First Look: Preliminary Monterey Sales Total $400m, and a Post-War Ferrari Wins Pebble Beach Best of Show

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Preliminary reports put the cumulative sales of Monterey Car Week 2014 at a whopping $400m, with 745 cars sold out of 1,235 offered — growth of 30% over last year’s cumulative $308m, and a bump in average sold price to $536k from $405k. The overall totals are sure to increase, once post-block sales are concluded. Also, these overall figures do not include numbers from Rick Cole, but we expect to receive that information shortly.

Watch this space for official final auction totals as they are released. The November issue of SCM will feature full, in-depth coverage of all the Monterey action. In the meantime, here is where the numbers stand currently:

RM sold 118 of 129 consignments (91%) for $143m total. The high sale was was a 1964 Ferrari 275 GTB/C Speciale, sold at $26.4m

Bonhams offered 117 cars and reported a 92% sales rate, for overall sales of $108m. The top lot of the sale — and a new world record for most expensive car sold at auction — was a 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO at $38.1m (pictured above).

Gooding & Company sales totaled $106m with 107 of 121 cars sold (88%). A 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spider topped the charts at $15.2m.

Russo and Steele achieved sales of $9.6m, with 81 cars selling out of 185 (44%). A 1956 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing was the high seller at $1.3m.

Mecum‘s biggest sale was a 1961 Ferrari 250 Series II Cabriolet, sold at $2.4m. 334 of 676 lots sold (49%), totaling a combined $33.5m.

Rick Cole sales figures were not available by press time.

At Pebble Beach, Best of Show went to a 1954 Ferrari 375 MM Scaglietti Coupe, owned by Jon Shirley of Medina, WA. This was the first time a post-WWII car won the prize.

Tony Piff

SCM Auctions Editor and Photographer

Tony has long trumpeted the virtues of collecting Japanese cars. His daily driver is a 1970 Toyota Hilux — the one with the turn signals on top of the fenders. His popular “Rising Sun” column keeps a pulse on the J-tin market.

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