1971 Citroën SM Coupe

What makes this Citroën SM special is that it is as close to a new car as is possible to be following a no-expense-spared restoration. It was given to the renowned Garage du Lac, run by Vincent Crescia in Switzerland, for a total mechanical and body rebuild.

New or refurbished parts were fitted throughout, and the gearbox, running gear, steering, wiring, hydraulic and cooling systems were all restored to new. The body was completely dismantled and elements that showed Read More

1936 MG NB Magnette Airline Coupe

It could easily be argued that one of the prettiest swept-back designs of the 1930s was on the very few Airline Coupes that graced MG chassis.

The design was created by H.W. Allingham, and the cathedral-style lighting panels on the sliding sunroof, the spare tire neatly blended into the swept-back tail underneath a metal cover, and the effect of the tail that tapers inward at its base are of particular note.

Then there is separation molding down the sides Read More

1955 Lancia Aurelia B24 S Spider America

Lancia Aurelia B24 S Spider America 1131

This car is among the rare survivors, having resided for its entire life in the forgiving western United States. In 1992, it was owned by the president of the U.S. Lancia club, who also was an avid vintage racer. He had the car cosmetically restored by Italian Lancia expert Franco dePiero, and his full-time mechanic restored the car’s numbers-matching drivetrain. During the restoration, the original Weber carburetor was replaced with a period-correct Nardi Read More

A Practical Hipster of a Volvo

The 1950s saw most car manufacturers reaching to sports cars to burnish their image and give a spark to their product lines.

This was especially true of European makers eager to get a bigger part of the lucrative U.S. market, where buyers were embracing a more spirited and involving driving experience — even while continuing to buy family sedans.
As a result, even Volvo — possibly the most practical carmaker on the planet — launched a limited-production two-seater to Read More

1951 Delahaye 135M Cabriolet

Based initially at Tours — and from 1906 in Paris —Delahaye built its first automobile in 1894 and soon diversified into commercial vehicle manufacture. Its early products tended to be rather lackluster, but then in 1935 came the first of a new generation that would change the marque’s image forever: the T135 Coupe Des Alpes. A fine sporting car, the T135 was powered by an engine which, although designed for car use, had first appeared in a Delahaye commercial Read More

2008 Koenigsegg CCX

The idea of building one’s own supercar to compete with the likes of Ferrari, Lamborghini, and McLaren would generally be considered ludicrous, what with the monumental strides these companies have made in automotive technology and performance over the past decades. How could one man’s vision compete with such established sporting pedigree and record-setting engineering?

From time to time, however, someone does indeed attempt such a feat and, on even rarer occasions, succeeds brilliantly. Such is the case with the Read More

Alfa Romeo’s Underrated Grand Tourer

This was supposed to be an Affordable Classic piece about the entire Alfa Romeo 2600 range. It has become a piece about only one of the five models of the Alfa 2600 — the Sprint.

Why? I don’t want SCM World Headquarters to be bombarded with emails, letters and tweets complaining about the definition of “affordable.”

I believe that all Alfa 2600s are undervalued for what they offer, but it’s tough to call the $65,000-plus it takes to buy a good example of the 2600 Spider or the $145,000 cost of a non-project 2600 SZ affordable by any real measure, as “affordable” is roughly synonymous with “credit card” for most of us.

1969 DeTomaso Mangusta Coupe

One of the very first supercars, the Mangusta effectively established DeTomaso as a serious automobile manufacturer on its arrival in 1967. The Mangusta (mongoose) was powered by a mid-mounted 289-ci Ford V8 engine. Also used to power Ford’s GT40 Le Mans challenger, the iconic 289 produced 306 horsepower as installed in the Mangusta, which also used the GT40’s early-type ZF transaxle.

Later Mangusta production used the less-desirable Ford 302-ci engine, producing only 220 horsepower, together with a later ZF Read More

1955 Maserati A6G/2000 Berlinetta

n total, Carrozzeria Frua completed fewer than 20 bodies for Maserati’s A6G/2000 chassis. Although the Frua spiders may garner greater recognition, the beautifully styled Berlinettas were featured in Maserati’s official catalog and offered a unique blend of sporting and grand touring characteristics.

Today, these rare Maseratis appear fresh, modern and utterly distinctive when compared with other 2-liter Italian sports cars of the period. Chassis 2114 was completed by Gilco — the company assembling bare chassis frames for Maserati and Read More

1959 Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Speciale “Low Nose”

With the introduction of the new aerodynamic, Bertone-bodied Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint Speciale at the Turin Auto Show in 1957, the Milanese manufacturer offered a true alternative to the Type 750 Competizione. Lower floor pans allowed a lower roof line, and the radiator was also lowered to allow a sleeker bonnet line, which resulted in the “Low Nose” moniker.

Of only 101 “Low Nose” Giulietta SSs produced, Chassis 0061 is one of the rare aluminum versions, of which only Read More