1964 Chevrolet CERV II

Michael Furman ©2013, courtesy of RM Auctions
Michael Furman ©2013, courtesy of RM Auctions

The brainchild of Zora Arkus-Duntov, the “Father of the Corvette,” the Chevrolet Engineering Research Vehicle II is the first known operating example of torque-vectoring all-wheel drive, and it is among the most important Corvette development vehicles in private hands today. Since leaving General Motors, it has only been owned by the Briggs Cunningham Museum, Miles Collier, John Moores and the consigning owner.

The first CERV was completed in 1960, and it was aimed at open-wheel racing. Duntov began work on Read More

John L. Stein

SCM Contributor

John is the product of the 1960s SoCal car and bike culture and has been screwing around with Ducati motorcycles since he was 16. An interest in cars, bikes and boats saw him simultaneously owning a twin-cam Lotus Europa and Kaiser Special, NSU Super Max and Ducati 750 GT motorbikes, and a mahogany Chris-Craft runabout. After leaving his job as Road Test Editor at Cycle magazine, he had a short-lived career in marine biology before becoming Associate Editor at Automobile and then Editor of Corvette Quarterly, GM’s official journal for Corvette. He’s American Car Collector magazine’s Corvette Market columnist and a regular contributor to Sports Car Market.

Posted in American

0 comments

Leave a Reply