1961 Fiat Jolly 500

The expense of restoring these cars can be surprisingly high even if you
get the local basket-weaving class to refurbish your seats for free

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Few cars that Fiat produced had the “cuteness” of the Jolly. With coachwork by Ghia, the Fiat Jolly 500 was introduced in 1957, and had no real practical use, except for that of pure enjoyment. Many wealthy playboys, such as Fiat chief Gianni Agnelli, would Read More

1962 Jaguar E-Type Series I 3.8 Convertible

Early E-types had a variety of distinctive styling features that complemented the elegance of their lines, though not all of them were practical

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The new E-type had understandably received rave reviews at the Geneva Auto Show in March 1961, so Jaguar Cars Inc. geared up for another public relations coup as the new model arrived in the U.S. The launch was accompanied by all the pomp and circumstance Jaguar and the auto Read More

1968 Triumph TR250

For parts support to be any better, Girl Scouts would have to give away
TR250 distributor caps with their cookie orders

Among all the great stories of British car industry ineptitude, the genesis of the Triumph TR250 must rank among the best.
Triumph had planned to replace the TR4A in the summer of 1967 with the car that eventually became known as the TR6. However, as legend has it, the Germans Read More

1960 Ferrari 250 GTE

If you can’t afford a nice example, you really can’t afford a bad one

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By the end of the 1950s, the success of rivals Aston Martin and Maserati in providing Grand Touring cars for the enthusiast with a family meant that Ferrari could no longer ignore this increasingly important market sector. There had been four-seater Ferraris before the 250 GTE, with Ghia, Touring and Vignale all producing 2+2 designs in Read More

1960 Cooper T52 Formula Junior

The over-the-top factory team cars like the Lotus 27 and Lola Mk 5 were
the reason Formula Junior died off

Powered by JAP and Manx Norton motorcycle engines, Cooper’s innovative mid-engined racing cars dominated the 500-cc Formula 3 scene in the 1950s. These cars provided many future stars, most notably Stirling Moss, with their first taste of “real” motor racing.
What had been a strictly pragmatic solution to the problem Read More

1955 OSCA MT4-2AD Coupe

No regular OSCA MT4 had made anything like this at auction recently-and probably not even at the peak of the sports car madness in 1989

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Chassis 1153 is undoubtedly one of the most original surviving OSCAs in the world today. Only the patina of age would distinguish it from a new car.
The chassis and engine are as they left the factory with the correct adjustable shock absorbers and Read More

1955 Austin-Healey 100 Le Mans

Dealers were using the Le Mans kit to tart up cars and help move them off the showroom floor

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This is a rare Austin-Healey with factory Le Mans options, finished in beautiful Reno Red and black. Notice the vented hood with leather strap, fold down windshield, and original dual carbs with original 100M Le Mans tag intact.
Equipped with all options including overdrive, its credentials include scoring 96.1 points Read More

1968-76 BMW 2002

Nearly every sports car enthusiast over 50 seems to have a 2002 story.
Invariably, these end with “we drove it until the fenders rusted off”

A favorite of enthusiasts from day one, the BMW 2002 was described by David E. Davis, Jr. in Car and Driver as “the best way to get somewhere sitting down.” The 2002 is in large part the reason why BMW enjoys the reputation that it does Read More

1969 Porsche 911E Targa

Soft rear window Targas have become the darling of the early 911
cognoscenti

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Porsche introduced the 911 Targa in mid-1966 to an enthusiastic audience anxious for an open 911. For the first model year in 1967, only the soft rear window was available. A year later, the glass rear window was introduced as a far more durable alternative. By 1969, virtually all Targas were glass rear window models, even Read More

1965 Pontiac GTO

Pontiac Historic Services build sheets are the only way to tell which cars left the factory as real GTOs

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The exemplary 1965 GTO offered here is one of only 11,311 Pontiac GTOs that came as convertibles, just 15% of production in 1965. How many came with the ultimate 389-ci, 360-hp Tri-Power V8 and four-speed manual transmission is unknown, but it is certainly relatively few.
This example’s other equipment includes a Read More