1957 Porsche 356A Coupe

If this car drives as the catalog says, the new owner did very well. If not get busy spending and making it right

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The 356A was Porsche’s first volume production car, in Coupe, Speedster, and Cabriolet versions. Introduced in 1956, the 356A embodied substantial revisions to the original 356 series, including a one-piece curved windshield, horn grilles under the headlights, and a gas gauge.
Changes to the front and rear Read More

1955 Maserati 300S

In 1955, after taking delivery of his most powerful Maserati to date, the three-liter 300S offered here, chassis number 3057, Benoit Musy contested eleven European Sports Car Championship events, winning five times and scoring a further five podium finishes up to the August 12, 1956, Kristianstad Swedish Grand Prix, which he won.

In a cruel twist of fate, Musy was to perish abruptly at the Coupe de Paris Montlhery on October 7, 1956-the last big race of the season. Musy Read More

1974 Gaz-13 Chaika Limousine

I suspect this car falls into the same class of collectible as hearses-you can’t get away from the Dark Side

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This Russian Gaz-13 “Chaika” limousine is number 2,511 of only 3,719 built between 1959 and 1981. The Chaika-which means Gull-was favored by Kremlin officials, Soviet heads of state, and senior KGB officers.
To the average Russian, however, the cars were sinister symbols of the terrible power of the state. The large Read More

1980 Triumph Spitfire 1500

They were cited by motoring journalists as an example of the thrills to be found in driving slow cars quickly

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The Triumph Spitfire 1500, according to the original brochure, is a true sports car whose classic lines express “the harmony of power and grace which is the car’s hallmark.” The brochure boasted that the 1,493-cc engine is strict on fuel but generous on power. Developing 71 bhp at 5,500 rpm, Read More

1967-69 MGC

The MGC was the first in a string of half-baked ideas that turned the British motor industry into a historic-preservation trust

Few cars have taken more of a beating right out of the box than the MGC. Already incensed by BMC’s premeditated murder of the Austin-Healey 3000 in favor of the C, journalists were out for blood.
And they drew plenty: “clumsy,” “nose-heavy,” and “not particularly nimble” were among the kinder Read More

1961 Ferrari 250 GT Series II Pininfarina Cabriolet

The car defines the scene: a little playful, a little romantic, and a serious
reinforcement of privilege

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The 250 GT Cabriolet was conceived by Pininfarina as Ferrari’s semi-luxury touring car and was thus given better interior appointments and more soundproofing than the California Spyder Series.
The cabriolet appearance was also created to look different from the Spyder, relating strongly to the 250 GT Pininfarina coupe, which was also presented as Read More

1938 M-B 540K Sindelfingen Cabriolet “A”

Together with its predecessor the 500K, the magnificent Mercedes-Benz 540K was arguably the most noteworthy production model offered by the Stuttgart firm during the 1930s.

A development of the 500K, whose independently suspended chassis it shared, the 540K was powered by a 5.4-liter supercharged straight-eight engine. It featured the company’s Roots-type supercharger system, in which pressing the accelerator to the end of its travel would engage the compressor and close off the atmospheric intake.

Launched at the Paris Salon in Read More

“Goodall Special Sports”

According to information supplied by the vendor, this intriguing two-seater special is believed to have been constructed in 1926 by one Cleland C. Castleman. Built around an inverted ladder frame (hence the ground-hugging stance), it’s equipped with a beam front axle, “live” rear end, leaf springs, and Andre-Hartford-style friction dampers.

Clothed in a mixture of aluminum and steel, it rides on 19-inch wire wheels and features unusually large finned rear brake drums (those at the front appearing somewhat smaller).

Reputedly Read More

2004 612 Scaglietti

Despite controversial styling, the 612’s performance is Formula One: It reaches 60 mph in just over four seconds and tops out at 199 mph

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In naming its new four-seater Granturismo after Carrozzeria Scaglietti, Ferrari acknowledged the immense contribution made by its collaborator in the past 50 years. Founded by Sergio Scaglietti in 1951 and now a wholly owned subsidiary, the company has created many of Ferrari’s most memorable cars. Read More

1966 Lamborghini 400 GT Monza

In 1970, after just 7,136 km, this unique V12 Granturismo was bricked up in a garage on a busy street

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Lamborghini’s first model-the 350 GT-wowed the motoring press and public at its 1964 launch. Not content to rest on their laurels, Lamborghini’s engineers were already at work on the 400 GT, which was in road testers’ hands by the end of the year.
The series-produced 350 GT/400 GT coupé Read More