1925 Amilcar 4 CGS

These lightweight, small-displacement sports cars provide a true pre-war motoring experience at a fraction of the cost of their more expensive French cousin from Molsheim

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Of all the small sports-racing cars that proliferated in France after World War One, the Amilcar was the most famous and most successful. Built at St. Denis from 1921 through 1937, they did extremely well in the hotly contested 1,100-cc class, in which so many Read More

1962 Daimler SP250 Dart Roadster

No less an authority on grace than Sir William Lyons was rumored to have tossed his scones on his first sight of a Dart

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Daimler of England startled the automotive world in 1959 with the Dart roadster, a swoopy sports car powered by an advanced 2.6-liter, hemi-head V8. With a chassis inspired by Triumph’s TR3A and a fiberglass body, it weighed barely over 2,000 pounds, giving Daimler’s new roadster obvious Read More

1959 Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder LWB

It lacks reasonable weatherproofing, rusts easily, and has a chassis that is way too flexible, but the California Spyder proves that people will always buy beauty and performance over practicality

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Convincing Enzo Ferrari to produce an open version of the highly successful competition 250 GT Berlinetta was an effort credited to the famous American Ferrari importer and driver Luigi Chinetti. The resultant “Spyder California,” with mechanical specification very similar to the 250 Read More

1954-1963 Mercedes-Benz 190SL

The 190SL’s designers had a challenge on their hands-to echo the 300SL’s styling, but not copy it

Close your eyes and picture your local main drag on a Saturday afternoon. Parked outside the neighborhood coffee shop, what do you see? Likely one or two Mercedes SLs, 280s. 560s. 450s. 380s. They’re a breeze to own and drive, good-looking cars that have always been popular, comfortable, and tasteful. On the used market, they’re Read More

1964 Buick Riviera

GM design chief Bill Mitchell’s “personal luxury” land yacht set sail as a sophisticated merger of Ferrari GT car style with Rolls-Royce luxury

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Although Buick was primarily a luxury line, in 1963 it issued a sports model, a beautiful coupe called the Riviera. It was America’s answer to the Ferrari GTs, a car for Buick’s most affluent customers. As such, it was delivered with a host of standard features, including Read More

1955 OSCA Mt4 Spider Morelli

The little jewels from Bologna won everywhere-from the small regional Italian events to major international venues like the Mille Miglia, Targa Florio, Le Mans and Sebring

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A tiny bantam of a racing car, the OSCA Mt4 was ahead of its time, winning overall at Sebring in 1954 with Stirling Moss and Bill Lloyd behind the wheel. Its 1.45-liter, dual-overhead-cam four cylinder was fed by two Weber carburetors, and produced 120 Read More

1962 MGB Sebring

The U.S. MG distributors were hoping to put a gleam in the eye of the
dentist from Columbus, who might imagine his car out there running with the Ferraris and Porsches

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Sebring in 1964 was one of the world’s top-tier endurance races, part of the FIA’s Challenge Mondiale and Prototypes Trophy, along with the Targa Florio, Le Mans, and the Nurburgring 1000 km. Two of British Motor Car Distributors’ Read More

1956 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing

In the collector car world, there is no more immediately recognizable sight than a 300SL with its doors open. Introduced in 1954 as a coupe with signature “Gullwing” doors, the legendary 300SL was conceived as a high performance street machine that was really a thinly veiled racing car. It was fast, solid, and handled well, and it quickly developed an enviable reputation, both on the track and in the streets.

This particular 300SL Gullwing has a fabulous history, as it Read More

1955 Triumph TR2 Roadster

Some early TR2s were immediately re-sprayed by their owners, changing effeminate colors like Olive Yellow and Geranium to more traditional ones like British Racing Green

The post-war Standard-Triumph company, like most manufacturers of the period, found strong demand for its products. Exports were critical to the survival of the English auto industry and Triumph knew that returning American GIs had developed a taste for British sports cars, so plans were made for Read More

1966 Ferrari 275 GTS Spyder

The GTB/GTB4 has catapulted in value over the past 18 months and dragged the GTS along with it

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Ferrari introduced the 275 GTS at the October 1964 Paris show alongside its sibling, the 275 GTB. The two shared the same chassis and driveline, although the GTS engine was more mildly tuned to give 20 horsepower less than the berlinetta at 600 fewer revolutions. These were Ferrari’s first production cars with Read More