1931 Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 Zagato Spyder

With the body bare, the originality of the car could be confirmed, down to markings inside panels left by craftsmen who created it in 1931

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Alfa Romeo and Zagato are two of the most charismatic names in Italian automotive history. Alfa Romeo built thousands of cars with bodies by other coachbuilders, and Zagato bodied chassis from most of the great manufacturers of the world, but beginning in the late 1920s, Read More

1995 Bugatti EB110 GT Coupe

That Club Bugatti France actually welcomes owners of the EB110 is testament to the members’ regard for Artioli’s effort

Forty years after Ettore Bugatti’s death in 1947, the once legendary marque-one of the most renowned in automotive history-was acquired by ambitious Italian businessman Romano Artioli. His aim was nothing less than a resurrection of Bugatti as a state-of-the-art supercar.

Designated “EB110” (signifying 110 years after Ettore’s birth), the first new Bugatti since Read More

1961 Facel Vega HK500

The ultra-glamorous French coupe became the car of choice for owners
including Picasso, Tony Curtis, Ava Gardner, and Stirling Moss

Almost all automobile marques carry the name of their creator. But that’s not the case of FACEL (Forges et Ateliers de Construction d’Eure-et-Loir), the company founded in 1939 by Jean Daninos, which became Facel-Métalion in 1945 with two distinct activities-aviation and automobiles.

The HK500 was presented in May 1958 and replaced Read More

1935 MG NB Magnette Airline Coupe

The estimate of $200,000-$250,000 was aggressive; the nearly $400,000 realized for this car is a high point for the marque

After the introduction of the new P-type Midget early in 1934, the N-type 6-cylinder Magnette appeared, replacing the L-types and the K-types. Originally, these models were fitted with a 56 hp, 1,271-cc engine in a beefed-up chassis. The new 6-cylinder N-type was capable of a top speed of just over 80 mph, Read More

1926 Bugatti Type 39A Grand Prix

Without doubt, Ettore Bugatti found his feet as an internationally recognized manufacturer of high-performance motor cars in 1926. The Type 39A was his first supercharged racer that really worked and gave little if any teething trouble. The 1926-27 Grand Prix Formula demanded cars of no more than 1,500 cc, with a minimum weight of 1,320 lbs, 110 lbs less than the limit for the 2-liter Grand Prix category of 1924-25. Riding mechanics were not required and a cover was permitted Read More

1936 Panhard X76 Dynamic

To take full advantage of the “panoramic” windows, the driver was moved to the center of the car

René Panhard and Emile Levassor obtained an 1888 Daimler patent for a V-twin motor, with the idea of using it in a small car. Two prototypes were built, equipped with a front-mounted engine and a gearbox.

Levassor and his team worked on increasingly powerful engines and tested them in races. In 1896, a Read More

1972 Lancia Stratos H.F.

It’s one of the most successful rally cars ever built, wicked and unforgiving
to drive, a spaceship for the road

Lancia was struggling when Sandro Fiorio, the company’s director of public relations, and his son Cesare, head of Lancia’s rally team, spied the Fulvia-based “Stratos” concept on the Bertone stand at the 1970 Turin Motor Show.

They immediately recognized its potential to revitalize Lancia’s competition reputation and generate some badly Read More

1936 Delahaye Type 135 Special

Delahaye had an enviable competition record, though most successes came either when the Germans didn’t show up or when they broke

Emile Delahaye built his first automobile in 1895 and in 1896 drove one of his cars to sixth place in the Paris-Marseilles-Paris race. Sporting ambition lurked in the background as his truck business was crippled by a glut of WWI surplus U.S. trucks.

Delahaye hung on, aided by a marriage of Read More

1959 Borgward Isabella TS Coupe

The Isabella sought to translate ’50s Detroit flash into a more compact Euro language, but it didn’t work; Americans wanted foreign cars that looked foreign

Carl Borgward entered the German auto industry as the charismatic proprietor of the Hansa Company in Bremen, Germany, in 1929, and produced individual and technically advanced vehicles between the wars.

From 1938, Hansa cars were marketed under the name of its proprietor, and in post-war years, when Read More

1953 Fiat 8V Ghia Supersonic

In 1951, Fiat’s great designer Dante Giocosa began work on a new high-performance sports car, the legendary 8V, or “Otto Vu” in Italian, a two-liter, V8-engined two-seater.

Giacosa theorized that for a car to have the power and characteristics for which he was aiming, a tubular chassis would not be stiff enough to mount the fully independent suspension, so a platform was constructed from welded sheet metal, to which was welded the coachwork paneling.

The chassis construction was contracted out Read More

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