1993 Williams-Renault FW15C

ABS brought the realization that it was possible to allow computing power to do far more than keep the wheels from locking

World Champion Alain Prost once described the Williams-Renault FW15C, as “really a little Airbus” -his way of describing an F1 car in the electronic era.

Prost campaigned seven grands prix in the 1993 season, from Germany to Australia. He won the German grand prix where S/N 005 debuted. It Read More

1974-77 Plastic (Not So) Fantastic ‘Vettes

1975 was the nadir. The base motor was down to 165 hp-the lowest since Chevy abandoned the Blue Flame Six in 1955

The 1970s included some great years for the Corvette-Corvette fans still get slightly dizzy at the mention of the L88 and L71 engine options. Unfortunately, those were the other ’70s, the pre-disco, Vietnam-era early ’70s that were really more like a brief encore to the ’60s. The real ’70s, the Read More

1987 Ferrari Mondial 3.2 Cabriolet

Rear side windows on Cabriolets cost $1,500 to fix, the engine must be removed for major servicing and any electrical glitch is probably serious

When the Ferrari Mondial 8 was introduced at the Geneva Auto Show in March 1980, it was named in honor of the 4-cylinder, 3-liter sports racing Ferrari of the ’60s.
The new Mondial had a 3-liter, 8-cylinder motor mounted transversally behind the driver, as in the 308 Read More

1938 Aston Martin 15/98 Short-Chassis

A pre-war sports car requires more skill and nerve than newer machinery, but the rewards can be enjoyable at speeds just over the legal limit

By the mid-1930s, Aston Martin was one of the most admired British sporting makes. Solidly engineered, low-built,1.5-liter sports-racers took the team prize in the 1934 Tourist Trophy race in Ulster, followed by an impressive third in the 1935 Le Mans 24 hours.

But if the company were Read More

M3A1 Stuart Light Tank

British troops called the gasoline-powered American tanks ‘Ronsons.’ Like the cigarette lighter slogan of the day, they ‘lit the first time when struck’

The catalog description for the M3 Stuart light tank was sparse but pithy.
Manufacturer: American Car & Foundry Co., U.S.A. Crew: Four. Engine: Continental W-670-9A; 7-cyl. engine. Length: 450cm. Width: 246cm. Height: 230cm. Approx. Weight: 14.25 tons. Armament: One 37mm gun. Two replica 30-inch machine guns

1987 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe

Porsche street cars had a very strong reputation for excellent durability-Turbos broke that rule

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In order to compete against bigger-engined rivals, Porsche homologated the type 934 race car in 1974 and embarked on an entirely new phase in race car development. As word spread about the incredible performance, the initial run of 500 cars disappeared like Houdini. They made another 800 that year, yet didn’t satisfy the demand.

Porsche transferred Read More

1968 Howmet Turbine

Much of the experimental engine is missing. Only ten were built, to win a government contract, so replacement parts are on intergalactic backorder

Throughout the past century of automotive progress, the turbine engine was perceived as a possible alternative to the internal combustion engine.
The two most famous American turbine programs are the Chrysler Turbine and the Andy Granatelli Paxton-STP Indy racers. Yet, the most successful and only race-winning turbine cars Read More

1976-81 Triumph TR7

It had the misfortune of being built in British Leyland’s Liverpool plant, better known for producing continuous labor strife than automobiles

The Triumph TR7 was perhaps the ultimate product of the 1970s, a period referred to as “the decade that quality control forgot.” Abysmal production quality, labor strife, bad management and controversial styling all conspired to render the TR7-although a surprisingly decent seller-a tragic footnote in the last days of the British Read More

1963 Ferrari 250 GTL Lusso ‘Competizione’

Why Blouin chose to race a Lusso is a mystery, as by 1965 the era of the front-engine competition car was coming to an end

The Lusso is regarded as the most beautiful of all Pininfarina’s creations on the 250 GT chassis. It is a true Granturismo, combining high performance with contemporary levels of elegance. Chassis 4965GT left the factory in September 1963, destined for Paris dealer Franco-Britannic for delivery to Robert Read More

1967 Austin-Healey 3000

Two years ago, $60,000 would have been a good price for this concours-winning BJ8. By waiting, the seller’s return increased by more than 50%

The new Austin-Healey went into production in 1953 and was immediately popular in the U.S. The cars were well-styled, inexpensive, rugged and above all easy to drive, for both the sports car enthusiast who fancied some light competition or just for tooling down to the shops.
The early Read More