate Packards, and the ultimate of the ultimate were the versions designed by Alexis de Sakhnoffsky and built by LeBaron of Detroit. These scarce cars featured the latest in aerodynamics, including separate, sensuously rounded pontoon fenders, curved running boards blended into the body, and tapered tails. They were the hottest thing to come from East Grand Boulevard in years. Two of the LeBaron styles, the Runabout Speedster P and the sport coupe, were given their own unique, sporty chassis, which ended up being a shortened 136inch wheelbase variant of the Twelve platform, known as the 1106. The chassis was mounted on a sturdy Standard Eight frame, and it utilized the V12 engine. The sport coupe, with its fastback roofline inspired by the Mercedes-Benz Autobahn-Kurier, was the real shape of things to come, so it is no wonder that Packard tried to claim credit for it; the bodies may have been built by LeBaron, but they were attributed to the Packard Custom Body Division. SCM Analysis This car, Lot 221, sold for $2,200,000, including buyer’s pre- mium, at RM Sotheby’s Andrews Collection sale in Fort Worth, TX, on May 2, 2015. 68 In the early 1930s, the Packard Motor Car Company ackard’s most beautiful automobiles of the 1930s were arguably produced as part of the Eleventh Series, and they boasted the first gentle hints of streamlining, such as a slightly angled radiator offered some of the most dramatic and elegant motorcars of the Classic era. This is rather remarkable, as Packard management was primarily composed of engineers, and coachwork was regarded as a necessity that was required to sell the finished chassis. Fortunately, management was not averse to selling the Packard chassis to outside coachbuilders — a practice that started in the late 1910s. Raymond Dietrich and Thomas Hibbard founded LeBaron Carrossiers in 1920 with the purpose of designing and building custom coachwork automobiles. By 1925, both of the founders had left the firm, and in 1926 it was acquired by Briggs Manufacturing, who continued to build standard bodies for Packard until 1952, when it was acquired by Chrysler. LeBaron, however, continued as a coachbuilding subsidiary, and a new design center, LeBaron Studios, was established to build custom bodies in small series. In 1925, Packard established their Custom Body Division, which acquired individual body styles in lots of 10 to as many as 100 of a particular design and included them in their catalog as factory customs. Of course, they still offered individual full-custom bodies for their well-heeled clients who demanded a truly unique motorcar. In the late 1920s, many of the Packards that were de- signed by Raymond Dietrich and Dietrich Inc. wore body tags stating “Custom Made by Packard” or “Dietrich Inc.” Packard, using a professional stylist and adding a few minor accessories along with a body tag, was able to charge almost twice as much compared with the equivalent standard body offering. A profitable business indeed. 1934 Packard Twelve Lot 163, s/n 110832 Condition 1 Sold at $2,035,000 RM Auctions, Phoenix, AZ, 1/18/08 SCM# 48889 1934 Packard Twelve Two-Place 1108 Lot 24, s/n 110832 Condition 1- Sold at $1,100,000 Gooding & Co., Otis Chandler Collection, Oxnard, CA, 10/21/06 SCM# 43436 1934 Packard Twelve LeBaron Speedster Lot 167, s/n 110612 Condition 1 Sold at $3,190,000 RM Auctions, Phoenix, AZ, 1/20/06 SCM# 40658 Sports Car Market Darin Schnabel ©2014, courtesy of RM Sotheby’s


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Dietrich, Macauley and Sakhnoffsky Raymond Dietrich was an integral part of Packard’s custom offer- ings, serving as an in-house “body critic,” independent designer and founder of Dietrich Inc., the firm from which he was ousted in 1931. In January 1931, Edward Macauley was appointed by his father, Alvan Macauley, the president of Packard, as head of the new Packard styling division. “He was no designer; he was a playboy,” Dietrich said of Edward Macauley. That salvo may have been the reason Packard did not keep Dietrich as a styling consultant. Dietrich’s prior designs were, however, integral parts of the last “Custom Made by Packard” offerings, including the spectacular 1933 Chicago Exhibition “Car of the Dome.” Dietrich, however, was now firmly established at Chrysler, where he was in charge of exterior styling. So Edward Macauley hired Count Alexis de Sakhnoffsky as a body stylist. Sakhnoffsky was responsible for the false hood that extended back to the cowl — increasing the apparent length of the car. This had been used on the Car of the Dome, and it was part of the design for the last “Custom Made by Packard,” which was the 1106 sport coupe that was presented at the 1934 New York Auto Show. A delightful blend of styling The RM Sotheby’s catalog stated that the sport coupe with its fast- back roofline was inspired by the Mercedes-Benz Autobahn-Kurier, but that vehicle was also introduced in 1934 at the March Berlin Auto show. The design for the Packard sport coupe was a blend of the false hood of Sakhnoffsky, the Dietrich waistline, the split windshield of the Car of the Dome and the pontoon fenders of the famous 1934 Macauley Speedster. Four sport coupes were produced. Originally, they all had the unique “teardrop” windows and a steel roof. In addition to the sport coupe, a Runabout Speedster was also presented. Both were built on a shortened 136-inch wheelbase with the V12 engine. They were built at LeBaron, but Packard attributed them to their Custom Body Division. A very special Packard The 1106 sport coupe offered by RM Sotheby’s was the actual New York Auto Show car. It was not offered to the public. It was taken back to the factory, where it received the Twelfth Series 1935 front sheet metal and a leather-covered top that obscured the rear quarter windows. The teardrop windows were merely covered — you can feel their outline in the headliner. While the other three examples were sold at a list price of $7,746, the factory kept this car until 1939, and its ownership history is well documented since that time. It was restored in the 1980s while it was part of the Jerry J. Moore Collection. While the car has been well maintained, it is now in need of attention. The paint is cracked on the front fender, and there are other minor signs of age. These minor flaws did not discourage bidders, as the car sold at the high end of the expected range. Should the new owner be concerned? Absolutely not, as he owns one of the most striking Packards ever produced. While there are three others, this is the documented World’s Fair car with unique factory modifications. In today’s market, $2.2 million was a very reasonable transaction. ♦ (Introductory description courtesy of RM Sotheby’s.)


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Race Car Profile 1955 Frazer Nash Le Mans Coupe This enthusiast’s car is rare, has race history and it’s fast and fun, but it’s only a fair investment car by Thor Thorson Details Years produced: 1953–55 Number produced: Nine Original list price: $6,850 Current SCM Valuation: $500,000– $650,000 Cost per hour to race: $800 Club: Frazer Nash Car Club More: www.frazernash.co.uk Alternatives: 1956–63 AC Aceca Bristol, 1953–55 Aston Martin DB 2/4, 1951–58 Lancia B20GT SCM Investment Grade: B Comps Chassis number: 421200203 Engine number: BS41415 I ntroduced in 1953, complementing the company’s successful open sports cars, the Le Mans coupe was the first closed Frazer Nash to enter production. It used the new parallel-tube-chassis frame, around which was wrapped a beautiful, full-width alloy body that, with its curvaceous lines and horizontal front grille, hinted at the forthcoming Sebring roadster. The chassis boasted independent front suspension, rack-and-pinion steering, torsion-bar rear suspension and twin-leading-shoe brakes, while the engine was, of course, the 1,971-cc, 6-cylinder Bristol. Of the nine cars completed, three would race at Le Mans, the most successful being chassis 186, which finished 13th overall in 1953 (winning its class) and 11th overall in 1954. One of only nine Le Mans fixed-head coupes built from April 1953 to October 1956, this particular car is historically significant as the last Frazer Nash to compete at the famous French endurance classic. Completed in April 1955, chassis 421200203 was ordered new by Mrs. Kathleen “Kitty” Maurice, the enthusiastic landowner/ promoter of Wiltshire’s Castle Combe race circuit. A Frazer Nash enthusiast, Mrs. Maurice took delivery of her Le Mans coupe in April of 1955. Chassis 421200203 was raced at the 1959 Le Mans 24-Hour Race by gentleman driver John Dashwood. Dashwood had bought the car, registered XMC 1, from Frazer Nash’s parent company, AFN Ltd., in March 1959. AFN then prepared the car for Le Mans, which included altering the method of rear axle location by fitting a Panhard rod and Rose joints in place of the original “A” bracket. 70 SCM Analysis This car, Lot 26, sold for $693,148, including buyer’s premium, at Bonhams’ Goodwood auction in Chichester, U.K., on March 21, 2015. A what? I’ll admit that Frazer Nash isn’t a manufac- turer’s name that leaps to mind. The few people who do know of it tend to assume that it was one of those weird little pre-war builders that built quirky, primitive racers (something about “chain gang”) and didn’t survive World War II. In fact, Frazer Nash not only survived the war, they did very well, and in various evolved forms, continue to do well to this day. They didn’t build a lot of cars before the war and even fewer after, but they were anything but a struggling, quixotic little company. Let’s start with some history. More than 100 years ago… In 1910, two young engineers, a Mr. Godfrey and Archibald Frazer-Nash, started a company to manufacture very simple, inexpensive belt-drive cycle-cars, called GN. They proved to be remarkably good performers for the price and enjoyed immediate success. During World War I, a multiple-chain transmission was developed (think of three or four bicycle sprocket/chain setups side by side, shifted by sliding dog gears) to improve power transmission and reliability. After World War I, more competition dimmed pros- pects, and in 1923 the two founders left the company. Archibald formed a new company — Frazer Nash — to build an improved car along the GN lines, but with emphasis on sporting performance rather than economy. Sports Car Market 1960 AC Aceca Lot 210, s/n AEX756 Condition 1Sold at $286,000 RM Auctions, Monterey, CA, 8/16/14 SCM# 245137 1952 Frazer Nash Targa Florio Lot 21, s/n 421200175 Condition 2 Sold at $442,924 Bonhams, London, U.K., 12/1/13 SCM# 231863 1952 Frazer Nash Le Mans Mk II Lot 187, s/n 421200174 Condition 4+ Sold at $1,001,000 Bonhams, Carmel, CA, 8/16/13 SCM# 227393 Courtesy of Bonhams


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The new Frazer Nash proved to be an amazing performer, particularly with the chain-drive transmission that allowed very fast shifting compared with other transmissions of the time. The company did well for a few years, but a business downturn com- bined with health issues to force Archibald out, and he sold the company to H.J. Aldington. The new company, AFN, built about 360 chain-drive Frazer Nash cars through the 1930s, establishing a fearsome reputation for the cars as highly competitive and cheerfully nonconformist racers. The aficionados called themselves the “Chain Gang” and still do. Possibly as important, Aldington was an adventurous entrepreneur and, on a racing and touring trip through Europe in 1934, he became acquainted with the BMW car company in Munich. He arranged to become the BMW importer for England, badging them as the “Frazer Nash BMW” and doing rather well in the process. Everything ended, of course, with the onset of World War II in 1939. Building a few good cars Immediately after the war, Aldington returned to Munich and, in a combination of astute business acumen and war reparations, managed to bring the design rights to the now legendary BMW 328 and its designer, Fritz Fiedler, back to England. The Bristol Aircraft Company was looking to diversify into automobiles after the war, and arrangements were made to share the rights, with Bristol building the 2-liter 328 engine as a “Bristol” under license and Frazer Nash effectively building an updated 328 sports car under its own nameplate. The essential point here is that Aldington was an excellent and suc- cessful businessman who obviously created multiple sources of revenue to support his passions (he became the U.K. importer for Porsche in the early 1950s). In the post-war years (through 1958), Frazer Nash built about 70 cars (records weren’t great). Building cars was not a hand-to-mouth struggle to keep the doors open, and AFN was anything but a “normal” car company. Frazer Nash built cars because they wanted to and could afford to do it, and they sold to the few people who could afford to buy them. As you might expect from such an arrangement, the cars they pro- duced were highly individual. With the exception of our subject Le Mans coupe, they were all open cars. By far the most common and recognizable (34 built), were the first of the post-war cars. The High-Speed was a cycle-fendered, English-built BMW 328 designed almost strictly for racing. When one finished 3rd at Le Mans in 1949, the later cars were called “Le Mans Replica” in its honor, and all of them now go by that moniker. On to the Le Mans coupe It was also the last of the cycle-fender cars. Technology and aerody- namics marched forward, and Frazer Nash started to build sports cars that pretty much looked like the modern definition. In 1953, they introduced the Le Mans coupe, which was designed with high-speed aerodynamics and long-distance comfort in mind. It proved to be a splendid little car, tiny on the outside but comfortable once you got yourself folded into it — with an amazing amount of luggage space in the boot for touring (or a big gas tank for distance racing). The combination of the 2-liter Bristol engine and the lightweight alu- minum body made the car very quick for its time, and it ran comfortably at 120 mph or more. In many ways it can be considered the first truly modern aerodynamic GT car, predating the Lotus Elite by four years. Toy, tool or investment? So here we are in 2015, 60 years after this car was built — and almost as many since the marque ceased production. What are we to make of it as a toy, a tool or an investment? I will argue that the results are mixed. As a toy it is great. My shop maintained this car for a number of years, so I know it well and it really is a wonderful little car, fun to drive, easy to maintain and strikingly handsome. As a tool for competition it also fares very well indeed. These cars raced at all the important venues in the day: Le Mans, Mille Miglia, Goodwood and scores of others, so it is instantly welcome at the modern versions of these events that have become very difficult for most cars to enter. Once there, you can be as competitive as you want to be: Fire- breathing (ostensibly vintage) Bristol engines are available with a phone call if you want to go fast, and the chassis will handle it well. The glory of high-profile vintage racing is a specialty of Frazer Nash. As an investment, I’m not quite so sure. It does seem to have every- thing going for it — rarity, beauty, aluminum bodywork, racing history, usability and the like, but somehow it remains more of an enthusiast’s car than an investor’s vehicle. I am aware of what this very car sold for privately in 2004 and 2010 — as well as the current auction value. Although it has increased generally in pound sterling, in U.S. dollars the value growth has remained unspectacular — while other cars have skyrocketed. After some thought, I came up with a number of limiting consider- ations: 1. It’s not Italian. 2. It’s not mechanically exotic (Bristol engines are cool, but…). 3. It’s not wildly fast. 4. It was never particularly important. Finally, nobody knows what a Frazer Nash is (or was). Thus, the Le Mans coupe is what I would call an excellent pure enthu- siast’s car: a relatively safe place to put your money while you go have a great time with a car that you love, but it’s not a mechanism for value appreciation. As such, I would say fairly bought. ♦ (Introductory description courtesy of Bonhams.) e new Frazer Nash proved to be an amazing performer, particularly with the chain-drive transmission that allowed very fast shifting com- pared with other transmissions of the time. The company did well for a few years, but a business downturn com- bined with health issues to force Archibald out, and he sold the company to H.J. Aldington. The new company, AFN, built about 360 chain-drive Frazer Nash cars through the 1930s, establishing a fearsome reputation for the cars as highly competitive and cheerfully nonconformist racers. The aficionados called themselves the “Chain Gang” and still do. Possibly as important, Aldington was an adventurous entrepreneur and, on a racing and touring trip through Europe in 1934, he became acquainted with the BMW car company in Munich. He arranged to become the BMW importer for England, badging them as the “Frazer Nash BMW” and doing rather well in the process. Everything ended, of course, with the onset of World War II in 1939. Building a few good cars Immediately after the war, Aldington returned to Munich and, in a combination of astute business acumen and war reparations, managed to bring the design rights to the now legendary BMW 328 and its designer, Fritz Fiedler, back to England. The Bristol Aircraft Company was look- ing to diversify into automobiles after the war, and arrangements were made to share the rights, with Bristol building the 2-liter 328 engine as a “Bristol” under license and Frazer Nash effectively building an updated 328 sports car under its own nameplate. The essential point here is that Aldington was an excellent and suc- cessful businessman who obviously created multiple sources of revenue to support his passions (he became the U.K. importer for Porsche in the early 1950s). In the post-war years (through 1958), Frazer Nash built about 70 cars (records weren’t great). Building cars was not a hand-to-mouth struggle to keep the doors open, and AFN was anything but a “normal” car company. Frazer Nash built cars because they wanted to and could afford to do it, and they sold to the few people who could afford to buy them. As you might expect from such an arrangement, the cars they pro- duced were highly individual. With the exception of our subject Le Mans coupe, they were all open cars. By far the most common and recogniz- able (34 built), were the first of the post-war cars. The High-Speed was a cycle-fendered, English-built BMW 328 designed almost strictly for rac- ing. When one finished 3rd at Le Mans in 1949, the later cars were called “Le Mans Replica” in its honor, and all of them now go by that moniker. On to the Le Mans coupe It was also the last of the cycle-fender cars. Technology and aerody- namics marched forward, and Frazer Nash started to build sports cars that pretty much looked like the modern definition. In 1953, they introduced the Le Mans coupe, which was designed with high-speed aerodynamics and long-distance comfort in mind. It proved to be a splendid little car, tiny on the outside but comfortable once you got yourself folded into it — with an amazing amount of luggage space in the boot for touring (or a big gas tank for distance racing). The combination of the 2-liter Bristol engine and the lightweight alu- minum body made the car very quick for its time, and it ran comfortably at 120 mph or more. In many ways it can be considered the first truly modern aerodynamic GT car, predating the Lotus Elite by four years. Toy, tool or investment? So here we are in 2015, 60 years after this car was built — and almost as many since the marque ceased production. What are we to make of it as a toy, a tool or an investment? I will argue that the results are mixed. As a toy it is great. My shop maintained this car for a number of years, so I know it well and it really is a wonderful little car, fun to drive, easy to maintain and strikingly handsome. As a tool for competition it also fares very well indeed. These cars raced at all the important venues in the day: Le Mans, Mille Miglia, Goodwood and scores of others, so it is instantly welcome at the modern versions of these events that have become very difficult for most cars to enter. Once there, you can be as competitive as you want to be: Fire- breathing (ostensibly vintage) Bristol engines are available with a phone call if you want to go fast, and the chassis will handle it well. The glory of high-profile vintage racing is a specialty of Frazer Nash. As an investment, I’m not quite so sure. It does seem to have every- thing going for it — rarity, beauty, aluminum bodywork, racing history, usability and the like, but somehow it remains more of an enthusiast’s car than an investor’s vehicle. I am aware of what this very car sold for privately in 2004 and 2010 — as well as the current auction value. Although it has increased gener- ally in pound sterling, in U.S. dollars the value growth has remained unspectacular — while other cars have skyrocketed. After some thought, I came up with a number of limiting consider- ations: 1. It’s not Italian. 2. It’s not mechanically exotic (Bristol engines are cool, but…). 3. It’s not wildly fast. 4. It was never particularly important. Finally, nobody knows what a Frazer Nash is (or was). Thus, the Le Mans coupe is what I would call an excellent pure enthu- siast’s car: a relatively safe place to put your money while you go have a great time with a car that you love, but it’s not a mechanism for value appreciation. As such, I would say fairly bought. ♦ (Introductory description courtesy of Bonhams.) 71 71


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Next Gen Profile 1981 Renault 5 Turbo There’s a whole universe of difference between Le Car and a Renault 5 Turbo, also known as an R5 Turbo by Jeff Zurschmeide Details Years produced: 1980–86 Number produced: 3,576 Original list price: N/A Current SCM Valuation: $35,000–$65,000 Tune-up cost: $200 Distributor cap: $18 Club: Renault Turbo Owner’s Club, Renault 5 Turbo Facebook Group Club website: www.rtoc.org, www. facebook.com/pages/Renault-5TURBO-Club/299756880042994 Alternatives: 1984–86 Ford RS200, 1980–84 Audi Quattro, 1998 Subaru Impreza 22B SCM Investment Grade: B Comps 1986 Renault R5 Turbo 2 Lot 331, s/n VF182200000500128 Condition 2 SOLD at $91,851 Chassis number: VF1822000B000159 T he Renault 5 Turbo is a hatchback with a highperformance engine. This French car debuted at the Brussels Motor Show in January of 1980. At this time, rally cars were climbing in popularity. The design of this car was tailored towards the rally car market, but a street version also was sold. During its four-year production run, fewer than 4,000 of these highperformance cars were manufactured. The Renault 5 Turbo should not be confused with the Alpine Turbo or GT Turbo. This no-nonsense machine was profoundly modified. The turbocharged engine was mounted behind the driver in what is normally the passenger’s compartment, which created a mid-engined hot hatch and rally car. It is also a rear-wheel-drive car. The Renault 5 Turbo was made in many guises and received many plaudits along the way. Powering this car is a powerful inline 4-cylinder, turbocharged engine. The power transfer to the widecontact-patch rear tires is a manual gearbox. The exterior is highlighted with red paint and alloy wheels with matching accents, along with a pop-up sunroof. This hatchback has a sporty interior with contoured bucket seats with cloth inserts, electric windows, glove compartment and an efficient dash decorated with gauges. The rear window is fitted with a wiper, and the rear windows are hinged to vent fresh air through the cockpit. The Renault 5 also has numerous ducts and air vents that are seen in black. Even the trailing edge of the roofline has a slight rise to it, 72 giving it the appearance of a subtle spoiler — most fitting for this pure performance platform. SCM Analysis This car, Lot 472, sold for $50,400, including buyer’s premium, at Auctions America’s Fort Lauderdale, FL, sale on March 28, 2015. You’d have to look for a long time to find a car that’s been mocked as thoroughly as the Renault 5 — known in the United States as “Le Car.” With just 55 horsepower and looks that only a Renault designer could love, Le Car was forced to compete with the highly successful Honda Civic and Volkswagen Rabbit from 1976 to 1983. But sports car cognoscenti know that there’s a whole universe of difference between Le Car and a Renault 5 Turbo, also known as an R5 Turbo. Where the Renault Le Car was a front-engine, front- wheel-drive economy car, the R5 Turbo moved the engine behind the driver, gave it a big Garrett turbo, and mated it to a 5-speed transaxle. The mid-engine, reardrive design put out 160 horsepower and 163 pound-feet of torque and pushed the R5 Turbo from zero to 60 in 6.6 seconds — and to a top speed of about 125 mph. On the outside, the R5 Turbo sports enormous box flares covering a set of extra-wide rear tires on sexy alloy wheels. Buyers also got a racing-oriented interior package with extra gauges and nifty sport seats. One of the big differences that you can’t see is that the first Sports Car Market 1981 Renault R5 Turbo Lot S124, s/n B0000564 Condition 2 SOLD at $140,400 Mecum Auctions, Monterey, CA, 8/16/2014 SCM# 248351 Bonhams, Paris, FRA, 2/5/2015 SCM# 257280 1984 Audi Ur Quattro Lot 211, s/n WAUZZZ85ZEA901097 Condition 2Sold at $33,267 Bonhams, Sydney, AUS, 12/6/09 SCM# 153258 Darin Schnabel © 2015, courtesy of Auctions America NEW Feature!


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years of R5 Turbo production were also gifted with aluminum door skins, roof panel and tailgate. After the original R5 Turbo satisfied the homologation requirements for FIA racing and rally, Renault announced the Renault 5 Turbo 2 in 1982. The Turbo 2 exchanged the expensive aluminum body panels for steel, and downgraded the racing interior to the same economy-car trim delivered with the base model. Over the entire production run from 1980 to 1986, just 3,576 R5 Turbo cars were made — the vast majority being the all-steel Turbo 2 model. A solid investment The Renault 5 Turbo is just one of several European cars becoming more collectible in the modern era. Along with other factory racing homologation models such as the Audi Sport Quattro (SCM# 261959), BMW 3.0 CSL (SCM# 239009), and the Ford Escort RS2000 (SCM# 243819), prices have slowly risen for some time. Many collectors have not yet done the homework on these cars, especially when compared with more conventional classic, muscle and sports cars, and that’s helped keep prices reasonable. That’s all changing now. If you go back five to 10 years, solid examples of the Renault 5 Turbo were trading at about $30,000–$40,000 (SCM# 120861). However, during the past year, the typical sale price for a good street-going Renault 5 Turbo has generally been north of $100,000. In early February, just six weeks prior to this sale, a 1980 R5 Turbo sold for $117,517 at Rétromobile 2015 by Artcurial in Paris. Just one day before that, a less-desirable 1986 Turbo 2 sold for $91,851 at Bonhams’ Paris auction (SCM# 257280). This analysis omits the cars with bona fide racing history — they often sell for far more. See the 1980 Renault 5 Turbo Group 4 Race Profile in the May 2014 issue of SCM (p. 62). An outlier sale For some reason, this particular car brought less than half the money commanded at other auctions this year. You won’t get much of a clue from the rather perfunctory lot description. You can (and should) learn a lot more about the R5 Turbo. One strange feature of this car jumps out right away: the sunroof. The R5 Turbo was a homologated racing model, and the factory would never have cut a big hole in the roof. From the photos, this looks to be one of the cheap glass pop-ups that were installed by the millions at car stereo shops — and have been leaking ever since. Strike one, but not a strikeout. A good body shop could easily set that right, even though that roof is aluminum. The other curious fact to note from the auction description is that this R5 Turbo came with electric windows. The early homologation models were generally fitted with wind-up windows to save weight. Now, this doesn’t mean the car is a fake by any means, but it is unusual for an early-series R5 Turbo. The rest of the interior is the correct racing-inspired trim for the early model, and apart from a few really minor dings, this car looks like it came from a museum collection — which it did. This car was part of the Cayman Motor Museum Collection before the auction. Bottom line: This is easily a $100,000 car — if not higher. A cautionary tale So what’s the answer to this riddle? Note that this car was offered for sale with no reserve. Our best guess is that the collection of buyers at that particular time and in that particular place did not include enough Renault 5 Turbo enthusiasts to boost the price to current market levels. That’s likely because the bidders at this auction had not done the homework on this car’s value. The result is that some lucky buyer just walked away with at least $50,000 of the seller’s equity in his pocket. This sale should be a cautionary bedtime story for hopeful sellers: You cannot rely on past auction sales to predict the price at the next auction. You need to know what your car is really worth and insist on a reasonable reserve price to ensure that you don’t lose le chemise. ♦ (Introductory description courtesy of Auctions America.) July 2015 73


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Market Reports Overview Springing Into a Steady 2015 A wrecked Ford GT upends the notion of “value” Top 10 Sales This Issue (Land Auctions Only) 1. 1938 Mercedes-Benz 540K cabriolet A, $2,996,256— Bonhams, p. 92 2. 1931 Mercedes-Benz 770 cabriolet D, $2,509,364— Bonhams, p. 92 3. 1960 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster, $1,217,229—Bonhams, p. 95 4. 1961 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster, $1,186,018—Bonhams, p. 96 5. 1957 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster, $1,148,565—Bonhams, p. 94 6. 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing, $1,136,080—Bonhams, p. 94 7. 1959 Ferrari 250 GT PF coupe, $715,000—Auctions America, p. 81 8. 1955 Frazer Nash Le Mans racer, $693,148—Bonhams, p. 114 9. 1957 Mercedes-Benz 300Sc coupe, $621,723—Bonhams, p. 94 10. 1931 Mercedes-Benz 370S 15/75 PS Mannheim convertible, $599,251—Bonhams, p. 92 Best Buys 1900 Benz Ideal 4½-hpw vis-à-vis, $230,961—Bonhams, p. 92 76 Offered as rebuilt/reconstructed but with clean CARFAX and Autocheck — 2006 Ford GT coupe, sold at $231,000, Leake, Fort Lauderdale, FL By Tony Piff on top at $715k. Bonhams’ second annual all-Mercedes sale in A Stuttgart, Germany, totaled $14.1m, down from $16.1m last year, with 33 of 46 cars going to new homes. A 1938 540K cabriolet A sold for $3m, securing high-sale honors. The Goodwood Members Meeting sale in Chichester, U.K. — that makes three Goodwood sales on Bonhams’ calendar — debuted with total sales of $6.4m. Forty-nine cars sold out of 64 offered, and a 1955 Frazer Nash Le Mans racer was the most expensive at $693k. Leake sales totaled $5.5m at their spring Dallas sale last year. They returned this May and grew sales to $6.3m, selling 269 cars out of 422. Top money went to a 2006 Ford GT at $231k. Branson reduced consignments for their spring sale this time around (172, down from 207) but sold more cars (124, up from 118) for more money ($2.3m, up from $2.2m). A 1953 Packard Caribbean convertible was the biggest sale of the day at $75k. Tony’s Market Moment: Despite the fact that the Jaguar XKE, Porsche 911 and Ferrari 246 Dino grew better, more powerful and more reliable with each new iteration, it is the earliest, “purest” and, well, least-usable examples that fetch the biggest prices today. For modern supercars such as the Ford GT, this same principle turns almost inside-out: Biggest prices go to the lowest-mile examples, ensuring that these oh-so-usable cars uctions America earned their biggest Fort Lauderdale total ever in late March, selling 368 of 495 cars for $21.3m, up from $20.8m last year. A 1959 Ferrari 250 GT PF coupe came out Northamptonshire, U.K. Mar. 3, 2015 Sales Totals of Auctions in This Issue Bonhams CCA Chichester, U.K. Mar 21, 2015 Fort Lauderdale, FL Mar. 27–29, 2015 Stuttgart, DEU Mar. 28, 2015 Birmingham, U.K. Mar. 28, 2015 Punta Gorda, FL Apr. 10–11, 2015 Apr. 17–18, 2015 Leake Apr. 17–19, 2015 Dallas, TX $0 Branson, MO Branson Apr. 9–11, 2015 Premier Houston, TX Mecum $4.6m $2.3m $6.3m $10m 1: National concours standard/perfect 2: Very good, club concours, some small flaws 3: Average daily driver in decent condition $20m SCM 1–6 Scale Condition Rating: 4: Still a driver but with some apparent flaws 5: A nasty beast that runs but has many problems 6: Good only for parts can never, ever be driven. At Leake’s spring Dallas sale, a 2006 Ford GT with 2,846 miles in 2+ condition looked like a screaming deal at $231k, but the seller disclosed that it had been crashed and repaired. I’m sorry to say, if the buyer wants to get his money’s worth, he’s just going to have to drive the heck out of it. How tragic. ♦ $30m $40m Silverstone Bonhams $3m $25.2m Auctions America $641k $6.4m $21.3m $14.1m 1961 Jaguar XKE convertible, $215,000—Auctions America, p. 80 1961 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk II BN7 roadster, $81,136—Bonhams, p. 116 1955 Chevrolet Cameo pickup, $30,250—Leake, p. 108 1951 Land Rover Series I 80-in pickup, $7,728—CCA, p. 134 Sports Car Market


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Auctions America Fort Lauderdale, FL Auctions America — Fort Lauderdale 2015 The “Shorty” buyer paid a half-million for an amazing story and got a one-off fiberglass Mustang thrown in for free Company Auctions America Date March 27–29, 2015 Location Fort Lauderdale, FL Auctioneers Brent Earlywine, Mike Shackelton Automotive lots sold/offered 368/495 Sales rate 74% Sales total $21,280,245 High sale 1959 Ferrari 250 GT PF coupe, sold at $715,000 Buyer’s premium Interesting car with an interesting story — 1964 Ford Mustang “Shorty” prototype coupe, sold at $511,500 10%, included in sold prices Report and photos by Pierre Hedary Market opinions in italics “Shorty” Mustang one-off at Auctions America’s 2015 Fort Lauderdale sale. More compelling than the car itself was its story: Designer Vince Gardner couldn’t bear to see the prototype destroyed (per company policy), so he squirreled it away, and FoMoCo reported it stolen. Thus saved from the crusher, the insurance company soon recovered it, and the car found its way to collector Bill Snyder, who, 47 years later, brought it here to sell. The new owner paid a market-correct price O ne determined bidder paid more than a half-million for the aptly nicknamed for an amazing story and got a one-off fiberglass Mustang thrown in for free. AA had no trouble replicating the strong results of 2014’s Fort Lauderdale sale. They sold a few more cars than last year (368/495, up from 355/493), and boosted total sales to $21.3m from $20.8m. The only car to fetch more than the Shorty Mustang was a 1959 Ferrari 250 Fort Lauderdale, FL GT PF coupe, which brought a strong $715k with commission. Rounding out the top five were two super-low-mile Ford GTs, sold at $451k and $410k, and a 1987 Lamborghini Countach LP5000 QV, at $336k. The high-sale Ferrari 250 GT PF was part of the Cayman Motor Museum Collection. Many of the cars in the collection were poorly maintained and somewhat tatty, selling between $40k and $100k, but there were gems, too, such as a 1966 Batmobile ($143k) and a 1975 Ferrari Dino 208 GT 2+2 ($42k). In the “Best Buy” category, I noted a 1961 Jaguar XKE convertible at $215k, a 1937 Packard Super Eight convertible at $77k and a 1966 Porsche 911 at $68k. Some of the pre-sale estimates looked strong 1959 Ferrari 250 GT PF coupe, sold at $715,000 78 to me, and I was not surprised when bids came up short. The good news is that consignors were not married to these estimates, resulting in sales that were fair to all parties. This kind of trend translates into market stability, and the occasional expensive outlier reminds us that there is always an above-market price for the best of the best. © $20m $15m $10m $5m 0 Sports Car Market Sales Totals $25m 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 Drew Shipley © 2014, courtesy of Auctions America


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Auctions America Fort Lauderdale, FL ENGLISH #702-1953 DAIMLER EMPRESS sedan. S/N 82016. Maroon & gray/gray leather. RHD. Odo: 2,045 miles. Older restoration of a solid car. Paint showing age, but panel fit very good. Bright trim also showing some patina. Engine bay very crusty, but nothing looks dangerous. Seats look nice and sumptuous, as do sellers. Very nice red paint with some very minor polish marks. Interior done very accurately, with all finishes to a high level. Some aging of top seals, but everything looks nicely settled in. Engine detail very accurate and looks mechanically trustworthy. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $215,000. Sold $25k shy of the low estimate, meaning someone got a very good deal. Consignor should have held out for a bit more. #695-1984 ASTON MARTIN LAG- ONDA sedan. S/N TL13316. Eggplant/tan leather. One-owner California car wearing original paint. Micro-scratches and abrasions in paint but still acceptable. All gaps per final assembly, and interior looks like it has been well preserved. Some discoloration on leather but otherwise hard to fault. Supposedly in good order mechanically. Some of the typical instrumentation issues present. Hard to believe interior woodwork and instrumentation. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $26,400. Pre-Lyons Daimlers represent superb value for the money, and this was no exception. Well engineered and very reliable, it should be a delightful weekend car for someone with a family or a wedding business. A great buy, with applause thrown in for free. #686-1954 JAGUAR XK 120 coupe. S/N 680893. Silver/black leather. Odo: 1,413 miles. Very solid restoration of an early 120, with excellent gaps and chrome. Some very minor prep flaws in paint on curved surfaces. Engine bay detail also very good, with no seri- that a machine this “futuristic” still has a choke. Odometer reading unavailable. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $60,500. While it was unclear whether or not the cathode-ray-tube instrumentation worked, this looked like a superb example of a car that will eventually gain a following thanks to its weirdness. I consider the Lagonda the best of William Towns’ excellent designs, and this one, combined with its clear history, looked well bought. #700-1997 BENTLEY CONTINENTAL ous oil leaks and no sign of shortcuts. Interior similar, with no issues in wood or leather. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $115,500. A good buy for a 120, with the possibility of adventure and excitement $15k below the low estimate. A good deal for the buyer, but some sorting may be needed. #490-1961 JAGUAR XKE convertible. S/N 875407. Red/tan canvas/red vinyl. Odo: 59,844 miles. Early Etype, but not early enough to be one of the big BEST BUY eter illegible, but I’d guess it has less than 20,000 miles. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $61,600. Of all the modern cars at this auction, this was my favorite. It looked incredible, it was rare and it was well preserved. Selling price fell below the bottom of the estimate range ($71k– $78k), and I would be stupid not to call this a fair deal. 80 coupe. S/N VCX53457. Dark green metallic/ tan leather. Presents as-new, with only slight aging of paint. Some scratches in rear bumper. One blemish on rear quarter has been touched up. Absolutely no wear on seats, with attractive light creasing of leather. Electronic odom- scured. Some details under dash could be better, too, and wiring seems a bit sketchy. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $53,900. This one raised a few red flags, especially the VIN tag, and that made me wonder if there were any other hidden flaws. However, it is a 356, and sorting it out will be easy. No harm done at this price. #646-1966 PORSCHE 911 coupe. S/N 304061. Dark green metallic/black vinyl. Odo: 54,191 miles. Comfortably worn-in SWB 911, with some micro-blisters and chipping in paint. Looks like an unrestored car where various things were done over the years to keep it up. Seat covers almost certainly redone some years ago. Chrome also aging a little bit with scratches and fading. Lots of PCA stickers and badges. Everything appears to Sports Car Market raised. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $41,800. A true oddball in the States, this very tidy pre-war Mercedes looked like it could benefit from some elbow grease. The 230 was never fast, and Mercedes is hesitant to supply parts for pre-war models. However, a strong community that loves these exists in Europe, and the new owner should try to get in touch with them. Well bought as long as the engine checks out. #678-1964 PORSCHE 356C coupe. S/N 131578. White/black vinyl. Odo: 50,607 km. Minty-fresh 356 just out of cosmetic restoration. Body and interior all look good, with decent panel fit. Engine free of oil spots. Recent restoration, probably for resale. Some pitting in chrome. Data plate on body ob- GERMAN #664-1939 MERCEDES-BENZ 230 se- dan. S/N 44627. Dark red & black/red leather. Odo: 27,320 km. Older restoration with some liberties taken. Chrome is cracking and aging. Paint holding up well and needs to be polished. Interior presentable, although seats may not be correct pattern. Wood substructure appears to be in good order. Engine presents as authentic without too many questions being


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Auctions America Fort Lauderdale, FL panel gaps. Engine clean and dry and looks to have been serviced recently. Seats feel soft, but they look good. Dash and carpets almost certainly original. Overall honest car, but the chrome wheelarch trim detracts. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $79,000. A fair buy for a solid T, even if the color is not your cup of tea. While there are still some small interior and possibly mechanical issues to deal with, this car is money in the bank. be correct in engine bay, down to the details on the Weber 3-barrel carbs. No drips, either. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $68,200. Someone got a great deal on a road-ready SWB. With prices of early 911s pushing past $200k for restored examples, a tidy, patinated car like this represents a robust alternative for the Porsche enthusiast. Well bought for how much love it has been given already. #410-1970 MERCEDES-BENZ 280SL convertible. S/N 018046. 904 blue/blue canvas/ creme M-B tex. Odo: 47,482 miles. A very solid 280 from the best of the bunch (1970–71). Paint hard to fault, with just some polish micro scratches. Right door gap very tight, but left is only a little better. All trim in decent order. Chrome done to a high standard, as are dash and carpeting. Engine bay detailed with yellow zinc, but incorrect hoses and clamps diminish appeal. Entire car shows much effort, but there are still several prob- #462-1974 BMW 2002 Turbo 2-dr sedan. S/N 4290414. Polaris Silver/black vinyl. Odo: 18,578 km. Another Cayman Islands car. May have been painted once, but otherwise completely original. Interior has aged gracefully, as has engine compartment. Very straight. Certainly a very nice settled-in car overall. One small scratch in roof by windshield. Driver’s door does not close well. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $50,400. 2002 Turbos are breaking out of the affordable touring car class, meaning that a car like this, with all of its needs and neglect, will still bring silly money. Well sold, but find another. ITALIAN lems that should be addressed. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $118,250. When purchasing a collector car that has been restored, the most important question you can ask is “did a marque expert restore this?” This car was probably restored by someone who made a good effort, but some of the small details were wrong, and more work will be needed to really make it perform and function as intended. Still, it was better than all of the other W113s here, and it sold for the highest price. #515-1972 PORSCHE 911T coupe. S/N 102682. Brown/tan leather. Odo: 51,832 miles. Very honest 911, with one repaint and nice been kept up over the years. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $715,000. If I open my mouth and call it “well bought,” all of the longtime Ferraristi are going to think I am crazy. If I call it “well sold,” I might discourage the upswing in prices of “less desirable” vintage Ferraris. Right now we are in market limbo, and with these kinds of rising prices (this was a $500k car a few months ago), it’s like pitch-black cave diving—you don’t know in which direction you’re headed. July 2015 81 #452-1959 FERRARI 250 GT PF coupe. S/N 1195GT. Red/black leather. Odo: 87,659 km. Very clean 250 GT coupe, out of long-term ownership from 1990. Really nice paint and most chrome in very good shape. Gaps also excellent. Some aging of rear bumper. Hard to say whether or not mechanicals are sorted, but it looks like it has TOP 10 No. 7


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Auctions America Fort Lauderdale, FL #466-1975 FERRARI 208 GT4 2+2 coupe. S/N F106CL11576. Giallo Fly/blue cloth. Odo: 23,033 km. Very clean Italianmarket 208, and mileage is almost certainly original. One repaint with some overspray in doors. Body very straight, no signs of corrosion. Most weather seals also probably original. Some parts (dash, console) of interior are in time-warp condition, but not sure if carpets and seats are original. Car looks like it has definitely been sitting for a very long time. fidence. Leather definitely original, as is interior wood. Underside of car also looks pleasing design than the overdone Countach. An example like this one should command top dollar, and I must call this a very good deal for an irreplaceable example. SWEDISH #673-1959 KING S7 Fuldamobil micro- untouched. Visible coolant leak from rear left of engine compartment. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $137,500. Despite the obvious neglect, it still made its low estimate, which blew my mind. I could see it being sorted and driven as-is, but this is the kind of car where one must assume that nothing is going to work as planned. My only hope is that it gets the love and attention it deserves. Well sold. (See profile, p. 62.) Everything looks very good in trunk. Engine raises no red flags, with some gas smell but no oil leakage. No idea about recent service. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $41,800. Another Cayman Motor Museum car. The Italians were offered a 2-liter V8, which was not as powerful but kept the ownership costs down. In all fairness, it was so weird and so rare that I had a strong desire to own it myself, but the lack of recent service records was discouraging. At this price, it could be sorted and used for regular driving. It was still expensive for what it is, though. #458-1977 MASERATI KHAMSIN coupe. S/N AM120214. Dark red metallic/tan leather. Odo: 40,075 km. Looks like a very low-mileage car; has not had a service recently. Paint checking and developing microblisters. Most panels very flat and straight. Engine bay definitely in original condition, with some attempts made at service, but overall the whole thing does not inspire much con- #514-1988 LAMBORGHINI JALPA convertible. S/N JA12381. Black/tan leather. Odo: 25,378 km. Very clean baby Lambo with only minor aging of exterior finishes. Engine bay very original and looks nice, with recent attention to fuel hoses, belts and such. Interior similar, with limited use. Wheels unscuffed and undercarriage clean. Overall, a time-cap- condition, probably not very far from how it was new. Some pieces creatively refabricated. Engine dripping oil, and a sign discourages starting. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $17,600. When I was a child, this was my fantasy car of choice. In my imagination, I climbed in, sat down and found I just barely fit. While it would have been a fine car for me as a 10-year-old, it looks like a golf cart today. A pretty fair deal for a rare car. sule car. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $88,000. Ridiculed for years as a market failure, the Jalpa is, in my opinion, a much more aesthetically AMERICAN #419-1937 FORD MODEL 77 stake-bed pickup. S/N 184152236. Red/black vinyl. Odo: 58,529 miles. Paint very wavy and gaps are what you’d expect, with some wear to door hinges and latches. Lots of paint chipping. Interior work and detail looks very good with the new wiring, rubber and seat covers. Stake bed is very tidy with good craftsmanship. Engine bay detail accurate. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $41,800. So often I see awesome old trucks like this adorned with stupid trin- car. S/N T7609. Blue/blue check cloth. Odo: 28,611 km. A real Fuldamobil, this one license-built by King of Sweden. Sitting since 1991. Paint distress in door jambs, but otherwise body and paint present very well for older restoration. In Sweden before crossing the Atlantic. Interior and seats in very honest kets, gaudy improvisations and useless bling. This truck should be a lesson to everyone restoring an older truck, as it was not over-thetop, no one tried to modify it, and it looked cheerful and happy—not macho and hairy. When you modify it, it loses its beauty, and 82 Sports Car Market


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Auctions America Fort Lauderdale, FL this one shows just how beautiful an unmodified old American pickup really is. Sold a year ago for $50k at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale 2014 (SCM# 240875). Well bought today. #516-1937 PACKARD EIGHT dual-cowl phaeton. S/N I20CA1654. Black/black canvas/ red vinyl. Odo: 36,608 miles. Acres of metal very flat, with paint application beyond excellent. Minor scratches from polishing. Minor chips on inside of door. Interior also driving it myself and yelling to everyone who notices, “I am the Kaiser of crazies!” #488-1958 DUAL-GHIA convertible. S/N 191. Purple metallic/purple vinyl/purple & cream leather. Odo: 73,243 miles. 315-ci V8, 4-bbl, auto. Very high-quality restoration with decent chrome and lots of metal-flake in paint. Interior is a little sloppy, but the colors really set it off. Engine detailed to a very high level done very well in high-quality materials. Details on dash very good and woodwork is excellent. Engine charming, if a little bit crusty. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $77,000. An imposing and magnificent car. With the high-quality workmanship, the buyer got a great deal. Now, where to keep it? #220-1947 CROSLEY pickup. S/N 14514. Seafoam green/tan vinyl. Odo: 45,021 miles. 44-ci I4, 1-bbl, 3-sp. Very solid restoration. Paint has minor prep flaws and orange peel. Gaps all very good, chrome probably not redone. Interior is plain but with good level of detail. Headliner not installed well. Engine and looks accurate. Gaps all probably better than new. Everything looks consistent, suggesting this was solid prior to restoration. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $225,500. Sold at high estimate. One of the better D-Gs I have seen, although the interior work was below par. Recently no-saled at RM Phoenix in January for $220k (SCM# 256985), confirming this market-correct price. #491-1959 CADILLAC ELDORADO impressive for such a tiny thing. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $18,150. My 6-foot-4-inch frame actually fit with reasonable comfort, making this little truck fully usable. The automotive equivalent of “tiny house living,” complete with the vintage charm. Smart buy. #625-1953 KAISER DRAGON sedan. S/N K530001236. Jade Green/green & cream basket-weave. Odo: 59,465 miles. Restoration of unusual car. Everything done to very high level, considering the car is not very valuable. Body taken apart and painted. All chrome and weatherstripping very good. Mechanicals don’t set off red flags. Interior feels like lizard scales. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $29,700. Another weird fantasy, showing that some people are very talented, creative and a bit cuckoo. Overall, this was a well-done car. I could imagine 84 Biarritz convertible. S/N 59E093086. Desert Rose/white vinyl/white leather. Odo: 15,480 miles. 390-ci V8, 4-bbl, auto. Well-restored car, with really good gaps and brilliant paint. Air suspension missing, but compressor is still there. Leather is okay but could be better. Dash is excellent. All chrome fits and looks very good, and judging by pictures, so does top. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $189,750. I’m aware riage good; no signs of monkey business or rust. 4:10 rear axle suggests it runs in a straight line pretty well. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $32,000. This entry-level “muscle car” failed to sell on the block, but a deal was put together later. It will almost certainly need some mechanical attention, but I found it irresistibly cool. A fair deal for both parties. #438-1964 FORD MUSTANG “Shorty” prototype coupe. S/N 100009. Dark red metallic/black vinyl. Odo: 15,249 miles. 302ci V8, 3x2-bbl, auto. Body and interior restored to the last detail. Engine different from anything you would see in a normal Ford. A project that Ford never embraced; designer Vince Gardner stole the car to keep it from the of how difficult the air suspension was to set up on these big cars, but we’re now in the era of solvable problems, and if this was really the excellent restoration it came off as, someone should have fixed it. There were other bits on this car that could have used a little help, which explains its selling price, $11k shy of Sports Car Market the low estimate. It certainly won’t need cosmetic work, which makes this a fair buy. #341-1960 METROPOLITAN convert- ible. S/N 76495. Red & white/black canvas/ cream vinyl houndstooth. Odo: 25,910 miles. 91-ci I4, 1-bbl, 3-sp. Very tidy restoration with good panel fit and excellent paintwork. Stainless and chrome very good. Top fits well. Details of dash very good. Seats could be done better. Engine bay very cute and non-threaten- ing. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $18,150. Mets are starting to show some promise, but they still remain an affordable form of classic motoring. This example missed its low estimate by $7k. A good deal that no one should regret. #354-1962 PLYMOUTH FURY 2-dr hard top. S/N 27119884. Red/red vinyl. Odo: 29,047 miles. 361-ci V8, 2x4-bbl, auto. Very solid high-performance Fury with factory gaps. Interior smells musty, and most equipment on dash looks original. All stainless in original condition. Engine bay looks okay, but some electrical stuff raises questions. Steering box worn out. Push-button auto. Under-car


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Glovebox Notes 2015 Audi 2.0T Allroad Quattro wagon Auctions America Fort Lauderdale, FL A brief look at cars of interest that have passed through the SCM garage. HHHHH is best. crusher and left in a warehouse. It was discovered six months later, by which time insurance had already paid out on the car. Bill Snyder soon acquired the car. Now offered out of 47 years of ownership. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $511,500. Cheap for a prototype, especially one with this kind of story. Anyone who finds the entry interesting should Google the history of this car, as it reflects the genius and perseverance of a certain bygone era. Well bought, even if it is made of fiberglass. #439-1968 DODGE HEMI CHARGER Price as tested: $48,875 Equipment: 220-hp 2.0-liter turbocharged I4, 8-speed Tiptronic, Technology package, Allroad Premium Plus package EPA mileage: 21/28 Likes: A nice, get-around-town wagon with ample space to handle daily chores. Sporty looks and decent performance from its 220hp, 2.0-liter turbocharged 4-cylinder engine. Good handling, but with mild torque-steer off the line under brisk acceleration. Numerous safety features look great when compared with Audi’s competition in the segment. Dislikes: There’s an over-abundance of dash controls, switches and stalks off the column — and I actually like a lot of gadgets. With so many buttons and knobs, finding a place to rest my right hand on the console without it landing on something was tough to do, and the shifter was just too tall for a comfortable resting spot as well. Also, I’d prefer the upshift/ downshift directions reversed — I instictively moved it the wrong way each time I attempted to up or downshift. Fun to drive: HHH Eye appeal: HHH Overall experience: HHH Verdict: Inclement weather is where this vehicle should shine. Unfortunately I didn’t get to experience it at its full all-wheel-drive potential. It wins style points, and the driving position was more comfortable than a few other Audi models that I’ve driven. Given the decent rear cargo storage, good performance, nice features and its all-weather traction capabilities, it’s worth a look — especially if you’re shopping for something more upmarket than a Subaru. — Jeff Stites R/T 2-dr hard top. S/N XS29J8B360735. Light red metallic/black vinyl/black vinyl. Odo: 437 miles. 426-ci V8, 2x4-bbl, 4-sp. Perfect restoration of a very solid Hemi Charger, only let down by scratches in stainless trim. Interior components may be original. Pistolgrip shifter. Engine detail to very high level. when someone takes the car apart. They never end up going back together correctly. The panel fit and final assembly of this car, by contrast, were excellent, and I doubt it could be replicated. A smart buy $15k below the low estimate. Last bid to $155k at Auctions America California in August of 2013, where it was dinged for its poor cosmetics (SCM# 227057). #692-1974 STUTZ BLACKHAWK 2-dr hard top. S/N P103089. Black/blue leather. Odo: 64,070 miles. 455-ci V8, 4-bbl, auto. Generally original example with one repaint likely. Leather looks very impromptu and was probably redone. Chrome in very good original condition. All emissions equipment in place in engine, strangled with smog controls. Catalog mentions reports by Mopar experts David Wise and Galen Govier but does not explicitly state the the car was born with this Hemi. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $115,500. While the sales price was low compared with the $150k–$250k estimate, I think the car sold fairly. I would rather see cars like this sell to end users for lower prices than continuously get flipped into the stratosphere. Well bought. #487-1969 FORD MUSTANG Boss 429 fastback. S/N 9F02Z164795. Dark red/black vinyl. Odo: 25,117 miles. 429-ci V8, 4-bbl, 4-sp. Very original. Paint has suffered a bit but still looks good, with scratches and chips on all surfaces, as well as some separation and cracking. Same with finishes on engine and interior. Some slight flaws in paint on flat surfaces. Dash has material issues in front left With power sunroof. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $49,500. At an auction where an excellent F-bird can’t make $150k, I was amazed that this sold for what it did. It was not an attractive car, nor was it well preserved. These new Stutzes are no better than the Pontiac Grand Prix that they were made out of. Some people have special tastes, but I would rather they spend $50k on this than some boring new car. Well sold! #440-2006 FORD GT Heritage Edition coupe. S/N Y400783. Blue, orange & white/ black leather. Odo: 3 miles. 5.4-L supercharged V8, 6-sp. New car in all regards, with 3 miles and no indication of use. Interior smells new. Engine still has the feeling of a freshly machined piece of metal. Paint looks like it was just sprayed. More importantly, it is still on MSO, and—here’s the kicker—it’s a corner. Engine bay is in good order. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $175,000. I appreciated this decently preserved Boss. The one thing that ruins a car that is so hand-built, as these were, is Canadian export model. Cond: 1. SOLD AT $410,000. I expected more from this, but the customs requirements looked like a P.I.T.A. The message behind this sale is that if you have a low-mileage GT in Gulf colors, it won’t hurt you to use it carefully. Think of all the fun the owner missed out on! Well bought, but what do you do with something like this? Answer: Break open the sealed-in freshness and go for a drive. © 86 Sports Car Market


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GOODING & COMPANY, CHUBB COLLECTOR CAR INSURANCE, VELOCITY CHANNEL AND SPORTS CAR MARKET PRESENT THE 14th ANNUAL SCM MONTEREY INSIDER’S SEMINAR What’s Collectible Now? Moderated by Keith Martin, Publisher, Sports Car Market SATURDAY, AUGUST 15, 2015 Gooding & Company Auction Pavilion, Pebble Beach, CA • 9:30–11:30 a.m. This seminar brings together market experts from around the world to discuss the changes and predict what’s ahead in the collector car market. Topics will include: • Why Countach Prices Have Exploded • Why You Should Put a ’60s Chevy C-10 Pickup Next to Your Gullwing • Is the Miata the New Bugeye? • Duesenbergs — Big Buck Bargains? • Have Air-Cooled 911s Finally Hit the Ceiling? • Panelists’ Picks for Best Buys for 2016 After the discussion, panelists will offer detailed examinations of select cars to be offered at auction. Panelists include: Carl Bomstead American Sports & Muscle Donald Osborne European Sports & Racing (excluding Ferraris) Miles Collier Collier’s Choice Jim Pickering Editor, American Car Collector Space is Limited — Sign Up Today Complimentary admission for SCM Platinum members; subscribers, $35 for two; non-subscribers, $70 for two To enroll, and for the latest information, go to www.sportscarmarket.com/ monterey2015 or call 503.261.0555 Ext. 217 Simon Kidston The European Perspective Stephen Serio Ferraris & Late-Model European Exotics


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Bonhams Stuttgart, DEU Bonhams — The Mercedes-Benz Sale A 115-year-old Benz Ideal 4½ hp sold for $231k, while a slightly more modern 2007 SLR McLaren that originally retailed for $667k sold here for $308k Company Bonhams Date March 28, 2015 Location Stuttgart, DEU Auctioneer Malcolm Barber Automotive lots sold/offered 33/43 Sales rate 77% Sales total $14,104,919 High sale 1938 Mercedes-Benz 540 K Cabriolet A, sold at $2,996,255 Buyer’s premium A regular contender in the annual London to Brighton Run, this 1900 Benz Ideal 4½-hp vis-à-vis sold at $230,961 Report by Leo Van Hoorick Market opinions in italics century-old Benz Ideal 4½ hp and a 2007 SLR McLaren. It was enough variety to make you forget that this was a single-marque sale. Total dollars took a dip compared with last B year’s inaugural Mercedes sale, when 32 of 46 cars sold for a combined $16m. This time out, Bonhams sold 33 out of 43, totaling $14m. The car with the biggest pre-auction estimate — a “Grosser” 1931 770 Cabriolet D — sold for the expected onhams brought three 300SL Roadsters to The Mercedes-Benz Sale in March, along with a Gullwing, a Grosser, a 540K and two Unimogs. There were also a Stuttgart, DEU $2.5m, but a 1938 540K Cabriolet A snagged the high-sale spot at $3m. This was the first time the 540K had been publicly offered. The 1931 770 Grosser Cabriolet D, one of only 18 produced, was originally the property of German actor, producer and director Erik Charell. Other highlights included a 1957 300Sc coupe, sold for $622k, and a 115-year-old Benz Ideal 4½ hp, for $231k. A slightly more modern 2007 SLR McLaren that originally retailed for $667k sold here for a reasonable-but-strong $308k. Four iconic 300SLs achieved excellent, market-correct prices. Top lot of the set was the 1960 300SL Roadster previously owned by German industrialist Alfried Krupp, being offered for sale after 35 years of continuous private ownership. It sold for $1,217,229. A 1961 disc-brake Roadster that spent 48 years with one family came next at $1,186,018, and the 1957 300SL Roadster with factory hard top followed at $1,148,564. A very nice 1957 Gullwing brought up the rear at $1,136,080, confirming that buyers now respect the Roadster as much as the iconicbut-perhaps-not-so-user-friendly Gullwing. Most cars stayed close to their low estimates, 2007 Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren convertible, sold at $308,365 90 and the prices paid for the 300SLs in particular — which were all excellent cars — further confirm the apparent trend of a stabilizing market. The 77% sell-through rate here showed that buyers and sellers came with reasonable expectations and did not leave disappointed. ♦ Sales Totals $20m $15m $10m $5m 0 Sports Car Market 2015 2014 15%, included in sold prices ($1 = €0.92)


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Bonhams Stuttgart, DEU GERMAN #121-1900 BENZ IDEAL 4½-HP vis-à-vis. S/N 2727. Eng. # 2604. Green/green leather. RHD. A true Veteran, discovered in the 1950s somewhere in Wales. Most hardware is still original, and even numbered. It retains its original surface vaporizer and its Grouvelle & Arquembourgbadged radiator. It also sports VCC badges and a very period copper dealer badge from Hewetson’s Ltd. in London. Paint and match- BEST BUY was told after the sale that the new owner plans to take it back to its original looks. This was a very fine car if you could look past its musical-comedy appearance. Nevertheless, strong money, considering the work ahead. TOP 10 No. 2 #138-1931 MERCEDES-BENZ 770 cabriolet D. S/N 85205. Eng. # 85205. Black & silver/black canvas/gray leather. Odo: 71 km. Grosser Mercedes delivered new to Erik Charell, a musical star and film director. He fled to the U.S. after the Nazis came to power and took the Mercedes with him. He returned after the war, but the car stayed in the U.S. until 2004. It was restored twice, the last time to better-than-new condition. Flawless inside and out. In one corner of spectators. Quite a few members of the audience left after the car hammered down. There were two bidders left in the room after the telephone bidders gave up: one who placed himself standing well in view for all to see, and the other sitting discreetly in the back, and placing the final bid. The car sold in February 2006 to the current owner for an undisclosed price, but he probably realized a healthy return on his investment, as the market has climbed to new heights since then. #122-1952 MERCEDES-BENZ 220 cab- riolet A. S/N 2279952. Green metallic/beige cloth/beige leather. Odo: 73,044 km. Restored 1985–86 by the renowned French Atelier de Restauration de Touraine. The restoration included full retrimming of the interior, restoration of the timber body frame and mechanical overhaul. Brakes and clutch overhauled only months ago. Nicely presented with beige soft ing green leather seats in good condition. Solid tires. Nice details such as umbrella in wicker tube on right fender. Regular contender in the annual London to Brighton Run. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $230,961. In the past few years, the market has shown special interest in pre1905 cars, which are eligible for the LondonBrighton. A comparison of pre- and post-1905 prices for similar motorcars says it all. This price was therefore a little disappointing, but the Qatari delegation cheered, as they now have a true Veteran for their museum. Well bought. TOP 10 No. 10 #126-1931 MERCEDES-BENZ 370S 15/75 PS Mannheim convertible. S/N U83 903. Eng. # U83903. Red & white/ black canvas/ red leather. Odo: 23,618 km. Restoration took many years, finished in 2000. Quite ridiculous red-and-white color scheme and contrasting pin-striping on the hood louvers. Far too much chrome, too. Apart from that, in excellent condition. Immaculate engine bay (but with chromed parts as well). Beautiful red leather interior, but not matching the hood, the metallic paint is wrinkled as if the surface was badly prepared. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $2,509,364. These seldom come to auction. In fact, this is the first one I’ve seen in the flesh. It has an interesting story and was part of the famous Blackhawk Collection before it returned to Germany. However, the over-restoration did away with much of the car’s charm in the process. I had questions about the authenticity of many details. It had the biggest estimate of the sale ($2.5m–$3m), but the 540K (Lot 119) beat it at $3m. Well bought and sold. #119-1938 MERCEDES-BENZ 540K cabriolet A. S/N 154076. Eng. # 828610. Blue/blue canvas/blue leather. Odo: 3,650 km. Magnificently restored example of this classic pre-war Mercedes—the best money could buy in those days. Rare and attractive enclosed spare wheel and sporty rear end, similar to some “Spezial Roadsters.” Shown at the Louis Vuitton Bagatelle Concours in 2001; still in concours condition today. Resplendent mother-of-pearl dash. TOP 10 No. 1 top. Original period Becker radio with round dial. Nicely patinated leather interior with timber in good shape. Whitewalls of Vredestein tires somewhat stained. French Carte Grise and photographic records of restoration. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $112,360. One of 1,167 cab As produced 1951–55. These models are rare and highly sought after. This was a nice example, but color seemed a bit odd. Another nice acquisition for the Qatari museum at a very reasonable price. #130-1954 MERCEDES-BENZ 300S cabriolet A. S/N 1880104500019. Eng. # 1889203500380. Black/black cloth/beige leather. Odo: 35,710 km. Complete restoration in Switzerland in 1989 included a new interior and new carpets and major service of the mechanicals. Woodwork was re-lacquered, steering wheel restored, new hood lining installed (invoices on file). Good paint and chrome, perfectly closing doors with the right sound. the bright red body panels. Elegant steering wheel with wooden rim. Nice stone guard in front of the radiator grille. The shallow windscreen—11 cm (4.33 inches) shorter than normal, according to the catalog—adds to the sporting appearance. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $599,251. Originally, the car was black, and I 92 Matching luggage set, nice details such as extra protection of radiator grille and Bosch spotlights. Fully serviced and on the button. British documents. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $2,996,256. Spectacular cars like these attract Chrome around headlights scratched, headlight reflectors dull. Nice interior with right amount of patina. Period altimeter. Pigskin Sports Car Market


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Bonhams Stuttgart, DEU luggage set. Clean engine bay. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $505,618. One of only 203 S cabriolets hand-made between 1952 and 1955. These exclusive cars are following the trend of the better investment cars on the market, with a steep climb in prices in the past five years. I thought that the $543k–$651k estimate was a tad optimistic, as the sales price confirmed. Fair, but slight advantage to the seller. #120-1955 MERCEDES-BENZ 190SL Clubsport racer. S/N N/A. White/red leather. Odo: 38,287 km. Delivered new to Joseph F. Weckerle, main agent of Mercedes in Casablanca, for his own use. The factory offered Clubsport and Rennsport packages for 190SLs in 1955 and 1956. This car believed to be an original Clubsport kit. Exported to Germany in 1988. The engine is not the original but is a stock unit. The car is in good condition and has never needed a full restoration. The red leather period bucket seats have red Schroth lin headliner. Overhauled electrics, original white steering wheel and four new Michelin tires on standard steel rims. Very good chrome, excellent panel fit. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $1,136,080. All four 300SLs here sold closer to the $1 million than the $1.5 million mark. This was the only coupe of the sale yet the cheapest of the quartet, but it wasn’t a bad example. Well bought. Hard to believe that Gullwing values were worth more than double Roadsters some years back. (See the profile, p. 64.) TOP 10 No. 9 #141-1957 MERCEDES-BENZ 300SC coupe. S/N 1680147500020. Eng. # 199980 6500131. Black/red leather. Odo: 79,724 km. Brought over from the U.S. and restored in 2010 by marque specialist Swoboda with invoices totaling more than $130k; copies on file. Woodwork still original. Rare, large sliding steel sunroof. Electric power steering fitted in 2013. Original Becker Mexico radio. Original color combina- exercise), clutch renewed, etc. A very nice car that has visibly been enjoyed. Nice black factory hard top. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $1,148,565. There are plenty of these on the market, but they remain good investments, although the market shows some signs of stabilization now. I loved the color combo on this one. Marketcorrect price. #108-1958 MERCEDES-BENZ 220S coupe. S/N 180037N8506709. Black/gray leather. Odo: 36,087 km. In the same family until 2007, then sold to current owner, who repainted it, but still with original chrome. Upholstery is original, too, but repainted leather has a slightly sticky feel. New carpeting. Very nice wood trim in excellent condition. Original Becker radio. Car is said to have harnesses. Fitted with wooden Moto-Lita steering wheel and race filler cap. Cond: 2-. NOT SOLD AT $227,850. Weckerle is known for winning the 2-liter GT class at the Casablanca Grand Prix in 1956 in a 190SL Clubsport. If this is in fact that car, it’s one of the most important 190SLs in existence—but it is missing its original engine. Furthermore, it’s always difficult to make an assessment when there are no real comps. High bid was way below the $271k lower estimate, but the market is always right, isn’t it? TOP 10 No. 6 #117-1955 MERCEDES-BENZ 300SL Gullwing. S/N 1980405500049. Eng. # 1989804500209. Silver/ blue leather. Odo: 81,818 miles. Originally an American car, exported to Europe in 2003, where it has been part of several collections. Magnificently restored, and painted in gray metallic (was white). Blue cloth/vinyl interior was replaced with a beautiful light blue leather interior with matching carpets and beige mus- tion. Excellent and abundant chrome. Perfect gaps. Very clean engine bay. Yellow Bosch fog lights. German historic registration papers. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $621,723. Only 98 of these coachbuilt coupes were made 1955–58. They had the same fuel-injected powerplant as the famous 300SL, but with less horsepower. The rear suspension was inspired by that of the Gullwing. Conservative but very usable touring car and one of the most desirable post-war luxury coupes. Sold for 300Sc cabriolet money. Advantage to the seller. #137-1957 MERCEDES-BENZ 300SL Roadster. S/N 1980427500203. Eng. # 1989807500231. Graphite Gray/black hard top/black canvas soft top/red leather. Odo: 56,797 km. Delivered new to Studebaker/Packard in Indiana. The current vendor purchased it in 2011 and commissioned a selective restoration at marque expert Swoboda. This included a bare-metal repaint in an original 300SL color, which contrasts beautifully with the original red leather interior. Chrome is not straight everywhere. Fuel injection was overhauled (quite an expensive TOP 10 No. 5 covered 36k km only, with maintenance history to prove it. Replacement engine, though. Original Webasto sunroof. Period Hella fog lights. Cond: 2-. NOT SOLD AT $54,250. One of 2,081 220S coupes, compared with the more common (and more elegant) cabrio at 3,290. There was not much enthusiasm in the room, and phones remained silent, so bidding stalled way below the $65k low estimate. Seller was right not to let go. #131-1958 MERCEDES-BENZ 220S cabriolet. S/N 180030N8513310. Blue/blue canvas/beige leather. Odo: 34,996 km. Exported to California in 1959. Bought by the current owner and brought back to Germany in 1992. Said to be untouched since new. Scratches, dents, tired and flaking paint. The hood seems to have been painted blue at one time, now completely faded. Interior in bad condition, especially the woodwork—I doubt that it can be saved with varnish. Engine bay rough. Engine described as in working order. Cond: 4-. NOT SOLD AT $75,950. One of 3,290 cabriolets built 1956–59. Original cars are very popular these days. But would it be worthwhile to try and preserve this Benz asis? These are expensive to restore—that’s one argument in favor of preservation. Anyway, 94 Sports Car Market


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Bonhams Stuttgart, DEU price offered didn’t leave much room for a serious makeover. Seller should have taken the money. #135-1958 MERCEDES-BENZ 220S cabriolet. S/N 180030N8506104. Eng. # 317196. Black/black canvas/red leather. Odo: 93,661 km. Extensive restoration in 2010 cost approximately $50k. This included a complete mechanical overhaul. The body was completely dismantled and taken back to bare metal. Chrome was replated, rubber renewed. Soft top and carpets are new, the interior wood is re-varnished, but the leather of the seats is 1899808500825. Black/brown leather. Odo: 5,082 miles. Delivered new to the U.S. Probably resprayed but otherwise a tired example. Original Webasto sunroof. Rubber around fenders perished. Chrome faded. Rust on hubcaps. Soiled whitewalls. Well-used interior appears to be original. Badly cracked steering still original. Car comes with original sales brochure, owner’s manual, service and warranty booklets. Becker Mexico and good Vredestein whitewalls. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $147,316. The best of the several 220 Ponton cabriolets on offer. With one family all its life. A very healthy price, but considering the efforts that went into it, we’ll call this well bought. #132-1958 MERCEDES-BENZ 220SE cabriolet. S/N 1283010003320. Eng. # 12798310000753. Brown/beige canvas/brown leather. Odo: 74,799 km. Sold new to Guatemala. Came to Portugal in 1983 and stayed there until 2014. Low mileage said to be genuine, maintenance stickers in door record services at 57,000 and 60,000 km. Original s Stuttgart, DEU price offered didn’t leave much room for a serious makeover. Seller should have taken the money. # s Stuttgart, DEU price offered didn’t leave much room for a serious makeover. Seller should have taken the money. #135-1958 MERCEDES-BENZ 220S cabriolet. S/N 180030N8506104. Eng. # 317196. Black/black canvas/red leather. Odo: 93,661 km. Extensive restoration in 2010 cost approximately $50k. This included a complete mechanical overhaul. The body was com- pletely dismantled and taken back to bare metal. Chrome was replated, rubber renewed. Soft top and carpets are new, the interior wood is re-varnished, but the leather of the seats is 1899808500825. Black/brown leather. Odo: 5,082 miles. Delivered new to the U.S. Prob- ably resprayed but otherwise a tired example. Original Webasto sunroof. Rubber around fenders perished. Chrome faded. Rust on hub- caps. Soiled whitewalls. Well-used interior appears to be original. Badly cracked steering still original. Car comes with original sales brochure, owner’s manual, service and war- ranty booklets. Becker Mexico and good Vre- destein whitewalls. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $147,316. The best of the several 220 Ponton cabriolets on offer. With one family all its life. A very healthy price, but considering the ef- forts that went into it, we’ll call this well bought. #132-1958 MERCEDES-BENZ 220SE cabriolet. S/N 1283010003320. Eng. # 1279- 8310000753. Brown/beige canvas/brown leather. Odo: 74,799 km. Sold new to Guate- mala. Came to Portugal in 1983 and stayed there until 2014. Low mileage said to be genu- ine, maintenance stickers in door record ser- vices at 57,000 and 60,000 km. Original wheel. wheel. Becker Grand Prix radio; aftermarket Pioneer speakers under rear window. Big sign saying brakes not functional; hand brake only. Cond: 4. SOLD AT $51,186. Said to be very original. How many times the odometer rolled over is not known. At least once for sure. Good base for extensive restoration work. With that in mind: well sold. #109-1960 MERCEDES-BENZ 190SL convertible. S/N 12104010015797. Eng. # 12192110015778. Red/red hard top/beige canvas soft top/brown leather. Odo: 76,134 km. Delivered new to New York, then sporting a black body with red leather interior. Beyond that, early history is unknown, but current owner told me that when he imported the car it came with handbook, tools, documentation and California license plates (included). The car has a factory hard top and has been extensively restored inside and out. Very clean engine bay, and said to be a delight to drive. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $99,875. On restoration, this 190 was repainted in bright red, almost orange—a bit flashy for my liking, and I suspect others felt the same. I’d guess the color hurt the selling price by at least $10k, but the buyer can consider a respray. Stuttgart, DEU price offered didn’t leave much room for a serious makeover. Seller should have taken the money. #135-1958 M hams Stuttgart, DEU price offered didn’t leave much room for a serious makeover. Seller should have taken the money. #135-1958 MERCEDES-BENZ 220S cabriolet. S/N 180030N8506104. Eng. # 317196. Black/black canvas/red leather. Odo: 93,661 km. Extensive restoration in 2010 cost approximately $50k. This included a complete mechanical overhaul. The body was com- pletely dismantled and taken back to bare metal. Chrome was replated, rubber renewed. Soft top and carpets are new, the interior wood is re-varnished, but the leather of the seats is 1899808500825. Black/brown leather. Odo: 5,082 miles. Delivered new to the U.S. Prob- ably resprayed but otherwise a tired example. Original Webasto sunroof. Rubber around fenders perished. Chrome faded. Rust on hub- caps. Soiled whitewalls. Well-used interior appears to be original. Badly cracked steering still original. Car comes with original sales brochure, owner’s manual, service and war- ranty booklets. Becker Mexico and good Vre- destein whitewalls. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $147,316. The best of the several 220 Ponton cabriolets on offer. With one family all its life. A very healthy price, but considering the ef- forts that went into it, we’ll call this well bought. #132-1958 MERCEDES-BENZ 220SE cabriolet. S/N 1283010003320. Eng. # 1279- 8310000753. Brown/beige canvas/brown leather. Odo: 74,799 km. Sold new to Guate- mala. Came to Portugal in 1983 and stayed there until 2014. Low mileage said to be genu- ine, maintenance stickers in door record ser- vices at 57,000 and 60,000 km. Original wheel. Becker Grand Prix radio; aftermarket Pioneer speakers under rear window. Big sign saying brakes not functional; hand brake only. Cond: 4. SOLD AT $51,186. Said to be very original. How many times the odometer rolled over is not known. At least once for sure. Good base for extensive restoration work. With that in mind: well sold. #109-1960 MERCEDES-BENZ 190SL convertible. S/N 12104010015797. Eng. # 12192110015778. Red/red hard top/beige can- vas soft top/brown leather. Odo: 76,134 km. Delivered new to New York, then sporting a black body with red leather interior. Beyond that, early history is unknown, but current owner told me that when he imported the car it came with handbook, tools, documentation and California license plates (included). The car has a factory hard top and has been exten- sively restored inside and out. Very clean en- gine bay, and said to be a delight to drive. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $99,875. On restoration, this 190 was repainted in bright red, almost orange—a bit flashy for my liking, and I sus- pect others felt the same. I’d guess the color hurt the selling price by at least $10k, but the buyer can consider a respray. der der the hood. Minor pitting on door handles. Engine bay shows use but is fairly clean. Original spare in trunk with warranty sticker still attached. Portuguese title. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $113,608. These “Ponton” cabriolets are a good value, as they have not seen the steep appreciation enjoyed by other 1950s Mercedes, and fuel-injected 220s are quite rare. Well bought. #144-1959 MERCEDES-BENZ 300D Adenauer sedan. S/N 1890118501027. Eng. # July 2015 #112-1960 MERCEDES-BENZ 300SL Roadster. S/N 19804210002539. Eng. # 19898010002544. Brown/ black canvas/beige leather. Odo: 73,850 km. Outstandingly original Roadster, delivered new to Alfried Krupp, head of the famous steel-making firm. Original brown resin paintwork, with disc brakes fitted shortly after delivery. Comes with original order form, owner’s manual, toolkit, etc. Accident-free with approximately 170,000 km on the clock. Lovely patinated beige interior, Becker Avus radio. Chromed wheels. Hood newer than the OP 10 No. 3 95


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Bonhams Stuttgart, DEU rest of the car. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $1,217,229. A three-owner car; last owner bought it back in 1980. Really nice to see a truly original Roadster—most 300SLs have been over-restored, in my opinion, with too much padding in the seats, etc. This was the most expensive of the four 300SLs on offer here, but it was the best example and with the nicest history. #106-1961 MERCEDES-BENZ 220S sedan. S/N 11101210049119. Eng. # 18094110045632. Black/red leather. Odo: 70,912 km. Delivered new to Switzerland in 1961. Three-owner car. Original miles with full history at hand. Very original but was repainted once in its original black. Red leather seats are original. Aftermarket Blaupunkt cassette player under dash. Star in center of steering in 1980; non-original carpets with checkered motif. Engine rebuild by Kienle in 1992; body resprayed at that time. Believed to have covered 16,000 km since. Engine bay very clean and looks untouched apart from some marks of clumsy respraying. Body and paint in very good condition, hard top (not original to this car) shows some scratches and chips at the edges. Hubcaps are not painted (should be white). Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $1,186,018. Impressive history file of service/correspondence with Daimler-Benz, even including clippings of the small ad through which it was sold by its first owner back in 1965. That all said, this was the lesser of the four 300SLs on offer. Some minor issues, but perfect for someone who wants to use it actively. Prices have seemed to stabilize a bit lately, but this was still strong money for a not-so-perfect car. #105-1965 MERCEDES-BENZ 230SL convertible. S/N 11304210012389. Eng. # 1279811001318. White/black hard top/black canvas soft top/brown leather. Odo: 88,024 km. Beautifully restored example with desirable manual gearbox. Comprehensive restoration in 2008; little use since. Engine bay to the same standard as rest of the car. Factory hard ms Stuttgart, DEU rest of the car. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $1,217,229. A three-owner car; last owner bought it back in 1980. Really nice to see a truly original Roadster—most 300SLs have been over-restored, in my opinion, with too much padding in the seats, etc. This was the most expensive of the four 300SLs on offer here, but it was the best example and with the nicest history. #106-1961 MERCEDES-BENZ 220S sedan. S/N 11101210049119. Eng. # 18094- 110045632. Black/red leather. Odo: 70,912 km. Delivered new to Switzerland in 1961. Three-owner car. Original miles with full his- tory at hand. Very original but was repainted once in its original black. Red leather seats are original. Aftermarket Blaupunkt cassette player under dash. Star in center of steering in 1980; non-original carpets with checkered motif. Engine rebuild by Kienle in 1992; body resprayed at that time. Believed to have cov- ered 16,000 km since. Engine bay very clean and looks untouched apart from some marks of clumsy respraying. Body and paint in very good condition, hard top (not original to this car) shows some scratches and chips at the edges. Hubcaps are not painted (should be white). Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $1,186,018. Im- pressive history file of service/correspondence with Daimler-Benz, even including clippings of the small ad through which it was sold by its first owner back in 1965. That all said, this was the lesser of the four 300SLs on offer. Some minor issues, but perfect for someone who wants to use it actively. Prices have seemed to stabilize a bit lately, but this was still strong money for a not-so-perfect car. #105-1965 MERCEDES-BENZ 230SL convertible. S/N 11304210012389. Eng. # 1279811001318. White/black hard top/black canvas soft top/brown leather. Odo: 88,024 km. Beautifully restored example with desir- able manual gearbox. Comprehensive restora- tion in 2008; little use since. Engine bay to the same standard as rest of the car. Factory hard wheel wheel badly damaged. Door handles slightly pitted. Headlights not shiny anymore. Very old Dunlop rubber. Engine bay very well cared for. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $28,090. Nice example of the famous fintail “Heckflosse” model. There are still quite a few of these around Europe, but not with such low mileage, and you don’t see them often at auction. Sold near its $27k low estimate, but it’s still just an old saloon. Fair both ways. #127-1961 MERCEDES-BENZ 300SL Rvoadster. S/N 19804210002973. White/white hard top/black canvas soft top/brown leather. Odo: 57,857 km. Disc-brake car. Amazing history file. Original red interior replaced with dark brown leather TOP 10 No. 4 tgart, DEU rest of the car. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $1,217,229. A three-owner car; last owner bought it back in 1980. Really nice to see a truly original Roadster—most 300SLs have been over-restored, in my opinion, with too much padding in the seats, etc. This was the most expensive of the four 300SLs on offer here, but it was the best example and with the nicest history. #106-1961 MERCEDES-BENZ 220S sedan. S/N 11101210049119. Eng. # 18094- 110045632. Black/red leather. Odo: 70,912 km. Delivered new to Switzerland in 1961. Three-owner car. Original miles with full his- tory at hand. Very original but was repainted once in its original black. Red leather seats are original. Aftermarket Blaupunkt cassette player under dash. Star in center of steering in 1980; non-original carpets with checkered motif. Engine rebuild by Kienle in 1992; body resprayed at that time. Believed to have cov- ered 16,000 km since. Engine bay very clean and looks untouched apart from some marks of clumsy respraying. Body and paint in very good condition, hard top (not original to this car) shows some scratches and chips at the edges. Hubcaps are not painted (should be white). Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $1,186,018. Im- pressive history file of service/correspondence with Daimler-Benz, even including clippings of the small ad through which it was sold by its first owner back in 1965. That all said, this was the lesser of the four 300SLs on offer. Some minor issues, but perfect for someone who wants to use it actively. Prices have seemed to stabilize a bit lately, but this was still strong money for a not-so-perfect car. #105-1965 MERCEDES-BENZ 230SL convertible. S/N 11304210012389. Eng. # 1279811001318. White/black hard top/black canvas soft top/brown leather. Odo: 88,024 km. Beautifully restored example with desir- able manual gearbox. Comprehensive restora- tion in 2008; little use since. Engine bay to the same standard as rest of the car. Factory hard wheel badly damaged. Door handles slightly pitted. Headlights not shiny anymore. Very old Dunlop rubber. Engine bay very well cared for. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $28,090. Nice exam- ple of the famous fintail “Heckflosse” model. There are still quite a few of these around Eu- rope, but not with such low mileage, and you don’t see them often at auction. Sold near its $27k low estimate, but it’s still just an old sa- loon. Fair both ways. #127-1961 MERCEDES-BENZ 300SL Rvoadster. S/N 19804210002- 973. White/white hard top/black can- vas soft top/brown leather. Odo: 57,857 km. Disc-brake car. Amazing history file. Original red interior replaced with dark brown leather TOP 10 No. 4 regulations. regulations. Italian registration and ASI Gold certification, with plaque mounted on the back. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $97,378. There were four Pagodas here, but this was the sole 230. One of the best open two-seaters of the 1960s. Not cheap at nearly $100k, but a fine example ready to enjoy. #111-1967 MERCEDES-BENZ 250SE convertible. S/N 11102312088311. Eng. # 12998012017798. White/green canvas/green leather. Odo: 9,715 km. Part of a collection; unregistered for 25 years, then sold with a believed original 74k km. Partly restored in 2008 with a drivetrain rebuild and electrics partially overhauled. Body resprayed but unrestored; panels are not 100% straight. Chrome sliding steel sunroof, Becker Mexico radio and a/c. The car has been repainted once in its original brown metallic. Matching dark brown leather interior in excellent condition. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $108,614. The unusual-but-charming color combination made this car stand out against its two rival 600s at the sale. Prices for 600s vary widely based on condition and a fluctuating market. This was a fine example that sold a tad above the $98k low estimate. Fair both ways. #142-1968 MERCEDES-BENZ 600 sa- loon. S/N 10001212001210. Eng. # 10098012001266. Gold metallic/green leather. Odo: 96,648 km. Comes from an Italian collection, which explains the ASI certificate. Major service and respray in its original gold metallic back in 2007. Bumpers rechromed at that time. Nicely patinated interior; pity about the under- new, the original seats have a lovely patina. Original a/c, non-original Blaupunkt. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $91,136. The 250SE production life was relatively short, with only 6,213 built 1966–68. Price paid for this one was well beyond the SCM Pocket Price Guide valuation of $41k–$78k, but find another fine example like this. #133-1968 MERCEDES-BENZ 600 se- dan. S/N 10001212001225. Eng. # 10098012001262. Brown metallic/brown leather. Odo: 19,109 km. Sold new in Germany and in the same collection since 1990. Work carried out during current ownership included overhauling the fuel injection and recently checking the hydraulic system and overhauling the pump and the steering. The car is in good condition overall. Noteworthy features are the dash Philips cassette player. Somewhat dusty engine compartment. Good gaps and solidly closing doors, but overall not so fresh. The lesser of the three W100s on offer. Cond: 3. NOT SOLD AT $65,100. The estimated $75k–$92k seemed realistic to me. Maybe there was one W100 too many at this sale, and this was the one. Seller was right not to let go. has some light scratches in places. Carpets are 96 #143-1969 MERCEDES-BENZ 280SL convertible. S/N 11304412007543. Silver Sports Car Market


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Bonhams Stuttgart, DEU metallic/silver hard top/black vinyl. Odo: 8,965 km. Originally a California car, came to Europe in 2013. Not much history. Resprayed in silver metallic. Hard top only. Optional small bench at the back. Wrinkled carpets. Chrome pitted and very used. Engine fairly be unrestored, still sporting its original body paint; only the hard top was partly repainted. Aftermarket a/c, but the accompanying certificate of origin lists no fewer than 12 factory fitted options, including 4-sp automatic transmission (which is not really a plus in Europe). Comes with a large file of maintenance history, handbooks and tool roll. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $112,984. One of the best and most original Pagodas I have seen lately. American spec, including large orange turn signals at the front; overriders on the bumpers make it less elegant than the original design. Expensive, but still fairly priced for condition. #125-1973 MERCEDES-BENZ 600 lim- clean, with some new hoses and ignition cables. Said to have covered only 66,000 km. Just another Pagoda. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $52,478. It looked clean, but a new layer of paint can hide much. I wasn’t smitten with this one. Neither was the room. The $70k low estimate would have been a correct selling price, so it was well bought at this cheap price. #124-1970 MERCEDES-BENZ 280SE 3.5 coupe. S/N 11102612000881. Eng. # 1169801200728. Sand Beige Metallic/black leather. Odo: 71,715 km. Very original example, one respray in its original Sand Beige Metallic. First a demonstrator for the MercedesBenz agency of Berlin. This explains the lavish and luxurious equipment, not to be taken for granted at that time. Leather interior, electric windows and steel sunroof, automatic transmission, original Behr a/c and Becker Mexico cassette deck. Same ownership since 1983. Low mileage confirmed in accompanying documents. Minor cracks in the paint and pock marks on the chrome. Front windshield delaminating at both sides. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $76,155. Very late W111 looking stylish and elegant. Its low mileage and original condition were the big pluses, and it looked properly sorted. Price paid was market-correct with slight advantage to the buyer. #110-1970 MERCEDES-BENZ 280SL convertible. S/N 11304412019709. Eng. # 13098312013014. White/black hard top/black canvas soft top/black leather. Odo: 2,016 km. Delivered new to California, and remained there with its original owner until 2006, when it was imported into the Netherlands. Said to ms Stuttgart, DEU metallic/silver hard top/black vinyl. Odo: 8,965 km. Originally a California car, came to Europe in 2013. Not much history. Resprayed in silver metallic. Hard top only. Optional small bench at the back. Wrinkled carpets. Chrome pitted and very used. Engine fairly be unrestored, still sporting its original body paint; only the hard top was partly repainted. Aftermarket a/c, but the accompanying certifi- cate of origin lists no fewer than 12 factory fitted options, including 4-sp automatic trans- mission (which is not really a plus in Europe). Comes with a large file of maintenance his- tory, handbooks and tool roll. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $112,984. One of the best and most origi- nal Pagodas I have seen lately. American spec, including large orange turn signals at the front; overriders on the bumpers make it less elegant than the original design. Expen- sive, but still fairly priced for condition. #125-1973 MERCEDES-BENZ 600 lim- clean, with some new hoses and ignition ca- bles. Said to have covered only 66,000 km. Just another Pagoda. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $52,478. It looked clean, but a new layer of paint can hide much. I wasn’t smitten with this one. Neither was the room. The $70k low esti- mate would have been a correct selling price, so it was well bought at this cheap price. #124-1970 MERCEDES-BENZ 280SE 3.5 coupe. S/N 11102612000881. Eng. # 1169801200728. Sand Beige Metallic/black leather. Odo: 71,715 km. Very original exam- ple, one respray in its original Sand Beige Me- tallic. First a demonstrator for the Mercedes- Benz agency of Berlin. This explains the lav- ish and luxurious equipment, not to be taken for granted at that time. Leather interior, elec- tric windows and steel sunroof, automatic transmission, original Behr a/c and Becker Mexico cassette deck. Same ownership since 1983. Low mileage confirmed in accompany- ing documents. Minor cracks in the paint and pock marks on the chrome. Front windshield delaminating at both sides. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $76,155. Very late W111 looking stylish and elegant. Its low mileage and original con- dition were the big pluses, and it looked prop- erly sorted. Price paid was market-correct with slight advantage to the buyer. #110-1970 MERCEDES-BENZ 280SL convertible. S/N 11304412019709. Eng. # 13098312013014. White/black hard top/black canvas soft top/black leather. Odo: 2,016 km. Delivered new to California, and remained there with its original owner until 2006, when it was imported into the Netherlands. Said to rior, rior, very clean engine bay. Chrome windowsurrounds show some scratches. Chrome otherwise perfect, as is paint. German registration. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $144,819. The best 600 of three on offer. Most 600s I see at auction tend to be tired. This was a really fresh example with a lot of interest in the room for it. Sold mid-estimate to the Qatari delegation, fairly well bought. #116-1974 MERCEDES-BENZ UNI- MOG 406A truck. S/N 40612010022907. Eng. # 3530100343. Green/green canvas/gray vinyl. Odo: 103,043 km. Completely restored short-wheelbase model with tipper and flipdown bed-sides. Rough-terrain tires. Restored to a better-than-new standard, including Mercedes exchange engine with only 128 hours on the clock. In the cabin, seats, engine cover and gearbox cover are among the many new parts. ousine. S/N 10001212002236. Black/dark brown leather. Odo: 88,308 km. A low-mileage car generally in very good condition. Ordered new by Léopold Sédar Senghor, President of Senegal. It is one of the last 600s built and incorporates all the updates, including an optional sunroof. The current vendor and third owner has spent about $25k on ams Stuttgart, DEU metallic/silver hard top/black vinyl. Odo: 8,965 km. Originally a California car, came to Europe in 2013. Not much history. Resprayed in silver metallic. Hard top only. Optional small bench at the back. Wrinkled carpets. Chrome pitted and very used. Engine fairly be unrestored, still sporting its original body paint; only the hard top was partly repainted. Aftermarket a/c, but the accompanying certifi- cate of origin lists no fewer than 12 factory fitted options, including 4-sp automatic trans- mission (which is not really a plus in Europe). Comes with a large file of maintenance his- tory, handbooks and tool roll. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $112,984. One of the best and most origi- nal Pagodas I have seen lately. American spec, including large orange turn signals at the front; overriders on the bumpers make it less elegant than the original design. Expen- sive, but still fairly priced for condition. #125-1973 MERCEDES-BENZ 600 lim- clean, with some new hoses and ignition ca- bles. Said to have covered only 66,000 km. Just another Pagoda. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $52,478. It looked clean, but a new layer of paint can hide much. I wasn’t smitten with this one. Neither was the room. The $70k low esti- mate would have been a correct selling price, so it was well bought at this cheap price. #124-1970 MERCEDES-BENZ 280SE 3.5 coupe. S/N 11102612000881. Eng. # 1169801200728. Sand Beige Metallic/black leather. Odo: 71,715 km. Very original exam- ple, one respray in its original Sand Beige Me- tallic. First a demonstrator for the Mercedes- Benz agency of Berlin. This explains the lav- ish and luxurious equipment, not to be taken for granted at that time. Leather interior, elec- tric windows and steel sunroof, automatic transmission, original Behr a/c and Becker Mexico cassette deck. Same ownership since 1983. Low mileage confirmed in accompany- ing documents. Minor cracks in the paint and pock marks on the chrome. Front windshield delaminating at both sides. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $76,155. Very late W111 looking stylish and elegant. Its low mileage and original con- dition were the big pluses, and it looked prop- erly sorted. Price paid was market-correct with slight advantage to the buyer. #110-1970 MERCEDES-BENZ 280SL convertible. S/N 11304412019709. Eng. # 13098312013014. White/black hard top/black canvas soft top/black leather. Odo: 2,016 km. Delivered new to California, and remained there with its original owner until 2006, when it was imported into the Netherlands. Said to rior, very clean engine bay. Chrome window- surrounds show some scratches. Chrome otherwise perfect, as is paint. German registra- tion. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $144,819. The best 600 of three on offer. Most 600s I see at auc- tion tend to be tired. This was a really fresh example with a lot of interest in the room for it. Sold mid-estimate to the Qatari delegation, fairly well bought. #116-1974 MERCEDES-BENZ UNI- MOG 406A truck. S/N 40612010022907. Eng. # 3530100343. Green/green canvas/gray vinyl. Odo: 103,043 km. Completely restored short-wheelbase model with tipper and flip- down bed-sides. Rough-terrain tires. Restored to a better-than-new standard, including Mer- cedes exchange engine with only 128 hours on the clock. In the cabin, seats, engine cover and gearbox cover are among the many new parts. ousine. S/N 10001212002236. Black/dark brown leather. Odo: 88,308 km. A low-mile- age car generally in very good condition. Or- dered new by Léopold Sédar Senghor, President of Senegal. It is one of the last 600s built and incorporates all the updates, includ- ing an optional sunroof. The current vendor and third owner has spent about $25k on Only Only front bumper showing marks of earlier life, although it was repainted. I count 28 items on the special-equipment list. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $59,925. Some years back, luxuriously equipped Unimogs were very fashionable in Japan. I found this one particularly charming with its canvas top and little tipper. These trucks rarely come to market in this condition. This one now heads to desert sands, apparently. Sold for a bargain price. #102-1975 MERCEDES-BENZ 280S sedan. S/N 11602012042977. Eng. # 11092212024173. White/blue cloth. Odo: 13,126 km. Time-warp car sold new in Germany and then exported to Japan, where it had two owners but was hardly driven. Now U.K. registered. Still in showroom condition, with impeccable blue velvet interior. Rubber floor cover in trunk missing. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $22,472. Well-cared-for and low-mileage, but not very exciting. Quite basic even, with carbureted engine and cloth interior. (Standard Benz equipment in those days was not particularly glamorous.) Offered at no reserve, it finished well short of the $27k–$38k estimate. Advantage to the buyer. #134-1975 MERCEDES-BENZ UNI- MOG 406 double-cab truck. S/N 40614510026284. Eng. # 353902509. Enzian Blue/ gray vinyl. Odo: 128,756 km. Originally delivered to the Luftwaffe; features special clutch for towing aircraft. Exchange engine fitted during its first years. Rare double cab and aftermarket rear loading deck with integrated stow boxes. Has had two owners since its Luftwaffe days. Minor restoration includes repaint “in an original Unimog color,” brake overhaul, new seat covers, door trim and headlining. Excellent condition inside and out. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $58,677. Last year Bonhams’ Mercedes sale included one Unimog— another double-cab—that went for an impressive $113k (SCM# 244631). This year they offered two, but lightning did not strike 98 Sports Car Market


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Bonhams Stuttgart, DEU again. This one went to a Gulf state at a bargain price compared with last year. (See “Affordable Classic,” p. 40.) #103-1983 MERCEDES-BENZ 380SL convertible. S/N WDBBA45A3DB025093. Eng. # 11696212015696. Silver/silver hard top/black canvas soft top/blue leather. Odo: 9,850 miles. A quite exceptional car in as-new condition. Comes complete with its original owner’s pack and service booklet. Delivered online, on the phone and in the room. One of few cars here to sell well above high estimate, despite being a very common R107—although it would be a pity to add miles to the clock. Well sold. new to the U.S. but now with British registration. Becker Grand Prix radio, factory mags, fog lamps and hard top. Engine bay as nice as the rest of the car. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $56,180. The R107 has its following and offers relatively cheap entry to the classic car scene. With some 237,000 built, they are not particularly rare, but considering this one’s condition and bulletproof presentation, I’ll call it slightly well bought. #107-1986 MERCEDES-BENZ 500SL convertible. S/N 1070461A028237. Silver/ silver hard top/black canvas soft top/blue leather. Odo: 65,666 km. Delivered new to Japan but returned to Germany in 2013. Relatively low-mileage car with original silver paintwork in good condition. Hard top with rare optional heated glass. Black spoilers front #145-1992 MERCEDES-BENZ 600SL convertible. S/N WDB1290761F069B1. Eng. # 12098112000309. Dark blue/blue hard top/ black soft top/beige leather. Odo: 117,015 km. Four owners and well used. Full history. Bumpers slightly discolored, front grille damaged. Clean interior showing use. Becker Traffic Pro with CD and navigation. Complete with car Stuttgart, DEU again. This one went to a Gulf state at a bar- gain price compared with last year. (See “Af- fordable Classic,” p. 40.) #103-1983 MERCEDES-BENZ 380SL convertible. S/N WDBBA45A3DB025093. Eng. # 11696212015696. Silver/silver hard top/black canvas soft top/blue leather. Odo: 9,850 miles. A quite exceptional car in as-new condition. Comes complete with its original owner’s pack and service booklet. Delivered online, on the phone and in the room. One of few cars here to sell well above high estimate, despite being a very common R107—although it would be a pity to add miles to the clock. Well sold. new to the U.S. but now with British registra- tion. Becker Grand Prix radio, factory mags, fog lamps and hard top. Engine bay as nice as the rest of the car. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $56,180. The R107 has its following and offers relatively cheap entry to the classic car scene. With some 237,000 built, they are not particu- larly rare, but considering this one’s condition and bulletproof presentation, I’ll call it slightly well bought. #107-1986 MERCEDES-BENZ 500SL convertible. S/N 1070461A028237. Silver/ silver hard top/black canvas soft top/blue leather. Odo: 65,666 km. Delivered new to Japan but returned to Germany in 2013. Rela- tively low-mileage car with original silver paintwork in good condition. Hard top with rare optional heated glass. Black spoilers front #145-1992 MERCEDES-BENZ 600SL convertible. S/N WDB1290761F069B1. Eng. # 12098112000309. Dark blue/blue hard top/ black soft top/beige leather. Odo: 117,015 km. Four owners and well used. Full history. Bum- pers slightly discolored, front grille damaged. Clean interior showing use. Becker Traffic Pro with CD and navigation. Complete with car acquire acquire a genuine factory-built MercedesBenz racer, but there was not much enthusiasm, not even from people filling a new museum. High bid looked fair against the ambitious $380k–$490k estimate. #104-2003 MERCEDES-BENZ CL63 AMG coupe. S/N WDB2153781A026599. Eng. # 137980400018874. Silver/dark gray leather. Odo: 147,825 km. Said to be one of only 26 built. Delivered new in the Netherlands as a demonstrator for an AMG dealer. Sold in 2006 to the current owner. Engine was replaced by AMG under warranty after 50,000 km, with documents on file. Kept on the road until 2012. Recommissioned by AMG last year. In overall excellent condition but has some stone chips at the front and scratched ams Stuttgart, DEU again. This one went to a Gulf state at a bar- gain price compared with last year. (See “Af- fordable Classic,” p. 40.) #103-1983 MERCEDES-BENZ 380SL convertible. S/N WDBBA45A3DB025093. Eng. # 11696212015696. Silver/silver hard top/black canvas soft top/blue leather. Odo: 9,850 miles. A quite exceptional car in as-new condition. Comes complete with its original owner’s pack and service booklet. Delivered online, on the phone and in the room. One of few cars here to sell well above high estimate, despite being a very common R107—although it would be a pity to add miles to the clock. Well sold. new to the U.S. but now with British registra- tion. Becker Grand Prix radio, factory mags, fog lamps and hard top. Engine bay as nice as the rest of the car. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $56,180. The R107 has its following and offers relatively cheap entry to the classic car scene. With some 237,000 built, they are not particu- larly rare, but considering this one’s condition and bulletproof presentation, I’ll call it slightly well bought. #107-1986 MERCEDES-BENZ 500SL convertible. S/N 1070461A028237. Silver/ silver hard top/black canvas soft top/blue leather. Odo: 65,666 km. Delivered new to Japan but returned to Germany in 2013. Rela- tively low-mileage car with original silver paintwork in good condition. Hard top with rare optional heated glass. Black spoilers front #145-1992 MERCEDES-BENZ 600SL convertible. S/N WDB1290761F069B1. Eng. # 12098112000309. Dark blue/blue hard top/ black soft top/beige leather. Odo: 117,015 km. Four owners and well used. Full history. Bum- pers slightly discolored, front grille damaged. Clean interior showing use. Becker Traffic Pro with CD and navigation. Complete with car acquire a genuine factory-built Mercedes- Benz racer, but there was not much enthusi- asm, not even from people filling a new museum. High bid looked fair against the am- bitious $380k–$490k estimate. #104-2003 MERCEDES-BENZ CL63 AMG coupe. S/N WDB2153781A026599. Eng. # 137980400018874. Silver/dark gray leather. Odo: 147,825 km. Said to be one of only 26 built. Delivered new in the Nether- lands as a demonstrator for an AMG dealer. Sold in 2006 to the current owner. Engine was replaced by AMG under warranty after 50,000 km, with documents on file. Kept on the road until 2012. Recommissioned by AMG last year. In overall excellent condition but has some stone chips at the front and scratched only only R129 in the world with a removable tow bar. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $24,969. The R129s with big engines are the most desirable, especially the V12s like this one. They represent potential and will be hot property in a not-sodistant future. This one needed some TLC, but there’s plenty of room for that with the price paid. #129-1996 MERCEDES-BENZ C- and rear, typical for the 500. Clean engine bay showing age. German registration papers. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $33,084. Just another clean R107, more of a second-hand car than a collectors’ item. Generally, the more powerful variants command higher prices. That was not the case here. Fair both ways. #123-1986 MERCEDES-BENZ 500SL convertible. S/N WDB1070461A043322. Eng. # 1179641200828. Diamond Blue/blue hard top/black canvas soft top/black leather. Odo: 7,793 km. As-new R107 with only 7,793 genuine km on the clock and still retaining its original underseal. Lots of extras, including a/c, heated seats and heated rear window on the hard top. German registration. Still in showroom condition. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $108,614. Quite a lot of interest in this car, 100 CLASS Works racer. S/N RS960230. Eng. # 6615. White/black racing bucket. Ex-Works DTM car driven by Jan Magnussen and occasionally by Juan Pablo Montoya and Ricardo Zonta. Montoya is the better known of this trio, hence his name on the side window. No real resemblance to a standard production CClass. In storage since the end of 1996. I was told that the car needs considerable work before it will start. Cond: 3-. NOT SOLD AT wheels. Sun roof. Comes with full service history and AMG badges the owner did not want on the car. Engine is the same as in the Pagani Zonda. Offered at no reserve. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $33,708. This car sold at Bonhams’ Mercedes auction in July of last year for $48k (SCM# 244651). But the American buyer was unable to register it in the U.S., so Bonhams took it back and entered it for this year’s Stuttgart event. This car is rare but more of a second-hand car than a classic, and tax-wise it’s very expensive to put on the road. It has some potential, and is therefore well bought, especially when compared with last year’s price. #128-2007 MERCEDES-BENZ SLR MCLAREN convertible. S/N WDD1994761M001547. Eng. # 15598060001618. Silver/ black canvas/red leather. Odo: 18,000 km. Heavily optioned. Comes with its sales invoice of €439,800 ($667k in March of 2008). It was registered in Switzerland and mainly used for $314,650. Cars like these come rarely on the market. This was an unusual opportunity to traveling to and from Belgium. Excellent color combination. Still presents as-new. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $308,365. In 2010, one of the last of these roadsters was for sale in Belgium (new) for $238,700. It is said that the price of supercars is at its lowest after 15 years. Judging by the price paid here, that is not the case for SLRs. © Sports Car Market


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Leake Dallas, TX Leake — Dallas 2015 My pick for “Best Buy” was a nicely restored 1955 Chevrolet Cameo pickup, sold at $30k Company Leake Date April 17–19, 2015 Location Dallas, TX Auctioneers Jim Richie, Brian Marshall, Tony Langdon, Bobby Ehlert Automotive lots sold/offered 269/422 Sales rate 64% Sales total $6,324,417 High sale 2006 Ford GT coupe, sold at $231,000 Buyer’s premium 10%, included in sold prices Very well bought — 1955 Chevrolet Cameo pickup, sold at $30,250 Report and photos by Cody Tayloe Market opinions in italics F our of the top five high sales at L Dallas auction in April were less than 10 years old. The top seller overall was a 2006 Ford GT with less than 3,000 miles that sold for $231k. In the red-hot GT market, this may seem like pretty good deal, but it was represented as re reconstructed because it was believed to ha a previous accident, although the title, CARFAX, and Autocheck reports were all clean. Next was a 2014 BMW i8 hybrid supercar. The owner, a private collector, told me that he felt “too old” Dallas, TX to drive such a flashy car, and he let it go at a market-correct $176k. A 2009 Ferrari F430 F1 coupe and a 2006 F430 Spider followed, selling at $151k and $135k, respectively. The only classic in the top five was a 1968 Chevrolet Camaro resto-mod. With massive big- block power and a host of customizations, it sold for $96k. Only a few deals managed to slip through the cracks. My pick for Best Buy” was a nicely restored 1955 Chevrolet Cameo pickup, sold $30k. Leake puts on a show unlike anything else out there, with two simultaneous auction stages running side-by-side. In the past, these two rings were referred to as “red” and “blue,” but the “blue” has now been replaced with “Platinum.” During prime time, this is where you will find the higher-end offerings. Affordable cars cross the Platinum block as well, but Leake is sure to play up the pedigree of the higher-end offerings. This year Leake expanded from a two-day to Top seller — 2006 Ford GT coupe, sold at $231,000 102 a three-day event, replicating the auction they hold at this same venue in the fall. The three-day sale realized sales of $6.3 million and a sellthrough rate of 64%, matching last year’s 64%. Leake consigned and sold more cars, sending totals up $800k, and the average price per car held steady at about $23k, confirming yet again that Leake knows how to serve their market niche. ♦ Sales Totals $6m $5m $4m $3m $2m $1m 0 Sports Car Market 2015 2014


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Leake Dallas, TX ENGLISH #420-1951 JAGUAR MK VII saloon. S/N A11967. Black/red leather. Odo: 33,432 miles. Rare C-type cylinder head and export market left-hand drive. Older paint is faded. Brightwork has not been redone in ages and shows heavy scratches and pitting. Rubber is older, with a few cracks here and there. Panel fit is correct. Glass in good condition overall. Interior shows age. Cushion leather on the driver’s seat is uneven. Carpets worn and it sold for $26,750 (SCM# 235032). History repeats itself here, and the value continues downward. If it keeps making the rounds, eventually it will be free. #1177-1977 MGB convertible. S/N GHN5UH424366G. White/black vinyl/black vinyl. Odo: 52,538 miles. Older cosmetic freshening showing signs of aging and use. Heavy orange peel in places. Touched-up chips here and there. Some pitting on brightwork around side vent windows and air-intake cowl behind the hood. Glass in good condition. Rubber is holding up well. Soft top mark. A lot of consignors tend to pass up what would be considered reasonable money, but this one sold right where it should have. Good deal for all parties. #477-1963 MERCEDES-BENZ 220SE convertible. S/N 11102312040423. Black/ black cloth/tan leather. Odo: 63,555 miles. Great paint and decent brightwork. Orange peel on rear fender. Paint bubbles on nose. Light scratches and fading on trunk lid. Pitting on some brightwork and haziness on some chrome. Rubber in very good condition. Interior is pretty rough. Carpets and seats are decent and appear refreshed. Dash wood is in poor condition. Cracking on leather door pan- dirty. Wood in decent shape. Gauges are a little hazy. Engine is dirty and could be so much better with a simple cleaning. Cond: 4+. SOLD AT $21,450. Recently offered at Dan Kruse San Antonio in late March, not sold at $19k (SCM# 264619). California black plates in the trunk. Options on this car included a sunroof which, after much finagling while crossing the block, failed to open. The hammer price here was $500 more than the high bid just a few month ago. The market has spoken. #2512-1953 BENTLEY R-TYPE sedan. S/N B434TN. Sand & sable/brown vinyl. RHD. Odo: 64,186 miles. Appears completely stock on the outside, but under the hood is an updated Chevrolet small block of unspecified displacement. Paint is decent. Brightwork is good overall, with a few small dings. Some light scratches around the rear windows. Rubber is in good shape. Passenger’s side seat leather is tearing away from the cushion piping. Wood is in good condition. Carpets are showing wear. Air conditioning has been is older and decent. Interior is nice and clean. Seat coverings and carpets are in very good condition, with minimal signs of wear. Gauges have a slight tint of cloudiness to them but are otherwise good. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $4,400. As long as this one runs decent and you don’t have to source any difficult parts to keep it on the road, the cost of entry was pretty low. Sure, it had some needs and wasn’t perfect, but the price paid was about half of average. Well bought. GERMAN #421-1962 AMPHICAR 770 convertible. S/N 100818. Blue/white canvas/yellow & white vinyl. Odo: 3,056 miles. Cosmetic restoration recently completed. Brightwork shows pitting and age. Paint is good overall. Not concours quality but acceptable. Vinyl top recently replaced. Rubber is older but not completely lost. Tires need to be replaced, as there is very little tread. Fresh bright yellow seats and door panel upholstery. Dash paint appears to be original. Gauges are decent, but els and door armrest. Ripped upholstery on side rear panels. Rubber brake pedal cover is missing. Engine average. Cond: 4+. SOLD AT $63,250. From far away, the car looked good, but up close it was a different story. The top down with windows up was a possible signal of further issues. A few years ago, $50k would have been big money. Values are up now and nearing $100k. This one had many obvious needs and may have been hiding more beneath the surface. A strong number, all things considered. #504-1971 MERCEDES-BENZ 280SL convertible. S/N 11304412020026. Red/red hard top/black leather. Odo: 8,498 miles. Recent repaint, with lots of small dimples on front fender and window sills. Touch-up on hood. Hood shut-lines are tighter on passenger’s side. Brightwork in very good condition. Glass is clean and clear, with minimal wiper marks. Seats covered in new leather. Door panels are decent. Carpet is in great shape. Brightwork at door threshold is a little worn. Working clock and Becker Europa radio. Fac- added. Electric radiator fan. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $20,625. At Barrett-Jackson’s 2007 Scottsdale sale, this car was offered with its original I6 still intact and sold for a very strong $41k (SCM# 44044). It reappeared at Mecum’s Dallas auction in 2013 with the V8, marketed as a “Bentley Street Rod.” The value took a hit and 104 the bezels are showing age. Steering wheel is chipped and cracked on the finish. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $50,600. When the Amphicar was introduced, it was pricey, more than a Mustang convertible. The values of these became very strong around seven years ago, then dipped back down. After rising recently, levels have returned to their circa-2008 high-water tory air conditioning. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $77,000. The market has spoken, and you cannot ignore what it is telling us. Top-condition Pagodas have appreciated by $100k in the past three years, and driver-quality examples are on the rise as well. This one sold last June at Leake’s Tulsa sale for just under $70k Sports Car Market


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Rising Sun Selected sales of Japanese collector cars by Tony Piff (All text within quotes minimally edited from online descriptions) #251876728308 1976 DODGE COLT GT coupe. S/N 6P23K67000316. 58,000 miles. “I drive it daily. Runs and drives great. No rust. Newer paint. New tires.” Interior has been redone. Red hoses throughout engine bay. Condition: 3. Leake Dallas, TX (SCM# 252149). Sold a little stronger this time, although the consignor barely broke even after fees. Market-correct. #2408-1984 PORSCHE 928S coupe. S/N WP0JB0920ES862262. Red/black leather. Odo: 146,141 miles. Older thick repaint with prep issues throughout. Chips and scratches. Rubber decent. Panel fit is good. Windshield wipers too large for the model. Sunroof does not close tight. Interior is a little tired but decent overall given the mileage. Dash overlay likely hiding cracks. Leather interior cracking on seat bolsters. Carpets are old and original. Automatic transmission gear selector is worn. SOLD AT $4,800. Funky little Mitsubishi-built Dodge. Not an investment piece, but will be a hit at Japanese car meets, and you even get a stick shift in your right hand. eBay Motors, 3/19/2015. #291407099055 1971 DATSUN FAIRLADY Z coupe. S/N S3005854. 26,151 miles. A U.S. soldier brought this RHD Japanese market car home after deployment. Looks well used but not abused and generally stock. Enkei92 wheel demo car, featured at SEMA and in Enkei catalog. With 5-speed. Condition: 3-. ITALIAN #2460-1990 FERRARI TESTAROSSA coupe. S/N ZFFSG17A5L0087232. Rosso Corsa/tan leather. Odo: 61,047 miles. Older repaint, with lots of light surface scratches. Small paint crack behind passenger’s door. Appears to have been used and driven. Glass and rubber in original but good condition. Driver’s seat leather shows minimal wear. Early ’90s automatic seat belts. Carpets are SOLD AT $21,100. Seems expensive for condition, but Series 1 cars are the most desirable, and this one gets JDM cred. Enkei wheels are a popular, period-correct choice, but they don’t carry any particular cachet. Market-correct. eBay Motors, 3/19/2015. #369 1989 TOYOTA SUPRA coupe. S/N JT2MA70L4K0119697. 26,836 miles. CARFAX certified, actual miles, two owners. Very well preserved. With 5-speed. Condition: 2. Speaker grilles missing on door. Underhood very faded and weathered. Engine tired and old. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $6,380. With a top speed of 146 mph in 1984, Porsche claimed the 928S to be “the fastest street legal production car sold in the U.S.” The “S” designation was not a hopped-up 928... It was the name of the 928 offered that year. This particular car was offered on eBay with a no-sale high bid of $3,750. The selling price here was still a little soft, but you can get into big money real quick with repairs and maintenance on anything that says Porsche. #2470-2014 BMW I8 coupe. S/N WBY2Z2C58EVX64253. White/gray leather. Odo: 2,005 miles. Everything is factory-fresh and well cared for. Minor paint flaws on nose. Glass is clean and clear. No signs of interior use. Door thresholds show only minor scuffing. Finely detailed. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $176,000. When the owner purchased the car, average. Gauges are clean and clear. Screen printing is all intact. Engine is average. Description states that engine-out service was performed in 2012, which was only about 500 miles ago. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $70,400. Frequent flier at auction, most recently sold for $70k at Leake’s Oklahoma City sale in February (SCM# 257392). Testarossa values have been soaring recently, and at least the buyer knows that the service is up to date. Fair deal for buyer and seller in today’s market. JAPANESE #152-1976 TOYOTA LAND CRUISER FJ40 SUV. S/N FJ40209352. Beige/gray vinyl. Odo: 21,905 miles. Fresh paint applied over heavily rusted body. The rust has not been repaired, merely painted over. Panel fit is good. Some rubber has been replaced. Upgraded suspension, wheels and tires. Most of the interior said to be original and in very good condition. Rear jump seats with seat belts. Optional rear heater. 350 V8 power recently added. Engine in very good shape. SOLD AT $11,550. “The Fast and the Furious” brought the Mark IV Supra into the consciousness of an entire generation. Mark IIIs like this one remain the “affordable alternative” for now, but the gap will narrow over time. Smart purchase. McCormick’s Palm Springs, 2/20/2015. ♦ he said there were only two in all of Dallas. Now there are a few more, but the owner says it just doesn’t fit his profile. It will be interesting to see if electric or hybrid cars are coveted by collectors in the future, or will they be old, used-up appliances that we have hauled off? After commission, the price paid was about retail. 106 Cond: 4+. SOLD AT $22,275. Purchased here by a restoration shop that says they are going to take out all the rust and sell it. This was an attractive-looking FJ that looked good on pa- Sports Car Market


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Leake Dallas, TX per, with updated engine, recent paint, etc... But the painted-over rust is problematic. This one was offered last August at Mecum’s Monterey auction, where the consignor passed up a $28k offer (SCM# 248383). Fair price considering the buyer is capable of his own repairs. AMERICAN #2450-1939 BUICK SERIES 60 phaeton. S/N 63717956. Burgundy/tan canvas/black vinyl. Odo: 9,142 miles. Said to be one of 269 produced in 1939. Older restoration and well preserved. Dry spray on front fenders and nose. Faded in places. Brightwork is decent overall, with some pieces showing age. Top shows some soiling. Bumpers recently rechromed and running boards freshly painted. Interior is tidy overall. Carpets are slightly worn and dirty. Thresholds show signs of wear. Doors sag when opened. Older restored lent condition and carpets are very nice. Small crack on top of driver’s door. Gauges clean and clear. Engine has been restored. Undercarriage almost as nice as the top, but does show some use. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $78,100. Last seen in April of 2002 at the Branson auction, where it sold for $50k, which our reporter called “fully priced” (SCM# 28160). Bel Air prices have been pretty stable over the past several years, with no big swings up or down. This one was the top-selling of all Tri-Fives at this auction, and deservedly so. Well bought. #2455-1955 CHEVROLET CAMEO pickup. S/N M255N009220. Bombay Ivory/red & tan vinyl. Odo: 56,210 miles. 235-ci I6, 1-bbl, 3-sp. Recent restoration in good overall condition. Small dent on top of hood. Dry spray under driver’s mirror. Brightwork has been replaced and/or rechromed. Wood in the bed is in excellent condition, with a lot of high-gloss lacquer. Rubber appears to be very fresh, and glass is BEST BUY tic. Carpets are worn. Seats are in good condition. Headliner is holding up well. Cond: 4+. SOLD AT $18,040. Fleetwoods of this era have never garnered the popularity of other benchmark 4-door Cadillacs such as the Eldorado Brougham. They are just too common, and who wants to replate all that chrome? If you’re a Cadillac aficionado looking for a project, this one is a good starting point. While it wasn’t a total basket case, dropping more coin on it won’t return much value any time soon. Fair price for a fair car. #2456-1960 CHEVROLET IMPALA convertible. S/N 1A01611J147408. Red/white houndstooth vinyl. Odo: 3,676 miles. 348-ci V8, 3x2-bbl, auto. Reassigned VIN. Older restoration with very little use. High-quality paint job, but lots of dimples throughout. Trouble areas behind the top ahead of the trunk lid and a few uneven areas on the hood. Brightwork in very good condition and most appears to have been replated. Minor delami- engine compartment has now returned to just being average. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $41,800. The Series 60 was also known as the Buick Century, so named for its 100-mph ability. This was an older restoration that was well cared for and likely used on occasion. Fresher paint has been applied to the running boards and a few trim pieces rechromed. Definitely ready for road use. The price paid seemed fair for a car with limited availability that would grab attention at any parade. #452-1955 CHEVROLET BEL AIR con- vertible. S/N VC55L051451. Shoreline Beige & Autumn Brown/brown & beige vinyl. Odo: 2,590 miles. 265-ci V8, 4-bbl, 3-sp. Older body-off restoration in very good condition. Brightwork is well preserved. Factory power steering, brakes, top, windows, seat. Highly optioned but with manual transmission. Fender skirts. Very straight body with excellent panel fit. Interior is extremely well cared clean and clear. Panel fit is likely better than factory original. Some areas of the rear bumper are chipped and appear to be touched up. Interior received fresh brightwork, carpet, upholstery and paint. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $30,250. Values for GM’s most luxurious pickup of the day have gone up-up-and-away in recent years, but despite this one’s great condition, it didn’t bring top dollar. Very well bought. #2491-1958 CADILLAC FLEETWOOD sedan. S/N 58M078533. Black/gray vinyl & cloth. Odo: 49,172 miles. 365-ci V8, 4-bbl, auto. Older repaint showing age. Faded in places, with occasional touch-ups here and there. Trim appears mostly original. Not much pitting, but miles of cloudiness and scratches. Some delamination on the side vent windows. Rock chip in front glass. Panel fit is very nice. Interior is driver-quality, with a few flaws here and there. Dash covering is fresh. Gauges are all covered by splintered instrumentation plas- nation on the side vent windows. Interior is in excellent condition. Seats show very little wear. Gauges appear original and are slightly cloudy. Engine compartment is well detailed. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $60,500. Great care was taken during the restoration to document the casting numbers and date codes to confirm this as a factory Tri-Power Impala. Values have been pretty steady over the years with not much excitement up or down. The new owner paid average money for an above-average car. Well bought. #1120-1963 FORD FAIRLANE 500 2-dr hard top. S/N 3F47T278237. Black/red vinyl. Odo: 58,310 miles. 302-ci V8, 4-bbl, auto. Amateur paint job shows age and many flaws. Tons of trash along the top and trunk lid. Heavy cracks and scratches touched up with nonmatching paint. Trim decent but faded. Bumpers cloudy and scratched. Rubber is older and dry in some places. Panel fit is good. Glass appears mostly original; front window for. Little sign of use. Seat material is in excel108 hazy. Interior upholstery in good condition. Large hole in driver’s seat bolster. Large crack on dash with previous repair attempts. Gauges Sports Car Market


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Leake Dallas, TX are decent with add-ons under the dash. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $8,800. Consignor’s description stated that it was originally born with a 289, but the T-code indicates a straight six. The body was pretty rough but could be massaged to get things in better order. At the price paid, “no harm, no foul.” Should be a fun little car for the money. #1168-1982 JEEP CJ-8 Scrambler pickup. S/N 1JCCN88E9CT006314. Brown/ tan canvas. Odo: 98,944 miles. 258-ci I6, 2-bbl, 4-sp. Body-off restoration completed in June 2014. Very presentable, but lots of dry spray and trash in the paint. Looks great from a few feet away. Rubber and what brightwork exists have been replaced. Decals are new and made of vinyl. Hard top appears to be original but touched up and repainted. Panel fit is good. Holes on back part of body where some- Some discoloring on white plastic on the center stack, which is now ivory. Carpets are in return on the build cost, but I still wouldn’t call it well bought. #466-2001 HUMMER H1 truck. S/N 137FA90341E195923. Yellow/black canvas/ gray cloth. 6.5-L turbocharged V8, auto. All original and garage kept. Paint is in good shape with expected scratches and dirt. Large, deep scratch behind passenger’s front tire. Soft top back light is very dirty and faded. Has been repainted on passenger’s side at some point. Mask lines present. Interior is very clean. Gauges are clear and crisp. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $57,200. A few weeks after the good condition, but driver’s floor mats show use. Very well cared for overall. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $8,800. Originally, 30 of these Emerald Green Mustang LX 5.0s were to be built as a 7-Up beverage promotion with the intention of giving them away at the 1990 NCAA basketball finals. Something went sour, and Ford decided to build about 4,100 and label them “Limited Editions,” under pressure to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the Mustang. Well bought for a clean, low-mileage, 5.0, 5-speed, Fox-body convertible. thing was mounted. Spartan interior in very good condition. New carpet and seats. Crack in driver’s door metal. Gauges are clear and easy to read. Radio delete. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $21,450. Simple in nature, old Jeeps are relatively easy to source parts for and freshen up. This one appeared to have had a decent body-off restoration, and it certainly had a lot of appeal. It’s not uncommon for mediocre CJ-8s and Scramblers to sell in the mid-teens. For not a lot more cash, you’re getting a much better Jeep here. Well bought. #2501-1990 FORD MUSTANG LX con- vertible. S/N 1FACP44E6LF156525. Emerald Green/white leather. Odo: 70,597 miles. 5.0-L fuel-injected V8, 5-sp. Original paint well cared for and in very good condition. Headlights are clean and clear, which points to minimal outdoor exposure. Original glass and rubber in good condition. Fitted with rear luggage rack. Body panels are straight. Leather interior shows some bunching and signs that the seat inserts may have been reupholstered. display in the middle crudely installed. Rearfacing rear seats are accessible through very small access hatch. Worn tires indicate moderate use—perhaps before the tires were donated. Current registration and inspection. Non-conforming VIN. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $13,200. The consignor did not likely get a CAR COLLECTOR 110 AMERICAN ™ AmericanCarCollector.com/subscribe SUBSCRIBE TO ACC 877.219.2605 Ext. 1 hicle has clean CARFAX and Autocheck, but is believed to have been in a collision and repaired. Offered as rebuilt/reconstructed. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $231,000. There is actually a decent demand for salvage and reconstructed GTs, as the preserved, low-mile cars fetching $400k-plus can’t be driven without cutting into the depreciation. And therein lies the market for these. Fair price considering the continued appreciation. © Sports Car Market #2519-1991 CHEVROLET BLAZER “airplane.” S/N 1GNCT18Z9M8167601. Gray/gray cloth. 4.3-L fuel-injected V6, auto. S-10 Blazer fitted with an airplane body. Paint is amateur, with plenty of unevenness. Vinyl decals have trash underneath. Only entry is through a door on the passenger’s side that does not shut well, and a small rear access door. Aircraft gauges inside with OEM digital Leake auction, this was listed on a dealer’s website for $66k, and the same dealer received a top bid of $63,888 when it failed to sell on eBay. Their asking price doesn’t seem that unreasonable and is in line with market retail averages. An identically equipped, low-mileage yellow 2000 open-top sold at Mecum’s Chicago auction in October 2014 for just $40 more (SCM# 255996), making the purchase price here spot-on. #2439-2006 FORD GT coupe. S/N 1FAFP90S06Y401432. Centennial White/Ebony leather. Odo: 2,846 miles. 5.4-L supercharged V8, 6-sp. Shows some signs of light use. Trash in paint points to a respray. Small fisheyes here and there. Rubber covering driver’s doorrelease button has a hole in it. Wavy rubber at the top of windshield. Panel fit is good. Glass is factory quality. Interior looks like new. Ve- Keith Martin’s


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Bonhams Chichester, U.K. Bonhams — Goodwood 73rd Members’ Meeting A 1985 Audi Quattro Sport set a new world record at $426k Company Bonhams Date March 21, 2015 Location Chichester, U.K. Auctioneer James Knight Automotive lots sold/offered 49/64 Sales rate 77% Sales total $6,404,285 High sale 1955 Frazer Nash Le Mans coupe, sold at $693,148 Buyer’s premium 15% on first $74,266, 12% thereafter, included in sold prices ($1 = £0.67) Hitting a world record for a Quattro — 1985 Audi Quattro Sport SWB coupe, sold at $426,435 Report and photos by Paul Hardiman Market opinions in italics T wo Audi Quattros were the most viewed cars at Bonhams’ new U.K. seasonopener, held at the second running of the regenerated Goodwood Members’ Meeting — which was astonishingly easy to get into, compared with the scrums at the estate’s flagship Revival and Festival events. A mechanically refurbished 1985 Quattro Sport with only 24,285 miles on the clock, and one of six cars officially imported into the U.K., sold for a world-record $426k. A bit cheaper was the ex-Works 1982 A1 rally car at $368k. The A1 may have helped Hannu Mikkola to the 1983 World Drivers’ Championship, but it was now presented in Group B spec. These ’80s icons helped divert attention from the big cars that didn’t sell. A 1939 Chichester, U.K. Frazer Nash-BMW 328 was bid up to $830k (about $150k light), and perfect copies of a Birdcage Maserati (bid to $550k) and Ferrari 250 GTO (bid to $431k) failed to find new owners, probably because they were slightly ambitiously priced. The catalog cover star was a 1955 Frazer Nash Le Mans coupe — the last Nash to compete in the 24 Hours of Le Mans, in 1959. It was unsold under the gavel on Saturday, but by next morning was declared sold for $693k. (See the profile, p. 70.) One re-creation that did get a strong price, however, was the “tool room” copy of a 1953 Jaguar C-type, with drum brakes, correct two-inch SUs and FIA papers, that sold for $385k — twice what was predicted and three times the price of a new Proteus C-type pastiche. Another Jaguar, a rare XK 150S right-hand-drive homemarket model, took an astonishing three-times-its-estimate $335k, probably because it was almost totally original, having been in the hands of one family since new and never restored. (See the profile, p. 60.) And the 104th right-hand-drive E-type roadster took $235k — top estimate money, but market-correct compared with recent sales. Four more stragglers from the Maranello Rosso Collection were offered, too, and The top seller — 1955 Frazer Nash Le Mans coupe, sold at $693,148 112 they all sold. The most interesting was an unfinished 1969 Abarth 2000 sports prototype show car at $50k, which could conceivably one day be made into a racer, although it needs an engine and much more. But perhaps the deal of the sale was a very original and rare 1961 Austin-Healey Mk II BN7 in triple-carb form, clinched post-block for $81k. ♦ Sports Car Market Courtesy of Bonhams


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Bonhams Chichester, U.K. ENGLISH #60-1934 ALVIS SILVER EAGLE 16.95- hp tourer. S/N 11358. Red/black vinyl/red leather. RHD. Odo: 97,973 miles. Restored late ’90s, nicely kept. Good, older paint. Clayton heater (they still make ’em) on toe-board. Newish leather, headlights dinged and dull. tach. Now with single-cam Singer SM motor, similar to what it ran in 1949. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $243,444. How to value such a bitsa with such a varied history, and so far from original, when it’s been in this form for more than 60 years? The market spoke with a £145k ($215k) top bid that was accepted, even though it was £15k ($22k) under the lower estimate, which is usually near the reserve. Still one of the cheapest ways into events such as the LeMans Classic, where real cars that actually ran there in period are favored. #54-1949 LEA-FRANCIS 14-HP road- Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $51,244. Sold mid-estimate and fairly priced for the smaller-engined version. Though, in truth, the seller, whose family owned this from 1964, has barely covered the restoration costs. #66-1936 ALVIS SPEED 25 drophead coupe. S/N 13380. Black & silver/brown leather. RHD. Odo: 23,577 miles. Rare Bertelli-bodied car, very original and now slightly ratty, with dull paint and some chrome flaking off front bumper. Distressed leather, no rear seat-base. Motor clean and tidy, said to run, but clutch is seized. No documents. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $108,696. Sold well over estimate. Originality and that rare body carry the price here. #50-1947 HRG LE MANS Lightweight racer. S/N 92. Green/black leather. RHD. Odo: 11,248 miles. A slightly weird animal, this. Originally with narrow, bug-eyed body and cycle fenders when it ran at Le Mans in 1949; soon rebodied in this style after wheelbase was shortened. Slightly cloudy repaint, newish leather, Moto-Lita wheel, newer Elliot enthusiast Ivan Dutton, who raced it at Snetterton in 2001. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $44,411. The tattiness made it affordable, and if one wants to actually get out and have fun with one’s motor (which is the point of it all, is it not?), then it ticked the right boxes. Last sold at Bonhams Beaulieu 2006 in an apparent post-auction deal after bidding ended at $18,655 (SCM# 43343). At that time, we said, “Even at $22,000, this could have been a most rewarding buy both on the track and when cashing it in after much play later on.” Sometimes, we are right. #42-1953 JAGUAR C-TYPE replica roadster. S/N 640211. Green/green leather. RHD. Odo: 2,799 miles. Perfect copy of a 1953 C-type built 2006 by Pearson Engineering, whose Jim Gibson made the body, with correct torsion-bar rear suspension and correct cylinder head, plus correct sand-cast 2-inch SUs and proper Hardura cockpit lining. With FIA papers, and drum brakes fitted to make it are likely aftermarket. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $95,387. “I can’t believe it,” said Jamie as he hammered it away £11k ($17k) below the lower estimate. Bought at Bonhams’ Festival of Speed sale last June for $103,659 (SCM# 250521), so even allowing for exchange rate variations, it’s dropped a bit. Can’t say well bought, for who knows what rust issues lie under the paint. TOP 10 No. 8 #26-1955 FRAZER NASH LE MANS racer. S/N BS41415. Green/ brown leather. RHD. Odo: 13,040 miles. The actual car that ran at Le Mans—the last Nash to run there—and restored very closely back to that form. Paint chipped on ster. S/N 3426. Eng. # S3359. Silver/gray leather. RHD. Odo: 63,358 miles. Nicely original and delightfully, disreputably tatty. Dull paint, wavy running boards and distressed leather. Newish hood covering, though, so it’s for using. Motor rebuilt 2007, now on 1½-inch SUs instead of standard 1¼s. Eligible for postwar races for drum-braked sports cars. Formerly owned by well-known Bugatti the race rules) has been shown in its making. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $384,846. About the only thing that sets it apart from the real thing is the roll bar. Weirdly, the chassis number (and presumably the Oxfordshire registration number) are from a 1951 3.5-liter Jag Mk V, rather than the usual S-type donor or XK 120, from which the C-type was derived. Expected to make £130k–£160k ($193k–$238k), it did almost twice that, but probably a savvy buy, as repeating it for this money would be a squeeze. #55-1953 JAGUAR XK 120 drophead coupe. S/N 667082. Black/red leather. RHD. Odo: 4,811 miles. Restored 2001 and still gorgeous looking with deep, lustrous paint, though there’s a hint of rust peeking out from behind panel joints, and steering column is rusty too. Dash timber and varnish a bit tired, leather lightly creased. Odd rear-wheel spats dashboard, lightly creased leather, Moto-Lita wheel. Two sets of seats included. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $693,148. Initially unsold on the block, “not quite there” at £470k ($715k), but final results show it sold at this price. Well bought and sold. (See profile, p. 70.) eligible for numerous historic racing series. Some serious reverence (to the real thing, and 114 #8-1956 MG MAGNETTE ZA racer. S/N KAA1318452. Yellow & brown/beige vinyl. RHD. Odo: 73,840 miles. Well-known Sports Car Market


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Bonhams Chichester, U.K. racer “Bumble,” owned by Historic Racing Drivers Club founder, Goodwood Revival stalwart and touring-car race luminary Julius Thurgood. Built 1971, later used for road rallies, now in basic racing spec, with Panhard rod rear and expensive shocks, front disc brakes, high-back racing bucket seat—and rev counter case fashioned from a coconut. Motor slipped back a bit in the past five years— though as we said last time, nice condition helps. #58-1961 JAGUAR XKE Series I 3.8 convertible. S/N 850104. Eng. # R16489. Red/black leather. RHD. Odo: 1,110 miles. 104th RHD roadster made, with higher-compression engine (last digit of engine number denotes compression ratio). Nicely restored (in 1995 but minimal mileage since) with gray hood frame and spotweld dimples still visible mate spec allowed by Appendix K, so it should be up there with the Swiftune-powered frontrunners. As such, it looks a bargain. It couldn’t be built again for the money spent here. BEST BUY is MGB and could be anything up to 1,860 cc, as a 25% increase is allowed under HRDC regs. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $32,454. Buying a ready-prepped racer is always cheaper than building a car from scratch, and this has Goodwood Revival history, so there’s every chance it might get invited again. That alone makes it worth the price of admission, even though you could buy two standard road cars for this money. #65-1959 JAGUAR XK 150S roadster. S/N T820030DN. Red/black cloth/red leather. RHD. Odo: 20,643 miles. One-family-owned from new and on its original registration. Door fit pretty good—probably connected with the fact that it looks to have never been apart. Good paint with even color, well-patinated leather with one small tear. Motor clean and #15-1961 AUSTIN-HEALEY 3000 Mk II BN7 roadster. S/N HBN716554. Eng. # AEC1489RS19699. Red & black/red leather. RHD. Odo: 28,003 miles. Very original car. Front end repainted and seats redone, but dash leather is original, as is spare-wheel-cover carpet. Decent chrome, chassis rails dead-straight. Engine is a replace- under rear pan. Super-clean underneath, excellent paint and chrome. Leather retrim has gone slightly baggy on seat bases, aluminum console and dash trim straight and unscuffed. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $235,126. Last sold in 2006 for $93k at H&H (SCM# 42458). Market-correct in today’s money, well done all around. ment. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $81,136. The BN7 two-seater is rare compared with the BT7 2+2 (only 25 home-market right-handers built in ’61, according to the catalog), so I thought this would fly away—especially being a triplecarb variant. Apparently not sold on the block at about this price, but later appeared “sold” in the results. Pretty good buy. tidy, O/D switch on tunnel. Not used since 2004. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $334,940. A simply amazing price, three times its estimate, matched so far in XK terms only by perfect 150S 3.8 roadsters. Very well sold, but in a market full of restored/messed-with cars, they’re hard to find like this—which does mitigate the number somewhat. (See the profile, p. 60.) #7-1961 AUSTIN MINI racer. S/N AA2S794335. Blue/black vinyl. RHD. Odo: 7,804 miles. Racer built from an 850 donor up to FIA Appendix K Cooper S spec, now with Historic Technical Passport. All very nicely done, in good order and ready to race. All goodies including EN40 crank, forged pistons giving 12.5:1 compression ratio and KAD Quickshift with reverse lock-out. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $47,827. This is built up to the ulti- 116 #25-1961 JAGUAR MK 2 saloon. S/N 221667. Maroon metallic/magnolia leather. Odo: 97,918 km. Restored 2011, repaint still lustrous, decent chrome, leather like new, timber excellent, newish leather. Some of the door seals are hanging loose. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $44,411. In Italy until 2014 and bought at Bonhams’ Hendon sale in April #40-1963 DAIMLER SP250 convertible. S/N 101553. Silver/red leather. RHD. Odo: 73,142 miles. Former concours winner still very good following 1992 restoration. Thick fiberglass very straight, no cracks in paint. Leather lightly used, chrome excellent, motor buffed within an inch of its life. Now with electronic ignition, electric fan and hightorque starter motor. Includes handbooks, original warranty card and tool roll. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $75,157. Bought by the vendor at Bonhams’ 2014 Festival of Speed sale for $102k (SCM# 244589). These have been coming on in leaps and bounds in the past five years—possibly why this sold so high last time. I reckon compared with sales of similar cars it’s slightly cheap here, so its true value is somewhere between the two numbers, making it slightly well bought this time. #17-1967 LAND ROVER SERIES IIA 2014 for $46,495 (SCM# 243813). The 3.8-L with 4-speed and overdrive is the most desirable spec, and here it sold for strong money, defying conventional wisdom that Mk 2s have utility. S/N 24130044D. Sandy beige/black vinyl. RHD. Odo: 50,365 miles. Perfectly restored to better than new—in fact, I’ve docked it half a point, as even the sump is shiny, making me wonder if it’s run since it was finished or even been filled with oil. New rear half of Sports Car Market


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Bonhams Chichester, U.K. cheap, but in truth it’s probably market-correct because of a) U.S. spec on twin Strombergs and b) it just wasn’t very nice. #10-1972 JAGUAR XKE Series III V12 convertible. S/N 1S1342. Eng. # 7S5821SB. Red/black leather. RHD. Odo: 56,352 miles. No rot but looks like some older rocker work. Door fit is okay. Lightly worn leather. Newish stainless exhaust. Unremarkable aside from spoke steering wheel replaced by conventional three-spoker. Motor with camshaft and intercooler upgrades lifting power from about 160 hp to 210 hp. Quoted chassis number is wrong; should start VF1822000. Or if you’re very lucky, VF18221... Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $90,397. Sold on the phone to bidder in Can- chassis, Fairey freewheel hubs, proper period repro battery. Even the seat belts are new. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $44,411. Good money for a IIA, but perhaps not quite as much as expected for such an exceptional example. Sold in the room and no doubt destined for a collection somewhere. #14-1968 BENTLEY T1 Pininfarina coupe. S/N CBH4033. Black/black leather. RHD. Odo: 21,298 miles. One-off and wellknown Bentley T-series bodied by Pininfarina. All good, though paint is now showing watermark bubbles. Leather lightly creased. Various colleagues and myself have been trying to lowish mileage (the first 30,000 of which is said to have been covered in the car’s first two years), but nothing fundamentally wrong here. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $76,865. Hammered away at the top end of the estimate range, and obviously a little more than Bonhams was expecting. Well sold. #32-1975 FORD ESCORT RS1800 rally car. S/N 1CBA84889. White/black velour. Always a rally car with quite a history. Reshelled early in its life and latterly used in historic rallying by David Sutton (Cars) Ltd., which ran it until recently. Driven in period by Roger Clark, Ari Vatanen, Björn Waldegård and later Stig Blomqvist (and Waldegård again). Recently refreshed again and presented work out for two decades where the headlights come from. Anyone offer a better guess than an Opel Rekord C? Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $371,538. Last sold for $172k at Bonhams Goodwood in August of 2009 (SCM# 142026). It’s basically still 10 times the value of a nice stock Bentley T1, which is arguably better looking. #59-1970 JAGUAR XKE Series II 4.2 convertible. S/N 1R11346. Maroon/black leather. Odo: 75,850 miles. Shiny and looks fairly well kept, but there’s a small amount of damage under rear pan behind right rear wheel-arch, consistent with backing into something. Leather only lightly creased. in almost as-new condition with only 50 miles on motor, gearbox and suspension. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $126,995. Recently offered at Bonhams’ last Festival of Speed sale, where seller rejected the £80k ($195k) high bid (SCM# 244578). This time it was let go for less money. Correctly priced for a built-up nonWorks car, and looks like an excellent value when a new-build Group 4 Mk 2 is something like twice what was paid here. FRENCH #53-1983 RENAULT 5 TURBO hatch- Stored and will require “recommissioning.” Dubai title. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $42,703. Imported from South Carolina 10 years ago. From a £15k ($22k) start (yes!), this sold 118 back. S/N 130000696. Blue/red leather & velour. Odo: 90,942 km. Good repaint in a very Alpine-esque blue that suits it (though this is the second one I’ve seen this month that was originally red). One crack in front bumper left corner. Unique Turbo 1 interior unworn but slightly faded. Bonkers original single- ada, broadly in line with recent prices: $91,851 for an immaculately low-mileage Turbo 2 at Bonhams Paris in February, and the £45k ($75k) tag on a dealer-offered Turbo 2 with a pretty rushed repaint that I drove the same month. Turbo 1s like this, with their aluminum roof and door panels and unique interiors, should always get a bit more than the more numerous T2s, so all things considered, fairly to quite well sold. GERMAN #35-1939 FRAZER NASH-BMW 328 roadster. S/N 85415. Gunmetal/red leather. RHD. Odo: 6,192 miles. Very original, with older (1972) paint now slightly tired and microblistered, and a few nicks and marks in brightwork. Headlamps once external, re- turned to original faired-in type in 1950s. Very patinated leather is probably the original, carpets have worn through. Mostly in museum storage since 1972—the date of the last tax disc—but it has a current MoT. Cond: 3-. NOT SOLD AT $830,000. Another big car that didn’t sell. High bid was about 10% light to secure it. #38-1963 PORSCHE 356B coupe. S/N 214233. Black/red vinyl. Odo: 72,665 miles. Shinily restored over excellent, rot-free structure. Doors fit well, paint and chrome not very old and still very good. Seat vinyl looks like an older retrim, though catalog claims original. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $135,313. While small-bumper 911s go stratospheric, 356s continue to hold their own. This price is high for the U.K., and out of range for the U.S., Sports Car Market


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Bonhams Chichester, U.K. miles. Shiny repaint, new retrim in leather. No leaks, new Nylocs under motor. Brushed stainless hoop panel good and straight, Fuchs alloys. Porsche Certificate of Authority confirms optional S brakes and front spoiler from new. $368,211. Sold by the Bonhams team at its Brooks auction at Olympia in 1995. This time sold on the phone £20k ($30k) under lower estimate. Given that there’s only really a fleeting Mikkola connection, when it was a Group 4 car, that feels fair. #36-1985 AUDI QUATTRO SPORT where most buyers prefer an open 356 at this price level. Well sold for the U.K. market. #2-1963 PORSCHE 356B Super 90 coupe. S/N 124333. White/black vinyl. RHD. Odo: 91,558 miles. Very rusty and dilapidated, sand in the engine bay and with doors roped shut... But it’s all there, apart from all the now-departed portions of the sheet metal. Has SWB coupe. S/N WAUZZZ85ZEA905206. White/gray velour & leather. Odo: 24,333 miles. One of 214 SWB Quattros and one of only six imported to the U.K. Almost like new. Fresh underseal and exhaust underneath. Repainted in places, wheels refurbished, seat leather only lightly creased, velour centers unworn. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $426,435. There Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $100,378. Supplied new to Los Angeles and in California until 2014. Jamie’s book bids ran out at £34k ($51k), and from there it was an agonizingly slow crawl in £1,000 ($1,500) increments to the final selling price. Worth the wait, you might say, as it was well sold at the end. #52-1982 AUDI QUATTRO A1 racer. S/N WAUZZZ85ZDA900012. White/gray racing buckets. Odo: 78,384 km. Ex-Works rally car, used as a practice/training car and driven at least twice by Hannu Mikkola in his championship-winning 1983 year. After that, converted to Group B spec, so it looks a little different than it did in its prime, now with boxed arches. Refreshed and in good order. Greek registration. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT Mk I Mini taillamps. Cond: 5. SOLD AT $47,827. Offered at no reserve, and it soared to more than twice its upper estimate. Hard to see how you could rescue this for within the same price as the ’63 356B later in the sale (Lot 38, $135k). Bring a dustpan. #45-1973 PORSCHE 911T Targa. S/N 9113111648. Black/black leather. Odo: 39,449 were five phones on this, which was always going to be hotly contested after the big-price sale of an identical car in the U.S. in January (our April cover car, $402k at RM Phoenix, SCM# 261959). A slight mystery why this needed so much cosmetic refreshment after only 24,000 miles, but it hit a world record for a Quattro, outselling even the ex-Works A1 later in the sale (Lot 52, $368k). ITALIAN #33-1960 MASERATI TIPO 61 “Bird- cage” replica racer. S/N 2478. Eng. # 2478. Blue/red leather. RHD. Perfect re-creation of the “near-infinite number of tubes of nearinfinite thinness” sports-racer, from Crosthwaite & Gardiner—the men responsible for Audi’s new Auto Union “Silver Arrows.” Build date is not certain, but it’ll be within the past 15 years. Looks almost unused apart from a couple of small paint chips and pings in the nose and lightly worn seat leather. With Historic Technical Passport. Cond: 2-. NOT SOLD AT $549,569. High bid was about 10% light to secure it. I would have taken the money. #23-1961 FIAT-ABARTH 1000 Bialbero Record Monza racer. S/N 987382. Silver/ black racing buckets. Odo: 3,303 km. Another 120 Sports Car Market


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Sports Car Market “Hats off to you. Keeping Keith Martin’s The Insider’s Guide to Collecting, Investing, Values, and Trends — E.M., Northbrook, IL, subscriber since 1998 ™ up the great effort to produce the best car magazine each month is no small feat.” Subscribe to SCM today and become a collector car insider www.sportscarmarket.com July 2015 121


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Bonhams Chichester, U.K. rear-engined Abarth “nickel rocket.” In okay used order with modern roll bar, so it may have been used in this ownership. Slightly grubby motor with crossover inlet manifolds; one bore said to be rusty and one head stud missing. Carpets manky, split and worn #24-1965 ABARTH-SIMCA 1300 GT CORSA long-nose racer. S/N 130S00047. Red/black vinyl. Odo: 43,324 km. In shiny, fair, used condition with a few cracks in paint. Seats unmounted, hand-brake calipers missing. Displayed with no motor or transmission, although they are included. Lead weights wired to the rear of the chassis to set the #18-1982 MASERATI MERAK SS coupe. S/N AM122A655. Yellow/black leather. Odo: 66,563 km. Late Merak, which means it’s a bit un-Citroën-ised, with conventional brakes and a Bora-style round-dial dash instead of SM-derived bonkersness. Straight, repainted, dash and instruments tidy, original through. Now with one-foot crack in windshield since cataloging. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $93,724. And another from the Maranello Rosso Collection, which owned it since 1981. Sold online below the lower estimate of £70k ($107k) and no surprise, because this is going to take time and money to make into a runner, and even more going-through if it’s ever to take to the track again. #28-1962 FERRARI 250 GTO replica coupe. S/N 4087GT. Red/blue cloth. Odo: 600 km. Like-new re-creation by Allegretti, built in 1978 from a 250 GTE 2+2. Is it just me, or is it slightly the wrong shape with a slightly peaky roofline and front fenders that swell just stance right for display. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $122,004. From the Maranello Rosso Collection, sold in the room at mid-estimate, which is the correct money because these Simca variants are rarer than the Fiat-powered cars. Still a fair bit of work before it works again, so in this case I’ll call it pretty well sold. #20-1969 ABARTH 2000 “Cuneo” proto- type racer. S/N SE014. Aluminum/black cord. RHD. Partly restored but never actually completed show car, with prototype aluminum body created in-house at Abarth and dummy engine hung out the back. Stripped to bare metal, chassis number written on in marker, leather looks only lightly used. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $78,573. Offered by the same seller who owned the Lamborghini Jalpa (Lot 12), and bought by the man who just missed that car six lots earlier. Multiple bidders kept the price buoyant, so I’ll go “well sold” on this one—though it is the most desirable model in the best color. #12-1983 LAMBORGHINI JALPA P350 convertible. S/N 8A9J00000DLA12068. Red/ beige leather. RHD. Odo: 65,498 km. One of 35 right-hand-drive Jalpas built. Good overall, paint unmarked, refurbished wheels, hardly any seat time on newish leather. Sodium-filled a little too generously? They were all different, though, so it shouldn’t matter. 600 km on modern speedo. Cond: 1-. NOT SOLD AT $430,743. From a Swiss Ferrari collection disposed of last year at another auction. The asking price was frankly a little steep, but the top bid missed the lower estimate by a mile ($165k). seat covering lightly faded but unworn. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $49,535. From the Maranello Rosso Collection, offered at no reserve. Could be made into a racer but will take a lot more money—making the price paid, three times over estimate, even more surprising. Very well sold. valves offered with car as proof that they’ve been replaced with more durable solid items. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $110,359. Sold strong, almost twice over estimate, which means that finally the Jalpa has caught up with its Ferrari 328 GTS equivalent. #31-1989 FERRARI 412 GT coupe. S/N ZFFYD25C000078593. Black/black leather. RHD. Odo: 51,027 miles. Said to be one of 24 manual right-hand-drive cars. Very well kept and with extensive history. Decent paint, good dash top, lightly used leather. Irish registered. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $51,244. Hammered a little under the lower estimate, which auctioneer Jamie Knight reckoned as “the steal of the day.” © 122 Sports Car Market


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Branson Branson, MO The Branson Auction The top-selling car was a 1969 Jaguar XKE convertible with hard top at $72k, until a 1953 Packard Caribbean sold post-block for $75k Company Branson Date April 17–18, 2015 Location Branson, MO Auctioneers Brent Earlywine, Jeff Knopf Automotive lots sold/offered 124/172 Sales rate 72% Sales total $2,344,377 High sale 1953 Packard Caribbean convertible, sold at $75,000 Big and little, American and foreign were well represented at Branson’s April auction. 1973 Lincoln Continental Mark IV 2-door hard top, sold at $7,344, and a 1965 Citroën 2CV sedan, sold at $7,830 Buyer’s premium 8%, included in sold prices Report and photos by B. Mitchell Carlson Market opinions in italics ing sales totals up $172k. The weekend of April 16–17 in the Missouri D Ozarks proved damp and cool — all the more reason for folks to come inside for the biannual auction at the Branson Convention Center. The reduced number of consignments showed most in the Friday run list, but Saturday was a typical full day. There was a heavy mist outside Branson, MO espite 35 fewer cars on the docket at their spring sale, Branson sold six more cars than they did here one year ago, bump- for most of the day, so having all cars inside the convention center was a good thing, even if parking was tight. While the car count was down, auction staff did a good job getting things sold, and nine post-block deals came together after the fact. Indeed, the 72% sales rate was the best sell-through seen here in years. The top selling car off the block was a well-restored 1969 Jaguar XKE convertible with optional hard top at $72k. However, auction company-supplied data after the event showed that one of those nine post-block sales was a 1953 Packard Caribbean sold for $75k. Those two top sales were representative of a bulk of the consignments here: British sports cars and post-war American luxury cars. Also in the sale was also a collection of almost a dozen 1920s-through-early-1930s Americanmade coupes — something of an anomaly in the current marketplace. American muscle was in short supply, and the muscle cars on offer did not include any correct, high-quality examples; most were put-together fakey-doos. This really wasn’t a surprise, as for the past few years muscle cars just haven’t played a big role at this venue. One consistent feature of this auction is its 1969 Jaguar XKE convertible, sold at $72,360 124 generally relaxed pace. Compared with some marathon auctions that send a thousand cars across the block in less than a week, doing 200 cars over the course of two days feels like a leisurely stroll through the park. It’s a formula that continues to serve Branson well. ♦ Sales Totals $3.5m $3m $2.5m $2m $1.5m $1m 0 Sports Car Market 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011


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Branson Branson, MO ENGLISH #551-1953 MG TD roadster. S/N XPAGTD228258. Red/black vinyl/red leather. Odo: 65,169 miles. Has a couple of years on a cosmetic restoration, featuring a pretty good trimoff repaint. Said trim has mostly been replaced or very well refurbished as authentic—not glitzy. Respectable door and hood fit. New off-brand radial tires on original wheels. Newer seats, door panels, dash cover and carpet. Gauges inconsistently faded. Older engine nyl. Odo: 1,771 miles. Optional electric overdrive unit. Older repaint showing some fading. Alloy grille has some waviness to it. Good older replate on the bumpers. Decent door fit. Hood-latch key stashed away, so the hood was not opened during the auction. The radial tires are starting to yellow along the outside edge of tional removable hard top. Miles claimed actual. Well restored quite a few years back with light use since. Excellent repaint now has light abrasions on lower panels. Brightwork condition nicely matches the paint. Good door and panel fit. Lower body seal on the hard top wasn’t glued in well and is lifting off. Generally tidy under the hood. Porcelain on the ex- repaint, now could use a detailing job. Unkempt undercarriage, including a piecemeal exhaust system. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $17,250. At first glance, this has a lot of eye appeal, but on close inspection it’s obviously more of a driving event or local show car. Sold here twice previously: for $20k in 2005 (SCM# 39621) and $22k in 2009 (SCM# 120102), confirming that this price was fair. #610-1958 AUSTIN FX3 taxi. S/N FX3D236520. Black & light yellow/tan vinyl. RHD. Odo: 17,465 miles. Old repaint with the last commercial user’s name on the doors, done on the fly and starting to crack. Rust blisters and some blow-out on the bottoms of the doors. Heavily deteriorated windshield gasket. 1995 Texas inspection sticker on windshield. Fare box still intact. Reupholstered seats in heavyduty vinyl in pretty good shape. Loose-fitting headliner and side panels. Ford automatic-shift quadrant added to control the non-original C4 the wide whitewall. More recent interior redo with good workmanship and minimal wear. Modern aftermarket steering wheel. Not much done on the bottom of the car aside from some paint overspray when individual components were worked on. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $22,950. Something of a well-known car in Triumph circles in this region. I got the impression that it was bought more for its chain of ownership the merits of the actual car. That would explain a slightly stronger-than-expected price for condition. #563-1961 AUSTIN-HEALEY 3000 Mk I BT7 roadster. S/N HBT7L11349. Red & black/black vinyl/red leather & vinyl. Odo: 2,972 miles. Older restoration that presents well. Good repaint with minimal chipping. Decent door fit and panel gaps. Bumpers and grille could stand to be professionally polished, and if they won’t buff out, a trip to the chrome shop would not be out of the question. Repainted original wire knockoff wheels with haust manifolds has mostly flaked off. Older radials in good condition on the original wire wheels. Interior is too nice to be all original. Newer rear coil-over shocks. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $72,360. Originally owned by a U.S. Air Force officer stationed in West Germany; the consignor was the third owner of the car. Bidding was ho-hum until the reserve was lifted at $63k, and then it picked up a bit. This was the top sale of the weekend until a post-block deal came together on Lot 567, a 1953 Packard Caribbean convertible, at $75k. #581-1977 ROLLS-ROYCE SILVER SHADOW II sedan. S/N LRF30305. Blue metallic/blue vinyl/blue leather. Odo: 58,085 miles. Miles claimed actual, with all maintenance records. Well-cared-for original paint. Left front door and hood unlatch but won’t open. Aftermarket window tint. Patinated seats, worn carpets. Has two radios in the center stack: a period (likely original equipment) Blaupunkt AM/FM on top and a 1980s Alpine tape deck where the ashtray used to be. Good transmission. No reserve. Cond: 4+. SOLD AT $14,040. 1958 was the final year of the FX3 taxi, replaced by the equally long-lived FX4. Originally these had a 2.2-liter diesel under the hood, but this one’s believed to be one of a group that were imported without powertrains and were then fitted with the North American version of the 2.3 four (of Pinto/Mustang/Fairmont fame—power of a four, economy of an eight). When a car is for hire and it’s time to retire, it’s most likely because it’s about to expire. The consignor should be one happy camper. #548-1960 TRIUMPH TR3A roadster. S/N TS73945SL0. White/white vinyl/red vi- 126 radial tires. Engine bay clean but not showdetailed. Recent Pertronix electronic ignition. Good older replacement top, tonneau cover and door panels. Replacement seat upholstery is showing some wrinkling, carpet has light soiling. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $43,200. The first Big Healey with front disc brakes, so these are cars that can generally handle modern traffic fairly well. The Pertronix also makes this a great car to take out and run with, as opposed to just park on grass two or three times a year. With the reserve dropped at $40k, it was a reasonable price for a reasonable example. #561-1969 JAGUAR XKE convertible. S/N 1R8947. Primrose/yellow hard top/black soft top/black leather. Odo: 51,867 miles. Op- interior wood, including the door tops. Older replacement Michelin radials. Dusty, untouched undercarriage, including original exhaust. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $11,500. I had high hopes for this one, but it was not the well-kept original I thought it might be. The door and hood issues signaled neglect and really put me off. Sold well enough. #547-1978 FORD CORTINA Ghia se- dan. S/N BABFUL11691. Red metallic/black vinyl/tan vinyl. RHD. Odo: 11,691 miles. U.K. market car retaining original dealer’s decal on back window. Last MoT tax disc is from 2009, just before it crossed the Atlantic. Claimed essentially original with actual miles. Wellcared-for original paint and brightwork. Solid door fit. Light fading on vinyl roof. Original Sports Car Market


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Branson Branson, MO seat upholstery fits too loose, but is in excellent condition. Global parts-sharing most evident inside, with the same door handles and center console as my ’79 Mustang had. dashboard, with lightly faded gauges and lots of wiring dangling beneath. Less-than-expert paint. Good door fit, weather strips are still holding fast. Minimal wear on the roof panel. Engine lid gas struts starting to go bad; lid slowly closes by itself. Still has its original set of Michelin TRX radials. Ferrari Owner Club decal on windshield. Light soiling on the seat bottoms, minimal carpet wear. Period leatherrim Nardi steering wheel and Blaupunkt AM/ Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $7,560. When I lived in West Germany in the mid-1980s, a Taunus was one of the cheapest sets of wheels a GI like myself could get at the time—usually for $200 to $500 (several rungs below even a rusty 1976 BMW 1502 and a whole staircase below my ’78 BMW 728). Now it’s one of those consumer commodity cars that nobody saved, like its Yank equivalent Ford Fairmont. The reserve was lifted at $5k and saw a surprising amount of interest past that here in Middle America. Decent buy. FRENCH #513-1965 CITROËN 2CV sedan. S/N 1793992. Pastel blue/blue vinyl/blue vinyl. Odo: 88,957 km. Replacement soft top. Newer repaint with overspray on underpinnings. Minimal panel prep; fenders are wavy with dents on the front. Door glass festooned with 1970s Formula 1 decals. Doors dinged and dented. Faded taillights. Brightwork is about as inspiring as the door fit. Reproduction seat uphol- wiring in the engine bay, too. Non-stock 1,600-cc engine appears generally stock. Newer radial tires on stock rims. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $15,500. Interesting variation on the paint job, mimicking a first-gen. Not that it’s really going to fool anyone. Originally a no-sale at $13k, but post-event data show that a deal came together. Plenty paid, since once you get over the eyeball appeal, there are some assembly issues. #542-1976 PORSCHE 911 coupe. S/N 9116201241. Black/red leather. Odo: 130,390 miles. Car was stripped and repainted, but the front end has a lot of gravel chips. Rest of paint has heavier polishing scratches. Driving lights point different directions. Sun fading on whale tail and bumper guards. CB whip-antenna mount on rear bumper. Plating is original and showing heavier wear. Fully reupholstered interior to stock specifications. Somewhat clean engine bay, with modern or- FM/cassette sound system. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $49,680. The fact that 308 prices have been escalating recently has less to do with the “Magnum P.I.” thing (some say it helps, some say it hurts), and more to do with the fact that it’s essentially the last Ferrari that us mere mortals can maintain and fix—this one with bulletproof Bosch fuel injection to boot. They usually don’t do much for me, but this nice original example could seduce me over to The Red Side. Lots of interest in it, especially after the reserve was surpassed at $42k. Not cheap, but all things considered, not surprising. #204-1982 FIAT 2000 Spider. S/N ZFA124C3O05001835. Black/tan vinyl/tan vinyl. Odo: 61,614 miles. Optional a/c and tinted glass. Stated that it had recent tune-up and servicing but has problems with the brakes. Newer tires on the stock alloy wheels. Serviceable original paint with some light chipping and polishing scuffs. Poor door fit. Muted original brightwork, with noticeable scuffing. Moderate soiling and sun fade on the original stery, if you can call cloth weave vinyl stretched on a lawn-chair frame “upholstery.” Runs out about as well as a 2-cylinder French chainsaw possibly can. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $7,830. I get the impression that this was some race team’s pit/paddock/run-around go-cart. If they’d actually worked the panels on it before spraying it, it would’ve been a pretty decent example. Sold well enough. GERMAN #537-1968 VOLKSWAGEN TRANS- PORTER pickup. S/N 268031637. White & blue/black vinyl. Odo: 55,539 miles. Excellent non-stock paint job. Good panel fit. Holes in tailgate dropside panel from a set of lights or reflectors. Original vent window seals are starting to crack, but the door seals are new. New seats and door panels. Reconditioned 128 ange heater-duct hoses. Period aftermarket Nardi wood steering wheel, modern a/c. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $23,490. It may have been redone 14 years ago, but it looks like they ran the snot out of it since. That’s not entirely bad, as you generally know it works. However, the owner is probably now at the point where some things that were fixed as part of the reconditioning are now worn out again, so he’s moving it out while 911 prices are hot—especially since the value of the car has easily doubled since 2001. Realistically sold, so at least someone can continue to run it and not fret about wearing out a $50k car. ITALIAN #562-1981 FERRARI 308 GTSI Spider. S/N ZFFAA02AOB0034581. Rosso Corsa/ black/tan leather. Odo: 14,814 miles. Stated to be original with actual miles. Good original top. Useable original interior; seats splitting and soiled. CD player cut into dash, modern speakers cut into door panels. Cracked dashpad. Cond: 4-. SOLD AT $2,160. Stated that the car was parked for 10–15 years (probably just waiting for parts), but it hasn’t been fully awakened yet. Pretty much a used car with storage issues, so this cheap price wasn’t a bargain. #573-1995 FERRARI F355 Spider. S/N ZFFPR48A5S0103329. Rosso Corsa/tan vinyl/tan leather. Odo: 19,093 miles. Miles claimed actual since new. Aftermarket 19-inch alloy wheels have plenty of curb rash. Even the tires are scrubbed pretty well on the sidewalls. Good original paint, even if there’s polishing swirls and chips on the nose. Engine bay could stand to be cleaned up. Undercarriage ignored since new. Moderate seat wear Sports Car Market


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Fresh Meat by Chad Tyson Branson Branson, MO Online sales of contemporary cars 2014 Mercedes-Benz CLS550 sedan Date sold: 05/03/2015 eBay auction ID: 171775998634 Seller’s eBay ID: themotorcarcollection Sale type: Used car with 8,269 miles VIN: WDDLJ7DB0EA090515 Details: Black over Almond/Mocha leather; 4.7-liter V8 rated at 402 hp and 443 lb-ft, 7-sp auto, RWD Sale result: $57,990, Buy It Now, sf 17 MSRP: $82,880 (as equipped) Other current offering: Cleveland Motorsports in North Olmstead, OH, offering a black-over-black CLS550 with 24,452 miles for $58,991. 2014 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28 coupe on the driver’s side—actually quite a lot for being a low-miler. Carpeting and seats recently cleaned up. Heavily faded Ferrari logo floor mats. Period Alpine CD sound system. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $62,100. Sold here last fall for $48k (SCM# 256241). They didn’t really do anything with it since then other than drive it on and off a trailer. Seller got lucky. JAPANESE #208-1995 LEXUS SC400 coupe. S/N JT8UZ30C7S0045859. Light blue metallic/ black leather. Odo: 66,339 miles. Optional power moonroof. Mostly original paint. Good panel gaps and bank-vault door fit. Michelin Pilot Sport all-season performance radials are getting low on tread but are still legal. Good detailing inside, but that seems to make the seat-edging wear stand out more. The trunk is a lot easier to access than the hood. Cleanedup engine bay shows that it’s generally been SOLD AT $17,000. Oakland and Viking were the first two GM brands to get hacked during tough times, and they certainly weren’t the last. In 1926 Oakland introduced what would eventually become its successor: the Pontiac. Of several mid-market coupes from this era sold from an estate at no reserve, this was arguably the most interesting on a historical and eyeball-attracting basis. It sold a little above average for its needs. #565-1932 BUICK SERIES 90 965 Date sold: 05/03/2015 eBay auction ID: 391129385704 Seller’s eBay ID: jrol78 Sale type: Used car with 28 miles VIN: 2G1FS1EE1E9700324 Details: White over black leather; 7.0-liter LS7 V8 rated at 505 hp and 481 lb-ft, 6-sp manual, RWD Sale result: $64,995, Best Offer, sf 850 MSRP: $72,305 (base) Other current offering: Ed Morse Sawgrass Automall, in Sunrise, FL, asking $68,798 for a two-mile, black-over-black Z/28. 2014 Maserati GranTurismo coupe Country Club Coupe. S/N 2776184. Maroon & silver/brown velour. Odo: 92,665 miles. Low-budget repaint, with overspray into rumble-seat compartment, upholstered a long time ago in thick bus-seat vinyl and missing first step. Okay door fit considering it’s a woodframed body. Original, foggy chrome for the most part. Sun-baked original window seals. Yellowed canvas covers for the dual sidemount spares and trunk. Old tires with scuffed and weathered sidewalls. Interior is either original or a good-quality older redo getting tended to and not ignored. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $5,076. Why is it that Lexus made better German-fighting luxury sports coupes before they actually got serious about it? So far, this is the closest Lexus has come to hitting the mark. Today they seem to be competing more with Lincoln than BMW. As these are starting to filter into the realm of legal collector cars in some states, they seem to be developing something of a following—if for no other reason than that the modern two-door coupe is nearly extinct. Sold right around retail. AMERICAN #615-1926 OAKLAND GREATER SIX Date sold: 04/25/2015 eBay auction ID: 321729662722 Seller’s eBay ID: fieldsluxurycars Sale type: Used car with 12,071 miles VIN: ZAM45VLA8E0083488 Details: Nero over Nero leather; 4.7-liter V8 rated at 454 hp and 384 lb-ft, 6-sp auto, RWD Sale result: $94,980, Best Offer, sf 753 MSRP: $134,825 (as equipped) Other current offering: Ferrari Maserati of Seattle, in of all places Seattle, WA, offering a Grigio-overNero 50-mile GT coupe for $141,625. ♦ 130 coupe. S/N L144613. Blue & black/black vinyl/black vinyl. Odo: 40,935 miles. Restored “several decades ago.” Still runs decently and presents well, with the expected amount of light chips, nicks and scuffing. Mix of plating ranges from lightly pitted original nickel to more recent chrome. Clear varnish on woodspoke wheels. Decent door fit for a woodframed body. Real wood trim on door tops and steering wheel rim in good condition; wood from an oil drum on the dashboard gauge panel looks tacky. Seats and headliner incorrectly redone in vinyl. Dumps coolant from bottom of the radiator when running. Cond: 3. scruffy. Aftermarket horn button. Old engine repaint is quite greasy. Modern spark-plug wires. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $27,540. Claimed to be the original color combination but seems a bit garish for a Depression Era product. Looks more like something from the early years of the collector car hobby, when “flashy” trumped “authentic.” Good news is that it needs to be redone anyway. Better news—since it was offered at no reserve, it’s about as cheap as you’ll ever find a low-production (586 in this body style), two-door CCCA Full Classic that moves under its own power. #572-1933 FORD SERIES 46 panel de- livery. S/N B5186051. Red & black/dark gray mohair. Odo: 13,782 miles. Older restoration, but no show pony. Good repaint now showing some nicks and chips. Graphics from an assisted-living facility (no comment). Door glass has multiple cracks. Average replating job on most chrome. Engine bay lightly detailed as part of the restoration, now with heavier dust and a rusty head. Good reproduction seat upholstery installation showing minimal wear. Sports Car Market


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Branson Branson, MO Original rubber floor mat and pedal pads are pretty much worn out. Clear varnished oak cargo floor and interior side boards. Estate truck, offered at no reserve. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $39,960. Henry (and, yes, it was at his insistence) continued to make 4-cylinder vehicles for two years after the V8 was introduced for 1932. This panel truck with an unwinding restoration and an anemic four sold for more than most better-restored V8 pickups of the same era. Seller must be pleased. #585-1949 BUICK SUPER Sedanette fastback. S/N 15240203. Green metallic/gray broadcloth. Odo: 34,093 miles. 248-ci I8, 2-bbl, auto. Miles claimed actual since new. Recent repaint and rechrome. The former is exceptionally good, the latter is lacking brilliance. VIN tag attached by modern Phillips screws after repaint. Typo on Iowa title against the frame-tag number. Original Win Stephens Buick dealer tag on the trunk lid. Good panel gaps and door fit. Well-cared-for original interior. Light soiling on seat backs. Carpet getting scruffy and is ready for the dumpster. Freshly rebuilt engine authentically detailed in springs, but underneath it is a reasonably welldetailed stock engine. Authentically reupholstered interior. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $46,250. Weissmuller reportedly used this car to tow a custom ski boat as part of his association with Johnson Outboards. The car no-saled on the block at $45k, but by the end of the day Mr. Cox announced that it sold. Not a bad price, putting the “Tarzan premium” somewhere between “none” and “losing money.” #613-1955 OLDSMOBILE 98 Holiday 2-dr hard top. S/N 559K5601. Aqua metallic & white/aqua & white vinyl. Odo: 17,686 miles. 324-ci V8, 4-bbl, auto. Older drivergrade restoration. Good repaint, with light overspray on undercarriage. Aqua portions have a pearlescent tint. Older bumper replating; alloy and stainless trim could use some work. Newer door seals, good door fit and gaps. Reproduction interior soft trim, well fitted and showing only slight wear. Good en- a tidy engine bay. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $36,720. Win Stephens was one of the largest Buick dealers in the country, as Buicks were one of the best-selling marques in Minnesota. Before WWI in 1914, they generally outsold even the Model T Ford. Afterward, up until when this car was new, they were also strong competitors for Ford and Chevy. The Sedanette fastbacks were a bit racy for the unostentatious clientele, but this Minnesotan thinks that they were some of the best-looking cars in the post-WWII landscape. Sold a bit strong, considering the title issue. #569-1955 CADILLAC SERIES 62 con- vertible. S/N 556211127. Red/white vinyl/red & white leather. Odo: 18,700 miles. 331-ci V8, 4-bbl, auto. Sold new to actor Johnny Weissmuller (best known as the original Tarzan) while he was a spokesman for motor company Johnson Outboards. Excellent body prep and color-change repaint; originally Deep Cherry. Masked-off vent window seals. Showquality chrome. Dented door-sill trim. Hood gaps uneven, with some paint chipping on right fender from contact. Hood has weak July 2015 131 gine bay detailing, but it still needed a mop-up after it was on the block. Newer dual exhaust system and radial tires. Optional power windows with all-tinted glass. Offered at no reserve. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $23,760. The lights in the convention center made this aqua look more like blue and helped contribute to the pearl sheen. It presented as a pretty garage queen, but some of the mechanicals may have suffered from disuse. Sold well enough, and the new owner had best find a ‘55 Olds shop manual first thing. #205-1963 CHEVROLET C10 Stepside pickup. S/N 3C144S2159610. Red/Fawn vinyl. Odo: 77,125 miles. 230-ci I6, 1-bbl, 3-sp. Sun-baked and worn original paint. Start of rust-out on the bottoms of the front fenders; rest of the truck is sound. Good door fit; hood,


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Branson Branson, MO not so much. Start of dry-rot on the window seals. 2006 Department of Defense gate sticker for Camp Robinson on windshield. Warranty booklet in glove box matches dealerengraved rear bumper from Wallace Baker Chevrolet of Beebe, AR. Rotted wood in box. No rips in original seat, but it’s heavily sun burnt. Recent engine work includes new ignition wires, hoses, clamps, etc. Cond: 4. SOLD AT $3,510. If I had this truck, all I would do is give it a fluid change and install seat belts. A side benefit of the “rat rod” thing is that old working trucks are now more socially acceptable—no fake patina needed here. Not that peeling off the front fenders and fixing the minimal rust issues would be damning. Just a good old truck set up to drive at a spot-on market-correct price. #559-1964 CHRYSLER 300K convert- ible. S/N 8443158888. Red/black vinyl/black vinyl. Odo: 45,418 miles. 413-ci V8, 4-bbl, auto. Older exterior repaint with good original paint in the door jambs. Decent door fit and panel gaps with some door rattle. Older replate or good original bumper chrome. New front seat upholstery doesn’t match the original rears. Replacement carpeting. Recent light engine-bay detailing. Unkempt undercarriage with sagging rear springs, old bias-ply tires, replacement muffler on rusty pipes, older re- quite dull but not rusted out and would be a good core. Original interior showing moderate wear. Older valve cover and air cleaner repaint. Unkempt undercarriage. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $15,120. This looked like it was gussied up over the decades whenever the owner(s) had time and money. A little shopping will yield better cars for similar or a little less money, restored or truly original. This one was well sold. #512-1966 AMC RAMBLER CLASSIC 770 convertible. S/N A6KS75F135980. White/white vinyl/black vinyl. Odo: 7,018 miles. 232-ci I6, 1-bbl, 3-sp. Optional power top and Magnum 500 wheels. Wears at least one older repaint but is generally presentable. The dull original chrome and dinged stainless trim help make the paint look better. Dent in the trunk lid, trunk key lock missing. Okay door fit with a bit of a rattle. Newer top with some wrinkling around the backlight. Good original seats, door panels, and carpeting. Topical engine bay cleanup, with a newer battery up onto the turntable, the original owner’s 20-something granddaughter got up and talked about how well her grandfather had cared for it and how little he used it. She closed by saying that she hated it. Odd way of trying to market a vehicle, and it certainly didn’t help the selling price. #538-1966 FORD MUSTANG GT coupe. S/N 6R07A232198. Red/black vinyl. Odo: 66,083 miles. 289-ci V8, 4-bbl, auto. With a/c, power steering and power front discs. Bought from the original owner’s family in 2007; competent restoration since. Retains original California title and warranty book. Betterthan-factory body prep and paint. Replaced or replated chrome and emblems. Louvered ex- placement fuel tank, and coating of road grime over flaking undercoating. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $17,820. One of 625 drop-tops made in the second-to-last year of letter-car production. Barely a step above a non-letter 300 and pretty much a “meh” car any way you look at it, it moved out at a realistic price. The SCM Platinum Auction Database shows it appeared at the Kruse Fall Auburn auction in 1991, not selling at $12k (SCM# 21087). #621-1964 FORD GALAXIE 500 XL 2-dr hard top. S/N 4P68Z117843. Rangoon Red/red vinyl. Odo: 91,108 miles. 390-ci V8, 4-bbl, auto. Optional Magic Air a/c, power steering, power brakes, power driver’s seat, and push-button AM radio. Later-era cruise control added. Older repaint, generally presentable on the outside, but poorly prepped in areas. Flaking around reattached data plate reveals original black of the replacement door. Most brightwork is original. Rear bumper and plastic in-line fuel filter. Title delay, due to a missing digit in the VIN. No reserve. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $8,208. 1966 was the first year that American Motors fully transitioned into presenting its products as a unified corporate image of AMC. The Rambler dealerships were rebranded, and Rambler became the primary series name for all AMC cars that year. As such, Rambler Classic 550s and 770s were the mid-line models; the Rambler American 220s and 440s below those; and the Rambler Ambassador 880s and 990s at the top of the pecking order. Sold well enough. #266-1966 CHEVROLET C10 Custom pickup. S/N C1546S174138. Green metallic/ green vinyl. Odo: 41,360 miles. 283-ci V8, 2-bbl, 3-sp. Original owner parked it in 1981 with 33k miles on it. Repainted on the cheap after it changed hands in 1996. All new exterior chrome, including pieces that most likely were painted when the truck was new. New front fenders and tailgate. Box sits crooked on the frame. Reupholstered seat, faithful to the original pleat pattern, with a Chevy patch sewn to the backrest. No hood stop bumpers, haust outlets canted to the right. New door latches, hardware, and good gaps and fit. Expertly installed reproduction interior soft trim. Restored simulated-wood-rim steering wheel. Well detailed under the hood. Front suspension sits low. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $22,788. Everything comes off as checking all the right boxes, except that it’s a notchback rather than a drop-top or fastback, even being a GT with the 4-barrel 289. Sold slightly under the market. #525-1969 PONTIAC TRANS AM rep- lica convertible. S/N 223679N108997. Red/ black vinyl/black vinyl. Odo: 17,133 miles. 350-ci V8, 2-bbl, auto. Originally Limelight Green with Parchment vinyl interior, and the color-change repaint is pretty darn good. Stated that front fenders, floor pan, trunk floor, trunk lid, lower rear quarters, both doors and hood have been replaced. Right door won’t latch. Modern replacement windshield. Replated rear bumper. Mostly reproduction emblems. New reproduction interior vinyl kit, so shutting it carelessly dents the top of the headlight buckets. Generally untouched motor. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $10,800. When it rolled 132 expertly installed and basted in silicone protectant. Modern sound system in dash, apparently installed with a chisel. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $20,520. With all the sheet metal that’s been swapped out, one wonders what’s left that’s original to the car. The cowl and VIN tag is my guess. At that rate, you can almost make the argument that it’s a new car, so might as well paint it a color you like. The selling price is probably what they had into the parts alone, but this is still market-correct for the car. Next time they’ll hang Camaro parts on that cowl and actually make money on it. © Sports Car Market


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Roundup Selected Sales Combined in One Comprehensive Report Global Auction Highlights AUSTRALIAN #166-1973 CHRYSLER VALIANT CHARGER Sportsman coupe. S/N 80292470. White/red tartan cloth. RHD. Odo: 76,248 miles. VJ series Australian Chrysler, said to be one of only 200 Sportsmans (other sources say 500) which featured a red/white paint scheme plus black/white interior and 4-speed manual. Anyway, it’s straight with decent paint (redone 2009), good chrome and brightwork. Tartan seat material unworn. Spare windshield on back seat. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $18,222. A strange creature to find on British soil. Sold for about the same money as a straight-six Mustang, which feels about right. CCA, Northamptonshire, U.K., 03/15. ENGLISH Top seller at CCA’s Northamptonshire, U.K., auction — 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo coupe in rare Riviera Blue, sold at $47,183 CCA Location: Northamptonshire, U.K. Date: March 3, 2015 Auctioneer: Jonathan Humbert Automotive lots sold/offered: 50/79 Sales rate: 63% Sales total: $641,024 High sale: 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo, sold at $47,183 Buyer’s premium: 6%, included in sold prices ($1.00 = £0.67) Report and photos by Paul Hardiman SILVERSTONE Practical Classics Restoration & Classic Car Show Location: Birmingham, U.K. Date: March 28, 2015 Auctioneer: Jonathan Humbert Automotive lots sold/offered: 57/70 Sales rate: 81% Sales total: $2,956,459 High sale: 2010 Porsche 911 GT2 RS, sold at $351,429 Buyer’s premium: 12.5%, included in sold prices ($1.00 = £0.65) Report and photos by Paul Hardiman PREMIER The Gulf Coast Classic Location: Punta Gorda, FL Date: April 11, 2015 Auctioneers: Brian Marshall, Jimmy Richie Automotive lots sold/offered: 156/340 Sales rate: 46% Sales total: $4,580,403 High sale: 1947 Kurtis roadster, sold at $280,000 Buyer’s premium: 7%, included in sold prices Report and photos by Robert Malke MECUM Location: Houston, TX Date: April 9, 2015 Auctioneers: Mark Delzell, Mike Hagerman, Matt Moravec Automotive lots sold/offered: 645/929 Sales rate: 69% Sales total: $25,178,024 High sale: 1969 Dodge Hemi Daytona, sold at $625,000 Buyer’s premium: 8%, $500 minimum, included in sold prices Report and photos by Cody Tayloe 134 to detract too much. Declared as 2.3 liters, so must have the “2¼” engine (2,286-cc) from the Series II of 1958 instead of original 1.6. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $7,728. Sold incredibly cheap for any working Series I, and a bargain if it appeals to you. It certainly did to me. CCA, Northamptonshire, U.K., 03/15. #S88.1-1959 JAGUAR XK 150 3.4 drop- head coupe. S/N S838216. Cotswold Blue/ white canvas/gray leather. Odo: 79,963 miles. Frame-up restoration approximately three years old. Fresh paint, fresh interior, fresh top, new wiring harness. Chrome has been polished or replaced. Windshield shows light Sports Car Market #102-1951 LAND ROVER SERIES I 80-in pickup. S/N 26101704. Green/black vinyl. RHD. Odo: 20,190 miles. Splendidly tatty old thing with paint flaking back to aluminum. Distressed interior, but looks mechanically up to snuff. Freewheeling front hubs, new tires. Front fenders have been cut, but, weirdly, this doesn’t seem BEST BUY


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Roundup scratches. Canvas top slightly soiled; ridge worn in from resting in the down position. Buff marks on trunk lid. Some pitting on rear turn signals. Whitewalls starting to yellow and look a little dry. Panel fit is good. Interior is fresh. Wood veneers and interior brightwork in excellent condition. Driver’s door hard to front fender is missing—but what’s left is only surface-rusted rather than rotted right through. No interior, grille or lights, though it looks mechanically complete. California blue plates, but taxes paid in U.K. Cond: 5. SOLD AT $5,690. Offered at no reserve. Probably savable, though still a massive job. The oily bits are simple, but it’s hard to see how it can be brought back to life within market value for a pushrod A. Silverstone, Birmingham, U.K., 03/15. #104-1963 FORD CONSUL CLASSIC 315 2-dr sedan. S/N H34C123162L. Blue & white/blue vinyl. RHD. Odo: 86,187 miles. Ford’s small Transatlantic-styled sedan, and 116E code means it’s the 1500, not the smaller 1340 engine. Repainted. On Rostyle wheels; original plain steelies come with the car. Seat latch. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $164,160. Originally restored in the 1990s, it received a refreshed body-on restoration from 2012 to 2013. The quality of the original restoration left the last owner a great starting point to bring the car up to where it is today, but it still has needs. DHC values have recovered in step with the wider economy, but this one exceeded expectations, trading in triple-carb 150S roadster territory—and there’s even more money to spend if the buyer wants a trailer-queen concours contender. Very well sold. Mecum Auctions, Houston, TX, 04/15. #137-1960 BERKELEY T60 roadster. S/N T601405. Red/red leather. RHD. Mad little British three-wheeler, with Excelsior bike power and front-wheel drive. Good, restored order, two owners from new, one of them for 53 years. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $7,029. Offered vinyl redone, small tear in back seat. Strut top mounts not welded. Electronic ignition fitted. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $5,206. Offered at no reserve and a fair price here, as the really collectible derivative is the fastback coupe Capri, which looks like a baby Mercury. CCA, Northamptonshire, U.K., 03/15. #145-1969 JAGUAR MK 2 saloon. S/N 1J4287DN. Blue/red leather. RHD. Odo: 82,533 miles. Repainted and very shiny, and frankly a bit bright even indoors. Originally a 2.4, has been hot-rodded with a 4.2 motor, later all-synchro box and Coombs-type rear arches, plus rear coil-spring conversion and pair of shoes. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $118,817. Sold on the phone for strong DBS V8 money, though good sixes aren’t far behind. But later V8s aren’t far ahead, either—see the $131k paid for Lot 142, a nine-year-younger 1980 V8. Silverstone, Birmingham, U.K., 03/15. #138-1976 DAIMLER SOVEREIGN 4.2 at no reserve, sold on the initial £4,200 ($6,248) commission bid as the auctioneer, Humbert, was looking for £4,500 ($6,694) that never came. Not as much money as a decent Bond Bug, which is its spiritual successor. Silverstone, Birmingham, U.K., 03/15. #115-1960 MGA roadster. S/N GHN282439. Incomplete restoration project—one power steering. Door fit and chrome all good, new leather, refinished timber, Moto-Lita wheel, rear seat belts. Declared as a repaired Category D write-off following a “small” engine fire in 2013, but you’d never tell. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $29,937. Strong money in today’s market for a Mk 2. They’ve slipped back slightly in recent years, but this had everything going for it except the last word in originality. CCA, Northamptonshire, U.K., 03/15. July 2015 coupe. S/N 2H17900BW. Squadron Blue/ black vinyl/black leather. RHD. Odo: 59,231 miles. Nice order, no rot, decent vinyl top. Good leather only lightly creased and prob- #180-1969 MGC convertible. S/N GCN1U8721G. White/black cloth/black leather. Odo: 2,494 miles. Three-wiper U.S. version. Straight, clean and tidy, though with unfortunate federal side marker lights and “pillow” dash. Later aftermarket seats, harnesses, Moto-Lita steering wheel, window winders, rally tripmeter. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $24,405. Well sold for a compromised version. Still, Cs look like a good value for the money compared with an E-type or 240Z. CCA, Northamptonshire, U.K., 03/15. #133-1971 ASTON MARTIN DBS V8 coupe. S/N DBSV881030R. Dark blue/ maroon leather. RHD. Odo: 36,743 miles. Restored, still with original fuel injection. Doors fit and close well, decent chrome, original leather beautifully patinated, like a comfy old ably the original. With handbook and service book (10 entries). Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $25,940. Almost one owner, and with its cherished condition and that paperwork, it was always going to attract decent money—against the background that first-gen XJs are on the 135


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Roundup up. I’d call this correctly bought and sold. Silverstone, Birmingham, U.K., 03/15. #142-1980 ASTON MARTIN V8 coupe. S/N V8S0R12233. Cumberland Grey/ magnolia leather. RHD. Odo: 96,345 miles. Very straight, repainted (originally red) and still deep and lustrous. Rockers and jacking points all look solid. Leather looks newish, new carpets, excellent veneers, still smells new inside. lot, donated by a local business to raise money for Mercia MS Therapy Centre in Coventry. That it sold is all we need to know, although the rare 10-inch (diameter!) Cosmic alloys account for some of the price, as they fit Minis. CCA, Northamptonshire, U.K., 03/15. With rare optional cruise control from new. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $130,531. Not far ahead of the older (but far more stylish, if not as sharp) DBS V8 earlier in the sale (Lot 133, $119k). Hard to say who got the best deal, but on balance and relative condition, I’d say it was this car. Silverstone, Birmingham, U.K., 03/15. #160-1981 TALBOT SUNBEAM LO- TUS S1 hatchback. S/N T4DCYAL306337. Black/gray velour. RHD. Odo: 68,796 miles. Straight and rot-free; some dust/sink marks in paint. Motor tidy with original airbox, though castings have been painted silver, which always looks tacky. Seat velour very baggy, as per normal on these. Four-pot caliper conver- #T220-1991 LOTUS ELAN convertible. S/N SCCGA36B3MHF26900. Red/black cloth/black leather. Odo: 18,335 miles. Said to be a two-owner car, with the same owner since 2001. Well-preserved, low-mileage original. Paint slightly faded on flat surfaces from age. Windows and rubber are in good original condition. Original top is excellent, with only slight fading on the back light. Exterior plastic lenses show some fading. Panel fit is factorycorrect. Interior is in excellent condition. Seats show almost no wear. Original cassette player. U.K. by 1999. Sold at the right money for a low-mileage Rover-era late Cooper. Silverstone, Birmingham, U.K., 03/15. #S202-1999 BENTLEY AZURE convert- ible. S/N SCBZK14E1XCX61807. Black/ black cloth/tan leather. Odo: 14,308 miles. All original with low mileage but showing age. Brightwork shows some scratches. Color is unforgiving. Flaws from use in the original paint. Could use a good buff. Heavy scratch behind driver’s door. Front and rear chrome bumpers are a little faded. Glass is in good condition. Rubber is holding up well. Interior shows very little use. Hardly any wear on the driver’s seat. Carpets are dirty but in good condition. Interior in very good condition. sion on front. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $18,711. Sister company Silverstone sold an unregistered, very-low-mileage, Italian-market one of these for a record $79k at their November 2014 Birmingham sale (SCM# 256664), but this is a correct “club valuation” price for a driver-quality car. And still cheaper than a MkII Escort RS2000, which it will leave standing. CCA, Northamptonshire, U.K., 03/15. #110-1988 RELIANT RIALTO estate. S/N SCD162425JJ055189. Orange/gray leather. RHD. Odo: 39,264 miles. And now for a bit of fun. Reliant Rialto (a slightly updated Robin) done up as the “Dodgy Charger.” In fair nick all around with rough paint and worn gray velour inside, although with galvanized chassis and fiberglass bodies, they don’t corrode. Catalog states, “This lot’s condition scores 0 / 135.” They race these, you know... Cond: 4+. SOLD AT $976. Sold as a charity 136 Gauges are crisp and clean. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $18,360. The 1990s Elan paralleled the design philosophy of the original 1960s Elan, offering an affordable sports car with a fiberglass body over a steel chassis. It is said that Mazda engineers studied the original Elan when developing the Miata. For collectors new to the hobby, this is a safe way to get into a true European roadster with the reliability of an Isuzu powerplant. The sale here is more than double the price of any ’90s Elan sale in the past five years. Very well sold. Mecum Auctions, Houston, TX, 04/15. #176-1998 ROVER MINI Cooper Sport Limited 2-dr sedan. S/N SAXXNNAZRWD151958. Eng. # 12A2LK70361106. Red/black leather & velour. RHD. Odo: 17,322 miles. Good order, backdated on 10inch Cosmic alloys (or look-alikes) in order to look like a proper classic Mini, along with a twin-tank conversion. Floors and rockers unwelded, subframes sound; repainted, with some pickling under the windshield. Superchip upgrade; with original handbooks and service book. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $15,899. Originally registered as a display car with a dealer in Germany, unsold and back to the Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $75,600. Short-term investments in modern luxury cars can be a quick way to lose money, as when this car sold twice in 2012: bought for $89k in January at Mecum’s Kissimmee auction (SCM# 199194) and sold three months later at Mecum’s Houston auction for $72k (SCM# 211251). Maybe the new owner realized how much the yearly maintenance is, combined with possible deferred catch-up service, and decided the car was worth a $17k loss. Nothing about a Bentley is cheap. The consignor did well here for what is still just a used car. Very well sold. Mecum Auctions, Houston, TX, 04/15. #111-2001 ROVER MINI Cooper 2-dr sedan. S/N SAXXNRAZEYD183570. Green & white/black vinyl. RHD. Odo: 182 miles. In immaculate order, as it’s covered only delivery mileage. Still with manuals and service book. Condition declared “135/135,” and I wouldn’t disagree, though I’ve deducted half a point as the Mini body tooling was pretty worn out by the end of production, so the panel gaps are a bit sloppy. Other part of serial number is 12A2LK70396173. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $25,869. One of the last Minis made and obviously stored since new, as last tax ran out in March of 2002. So this is the price of a new last-of-the-line Mini... which is about $6k Sports Car Market


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Roundup come with car. Digi odo but said to have 14,000 miles. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $33,469. Only 1,635 built (by Renault Sport at the Alpine factory in Dieppe, FRA). Silverstone sold one here last year, too, for $32,325 (SCM# 243148). Market-correct. Silverstone, Birmingham, U.K., 03/15. GERMAN #125-1957 VOLKSWAGEN TRANS- higher than last year. CCA, Northamptonshire, U.K., 03/15. FRENCH #122-1963 RENAULT ESTAFETTE 800 van. S/N 8070500. Cream/black vinyl. Odo: 10,974 km. Straight and solid, looks hardly worked, both rear arches have had small weld repairs inside. One split in driver’s seat. Old speedo with 23k km showing is still with vehicle, so only about 31,000 km (19,200 miles) from new. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $11,045. On the basis that you’d struggle to get a (smaller) Morris Minor van in the same solid condition for similar money, looks a good value. These carry 800 kg, though not very quickly with 1,108 cc—but the pre-1962 versions were only 845 cc. Silverstone, Birmingham, U.K., 03/15. #123-1997 RENAULT SPORT SPIDER. S/N VMKAF0H0516221732. Yellow/black leather. RHD. Odo: 14,000 miles. 60-off U.K. version with windscreen (hardcore home-market versions did without, pinning their hopes on the “air screen” instead—okay if you can keep traveling fast enough). Good overall order, no scuffs outside or in interior, motor has bumpier cam. Wears Sparco steering wheel and aftermarket road wheels, but originals pair.” Cond: 3. SOLD AT $25,219. Imported from the U.S. in 1993. Lots of interest, including a posting on Bring a Trailer, and it sold strongly, as all T2s do these days. A fully restored example complete with single-seater was offered for sale at over 200,000 euros in 2013 (about $260k), so this looks like a very fair deal by comparison. Perfect for the Goodwood Revival. CCA, Northamptonshire, U.K., 03/15. #F140-1960 VOLKSWAGEN BEETLE 2-dr sedan. S/N 3087160. Blue/white vinyl. Odo: 49,406 miles. Nice little Bug, relatively pure looking. Recent economy paint and bodywork. Bumpers and trim showing signs of classic Florida pitting and oxidation. Interior somewhat tidy, upholstery has modest wear, sunroof slider headliner very wrinkly, generally all there. Engine bay on the scuzzy Walmart accessories; slightly grimy and oily, as is the underside. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $6,848. Opels were sold through Buick dealerships in an attempt to compete with the influx of Japanese imports flooding the market. Rare to see one in this condition after all these years. Little things like a wallowed-out trunk lock and missing vinyl top trim didn’t seem to hamper interest. I’ll wager that the buyer drove one in high school. Premier, Punta Gorda, FL, 04/15. #T46.1-1978 MERCEDES-BENZ 450SEL custom pickup. S/N 11603312073294. Black/black leather. Odo: 72,464 miles. Low original mileage. Straight body with good panel fit. Small door ding behind driver’s door. Black paint is decent but shows light surface scratches throughout. European headlights and grille. Bumper chrome is dull with scratches. Glass and rubber in good condition. Bed cover opens from factory trunk release. Interior very presentable. Typical cracking on PORTER pickup. S/N CA398248. Blue/ black vinyl. Odo: 19,178 miles. A Bulli with a difference, as it’s been converted to a race transporter with the addition of aluminum channels, ramps and electric winch, as was done in period. Motor is now a twin-port 1,641-cc engine. No rot, repainted, seat base torn, fixed with “new but period tank tape re- 3. SOLD AT $13,375. Two-owner car from North Carolina. Bidders thought they could steal it, but the reserve was a little high. Strong price for condition. Premier, Punta Gorda, FL, 04/15. #F105-1969 OPEL KADETT 2-dr sedan. S/N 919165750. Copper/black vinyl/black vinyl. Odo: 56,888 miles. Decent straight little repainted body with proper graphics. Not abused and just about all there. Slightly tattered and maybe original vinyl top. Black vinyl interior could be original to the car. Bucket seats, auto on the floor and full gauge package with tach. Motor sounds okay. Engine compartment seems intact, no strange wiring or side but stock. Previous signs of pan repair. Trunk includes spare and jack. Painted steel wheels, wide whites. Motor putts along. Cond: 138 wood inlay around shifter. Carpets show some wear; seats and door panels in very good condition. Clear gauges. No dash cracks. Oversized Brabus-style wheels. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $11,880. Sold at last year’s Mecum Houston auction for $15,660 (SCM# 253198) and before that at Mecum Monterey 2012 for $12,720 (SCM# 212426). While the build Sports Car Market


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Roundup quality was good, cutting one down to a pickup truck gives this Mercedes limited appeal—even here in Texas, where trucks reign supreme. Cheapest price so far, so well bought unless the trend continues. Mecum Auctions, Houston, TX, 04/15. #187-1988 BMW 635 CSI coupe. S/N WBAEC820408187878. Black/brown leather. RHD. Odo: 89,586 miles. Very shiny repaint. Slightly lowered over big alloys. Leather retrim showing very little use. Looks nicely evil, but with the stock motor and automatic... today’s market. Mecum Auctions, Houston, TX, 04/15. #148-1989 PORSCHE 911 Turbo Targa. S/N WPOZZZ93ZKS010099. Blue/magnolia leather. RHD. Odo: 74,500 miles. Good, wellkept 930. Not hit in the front and only light wear to the interior, seats gently creased. Sounded healthy as it drove in. German registration but English plates. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $107,102. In Germany 2008–14, which is a bit “coals to Newcastle.” 930s have been getting big money of late, typically around £60k ($95k), and Targa values have finally exceeded the price of coupes. And this one’s a 5-speed. Put the three together, therefore, and this price shouldn’t look surprising. Silverstone, Birmingham, U.K., 03/15. it’s not. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $11,958. Proper 635s (i.e., with the manual 5-speed) have always been strong money. Even better is the M6 with the real stonky M1 motor. This one is neither, despite its promising looks. Quite well sold. CCA, Northamptonshire, U.K., 03/15. #F78-1988 MERCEDES-BENZ 560SL convertible. S/N WDBBA48DOJA089146. Signal Red/tan leather. Odo: 25,289 miles. All original and in very good condition. Paint is slightly faded, with light surface scratches throughout. Panel fit is correct. Registration shows New Jersey. Brightwork is dull and a little scratched, but in good shape for original. Gasket around the electric antenna mast is missing. Seats are a little worn and discolored. Plastic overlay on dash could be hiding cracks. #137-1993 BMW M5 Nürburgring Edi- tion sedan. S/N WBSHC92060GE00109. Blue/gray leather. RHD. Odo: 76,717 miles. Repainted, leather lightly creased, motor clean and tidy. Digital odo but mileage declared as just under 77,000, and with good history, in- cluding service records. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $20,500. The E34 was the last hand-built Mcar made, and the last to feature a motor with BMW Motorsport-derived engine. This example sold right in the middle of the estimate range, but it’s a helluva lot of car for the price of a 2002. CCA, Northamptonshire, U.K., 03/15. Wood on console in decent condition with minimal cracking. Original Becker radio. Center clock replaced with engine temperature gauge. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $28,620. The R107 was produced from 1971 to 1989, with the latter years benefiting from more refinement and offering the big 5.6-liter powerplant. Values are all over the board, with decent higher-mileage drivers still out there for under $10k. But these are trending up in price, especially the more difficult-to-find low-mileage examples. Mecum sold a sub-12k-mile 1986 560SL at their December 2014 Austin sale for $32k (SCM# 256554), so there’s no denying where values are headed. Correct price in 140 #141-2001 BMW Z8 convertible. S/N WBAEJ13451AH60797. Silver/silver hard top/black leather. Odo: 39,753 miles. Clean, shiny, unscuffed, leather looks hardly used. With hard top, toolkit, half tonneau, roll hoop covers. Lights all converted to U.K. spec. Last Sports Car Market


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Roundup service in 2014 at 39,717 miles. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $184,082. Originally supplied to Texas, then in Sweden from 2008, in the U.K. from 2013. Soared over its £75k–£95k ($112k– $141k) estimate, but market value for a Z8 this month... Silverstone, Birmingham, U.K., 03/15. #163-2001 PORSCHE 911 Turbo coupe. S/N WPOZZZ99Z1S683740. Riviera Blue/ black leather. RHD. Odo: 79,972 miles. Very clean 996, scuff- and chip-free, except for lightly worn outer seat bolsters. Has 11 stamps in the service book. Riviera Blue is the rarest color, apparently, with only three sold in the where expected. Silverstone, Birmingham, U.K., 03/15. ITALIAN #121-1967 FIAT 500 Giannini TVS 2-dr sedan. S/N 110F1429448. White/black vinyl/ blue vinyl. Odo: 62,269 km. Straight, clean, repainted. Not clear if this is a Giannini-built Fiat or just a Fiat with Giannini mods—though “TVS” in title suggests the latter—but it’s the cleanest 500 I’ve ever seen, with perfect underside. Usually floors are a bit manky and sill joints wavy; these are sharp and dead-straight. U.K. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $47,183. As the small-bumper 911s disappear into the stratosphere, pulling 3.2 Carreras and 3.0 SCs up behind them, it’s interesting to see where the first of the water-cooled cars are. Very cheap (or about half the price of a decent 930) is the answer, although not if you have to repair it. CCA, Northamptonshire, U.K., 03/15. #134-2003 PORSCHE 911 GT2 coupe. S/N WPOZZZ99Z3S695107. Silver/black leather. Odo: 30,950 miles. Two-wheel-drive 996 with no driver aids. Good, well-kept order with full service history (eight stamps, last in 2014). Cond: 2. SOLD AT $128,857. Racer boss Nick Whale stressed from the rostrum, km. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $128,857. Originally supplied to Switzerland. Sold mid-estimate. With similar cars at retail asking well over $140k—and that amazing world-record $311k Silverstone managed for a TR at its last sale (SCM# 257294)—looks slightly well bought, although this is more than twice what they were worth less than a decade ago. Silverstone, Birmingham, U.K., 03/15. Interior is just as good, with new vinyl, top vinyl very good; motor near concours level, with parts such as mounting brackets polished. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $24,266. In one family ownership 1967–2010 and then restored, so that’s when it may have got the tuning parts. Offered at no reserve and I’d say a good deal, as it would be hard to repeat for the money, in this condition, at least. Silverstone, Birmingham, U.K., 03/15. #120-1972 FIAT 595 SS Abarth replica “You can either drive them or you can’t; I love that”—thereby probably alienating half the audience. Sold strongly, with bidding finishing a couple of thousand pounds north of the high estimate. Silverstone, Birmingham, U.K., 03/15. #160-2010 PORSCHE 911 GT2 RS coupe. S/N WPOZZZ99ZBS776383. Black/ black leather. Odo: 8,284 km. The illustrated definition of the “turbonutterbastard.” Excellent order all round, with cruise control and sports bucket seats from new. Taxes paid but not U.K. registered. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $351,429. Supplied new to owner in Austria, then in Dubai. High spot of the sale, but with 500 built, they’re a known quantity and sold 142 2-dr sedan. S/N 110F3012013. Gray/red vinyl. Nicely done SS replica with rear roll hoop. Interior redone in red vinyl and new carpets. Motor hopped up the easy route by two at this sale, both with paddle shifts and both with similarly low miles. There was little to choose between them aside from the color of the leather, but judging by their paper trails, this one had been slightly better looked after, which upped its price a little. (Lot 165 sold for $96k.) Silverstone, Birmingham, U.K., 03/15. AMERICAN #F235-1908 REO tourer. S/N 11908. Red & black/black canvas/black leather. RHD. Offered at no reserve. Appears to be an older restoration in definite need of another. Paint Sports Car Market #144-1998 FERRARI F355 F1 Spider. S/N ZFFXR48C000111189. Red/cream leather. RHD. Odo: 25,433 miles. Tidy and original, with books, tools and big recent bills (cambelts, clutch and flywheel). Electronic dampers, a/c and Rosso carpet options from new. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $107,102. One of starting with the larger 126 unit. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $23,429. 126 conversion is very common on 500s if you want to actually go anywhere, and it won’t hurt the value of a replica. Offered at no reserve and sold for more or less the sum of its parts, at $1,000 less than the Giannini (Lot 121). I would’ve! Silverstone, Birmingham, U.K., 03/15. #153-1988 FERRARI TESTAROSSA coupe. S/N ZFFSA175000077206. Red/crema leather. Odo: 44,073 km. Catalog cover star. Very shiny. Optional red leather dash in good order. Seat leather lightly baggy. Service history shows belts were done in the last 1,500


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Roundup has many flaws throughout due to age. Brass is beginning to tarnish with heavy patina in places. Seats are in decent condition but show age. Top is older but holding up nicely. Tires are dry and discolored. Interior wood is weathered from decades of exposure. Carburetor #F154-1964 CHRYSLER 300K convert- ible. S/N 8443242566. Blue/white vinyl/white vinyl. Odo: 57,044 miles. 440-ci V8, 4-bbl, auto. Original 413 V8 has been replaced with a later rebuilt 1970 440. In average condition, more or less. Body filler bubbling in multiple spots all over, lousy paint a little rusty and crusty underneath. The white inside is messy with vinyl patchwork on the seats. Factory lying in rear seat footwell. Chain in a bucket sitting on the running board. Oil leaking underneath. Cond: 4. SOLD AT $28,080. Nice example from REO’s early days. This early example was not marketed as original, but no mention of a past restoration was made either, although there was likely a restoration at some point. Still, no apologies are necessary for the fading paint and patinated brass. Offered at no reserve, this one was well sold. Mecum Auctions, Houston, TX, 04/15. #S231-1963 CHEVROLET CORVETTE coupe. S/N 30837S116180. Red/red vinyl. Odo: 95,528 miles. 327-ci 250-hp V8, 4-bbl, auto. Driver-quality car showing some use. Paint in decent condition with a few flaws. Bright work very good. Rubber is older but holding up well. Wiper marks on windshield, scratches on rear glass. Kelsey-Hayes threebar knockoffs. Replaced carpets are showing a little age. Dry spray in door sills. Typical scratching on the console aluminum. Gauges are a little cloudy. Engine compartment is bucket seats, floor-shift and factory tach are a plus. With power steering, brakes, seats, windows and top, a/c and square steering wheel. Cond: 4. SOLD AT $19,795. Although condition was weak, the fact that it is a 300 “letter car” and a convertible adds some potential value. The car was clumsy-looking, and the raised white-lettered tires and hubcaps did not work for me, but someone liked it. Well sold. Premier, Punta Gorda, FL, 04/15. #F172-1964 IMPERIAL CROWN con- vertible. S/N 9243167458. Blue/white vinyl/ white leather. Odo: 73,497 miles. 413-ci V8, 4-bbl, auto. California car with same family since new. The 413 V8 has been rebuilt. New top. Loaded with options. Runs and idles okay. Still has the classic push-button automatic transmission. Straight body, old paint, surface rust on the undercarriage. Cheap chrome valve covers and air cleaner. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $19,795. Handsome, good color, nicely optioned, just not that nice of a car. It is also not a Lincoln or a Cadillac. It did hammer at $18,500, but it took a while to get there. Well bought and sold. Premier, Punta Gorda, FL, 04/15. #S114-1965 CHEVROLET IMPALA SS dirty and dusty. Recently expired Texas registration points to practical use. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $82,080. There’s never a shortage of Split-Windows at auction (there were seven here in Houston), but in a sea of C2 Fuelies and NCRS-decorated cars, unique options can make a car stand out. Of the roughly 21,500 Corvettes built in 1963, just over 2,600 were fitted with a Powerglide, about the same number as got fuel injection. Rarity doesn’t always equal value, however, especially on a car with the bottom-rung engine option. Well sold. Mecum Auctions, Houston, TX, 04/15. 144 396 2-dr hard top. S/N 166375C136776. Black/black vinyl. Odo: 8,214 miles. 396-ci V8, 4-bbl, 4-sp. Sat in a collection for years and driven occasionally. Motor believed original. Mileage probably plus 100k. Engine com- Sports Car Market


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Roundup partment tidy, with a/c, power steering, power brakes. Vintage-style chrome 16-inch Cragar five-spoke wheels with Redline tires and dual exhaust. An overall nice car, not beat up, has the usual scuffs, nicks and scratches inside and out, some fading here and there. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $25,948. Part of the Muscle Car City cast. Just a nice old driver with a period look, affordable to own and easy to fix. Retail price paid for a respectable car with all the amenities. Premier, Punta Gorda, FL, 04/15. #S110-1967 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX 2-dr hard top. S/N 266577P204949. Gold/ black vinyl. Odo: 57,398 miles. 400-ci V8, 4-bbl, 4-sp. Factory bucket seats, console 4-speed. Block stamped correct “XZ” code for a manual-transmission full-size car with 400ci V8. Bodywork needs help. Black interior is the best part of the car—not perfect but decent, no cracks in the dash. Used-car detail Said to be one of less than 10 X22 L78 Camaros known to exist. Paint better than new with no visible flaws. Perfect panel fit. Rubber is all new and flawless. Top presents as new, interior is better than new. Undercarriage as tidy as the top. Engine compartment is clean and perfect. Small blemish on driver’s door vinyl. Cond: nor 100% restored. Mecum Auctions, Houston, TX, 04/15. #S226-1970 CHEVROLET CHEVELLE SS 454 LS6 convertible. S/N 136670B188926. Black Cherry/white vinyl/black vinyl. Odo: 30,851 miles. 454-ci V8, 4-bbl, 4-sp. The car was sent to JV Enterprises in Azusa, CA, for a rotisserie nut-and-bolt restoration. Betterthan-new condition. Protect-O-Plate verifies all original components. Claimed to be one of under the hood, rattle-can sprayed underneath, rusty twin exhaust tips, later 15-inch Rally wheels. Basic options: power steering, no a/c. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $21,400. Pontiac set the pace for big muscle cars in the early ’60s with the Super Duties. This car had active bidding but fell short of expected price. Condition had a lot to do with that, but still, it’s an unusual 4-speed car with lots of potential. So-so deal for the condition. Premier, Punta Gorda, FL, 04/15. #S212-1968 SHELBY GT500 fastback. S/N 8T02S14344801575. White & blue/black vinyl. Odo: 14,335 miles. 428-ci V8, 4-bbl, auto. Early GT500, automatic with no a/c. Represented as non-original motor. Straight body with an older checking white paint job. Interior fairly original looking including shoulder harnesses. Tilt-Away steering column 1-. SOLD AT $153,900. The consignor says that the drive from the Mecum unload area to the display area inside the convention center is the single longest trip the car has made since the restoration. The rear Polyglas tires were wrapped in plastic to protect the white carpet that is usually included in the car’s display. The consignor had offered the car privately at $250k and had a reserve of $175k at this sale. He lifted the reserve on the block, and the new owner purchased it for a fraction of the restoration costs. Well bought. Mecum Auctions, Houston, TX, 04/15. #S138-1969 FORD MUSTANG Boss 429 fastback. S/N 9F02Z173015. Wimbledon White/black vinyl. Odo: 53,793 miles. 429-ci V8, 4-bbl, 4-sp. KK# 1656 with build sheets and letter from original owner. Out of a private collection. Unrestored California car but not what I would call “well preserved.” Black plates included. Mileage said to be original. All records from new. Evidence of prior paint with dry spray and flaking on front fender, fisheyes on hood scoop and early signs of the best LS6 Chevelle convertibles in the country. Equipped with the original 454 V8, M22 4-speed and 12-bolt Posi rear end. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $132,680. In 2013, it was featured in Muscle Car Review magazine, which called it “the pinnacle of perfection.” Last sold for $123k at Mecum Monterey in August of 2013 (SCM# 230572). Market-correct here today. Premier, Punta Gorda, FL, 04/15. #S131-1971 PONTIAC GTO convert- ible. S/N 242671P112596. Cinnamon Bronze/ white vinyl/Cinnamon vinyl. Odo: 52,538 miles. 400-ci V8, 4-bbl, 4-sp. Solid body and frame. Power steering, power brakes, a/c, detailed under the hood, very sanitary underneath. Although not mentioned, this car looks to have had a complete restoration years ago and has held up well. Nice interior features include buckets seats, console, hood tach, AM/ missing parts. Factory 10-spokes and raised white-letter tires. Odo has rolled over. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $78,110. This would be a great driver. Just tidy it up a bit and enjoy. Well bought and sold. Premier, Punta Gorda, FL, 04/15. #S122-1969 CHEVROLET CAMARO RS/SS convertible. S/N 124678N615403. Blue/black vinyl/black vinyl. Odo: 1 miles. 396-ci V8, 4-bbl, 4-sp. Multiple award winner. 146 crazing. Brightwork very good. Panel fitment is factory-correct. Glass in excellent condition. Interior in very good condition. Center console lid shows a little wear. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $216,000. No longer hidden away, these have become pretty commonplace at most major auctions. This Boss 429 was described as being 95% original; MCA National Silver winner in 2013. Condition-wise far from perfect; one would not call this “well preserved.” While some of the body was original, with paint applied in Dearborn in the late 1960s, other panels showed signs of repaint; no reason given. Price paid was on the steep side, given that the car was neither 100% original FM radio, comfort-weave seats and a/c. Factory honeycomb wheels and period Firestone Wide Ovals are a nice finishing touch. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $42,265. Member of the Muscle Car City Collection. The real deal and last of the coded GTOs (“42” in the VIN). Rare color combination. Looked as good underneath as on top. Right crowd and demographics. If the car is a true 4-speed with air, then it was a good buy for the condition. One happy new owner. Premier, Punta Gorda, FL, 04/15. #S104-1973 CHEVROLET CHEVELLE Roundup p Roundup p Roundup p Roundup p Roundup p Roundup p ndup partment tidy, with a/c, power steering, power br p partment tidy, with a/c, power steering, power brakes. Vintage-style chrome 16-inch Cragar five-spoke wheels with Redline tires and dual exhaust. An overall nice car, not beat up, has the usual scuffs, nicks and scratches inside and out, some fading here and there. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $25,948. Part of the Muscle Car City cast. Just a nice old driver with a period look, affordable to own and easy to fix. Retail price paid for a respectable car with all the amenities. Premier, Punta Gorda, FL, 04/15. #S110-1967 PONTIAC GRAND PRIX 2-dr hard top. S/N 266577P204949. Gold/ black vinyl. Odo: 57,398 miles. 400-ci V8, 4-bbl, 4-sp. Factory bucket seats, console 4-speed. Block stamped correct “XZ” code for a manual-transmission full-size car with 400- ci V8. Bodywork needs help. Black interior is the best part of the car—not perfect but de- cent, no cracks in the dash. Used-car detail Said to be one of less than 10 X22 L78 Cama- ros known to exist. Paint better than new with no visible flaws. Perfect panel fit. Rubber is all new and flawless. Top presents as new, interior is better than new. Undercarriage as tidy as the top. Engine compartment is clean and perfect. Small blemish on driver’s door vinyl. Cond: nor 100% restored. Mecum Auctions, Hous- ton, TX, 04/15. #S226-1970 CHEVROLET CHEVELLE SS 454 LS6 convertible. S/N 136670B188- 926. Black Cherry/white vinyl/black vinyl. Odo: 30,851 miles. 454-ci V8, 4-bbl, 4-sp. The car was sent to JV Enterprises in Azusa, CA, for a rotisserie nut-and-bolt restoration. Better- than-new condition. Protect-O-Plate verifies all original components. Claimed to be one of under the hood, rattle-can sprayed underneath, rusty twin exhaust tips, later 15-inch Rally wheels. Basic options: power steering, no a/c. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $21,400. Pontiac set the pace for big muscle cars in the early ’60s with the Super Duties. This car had active bidding but fell short of expected price. Condition had a lot to do with that, but still, it’s an unusual 4-speed car with lots of potential. So-so deal for the condition. Premier, Punta Gorda, FL, 04/15. #S212-1968 SHELBY GT500 fastback. S/N 8T02S14344801575. White & blue/black vinyl. Odo: 14,335 miles. 428-ci V8, 4-bbl, auto. Early GT500, automatic with no a/c. Represented as non-original motor. Straight body with an older checking white paint job. Interior fairly original looking including shoulder harnesses. Tilt-Away steering column 1-. SOLD AT $153,900. The consignor says that the drive from the Mecum unload area to the display area inside the convention center is the single longest trip the car has made since the restoration. The rear Polyglas tires were wrapped in plastic to protect the white carpet that is usually included in the car’s display. The consignor had offered the car privately at $250k and had a reserve of $175k at this sale. He lifted the reserve on the block, and the new owner purchased it for a fraction of the restoration costs. Well bought. Mecum Auctions, Houston, TX, 04/15. #S138-1969 FORD MUSTANG Boss 429 fastback. S/N 9F02Z173015. Wimbledon White/black vinyl. Odo: 53,793 miles. 429-ci V8, 4-bbl, 4-sp. KK# 1656 with build sheets and letter from original owner. Out of a private collection. Unrestored California car but not what I would call “well preserved.” Black plates included. Mileage said to be original. All records from new. Evidence of prior paint with dry spray and flaking on front fender, fisheyes on hood scoop and early signs of the best LS6 Chevelle convertibles in the country. Equipped with the original 454 V8, M22 4-speed and 12-bolt Posi rear end. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $132,680. In 2013, it was fea- tured in Muscle Car Review magazine, which called it “the pinnacle of perfection.” Last sold for $123k at Mecum Monterey in August of 2013 (SCM# 230572). Market-correct here today. Premier, Punta Gorda, FL, 04/15. #S131-1971 PONTIAC GTO convert- ible. S/N 242671P112596. Cinnamon Bronze/ white vinyl/Cinnamon vinyl. Odo: 52,538 miles. 400-ci V8, 4-bbl, 4-sp. Solid body and frame. Power steering, power brakes, a/c, de- tailed under the hood, very sanitary under- neath. Although not mentioned, this car looks to have had a complete restoration years ago and has held up well. Nice interior features include buckets seats, console, hood tach, AM/ missing parts. Factory 10-spokes and raised white-letter tires. Odo has rolled over. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $78,110. This would be a great driver. Just tidy it up a bit and enjoy. Well bought and sold. Premier, Punta Gorda, FL, 04/15. #S122-1969 CHEVROLET CAMARO RS/SS convertible. S/N 124678N615403. Blue/black vinyl/black vinyl. Odo: 1 miles. 396-ci V8, 4-bbl, 4-sp. Multiple award winner. 146 crazing. Brightwork very good. Panel fitment is factory-correct. Glass in excellent condition. Interior in very good condition. Center console lid shows a little wear. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $216,000. No longer hidden away, these have become pretty commonplace at most major auctions. This Boss 429 was described as be- ing 95% original; MCA National Silver win- ner in 2013. Condition-wise far from perfect; one would not call this “well preserved.” While some of the body was original, with paint applied in Dearborn in the late 1960s, other panels showed signs of repaint; no rea- son given. Price paid was on the steep side, given that the car was neither 100% original FM radio, comfort-weave seats and a/c. Fac- tory honeycomb wheels and period Firestone Wide Ovals are a nice finishing touch. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $42,265. Member of the Muscle Car City Collection. The real deal and last of the coded GTOs (“42” in the VIN). Rare color combination. Looked as good underneath as on top. Right crowd and demographics. If the car is a true 4-speed with air, then it was a good buy for the condition. One happy new owner. Premier, Punta Gorda, FL, 04/15. #S104-1973 CHEVROLET CHEVELLE Sports Sports Car Market


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Roundup chrome exhaust tips extending past the impact bumper. Front-line car-lot ready, driver quality. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $24,610. Resale Red and selling at no reserve, part of the Muscle Car City inventory. Fairly bought and sold. Premier, Punta Gorda, FL, 04/15. #S105-1973 PONTIAC GTO 2-dr hard top. S/N 2F37T3A216365. Blue/blue vinyl. Odo: 2,772 miles. 400-ci V8, 4-bbl, 3-sp. Oneyear-only body style often referred to as “The Forgotten GTO.” Factory a/c, power steering and brakes. Interior decent, some cracks in the dash. Straight, paint okay, possible Bondo, no signs of any previous crash damage. Original Firebird. Mecum Auctions, Houston, TX, 04/15. #S112-1979 PONTIAC TRANS AM coupe. S/N 2W87Z9L138385. Black/red vinyl & velour. Odo: 55,321 miles. 400-ci V8, 4-bbl, 4-sp. Non-T-top coupe. Very desirable black over red. Power windows, a/c, AM/FM. Showroom condition with lots of Armor All. Engine bay detailed. Performance options include WS6 Handling Package with aluminum wheels, 4-wheel disc brakes and sway bars. #S115.1-2006 FORD GT Heritage Edi- tion coupe. S/N 1FAFP90S26Y402002. Heritage Blue & Epic Orange/black leather. Odo: 13 miles. 5.4-L supercharged V8, 6-sp. One of 343 Heritage Edition GTs produced in 2006. Double-digit low mileage original. Everything is like new, other than a few light scuffs on the door thresholds from entry and exit. No chips on the nose. No scuffs under the chin. Cond: motor, great documentation, including copy of window sticker, PHS form, and original owner’s manuals. Has 15-inch Rally wheels, wrong trim rings, raised white-letter tires. Nice used-car-lot condition. No reserve. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $18,725. Part of the Muscle Car City Collection. Showroom stock. Fair deal here, since I’ve seen people pay more for less. Premier, Punta Gorda, FL, 04/15. #F68-1974 PONTIAC TRANS AM rep- lica coupe. S/N 2S87M4N141937. Carousel Red/black vinyl. Odo: 92,599 miles. 350-ci V8, 4-bbl, auto. Recent restoration. Paint still smells fresh. Multiple prep issues throughout. Lots of dry spray around the taillights. Front window is very scratched with wiper marks. Rear glass has some gasket bunching from the interior trim. Exterior brightwork is dull around the windows. Interior is average. Vinyl seat coverings fit very loosely. Carpet on the bottom of the door cards is worn. Floor carpet Silver wheels and graphics, no big bird on the hood. Actually has a clean look. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $26,750. Another Muscle Car City showpiece selling at no reserve. Excellent documentation. Great price paid for an end user, but still a decent price for a dealer looking for a profit margin. Watch for this at the next auction with a $40k reserve. Premier, Punta Gorda, FL, 04/15. #T123-1985 CHRYSLER LEBARON Mark Cross Edition convertible. S/N 1C3BC55E4FG155849. White & woodgrain/white vinyl/tan leather. Odo: 55,856 miles. 2.2-L turbocharged I4, auto. Low mileage and all original. Paint original with some fading. Woodgrain is in good condition and overall fade-free. White top appears to be original with some light soiling and scratches in the back light. Glass and rubber are in very good condition. Interior lights work. Screen-printing on buttons and knobs like new. Gauges are clean and crisp. Leather interior shows very 1-. SOLD AT $513,000. Values continue to rocket forward on all GTs, with the most valuable being the limited Heritage Editions. Another car with 182 miles sold at Mecum Chicago last October for the exact same $513k, which we called “market correct” (SCM# 255897). This one with less than onetenth the mileage certainly looked like a fair purchase. Too bad that you can’t drive it, though. Mecum Auctions, Houston, TX, 04/15. #F133-2010 CHEVROLET CAMARO custom coupe. S/N 2G1FB1EV9A9128834. Cotton Candy Pink/pink & turquoise faux gator skin. Odo: 24,932 miles. 3.6-L fuel-injected V6, auto. Custom show car, but age and amateur craftsmanship are taking its toll. Mask lines, sand marks, fisheyes, dry spray and paint runs throughout. Doors sag due to extra weight of televisions mounted in the doors. Custom interior in sad condition due to poor prep and questionable fit and finish. Many things that come from the factory as unpainted plastic have been repainted, with the paint easily wearing off. Faux gator-skin seat fabric has been replaced. Thresholds are new. Engine looks a little tired. Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $16,200. A cosmetically nearly identical Pontiac that was actually a Trans Am crossed the block just a few lots earlier and did not sell for $16k. This one was a Firebird modified to look like a Trans Am and powered by a lesser 350ci V8. The high bids on these two vehicles should have been more than $1,000 apart. This one was recently restored, but don’t expect to see it on the lawn at your regional concours. The price paid here was fair for a 148 little wear. Some wear on the driver’s side carpet. Engine appears well maintained. Hoses a little aged. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $7,560. Early LeBarons got the faux-wood trim as part of the Town & Country package; in later years, the trim came as part of the ultra luxe Mark Cross package, which featured high-quality leather and turbo power. Still, “K cars” as a whole are better known for their inexpensive build quality and acres of interior plastic. One configured just like this with a few more miles sold for a little less at Silver’s Portland sale in 2010 (SCM# 160042). Price here was on the money. Mecum Auctions, Houston, TX, 04/15. is very loose and looks very inexpensive. On 32-inch wheels. Cond: 4+. SOLD AT $27,000. A colorful “donk” (that’s what these highriding customs are called, if you didn’t know) taken to the extreme. With its cotton candy paint job and towering height, it was visible from across the venue. The craftsmanship was sub-par and already appeared very tired. A Missouri dealer recently had it listed on its website for $30k, and the sale price wasn’t too far off from retail. Recently no-saled at $23k Sports Car Market


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at Mecum Kissimmee in January (SCM# 262305). Mecum Auctions, Houston, TX, 04/15. #S232-2015 DODGE CHALLENGER Hellcat coupe. S/N 2C3CDZC92FH722644. Sublime Green/black leather. Odo: 191 miles. 6.2-L supercharged V8, auto. Factory-fresh and like new. Less than 200 test miles and not broken in. Everything is factory-correct. Tires barely worn. Interior still smells new. No signs of entry or exit. No sign of rubbing on the front chin. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $86,400. There was a lot of promise for this car, as another Hellcat that crossed the block on Friday sold for an astonishing $119k. That one had 11 original miles with stickers and markings still present, along with a manual transmission. These are in high demand, with independent dealers paying well over retail from Dodge dealers and still turning a profit. This one sold over MSRP but was almost wholesale given the current market. Fair deal for both parties. Mecum Auctions, Houston, TX, 04/15. © WHAT’S YOUR CAR WORTH? FIND OUT AT NOW FREE! The world’s largest collector car price guide based on over 500,000 sold transactions from . Updated weekly. collectorcarpricetracker.com July 2015 149


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Mystery Photo Answers The vinyl flames gave away yet another clone of the über-rare Limited Edition “Toy Story” Corolla. Experts know the flames are paint on the originals! — Thomas F. Magda, Pittsford, NY — Al Nelson, Pentwater, MI Read an in-depth analysis by John Draneas in our July issue of why maritime law prevails when a tuner T-bones an ark. — Michael D. Plante, via email Hey, Cheech, that was a bad trip! — Mitchell A. Josephs DDS, Palm Beach, FL The ideal vehicle for a long road trip with children who like to play “I Spy With My Little Eye.” — Jim Graham, Mount Pleasant, SC Some people mount their childhood memorabilia on the dashboard, but this is over the top — and the hood and the trunk. — Steve Schefbauer, Monroe, CT Thomas Magda wins an SCM hat festooned with plastic animals — and real flamethrowers — for finding the perfect mix of SCM snobbery and street style. © This Month’s Mystery Photo Response Deadline: June 25, 2015 RUNNER-UP: Bubba, the concours you are looking for is “Art of the Car,” which is located at the beautiful Kansas City Art Institute in June, not “Art on the Car,” which is located at your local Walmart parking lot most weekends. — Phil Schroeder, Platte City, MO This is what they do to your car at Toys R Us when you park in the handicapped spot and you don’t have a sticker. — Leslie Dreist, Troy, MI Mitsubishi has made the swan song/antelope song /polar bear/ dinosaur/Honey, We Bought a Comments With Your Renewals I love Sports Car Market. Somehow in my busy lifestyle I find time to read every issue. Congratulations on 27 years to Keith and the SCM crew. — Brad Barber, Houston, TX Keep up the good work! Still waiting for the collectors’ garages. — Ray Wojszynski, Pittsburgh, PA Keith Martin, I wonder 150 Zoo song 2015 Evo truly a car to remember — right down to the dog-dish hubcaps. — Erik Olson, Martinez, CA Pulled from a barn outside of Los Angeles, Walt’s Subaru revealed initial plans for Animal Kingdom. — Jack Frankel, Silver Spring, MD Those boar-hair detail brushes really brought out the negative space between the tchotchkes. — Norman Vogel, San Francisco, CA So Tommy turns 16, but he hasn’t quite outgrown the toys of his youth. Looks like a win-win. how many subscription renewals you lose because your website is so +!#//*K screwed up? Nevertheless, I am using a stamp to renew. I enjoy the entire magazine but most of all “Legal Files” by John Draneas. — Bart Nadeau, San Francisco, CA Bart, I’m sorry for the difficult time you are having. Scott Corey, our Lead Web Developer, should have been in touch with you by now to help sort out your issues. — KM Our Photo, Your Caption Email your caption to us at mysteryphoto@sportscarmarket.com, or fax to 503.253.2234. Ties will be arbitrarily and capriciously decided. Do you have a mystery photo? Email it to mysteryphoto@sportscarmarket. com at 300 dpi in JPEG format. Please include your name and contact information. If we use your photo, you’ll get an official SCM cap. I am torn: On the one hand, your publication is becoming too big, too rich, too in-crowd, and way too Ferrari for my humble tastes… On the other hand, if I hang on for two more years I should be eligible for the gold watch drawing for 20-year subscribers. So here’s my three-year renewal, probably my last, but in a way, that’s a tribute to the booming market, and your great success. — Lee Runk, Orchard Lake, MI Lee, we’ve decided to have a drawing for a Ferrari 250 GTO (of some scale size) for 30-year subscribers. How’s that for an enticement? — KM After 12 years of subscriptions, I found the finest 1967 Morgan Plus 4 in the USA. It is mine now. Thanks. — Dr. Ken Blumberg, Livingston, NJ I won Best of Show at Cavallino. Can you mention me in the magazine? — Jaime Muldoon, Houston, TX Congrats, Jaime. Now tell us what your car was and send a picture. — KM Dear SCM gang. It would be great if you created a price guide app for the iPhone. Just sayin’. Thanks. — Mike Meyers, Medfield, MA Mike, it’s on the way. — KM Thank you all for your continued renewals and thoughtful comments. — Keith Martin Sports Car Market Marty Orgel


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SCM Showcase Gallery Sell Your Car Here! Includes SCM website listing. Showcase Gallery Full-Color Photo Ad Just $66/month ($88 non-subscribers) Text-Only Classified Ad Just $15/month ($25 non-subscribers) 4 ways to submit your ad: Web: Visit www.sportscarmarket.com/classifieds/place-ad to upload your photo (300 dpi jpg) and text, or text only. Secure online Visa/MC payments. Email: Send photo (300 dpi jpg) and text, or text only, to classifieds@sportscarmarket.com. We will call for your VISA/MC. Fax: Attention Showcase, to 503.253.2234 with VISA/MC. Snail mail: Showcase, PO Box 4797, Portland, OR 97208-4797, with VISA/MC or check. 25 words max, subject to editing. Deadline: 1st of each month, one month prior to publication. Advertisers assume all liability for the content of their advertisements. The publisher of Sports Car Market Magazine is not responsible for any omissions, erroneous, false and/or misleading statements of its advertisers. English 1953 Sunbeam Alpine roadster Heritage CoA, handbook and operation manual. An exceptional MGA example. Classic Showcase, 760.758.6100, Email: webmaster@classicshowcase. com Web: classicshowcase.com/index.php/inventory/ detail/469 (CA) 1966 Jaguar XKE Series I convertible S/N 1R7547. Carmen Red/black. 21,559 miles. I6, 4-spd manual. Very original XKE with three decades of single ownership. Fiery color combo. Recently serviced and detailed, with its interior recently refreshed including a new correct top. Includes manual, service records, books and Heritage CoA. A great Series II XKE ready for the summer. Classic Showcase, 760.758.6100, Email: webmaster@classicshowcase. com Web: classicshowcase.com/index.php/inventory/ detail/410 (CA) 1969 Jaguar XKE Series II convertible Included with the chassis was a Twin-Cam Lotus engine and close-ratio transmission rebuilt by Dave Bean. It was assembled in 1982 and has less then 1,000 miles. $31,795. Contact Ted, 541.479.8888, Email: ted@automaniagp.com Web: www.automaniagp.com (OR) 1969 Jaguar XKE Series II convertible matic. 4.0-L. Leather interior with wood accents, stunning color combination, black power soft top. Always garaged, excellent condition, fog lamps, cruise control, front air bags, electric seats. $11,850. Contact Coleman, 804.380.9028, Email: tinkerhorse14@gmail.com (VA) German 1952 BMW 327/2 cabriolet 4-spd manual. BMW/EMW 327/2 Cabriolet, excellent candidate to preserve or restore. 45 years in dry New Mexico. Upgraded with period higher-horsepower Bristol 2-liter engine for more spirited driving. Don’t miss this opportunity. Cars will be auctioned at Auction America’s California Auction July 17–18. Call Ed or Scott (602) 541-9444. Contact Ed, 602.377.1197, Email: ebwestfam@cox.net (AZ) 1969 Mercedes 280SL convertible Beautiful car made famous in the Hitchcock film “To Catch A Thief.” Chevy V6, 5-speed, disc brakes, coilover suspension and rack-and-pinion steering. Entire car is restored to show-quality level. Leather and Wilton wool interior. Everything new, classic English looks. $69,900 OBO. Contact Mike, 303.947.7788, Email: jmfuchs@comcast.net (CO) 1959 MGA Twin-Cam roadster S/N 1304410006008. Dark green (286H)/bamboo. I6, 4-spd manual. Original owner! Rare 4-speed manual transmission car, 38k miles on odometer, numbers matching everything, never wrecked, never apart. An original car...and they are only original once. $300,000. Contact Thomas, 561.346.2816, Email: drIrahorowitz@gmail.com (FL) S/N 1E11887. Red/black. I6, 5-spd manual. This E-type is very well-presented and ready for your favorite summer cruise. Inline-six with overhead cam, headers, triple SU carbs, synchronized 5-speed, stainless-steel exhaust, cooling fan, Gaz adjustable shocks and Wilwood brakes. An excellent daily driver. Classic Showcase, 760.758.6100, Email: webmaster@classicshowcase.com Web: classicshowcase. com/index.php/inventory/detail/463 (CA) 1968 Lotus Super Seven S3 replica roadster S/N YD3/734. Old English White/red. I4, 4-spd manual. Rare, unmolested roadster, one of only 2,111 examples ever produced. Limited ownership, with an extensive and highly detailed restoration. Comes documented with an article covering its restoration along with photos of the work done, Light blue/dark blue leather. I6, 5-spd manual. Immaculate condition, JCNA and multiple show winner. 12k miles on rebuilt engine, full motor and interior-out repaint in 2014. 5-speed Tremec manual transmission, original 4-speed included. New stainless exhaust, new Dayton wires, new tires, new/ refurbished interior. MANY more photos available online. $92,000. Contact David, Auto Archeologist, Email: E4WBrill@aol.com Web: www.AutoArcheologist.com (CT) 1995 Jaguar XJS convertible 1970 Mercedes-Benz 280SE convertible S/N 11102512004359. Forest Green/light brown. 54,550 miles. I6, 4-spd automatic. Superbly maintained original car with excellent older repaint. Air conditioning, Becker AM/FM, new Michelins, original top cover. Recent dealer service. Needs nothing. $139,000. Contact Randall, 607.342.2734, Email: rmarcus@bgdmolaw.com (NY) S/N AM167. Green/black. I4, 4-spd manual. Super Seven S3 tribute car. The car came in parts from Tom McBurnie during a stressed cash flow moment. 1974 Mercedes-Benz 450SL convertible S/N SAJNX2749SC197498. Sea Green Metallic/magnolia. 61,000 miles. V6, 4-spd auto- S/N 10704412015437. Silver metallic/black. 130,468 miles. V8, 4-spd automatic. Every option, rare black hard top, black wheel covers, fitted with indestructible M-B 117 V8 4,520-cc/190-hp, Bosch fuel-injected engine. Second owner since 1978, meticulously maintained, with service records. Outstanding condition—body, interior and mechanicals. Hero car from the film “True Colors.” $18,500. Contact Annie, 804.380.9028, Email: tinkerhorse14@gmail. com (VA) 1981 BMW M1 German Collector Car Restoration Services This beautiful BMW M1 is just one of the restorations The Werk Shop has completed throughout the years. Our restorations are considered to be some of the finest in the world, garnering many best-in-class/ show trophies. Please contact us if you’d like help finding your next project car. BMW - Porsche - Mercedes The Werk Shop, 847.295.3200, Email: mike@ thewerkshop.com Web: www.thewerkshop.com 152 Sports Car Market


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SCM Showcase Gallery 1985 Porsche 911 coupe enjoy the ride. $89,500. Contact Andy, 801.647.7314, Email: andyp@permaplate.com (UT) 2005 Ferrari Superamerica convertible H6, European Model 930, 35k original miles, dark blue exterior, blue full leather interior including dash, excellent condition with recent service including new fluids and tires. Clean CARFAX. Don’t miss this opportunity. Cars will be auctioned at Auction America’s California Auction July 17–18. Call Ed or Scott (602.541.9444). Contact Ed, 602.377.1197, Email: ebwestfam@cox.net (AZ) 1996 BMW 318ti coupe S/N ZFFGT61AX50144597. Gray/red. 14,951 miles. V12, 6-spd automatic. Silverstone gray w/red leather interior, red calipers, interior carbon trim, Daytona seats, Scuderia shields, rear leather, Hi-power HiFi with six-CD changer. A major service including timing-belt replacement was performed by Scottsdale Ferrari in August of 2011. Recently serviced in March 2015. $379,900 OBO. Contact Chris, The Stables Automotive Group, LLC, 480.699.3095, Email: info@stablesgroup.com (AZ) 2006 Ferrari F1 Spider 1969 Chevrolet Corvette L88 coupe S/N WBACG8324TAU35636. Calypso Red/gray. 100,800 miles. I4, 4-spd automatic. We are the second owner of this car as of 2007. No rust evident. Front suspension has been fully rebuilt, new rear shocks, new rotors and pads front and rear, window regulators replaced, sunroof fixed and works, newer radiator, water pump and thermostat. Oil changes every 3,000 miles. Includes four alloy wheels with snow tires. $4,900 OBO. Contact Ralph, 732.357.5373, Email: ralphfreese1@aol.com (NJ) Italian 1965 Ferrari 275 GTS convertible S/N 7935. Silver/tan. V12, 5-spd manual. Owned by an enthusiast and Ferrari collector whose cars have included McQueen’s 1963 Ferrari Lusso. As you would expect, the car has been professionally looked after and kept in top mechanical condition. A recent service of the front suspension included new tie-rod ends and sway-bar bushings. The sophistication of the styling and understated design are complemented nicely by the silver paint and mildly contrasting tan leather interior with its black dash and tan door panels. This color combination displays the car’s subtle features better than red or darker, more common alternatives. A no-stories, no-issues automobile ready for tours, display and Sunday outings. The ultimate open classic Ferrari driving experience and pride of ownership along with proven investment potential. Recently driven on the Tributo Ferrari tour to celebrate 60 years of Ferrari USA and shown at The Quail show in Carmel Valley in 2005. Extensive documentation, including the pre-purchase inspection Patrick Ottis Company performed when purchased by current owner. $1,950,000. Contact Loren, 650.483.6567, Email: loren3hansen@gmail. com Web: www.65ferrari275gts.com (CA) 1983 Ferrari 308 GTS targa S/N ZFFEW58A160148683. Tour de France Blu/tan. 15,000 miles. V8, sequential. Rare exterior color. Concours condition. Recent best of show for Ferrari concours event. Factory Challenge wheels with Titanium lugs. Recent 15k mile service. Original paint. Great history. 90-plus photos and full history available on our website. $137,990. Contact Paul, AutoKennel, 714.335.4911, Email: paul@autokennel.com Web: www.autokennel.com (CA) American 1955 Pontiac Safari wagon Silver Blue/black. 4-spd manual. Factory a/c split-window, 300hp. Body-off restoration by Nabers. Bloomington Gold and NCRS Top Flight. Very rare! $195,000. ProTeam Corvette Sales Inc., 419.592.5086, Email: terry@proteamcorvette. com (OH) 1968 Plymouth Fury III convertible S/N L755H22047. Bolero Red & White Mist/red & white. V8, 2-spd automatic. Rare and beautiful. Restored from top to bottom, $100k+ spent. 287 Power Pack, 4-bbl, factory tinted glass, original wire wheel covers, dual spot lamps, radio, tissue box, discreet front disc brakes. Show winner. Excellent paint, brightwork and body fit. Detailed engine and chassis. 335 miles since completion. Gorgeous. $75,000. Contact Alex, RB Classic Car Collection, 610.398.9700, Email: alex@rbcarcollection.com Web: www.rbcarcollection.com (PA) 1956 Chevrolet Bel Air 2-dr hard top S/N 1G2PG370606FP257779. Red & gray/24,596 miles. V6, 4-spd manual. Exceptional condition, 2.8-liter, electric windows, a/c, deluxe sound system. Alloy wheels, two owner’s manuals. Email for additional images. Chicago. $8,750 OBO. Contact Burt, 312.951.8981, Email: burt@fitzrich.com (IL) Race 1975 Delta IR-F4B race car S/N ZFFEW59A260148741. Giallo Modena/black leather. 12,500 miles. V8, Like-new condition, an amazing car that provides maximum driving thrills. 4.3-liter, 483-hp DOHC V8 engine. Interior has leather upholstery, premium stereo sound system and carbon fiber trim throughout. Classic Showcase, 760.758.6100, Email: webmaster@classicshowcase. com Web: classicshowcase.com/index.php/inventory/ detail/395 (CA) 2006 Ferrari F430 F1 coupe S/N 216115103035. Roman Red/red. 0 miles. V8, 4-spd automatic. A “day two” certified 409 4-speed car with dual quads and Positraction. Heater and radio delete, no ps, no pb, hidden stereo under seat. Cheater slicks, exhaust cut-outs, Cherry Bombs, correct Sun tach, all-stock interior with bench seat. Steel wheels with poverty caps. Climate controlled storage. $75,000 OBO. Email: billcollopy@holbrookinc. com (IL) 1963 Chevrolet Corvette coupe Venetian Red/red. 270 hp. Body-off restored. Duntov Mark of Excellence, Bloomington Gold and four NCRS awards. $150,000. ProTeam Corvette Sales Inc., 419.592.5086, Email: terry@proteamcorvette. com (OH) 1962 Chevrolet Bel Air 409 2-dr sedan Monaco Orange/black. Nabers body-off restoration. Bloomington certified, Bloomington Earthquake ‘88, well documented. $650,000. ProTeam Corvette Sales Inc., 419.592.5086, Email: terry@proteamcorvette. com (OH) 1971 Chevrolet Corvette convertible S/N VC56J031280. Nassau Blue and Harbor Blue/light blue and light gray. 1,235 miles. V8, 2-spd automatic. Complete photo-documented restoration. Factory air conditioning. $54,900. Contact Chuck, Central Classic Cars, 419.618.3855, Email: chuckputsch@hotmail.com Web: www.centralclassiccars. com (OH) 1957 Chevrolet Corvette convertible Silver/red. 791 miles. 4-spd manual. 350-hp with 791 actual miles. Original unrestored time capsule with excellent cosmetics. $100,000. ProTeam Corvette Sales Inc., 419.592.5086, Email: terry@proteamcorvette.com (OH) 1969 Chevrolet Corvette convertible Mille Miglia Red/black. 74,000 miles. V8, 4-spd manual. LS5 454/365-hp, two tops, leather, a/c (rare on big-block cars), docs including original copies of tank sticker, MSO, titles. Refreshed/restored: a/c, hard top, interior, exterior. Heavily optioned, original matching engine, transmission, rear end, trim tag, etc. $58,500. Contact Ken, 248.626.5500, Email: kal@thepdmgroup.com (MI) 1985 Pontiac Fiero GT coupe Light blue/blue. 120,519 miles. V8, automatic. Second owner purchased from original owner in 2006. Numbers-matching Commando 383 V8 with 2-barrel carburetor and 727 Torque Flight Automatic Transmission. Always gets attention and sounds great. Always very well maintained. Car located in southwest Florida. $12,500 OBO. Contact Debbie, TYCTA, LLC, 847.774.4857, Email: tyctallc@gmail.com Web: https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=gvJaW1hvaFE (IL) S/N ZFFMA13A7D0048515. Rossa Corsa/black. 66,000 miles. V8, 5-spd manual. This is a chance to own a beautiful all-original 308. All maintenance done, new tires and an upgraded fuse box. A great opportunity for a fantastic example. Just get in and 154 Sports Car Market Black/I4, manual. One of three made in England in 1974/1975. Raced F4 in England and Formula C with the SCCA in the U.S. Not raced since 1979. Restored. Engine; Ford 105E, 997-cc, Hewland Mk9, new fuel cell. $29,750. Contact James, 402.435.0109, Email: jliska@neb.rr.com (NE)


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1983 Porsche/March 83G GTP race car H6, 5-spd manual. Al Holbert’s winning GTP car in 1983. Daytona 24-Hour outright winner in 1984. Great driving, original car. Excellent history, wellknown provenance. A fine addition to any collection. Contact Len M, 610.282.0109, Email: tigerlift@ hotmail.com (PA) © It’s so easy to sell your car on SCM! We now feature multiple images for our web listings. Go to: www.SportsCarMarket.com/classifieds/place-ad July 2015 155


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Advertise in the SCM Resource Directory. Call 877.219.2605 Ext. 218 for information, e-mail: scmadvert@sportscarmarket.com. Auction Companies Artcurial-Briest-Poulain-Le Fur. 33 (0)1 42 99 2056. 33 (0)1 42 99 1639. 7, Rond-Point des Champs-Elysées, 75008 Paris, France. Email: motorcars@artcurial.com. www.artcurial.com/motorcars. (FR) Auctions America. 877.906.2437. Auctions America specializes in the sale of American classics, European sports cars, Detroit muscle, hot rods and customs. The company boasts an expert team of specialists, who offer 180 years combined experience buying, selling, racing and restoring collector vehicles, making them uniquely qualified to advise on all aspects of the hobby. www.auctionsamerica.com. (IN) JR-Auctions. A Wyoming-based company, founded by Robert A. Tybor, entrepreneur/businessman and Jeff Davi, Entrepreneur/ Real-Estate Broker. JR-Auctions will be hosting its first live/virtual Monterey Plaza Hotel classic Auto/Yacht Auction in Aug, 2015 overlooking the beautiful Monterey Bay. For more information please visit our website jr-auctions.com or call to 844-572-8867. Accepting Consignments-please register online. You don’t want to miss it. of the excitement! Check us out at www.hollywoodcarauctions.com. Where Collectors Collect! See You On The Block! A family-run auction house producing two large classic cars auctions per year. McCormick’s Palm Springs Auctions has been in business for over 25 years, and each auction features over 500 classics & exotics. www.classic-carauction.com. (CA) Leake Auctions. 800.722.9942. Leake Auction Company was established in 1972 as one of the first car auctions in the country. More than 40 years later Leake has sold over 34,000 cars and currently operates auctions in Tulsa, Oklahoma City and Dallas. Recently they have been featured on several episodes of three different reality TV series — Fast N Loud on Discovery, Dallas Car Sharks on Velocity and The Car Chasers on CNBC Prime. www.leakecar.com (OK) Carlisle Collector Car Auctions. Barrett-Jackson Auction. 480.421.6694. 480.421.6697. For over four decades, the Barrett-Jackson Auction Company has been recognized throughout the world for offering only the finest selection of quality collector vehicles, outstanding professional service and an unrivaled sales success. From classic and one-of-a-kind cars to exotics and muscle cars, BarrettJackson attracts only the best. Our auctions have captured the true essence of a passionate obsession with cars that extends to collectors and enthusiasts throughout the world. A television audience of millions watches unique and select vehicles while attendees enjoy a lifestyle experience featuring fine art, fashion and gourmet cuisine. In every way, the legend is unsurpassed. N. Scottsdale Rd, Scottsdale, AZ 85251. info@barrett-jackson.com. www.barrett-jackson.com. (AZ) 717.243.7855. 1000 Bryn Mawr Road, Carlisle, PA 17013. Spring and Fall Auctions. High-line cars cross the block. Hundreds of muscle cars, antique, collector, and special-interest cars, trucks and motorcycles. Real Cars. Real Prices. www.carlisleauctions.com. (PA) Petersen Auction Group of Oregon. 541.689.6824. Hosting car auctions in Oregon since 1962. We have three annual Auctions: February, Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem, OR; July, Douglas Co. Fairgrounds, Roseburg, OR; September, Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem, OR. On the I-5 Corridor. We offer knowledgeable, fast, friendly “hassle-free” transactions. Oregon’s #1 Collector Car Auction www. petersencollectorcars.com Lucky Collector Car Auctions. Dan Kruse Classics is a family- owned collector car auction company located in San Antonio, Texas. DKC has been responsible for successful collector car sales since 1972, with annual sales in Austin, Houston and San Antonio. Dan has personally has over $1,000,000,000 in sales in his storied career. Dan and daughters Tiffany, Tedra and Tara, manage the company. 866.495.8111 Dankruseclassics.com (TX) 888.672.0020. Lucky Collector Car Auctions is aptly named after Harold “Lucky” Lemay. Based in the majestic, pastoral ground of Marymount, home to the Lemay Family Collection Foundation near Tacoma, WA, the collection, formerly the biggest in the world, according to Guinness, now hosts an unrivaled event center, art collection and charitable foundation, which features two exceptional collector car auctions a year. www.luckyoldcar.com (WA) Rick Cole Auctions . Rick Cole conducted the first auction ever held in Monterey. His dozen successive annual events forever changed the landscape of the historic weekend. Next August, Rick Cole and Terry Price combine 70-plus years of professional client care to present an entirely new type of Monterey Auction experience, conducted at The Marriott Hotel. Limited consignment. Email: rickcole@rickcole.com Web: www.rickcole.com (CA) Motostalgia. 512.813.0636. Bonhams is the largest auction house to hold scheduled sales of classic and vintage motorcars, motorcycles and car memorabilia, with auctions held globally in conjunction with internationally renowned motoring events. Bonhams holds the world-record price for any motorcar sold at auction, as well as for many premier marques. San Francisco: (415) 391-4000 New York: (212) 644-9001 Los Angeles: (323) 850-7500 London: +44 20 7447-7447 Paris: +33 1 42 61 10 10 www.bonhams.com/motors FOLLOW SCM Hollywood Wheels Auctions & Shows 800.237.8954. Hosting two auctions a year in beautiful Palm Beach, FL, March & December. Offering quality collector cars and personalized service, all in a climate-controlled, state-of-the-art facility. Come be a part 156 Palm Springs Auctions Inc. Keith McCormick. 760.320.3290. 760.323.7031. 244 N. Indian Canyon Drive, Palm Springs, CA 92262 Sports Car Market Gooding & Company. 310.899.1960. 310.899.0930. Gooding & Company offers its international clientele the rarest, award-winning examples of collector vehicles at the most prestigious auction venues. Our team of well-qualified experts will advise you on current market values. Gooding & Company presents the official auction of the famed Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in August, the recordsetting Scottsdale Auction in January and a world-class auction at the Omni Amelia Island Plantation in Florida in March. www.goodingco.com. (CA) A premier international collector car auction house offering the rarest and finest automobiles on the world market. Motostalgia publishes a full photographic catalog presenting and documenting professional descriptions and provenance. Motostalgia’s diverse automotive experts offer bidders and consigners alike an accurate understanding of the global automotive market. With venues that parallel the most exciting automotive events like the U.S. Grand Prix and Keels & Wheels Concours d’Elegance, Motostalgia offers an upscale experience that not only showcases the most collectable cars, but also provides a unique and exciting social environment that is befitting of the rarest and finest automobiles. www.motostalgia.com email: info@motostalgia.com facebook.com/Motostalgia Twitter: @Motostalgia RM Auctions, Inc. 800.211.4371. RM Auctions is the world’s largest collector car auction house for investmentquality automobiles. With 35 years’ experience, RM’s vertically integrated range of services, from restoration to private treaty sales and auctions, coupled with an expert team of car specialists and an international footprint, provide an unsurpassed level of service to the global collector car market. www.rmauctions.com. (CAN) Russo and Steele Collector Auto- mobile Auctions. 602.252.2697. Fax: 602.252.6260. Specializing in the finest European sports, American muscle, hot rods and custom automobiles; Russo and Steele now hosts three record-breaking auctions per year; Newport Beach in June; Monterey, CA, every August, and Scottsdale, AZ, every January. As one of the premier auction events in the United States, Russo and Steele has developed a reputation for its superior customer service and for having the most experienced and informed experts in the industry. www.russoandsteele.com. (AZ) RESOURCE DIRECTORY


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Appraisals Silver Auctions. 800.255.4485. Silver Auctions isn’t successful because we auction the most expensive cars, we’re successful because we auction the cars that you love. Silver Auction’s staff, bidders and consignors are everyday people with a passion for Nostalgic and Collector cars. Come see the difference at Silver Auctions. 2020 N. Monroe, Spokane, WA 99205. Email: silver@silverauctions.com, www.silverauctions.com. (WA) Automobilia Buy/Sell/General Auto Appraisal Group. 800.848.2886. Offices located nationwide. Pre-purchase inspection service, insurance matters, charitable donations, resale vales, estates, expert witness testimony. On-site inspection. Certified, confidential, prompt, professional. “Not just one man’s opinion of value.” See website for locations and service descriptions. www.autoappraisal.com. Worldwide Auctioneers. 800.990.6789 or 1.260.925.6789. Worldwide Auctioneers was formed over a decade ago by vintage-motorcar specialists Rod Egan and John Kruse. The sale and acquisition of classic automobiles is our core business, and no one is better qualified. Worldwide is unique in having owners who are also our chief auctioneers, so you deal directly with the auctioneer, and we are wholly invested in achieving the best result for you. Our auctions are catalogue-based, offering a limited number of higher-end consignments, with an emphasis on quality rather than volume. (We don’t limit ourselves to only selling the most expensive cars in the world, but do ensure that every car we consign is the very best of its type.) We also offer specialist-appraisal, estate-management and collectionconsultancy services. Our dedicated private sales division serves the needs of individual collectors who seek privacy or to acquire vehicles that may not be available on the open market. www.worldwide-auctioneers.com. (IN) Alfa Romeo Cosmopolitan Motors, LLC. 206.467.6531. For over a quarter century, Cosmopolitan Motors has been at the center of the world for collector cars changing hands. Their unparalleled experience in tracking valuations makes them uniquely capable of valuating the rare and unusual. Estates, settlements, collections, insurance. Let their billion dollars worth of experience supply the results you seek. “We covet the rare and unusual, whether pedigreed or proletarian”. www.cosmopolitanmotors.com (WA) Automotive Restorations. Coachbuilt Press. 215.925.4233. Coachbuilt Press creates limited-edition automotive titles for the discriminating motoring enthusiast. We present exceptional material on the most significant collections, museums and marques with a balance of authoritative writing, precise research, unique historical documents and the modern photography of Michael Furman. Please visit our website to view our latest titles and order. www.CoachbuiltPress.com (PA). 203.377.6745. Collector car sales, both road and race, have been a key activity for over 35 years. Our sales professionals actively seek consignments on a global basis. We also offer vehicle “search and find” for rare models. We undertake pre-purchase inspections worldwide. We provide auction support, including in-person or telephone bidding for absentee buyers. Restoration management and special-event assistance are also included in our services. Our aim is to make sure that your collector car passion is as enjoyable and worry-free as possible. www.automotiverestorations.com Gooding & Company. 310.899.1960. Gooding & Company’s experts are well-qualified to appraise individual automobiles as well as collections and estates. Whether it is the creation of a foundation, living trust or arrangement of a charitable donation, we are able to assist you. www.goodingco.com. (CA) Centerline Products. 888.750. ALFA, Exclusively Alfa Romeo for over 30 years — rely on our experience to build and maintain your dream Alfa. Restoration, maintenance and performance parts in stock for Giulietta through 164. Newly developed products introduced regularly. Check our website for online store, new arrivals, tech tips, and special offers. www.centerlinealfa.com. (CO) Motostalgia. 512.813.0636. Jon Norman’s Alfa Parts. 800.890.2532. 510.525.9519. 1221 Fourth Street, Berkley, CA 94710. Large selection of parts from Giulietta to 164. Efficient, personal service. www.alfapartscatalog.com. (CA) A premier international collector car auction house and professional appraisal company. Motostalgia’s diverse and multilingual automotive experts offer collectors and investors alike an accurate understanding of the global and domestic automotive market. Motostalgia’s international offices have the capability of appraising collector cars around the globe. With decades of global collector car market knowledge our experts can accurately value your most prized automobiles, ranging from a single pre-purchase appraisal to full collection valuations. www.motostalgia.com email: info@motostalgia.com facebook.com/Motostalgia Twitter: @Motostalgia Celebrate your ownership experi- ence! Automotive designer & illustrator, Steve Anderson is a specialist in the creation of owner-specified, fineart illustrations. Each original piece is hand crafted to portray the exact specification of individual automobiles and collections. All marques, eras, driven, concours and race. Ferrari- & Porsche-licensed Illustrator. For image samples, additional information or to discuss your project, please call us at 818.822.3063 or visit www.saillustrations.com (CA) Steve Austin’s Automobilia & Great Vacations. 800.452.8434. European Car Collector tours including Monaco & Goodwood Historics, private collections, and car manufacturers. Automobile Art importer of legendary artists Alfredo de la Maria and Nicholas Watts. www.steveaustinsgreatvacations.com. Charles Prince Classic Cars. Based in London, we are specialists in the finest historic motorcars and in contact with dealers and collectors from around the world. We offer the best advice and service in the collector car field. Int T: (0)798 5988070 or email: sales@ charlesprinceclassiccars.com www.charlesprinceclassiccars.com. Vintage Auto Posters. Since 1980, Everett Anton Singer has been supplying international collectors with the most diverse selection of authentic vintage automotive posters. The vast inventory runs from the late 1890s through the 1960s; featuring marque, event and product advertising. Please visit us at: www.VintageAutoPosters.com. July 2015 Checker Motor Cars. At Checker Motor Cars we have a passion for cars, not only CHECKERS, but all cars. We are fanatic about automobile history and that drives our passion to restore history and art. Sales, Parts, Service and Restorations for Checker Automobiles. www.checkermotorcars.com (MA) 157 Beverly Hills Car Club is one of the largest European classic car dealerships in the nation, with an extensive inventory spanning over 50,000 sf. We can meet all your classic car needs with our unprecedented selection; from top-ofthe-line models to project cars. We buy classic cars in any shape or condition & provide the quickest payment & pickup anywhere in the U.S. 310.975.0272 www.beverlyhillscarclub.com (CA) CAR ART, INC. www.CarArt.us We are your one-stop shop for the World’s Finest Automotive Art. Choose from 1,300 artworks of 130 marques by 80 renowned fine artists, car designers and photographers. “Whether your preference is European sports and racing cars, American muscle or pre-war classics, you’ll find what you’re looking for.” — SCM. Founded in 2002 by Peter Aylett after 25 years in car design with Ford, GM, Lotus, Mercedes, Mazda and Nissan. Contact Peter at info@carart.us or call 949-433-0500 (CA) Auto Kennel. 714.335.4911. Imag- ine if you had the best of the best market your car for sale. Jesse Alexander taking all the photographs. Lee Iacocca working with buyers. Keith Martin introducing you to the right car clubs. Well, the father and son team of AutoKennel do just that for all their clients. Paul and Ed Kramer, Costa Mesa, CA 92627. www.autokennel.com (CA)


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Advertise in the SCM Resource Directory. Call 877.219.2605 Ext. 218 for information, e-mail: scmadvert@sportscarmarket.com. Classic Assets Motor Sports Cen- ter. 760-452-6609 or 858-554-0331. A first-rate used car dealership specializing in vintage rally-eligible vehicles as well as an eclectic private collection of investment-grade automobiles including classic cars, vintage rally cars and supercars. Our business is buying and selling classic, collectible motorcars. We are considered to be the go-to resource for collector cars in San Diego. We are constantly seeking new additions. Top quality, collectible trades always considered. We are available to assist buyers and sellers with all aspects regarding classic cars including import and export. www.ca-motorsportscenter. com. (CA) DeLorean Motor Company. 239.495.8550. The first franchise of the new DeLorean Motor Company. Celebrating our 10th year in business we are the South Eastern United States exclusive source for DeLorean Sales, Service, Restoration and Parts. We have the largest selection of DeLoreans for sale in the world numbering 20 or more at any time and stock a full parts inventory. www.dmcflorida.com examples as enjoyable, tangible investments. Classic car storage, classic car consignment, brokerage, and other consulting services are available as well. We actively pursue the purchase and sales of any investment-grade classic car. Since 2009, we have offered a unique opportunity for collectors, enthusiasts and other industry professionals. www.lbilimited.com, sales@ lbilimited.com (PA) and transportation. Single or multi-car collections are welcome in our climatecontrolled 20,000 sq. ft. facility located in Scottsdale’s Airpark, near January’s auction scene. Stop by and meet the owners, Steve and Chris, they’re on site every day. www.stablesgroup.com Vintage Motors of Sarasota. Motorcar Portfolio, LLC. Gullwing Motor Cars stocks more Classic Showcase. 760.758.6100. For over 35 years, we’ve been restoring automotive history and helping collectors obtain, restore and sell classic vehicles. Our world class facility houses 3 showrooms of cars and department specialty areas to perform all facets of restoration under one roof. Let our team, of professional craftsmen and specialists make your classic car vision a reality. www.classicshowcase. com. (CA) than 100 cars at our warehouse location, 27 years of experience; visited by customers across the country and overseas. We specialize in European and American cars and we are always looking to buy classic cars in any condition. We pick up from anywhere in the U.S. Quick payment and pickup. 718.545.0500. www.gullwingmotorcars.com 330.453.8900. Motorcar Portfolio, LLC. 330.453.8900. Buy, sell, trade, auction of affordable antique, classic, collector vehicles. Bob Lichty offers over 40 years experience in the classic car industry. Motorcar Portfolio, LLC. has been serving NE Ohio and the world since 2004. Let us help with your needs. See our current inventory at our web site. www.motorcarportfolio.com (OH) 941.355.6500. Established in 1989, offering high-quality collector cars to the most discerning collectors. Vintage’s specialized services include sales, acquisitions and consignment of high-quality European and American collector and sports cars. Always buying individual cars or entire collections. Visit our large showroom with 75+ examples in the beautiful museum district of tropical Sarasota, FL. www.vintagemotorssarasota.com (FL) Paul Russell and Company. Heritage Classics Motorcar ComCopley Motorcars. 781.444.4646. Specializing in unique and hard-to-find classics and sports cars. We only sell cars we love ourselves, and deal in a limited number of models. Before delivery to you, all of our classics, including Defenders, are fully inspected and serviced by one of two expert shops. We are located in Needham, MA. copleycars@gmail.com, www.copleymotorcars.com (MA) pany. 310.657.9699. www.heritageclassics.com. Heritage Classics Motorcar Company, the premier West Coast classic car dealership established in 1985. Offering one of the largest indoor showrooms in Southern California, with an exceptional inventory of the very finest American and European classic cars available. We buy, sell and consign collectible automobiles, offering the best consignment terms available, contact us at sales@heritageclassics.com When in Southern California visit our beautiful showroom and specialty automotive bookstore, Heritage Classics Motorbooks, open Monday–Saturday. For current inventory and to visit our virtual bookstore visit www.heritageclassics.com 978.768.6092. www.paulrussell.com. Specializing in the Preservation and Sales of European Classics, pre-war through the 1970s, since 1978. You can rely on our decades of experience with Mercedes-Benz, Ferrari, Porsche, Bugatti, Alfa Romeo and other fine collectibles. Repeat customers are the lifeblood of our business. Contact us today to join them. Car Sales Manager, Alex Finigan: Alex@paulrussell.com. (MA) Woodies USA. 949.922.7707, 949.412.8812. We buy and sell great woodies — hundreds to date. If you are buying or selling, give us a call. We can help. Woodies are fun! Every car collection should have at least one. Located in Laguna Niguel, California. www.woodiesusa.com. (CA) Classic Car Transport Passport Transport. 800.736.0575. ProTeamCorvette.com. Corvettes: Cosmopolitan Motors, LLC. 206.467.6531. Experts in worldwide acquisition, collection management, disposition and appraisal. For more than a quarter century, Cosmopolitan Motors has lived by its motto, “We covet the rare and unusual, whether pedigreed or proletarian.” Absurdly eclectic and proud of it. Find your treasure here, or pass it along to the next generation. www.cosmopolitanmotors.com (WA) Hyman Ltd Classic Cars. 314.524.6000. One of the largest inventories of vintage cars in the world. Please visit our website often, www.hymanltd.com to see our current stock. Hyman Ltd Classic Cars, 2310 Chaffee Drive, St. Louis, MO. 63146 314-524-6000 sales@hymanltd.com 1953–1982. Over 10,000 sold since 1971! Money-back guarantee. Worldwide transportation. Z06s, L88s, L89s, LS6s, ZR2s, ZR1s, LT1s, COPOs, Fuelies, Special 425s/435s/RPOs. Call toll free 888.592.5086 or call 419.592.5086. Fax 419.592.4242, email: terry@proteamcorvette.com or visit our website: www.ProTeamCorvette.com. ProTeam Corvette Sales, 1410 N. Scott St., Napoleon, OH 43545. Special Corvettes wanted at CorvettesWanted.com! NCRS Member #136. Since our founding in 1970, we have shipped thousands of treasured vehicles door-to-door with our fully enclosed auto transporters. Whether your prized possession is your daily driver, a vintage race car, a classic, a ’60s muscle car or a modern exotic, you can depend on Passport Transport to give you the premium service it deserves. We share your appreciation for fine automobiles, and it shows. www.PassportTransport.com. Reliable Carriers, Inc. 877.744.7889. Luxury Brokers International. 215.459.1606. Specializing in the sales, purchase and brokerage of classic automobiles for the astute collector, with a new-age, contemporary approach. Focusing on original, high-quality 158 The Stables Automotive Group. 480.699.3095. Arizona’s finest facility for automotive management and concierge services offers show car preparation, auction representation, storage As the country’s largest enclosed-auto transport company, Reliable Carriers faithfully serves all 48 contiguous United States and Canada. Whether you’ve entered a concours event, need a relocation, are attending a corporate event, or shipping the car of your dreams from one location to another, one American transportation company does it all. www.reliablecarriers.com Sports Car Market RESOURCE DIRECTORY


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Collector Car Insurance acquiring the perfect British classic today! 760.758.6100. www.classicshowcase.com (CA) mance brakes, suspension, gaskets, engine parts, wheels and exhaust. Dealer for Tubi, Brembo, Koni, Razzo Rosso, Sangalli, Zanzi, Novitech Rosso and X-Ost. www.CAROBU.com. Barrett-Jackson is proud to endorse a new breed of insurance for classic, antique, exotic, special-interest, contemporary classic and limited-edition cars. To get a quote is even easier with our new online improvements. Go to www.barrett-jackson.com/insurance/, select Get a quote, enter in a couple of key pieces of information about your vehicle, and get an estimated quote within seconds! It’s that easy. Don’t be caught without the right insurance for your vehicle. In the unfortunate aftermath of damage to your vehicle, learning that your insurance won’t restore your prized possession to its former glory, or appropriately compensate you for your loss, is the last thing you want to hear. To get a quote by phone, call 877.545.2522. Heacock Classic. 800.678.5173. We understand the passion and needs of the classic-car owner; agreed value, one liability charge, 24-hour claim service and paying by credit card. We provide classic car insurance at rates people can afford! Instant quotes at www.heacockclassic.com. (FL) Radcliffe Motor Company. E-Type UK USA. An international specialist Jaguar E-type restoration and sales organisation with offices in both the U.K. and USA. E-Type UK USA are proud to announce the impending opening of their newly refurbished purpose built E-type showrooms and workshops designed to provide their USA clients with a real test of this famous English sports car. USA +1 805.267.6795 harry@etypeukusa.com www.etypeukusa.com 410.517.1681. The Mid-Atlantic’s premier facility for the maintenance, repair, and light restoration of exotic Italian and fine European automobiles. Having gained the trust of the exoticcar community, we are known for our proficiency and workmanship. We host the annual Vintage Ferrari All Italian Car Event each May, and you are cordially invited to attend. Visit our website for more information about our shop, and see photos of past events. www.RMCCAR.com. Finance J.C. Taylor Insurance. Chubb Collector Car Insurance. 1.866.CAR.9648. With Chubb, you’ll have flexibility and control with worldclass coverage and claim service. There are no mileage restrictions, “Agreed Value” is included, and you’re free to use the restoration shop of your choice for covered repairs. Special pricing is also available for large collections. For more information, call 1-866-227-9648 or visit www.chubbcollectorcar.com. 800.345.8290. Antique, classic, muscle or modified — J.C. Taylor Insurance has provided dependable, dynamic, affordable protection for your collector vehicle for over 50 years. Agreed Value Coverage in the continental U.S., and Alaska. Drive Through Time With Peace of Mind with J.C. Taylor Insurance. Get a FREE instant quote online at www.JCTaylor.com. English Fourintune Garages Inc. 262.375.0876. www.fourintune.com. Complete ground-up restoration on British Marques — specializing in Austin-Healeys since 1976. Experience you can trust, satisfied customers nationwide. Visit our website for details on our restoration process, which includes a complete quotation on Healeys. Located in historic Cedarburg — just minutes north of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (WI) J. J. BEST BANC & CO. provides financing on classic cars ranging from 1900 to today. Visit our website at www.jjbest.com or call 1.800.USA.1965 and get a loan approval in as little as five minutes! Aston Martin of New England. Grundy Worldwide. 888.647.8639. Grundy Worldwide offers agreed value insurance with no mileage limitations, zero deductible*, and high liability limits. Our coverages are specifically designed for collectible-car owners. From classic cars to muscle cars, Grundy Worldwide has you covered. (*Zero deductible available in most states.) 888.6GRUNDY (888.647.8639). www.grundyworldwide.com. (PA) 781.547.5959. 85 Linden Street, Waltham, MA 02452. Proudly appointed Aston Martin Heritage Dealer for the USA. New and pre-owned Aston Martins are our specialty. Please contact us when buying, selling or restoring. www.astonmartin-lotus.com. (MA) Kevin Kay Restorations. AUTOSPORT DESIGNS, INC. Hagerty Insurance Agency, LLC. 800.922.4050. is the leading insurance agency for collector vehicles in the world and host to the largest network of collector car owners. Hagerty offers insurance for collector cars, motorcycles and motorcycle safety equipment, tractors, automotive tools and spare parts, and even “automobilia” (any historic or collectible item linked with motor vehicles). Hagerty also offers overseas shipping/touring insurance coverage, commercial coverage and club liability coverage. For more information, call or visit www.hagerty.com. (MI) 631.425.1555. All Aston Martin models welcome regardless of age, as new inevitably become old! Routine servicingcomplete mechanical restorations/rebuilds — cosmetic repair/paintwork to complete frame-off restoration. Large inventory of parts. All services as well as our current unventory of automobiles for sale can be seen at www.autosportdesigns.com. (NY) 530.241.8337. 1530 Charles Drive, Redding, CA 96003. Aston Martin parts, service, repair and restoration. From an oil change to a concours-winning restoration, we do it all. Modern upgrades for power steering, window motors, fuel systems and more. Feltham Fast performance parts in stock. We also cater to all British and European cars and motorcycles. www.kevinkayrestorations.net. (CA) Events—Concours, Car Shows Ferrari Financial Services. 201.510.2500. As the world’s only Ferrari-owned finance company, no one understands a Ferrari customer’s unique perspective better than the company that designed these iconic sports cars. Whether it’s a line of credit for owners interested in utilizing the equity in their collection, or a simple interest loan, we stand committed to help our clients enhance their collection — without origination or early termination fees. “FFS” offers a level of expertise that cannot be matched by other lenders. German Hilton Head Island Motoring Fes- tival. The South; a place where tea is sweet, people are darlin’, moss is Spanish and, come autumn, cars are plentiful. This fall, HHI Motoring Festival returns to the towns of Savannah, GA and Hilton Head Island, SC. Join us this fall - October 23rd to November 1st - in the land of southern hospitality. To purchase tickets or for more information visit www.HHIMotoringFestival.com. Ferrari/Maserati/Lamborghini Classic Showcase. 760.758.6100. Classic Showcase has been an industry leader in the restoration, service and sale of classic Jaguars, and most other fine British automobiles. From sports cars to luxury sedans, our world-class restoration facility and highly skilled team are ready to assist your needs with July 2015 European Collectibles, Inc. Carobu Engineering. 949.722.9307. Ferrari specialist. Engine rebuilding/ development, dyno-testing, parts and service. Your source for high-perfor- 949.650.4718. European Collectibles has been buying, consigning, selling and restoring classic European sports cars since 1986. We specialize in Porsche (356 and 911) 1950s to early 1970s, along with other marks including Mercedes, Aston Martin, Ferrari, MG, Austin Healey and Jaguar, with 40 vehicles in stock to choose from. European Collectibles also offers complete mechanical and cosmetic restorations to concours level along with routine service. Located in Orange County, CA, between Los Angeles and San Diego. Sales@europeancollectibles.com or visit our website www.europeancollectibles.com. (CA) 159


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Advertise in the SCM Resource Directory. Call 877.219.2605 Ext. 218 for information, e-mail: scmadvert@sportscarmarket.com. ated, Ferrari of Seattle is Washington State’s only Official Ferrari dealer. Named “Ferrari Top Dealer-World Champion 2013,” our customer service and knowledge of the Ferrari brand is second to none. 1401 12th Ave, Seattle, Porsche of Bend. 800.842.1584. Located in Central Oregon since 1982, Porsche of Bend is the Northwest’s destination dealership for new and pre-owned Porsches. Formerly Carrera Motors, Porsche of Bend continues to proudly sell and service one of the most desired brand names in North America. www.bend.porschedealer.com (OR) WA 98122 www.ferrariofseattle.com analysis & special reports in every issue & website. 1 & 2 yr. subscriptions open the door to one-on-one SLML help finding & selling specific models. Ask about our private sales program. www.slmarket.com (MN) Museums California Car Cover Company. Hamann Classic Cars. 203.918.8300. with more than 30 years in the industry and worldwide clientele in dealing in European race and sports cars, specializes in classic Ferraris of the ’50s & ’60s. www.ferrari4you.com dC Automotive. 800-549-2410. We have the largest indoor Recycling Facility for Porsches in the U.S. We specialize in used rebuilt and new parts for Porsche cars. Including all models of the 911, 912, Carrera and Turbo, 944 16 valve S, 924S, 951, 944 Turbo, 914-4, 914-6 Boxster, 968, Cayenne,928, 928S, 928 S4 Vintage parts a specialty. We have an extensive inventory including used Porsche engines, transmissions, fuchs wheels, seats, brake upgrades, interior trim and suspension. No part is too small. We are a God-owned family business serving the Porsche community for over 25 years. www.dcauto.com 252-955-0110 (text) 252-977-1430 int’l Leasing LeMay—America’s Car Museum Premier Financial Services is the nation’s leading lessor of vintage and exotic motorcars. Our Simple Lease Program is ideal for those who wish to own their vehicle at the end of the term, as well as for those who like to change cars frequently. Our Simple Interest Early Termination Program allows you the flexibility of financing with the tax advantages of leasing. Contact Premier at 877.973.7700 or info@pfsllc.com. www.premierfinancialservices.com (CT) celebrates America’s love affair with the automobile. Named the Best Museum in Western Washington, the four-level, 165,000 sq. ft. museum features 12 rotating exhibits and 300 cars, trucks and motorcycles on display. ACM includes a 3.5-acre show field, State Farm Theatre, Classics Café, banquet hall and meeting facilities and offers a majestic view above Commencement Bay. For more information, visit www.lemaymuseum.org. LeMay – America’s Car Museum 2702 E D Street, Tacoma, WA 98421 877.902.8490 (toll free) info@lemaymuseum.org www.lemaymuseum.org. (WA) More than just custom-fit car covers, California Car Cover is the home of complete car care and automotive lifestyle products. Offering the best in car accessories, garage items, detailing products, nostalgic collectibles, apparel and more! Call 1-800-423-5525 or visit Calcarcover.com for a free catalog. QuickSilver Exhaust Systems. 305.219.8882. Our customers are sophisticated enthusiasts who choose our exhaust system for various reasons —durability, weight reduction and enhanced sound. QuickSilver are the default choice for many of the most important classics. Originality is essential, but there’s no reason why subtle improvements cannot be introduced. QuickSilver use superior materials and modern manufacturing techniques unavailable when the cars were new. www.quicksilverexhausts.com SpeedFurniture.com. LeMay Family Collection FoundaMercedes-Benz Classic Center. 1.866.MB.CLASSIC. The center of competence for classic Mercedes-Benz enthusiasts — for vintage car sales, meticulous restorations by manufacturer-trained technicians and the widest selection of Genuine Mercedes-Benz Classic Parts, we are the source. www.mbclassiccenter.com. (CA) Import/Export Putnam Leasing. 866.90.LEASE. Cosdel International Transportation. Since 1960 Cosdel International Transportation has been handling international shipments by air, ocean and truck. Honest service, competitive pricing and product expertise have made Cosdel the natural shipping choice for the world’s best-known collectors, dealers and auction houses. If you are moving a car, racing or rallying, or attending a concours event overseas, Cosdel is your comprehensive, worldwide resource for all of your nationwide and international shipping needs. We are your automobile Export Import Experts. 415.777.2000 carquotes@cosdel.com. www.cosdel.com. (CA) Italian The SL Market Letter. Ferrari & Maserati of Seattle. 206.329.7070. Family owned and oper160 612.567.0234. NOT just SLs but all rare and collectible Mercedes! A key resource on Mercedes since 1982. 100s of Mercedes for sale, market news, price For over 30 years, Putnam Leasing has been the leader in exotic, luxury, and collector car leasing. This honor comes from Putnam’s unique ability to match the car of your dreams with a lease designed just for you. Every Putnam Lease is written to provide maximum flexibility while conserving capital, lowering monthly payments, and maximizing tax advantages. Its Putnam’s way of letting you drive more car for less money. For leases ranging from $50,000 to more than one million dollars, with terms extending up to 84 months, contact the oldest and most experienced leasing company in the country by calling 1.866.90.LEASE. Or just visit www.putnamleasing.com. Legal Law Offices of Bruce Shaw Collector Car Fraud Specialists, www.shawlaws.com. A motorhead law firm with real practical knowledge and experience in the Collector Car Field. Experience: Chain of speed shops, Body Shops, Car Dealerships, former NCRS judge as well as licensed attorneys. Estate planning and divorce settlements concerning Collector Cars. 50 State Representation. 215.657.2377 Mercedes-Benz tion at Marymount Events Center near Tacoma, WA, hosts an epic backdrop for your next event. Home to 500 fabulous collector cars, world-class art exhibits, and assorted ephemera, consider your next event here. Weddings, swap meets, conventions, auctions. The facility can likely exceed your expectations. Visit during the 37th annual open house along with 13,000 other enthusiasts. 253.272.2336 www.lemaymarymount. org (WA) Parts, Accessories & Car Care 844-GO-SPEED. Racing-Inspired Furniture, Ergonomic Racing Office Chairs, Streamlined Automotive Desks, Bar sets, Lounge Chairs, Bookcases, Tables & Accessories! Experience the highest quality custom furniture available. Designed by award-winning Designer Henri Lenterman. Using cutting-edge European design and style. Offering Affordable Automotive Furniture backed by a Lifetime Guarantee. Manufactured using the highest-quality materials & components. Now available with custom embroidery! Email: SpeedFurniture@yahoo.com Website: www.SpeedFurniture.com Apex Detail. 201.308.3839. Apex Detail provides bespoke paint correction and detail services to discerning individuals wishing to restore, preserve, protect and maintain their fine automotive, aerospace and marine investments. From a single automobile to large collections Apex Detail has the experience to make a difference. Specializing in ultra-exotic, luxury and classic cars Apex Detail offers a wide range of products and services. www.theapexdetail.com Swissvax. 305.219.8882. Since Baldhead Cabinets. 877.966.2253. The garage is no longer a place to cast off items unwanted. It is a destination in itself. We are a full-service, family owned company that designs and manufactures custom metal cabinets in Bend, OR. Choose from meticulously crafted storage cabinets, TV cabinets, sink cabinets, or our ever-popular pull-out fastener bin cabinet, just to name a few. www.baldheadcabinets.com 1930, the Swiss family company creates magnificent wax formulations. The non-abrasive system consists of a pre-wax fluid and a high-content Carnauba wax. Unlike ordinary polishes, Swissvax restores the valuable oils of the paint finish that become starved over time and is safe for all paint finishes. Swissvax is also worldwide OEM supplier to Rolls-Royce Motorcars, Bugatti, Lamborghini. www.swissvax. com www.swissvax.us WeatherTech® Automotive Ac- cessories. 800.441.8527. MacNeil Automotive Products Limited providing Automotive Accessories for your vehicles for over 20 years. MacNeil has defined high-quality vehicle protection with the WeatherTech® line of Automotive Accessories. Choose from allweather floor mats, extreme-duty floor liners, cargo/trunk liners, side-window Sports Car Market RESOURCE DIRECTORY


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deflectors, no-drill mudflaps, many different options of license-plate frames and more. We have products available for virtually every make and model. To see and buy everything, go to www.WeatherTech.com. Restoration — General show/driver, show, and preservation level restorations for collectors worldwide. Our world-class facilities consist of a team of passionate and dedicated craftsman who are ready to perform either factory standards or performance/ modified upgrades. Visit our website or call us to discuss your project today. www.classicshowcase.com (CA) Hahn - Vorbach & Associates Automotive Restorations. 203.377.6745. Founded in 1978, we are well-established practitioners of the art and craft of vehicle restoration, preservation and service. Nearly 40 experienced craftspeople focused on the art and entertainment to be enjoyed with great cars describes our culture. Our staff and expertise encompasses a broad range of skills and specific vehicle experience. Proper project management and control produce the quality and attention to detail we have come to be known for in all we produce. See much more on the Web at www.automotiverestorations.com D. L. George Historic Motorcars. 610.593.7423. We stand at the crossroads between you and historic European motorcars of the pre-war and early post-war era. We provide full-service restoration, maintenance, and support of the finest cars driven extensively by the most refined collectors. Find us at concours from Amelia Island to Pebble Beach, venues from Lime Rock to Goodwood, and events including the Mille Miglia, Peking to Paris, and The Colorado Grand. www.DLGEORGE.com (PA) LLC. 724.452.4329. Specializes in the investment-grade restoration and preservation of European and American collectible antique and classic cars, muscle cars, sports cars, hot rods and vintage race cars. Our services include full and partial restorations, bespoke builds, repairs, show prep, sales and procurement assistance, as well as a full array of do-it-yourself assistance services. Recognized experts in the restoration of Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwings and Roadsters. Concours-level, national award-winning quality. Find examples of our craftsmanship and the wide range of past projects on our website. We would be happy to discuss your project. www.hahnvorbach.com Suixtil USA. 855.784.9845. Suixtil- USA is the premier retailer for fine menswear inspired by auto racing heritage. The Suixtil racing uniforms have been worn by many Formula One racing heroes including Juan Manuel Fangio. Built for Speed, Styled for Passion, Made for Gentlemen. For more information, shop online at www.suixtil-usa. com, call 1-855-SUIXTIL (784-9845), or email sales@suixtil-usa.com. The Guild of Automotive RestorHigh Mountain Classics. Dresser Leathers. 201.889.7168. Brighton Motorsports. 480.483.4682. Authorized Morgan 3-Wheeler Dealer and repair, and expert service facility for your collector car. Privately owned, we are located in the heart of the Arizona Auction Arena in Scottsdale. We offer a unique collection of European and American special interest cars and motorcycles and host the Brighton Classic Car Rally each November. BrightonMotorsports.com, 480-483-4682 or info@brightonmotorsports.com. Your source for vintage leather reproductions. Specializing in accurate reproduction of leather mirror/tire straps, luggage tie-downs and handles as well as custom leather accessories for the collector car investor. Service includes full buckle inspection, hand and machine polishing, dimensions measured to 1/32nd inch of original using the best harness leather from tanneries located in the USA. www.DRESSERLEATHERS.com 970.532.2339. World-class restoration, repair, and maintenance. Many Pebble Beach Class wins and Best of Show evidence our pursuit of restoration excellence. We service and maintain blue-chip collectibles, race cars, and other investment-grade cars, and provide vintage race track support. We have particular excellence with Bugatti and other pre-war marques. www.HighMountainClassics.com JWF Restorations Inc. SpecialExoticars USA. 908.996.4889, Wil Classic Restoration. 303.761.1245, Classic Restoration by Country Club Auto, located in Colorado, is a large facility that offers world-class restoration, repair and fabrication services. Highly organized, fiscally responsible and providing biweekly detailed billing, we keep you abreast of the rapid progress of your project in every way. Check out our excellent web site for details. Email doug@classicrestodenver.com. www.classicrestodenver.com. (CO) de Groot’s Exoticars USA has serviced and restored Ferrari, Maserati and Lamborghini in the NJ, PA, NY region since 1979. We’re passionate about keeping your car fast, reliable, beautiful and authentic. Our mechanical, paint/ body, electronic, machining and fabricating work is unsurpassed and awardwinning. We have specialized equipment and knowledge to service newer and vintage models and everything in between. www.exoticars-usa.com. (NJ) Fantasy Junction. 510.653.7555. For 35 years, Owner/Enthusiast Bruce Trenery has operated Fantasy Junction from the San Francisco Bay Area. The dealership enjoys an outstanding worldwide reputation for integrity and knowledge in the collector car field. Many of the world’s greatest sports cars have passed through the doors, with both buyers and sellers enjoying expert representation. Email Sales@FantasyJunction.com, www.FantasyJunction. com. (CA) Classic Showcase. 760.758.6100. For over 35 years, we’ve been restoring automotive history by creating driver, July 2015 161 izing in AC restoration from street to concours, U.S. Registrar AC Owners Club (U.K.). Jim Feldman, 11955 SW Faircrest St. Portland, OR 97225 503-706-8250 Fax 503-646-4009 The world’s largest organization of AC owners and enthusiasts. AC ownership is not required. Monthly magazine. Email: jim@jwfrestoration.com (OR) ers. 905.775.0499. No matter whether your car is bound to the concours or for the road, we are the sensible choice. We are expert in our craft and we combine this with unimpeachable integrity doing something that we enjoy as much as our clients enjoy the fruits of our labors. Share our passion for your passion. Give us a call, we look forward to hearing from you. David Grainger and Janice Stone Proprietors. www.guildclassiccars.com (CAN) Vintage Motor Group F. Roxas Inc. 708.598.1000. Brid- geview, IL. The Only Thing Better Than New is a Fran Roxas Restoration. Recent restorations include Duesenberg, Packard 12, 8-liter Bentley, Cadillac V16, Delahaye, Stutz DV32, Ferrari, 1950s & 60s Concept Cars. We take pride in enhancing our clients’ investments by bringing these truly one-ofa-kind cars back to life, maybe an even better life. The quality of our work has been nationally recognized since 1970 with consistent 1st place winners at concours around the world. (IL) RPM Classic Sports Cars. 802.877.2645. With over 25 years of experience in Classic Italian Sports cars, we know how to make your car perform as new. Please visit our website showing numerous cars for sale and a frequently updated blog to see what is going on in our busy shop, including video links of engines being run on a test stand and on a chassis dynamometer. Our two-car, enclosed transporter makes getting your car to our shop within the Northeast a breeze. www.rpmvt.com. Volante Classics. 978.447.1669. At Volante Classics we rebuild notable European classic cars. What sets us apart is our master craftsman, Roberto Donati, who learned to reshape contours, reconstruct panels, and recreate beauty while he was a young man in Italy. Under his father’s and grandfather’s mindful tutelage, Roberto dedicated his life to coachwork. More than the craft itself, Roberto saw and felt the passion with which his father toiled. He came to America to perfect his art, working at one of the most prestigious firms for more than a decade. Only those who live and feel that same passion, and possess the highest degree of skill, can reach his level of excellence. Only they can restore the essence of a classic machine. www.volanteclassics.com ©


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Carl Bomstead eWatch Syrup Dispensers Can Stick You on Price Vintage toy cars, tether racers and hood ornaments beat the sweet stuff every time Thought Carl’s Looking for a new collectible to sink your teeth into? Morphy Auctions, in their March 28, 2015, advertising auction, offered about 50 spectacular ceramic syrup dispensers with prices ranging from a few thousand bucks all the way to almost six figures. The one that caught my eye was for Wool’s Cherrie Smash “A Drink with a Taste.” It was about 15 inches in height and had the original ball pump. It was colorful, in great condition and may just be the only known example. It sold for $60,000 including the vig, so at that price, I don’t think there will be too many in my display case. Here are a few others I found this month that are just as cool — and not as expensive as the Wool’s syrup dispenser. Scottsdale auction earlier this year for $11,155, which makes this look like a wise purchase indeed. ful license plate attachment had a bit of rust on one end, which had an adverse effect on the value. Interesting piece of history and certainly cheap enough. EBAY #29139580028—1900S GERMAN TIN WIND-UP LIMOUSINE. Number of Bids: 27. SOLD AT: $6,966.89. Date: 3/8/2015. This 17-inch German tin toy was hand painted in cream and blue. It had glass rear windows and rubber tires. However, it was missing a few pieces and parts, and it had a few scratches and rubs. No maker was noted, but a bit of research determined it was made by Carette in 1911. A slightly better example sold at auction for $4,000 in 2009, so this one was fully priced. styling model was an awardwinning entry in a design contest sponsored by General Motors. It was about 14 inches in length and had the certificate from GM. It was in very nice condition — considering the age — with a few paint chips and dings. It was a design that GM was never serious about, but it sure had the look of a 1971 AMC Gremlin. Just saying. EBAY #221699465577—1931– 32 CHRYSLER GAZELLE WINGED HOOD ORNAMENT. Number of Bids: 45. SOLD AT: $760. Date: 3/3/2015. This was the middle of three sizes of gazelle hood ornaments that Chrysler used in 1931–32. It was used on the CG and Imperials, while the larger version was used on the CH and CL. It appeared to be in decent condition, and as such, was sold at a fair price. EBAY #331485297392—1933 CHICAGO WORLD’S FAIR CAST-IRON GREYHOUND BUS BY ARCADE. Number of Bids: 14. SOLD AT: $676.66. Date: 2/27/2015. This 14-inch, cast-iron Greyhound souvenir bus was the largest of five sizes that Arcade sold at their booth at the 1933 Chicago World’s Fair. Those that were sold at regular toy dealers had Greyhound Lines painted on the top. This one was in good condition, but it lacked the packaging. Price paid was fair enough. EBAY #131409607317— LARGE NASH PORCELAIN AND NEON DEALERSHIP SIGN. Number of Bids: 20. SOLD AT: $4,209. Date: 2/1/2015. This 75-inch-long, double-sided porcelain sign had a few bruises and was missing the neon, which is not a big deal. I watched the larger, 96-inch version sell at the Barrett-Jackson EBAY #231468838538—REPEAL 18TH AMENDMENT FOR PROSPERITY LICENSE PLATE ATTACHMENT. Number of Bids: 4. SOLD AT: $102.55. Date: 2/11/2015. The 18th Amendment was, of course, Prohibition, and its repeal was part of FDR’s election platform. It was repealed with the 21st Amendment to the Constitution on December 5, 1933. This color- EBAY #181660654524—1960s FISHER BODY GM COMPETITION STYLING MODEL. Number of Bids: 8. SOLD AT: $1,300. Date: 2/27/2015. This painted wood with metal trim SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION Sports Car Market (ISSN #1527859X) is published monthly by Automotive Investor Media Group, 401 NE 19th Street, Suite 100, Portland, OR 97232. Periodicals postage paid at Portland, OR, and at additional mailing offices. Subscription rates are $75 for 12 monthly issues in the U.S., $105 Canada/Mexico, Europe $135, Asia/Africa/Middle East $135. Subscriptions are payable in advance in U.S. currency. Make checks to: Sports Car Market. Visa/MC accepted. For instant subscription, call 877.219.2605, 503.261.0555; fax 503.253.2234; www.sportscarmarket.com. 162 EBAY #391105965441— DOOLING MERCURY REAR-DRIVE TETHER CAR WITH DENNYMITE MOTOR. Number of Bids: 14. SOLD AT: $1,985. Date: 4/2/2015. This was the second car produced by the Dooling Brothers, and it was offered in late 1939. It was known as the Mercury Deluxe or Rear Drive, and it was priced at $23.50 without the engine. It is powered by an original 1946 Dennymite Airstream 0.57 engine with the original instruction sheet. It is wearing an attractive custom livery. As the seller stated, it has “shelf presence.” These have an active following, and the price paid here did not seem unreasonable. ♦ POSTMASTER Send address changes to: Sports Car Market PO Box 4797, Portland, OR 97208 CPC IPM Sales Agreement No. 1296205 Sports Car Market