1948 Lincoln Convertible V12 Coupe

1942 was a tough year to introduce a new model, as the advent of WWII led to the cessation of all passenger automobile production. When Lincoln resumed production in 1946, what had been a bold restyling of the Zephyr model in 1942 was already starting to look dated. The front end retained the massive appearance it had established before the war, with the headlights still flanked by the parking and turn-signal lights.

Pent-up consumer demand for new Read More

1978 Ferrari 400A 2+2 Coupe

From the onset, the intention of the 400 had been to challenge the finest luxury saloons available. It was anticipated that a large demand would come from the lucrative American market, though sadly the cost involved in meeting the stringent US regulations denied this option.

Introduced in 1976 at the Paris salon, it was available with either a five-speed manual gearbox or automatic three-speed transmission, sourced from General Motors. This option was targeted at those customers who wanted Read More

1964 Volkswagen Karmann-Ghia Coupe

After the second World War and into the 1960s, as prosperity increased with the car-buying public, the demand rose for better, more elegant and entertaining vehicles. Up until this time, most manufacturers concentrated on rather bland and functional cars. Volkswagen, of course, produced the Beetle and a Microbus.

Looking for a new “image” car, Volkswagen contracted with Karmann, one of Germany’s oldest coachbuilding firms, to build such a vehicle. Karmann, in need of a design, approached the famed Read More

1996 Lamborghini Diablo SV-R

The Diablo was introduced in 1991 under Lamborghini’s brief period of Chrysler ownership, preserving but refining its layout, smoothing out the body’s humps and bumps and improving occupant accommodations. In the middle of the ’90s, Lamborghini built 31 Diablos prepared for use on the racetrack. The race version, known as the SV-R (for Sport Veloce, Race), was for competition in the new one-marque Lamborghini Diablo Supertrophy series. Customers could purchase an SV-R along with a season of racing. Lamborghini Read More

1926 Bentley 3-Liter Speed Model

In 12 short years, Bentley became one of Britain’s most revered marques through its cars’ technical sophistication and enviable record in long-distance racing events, including winning the Le Mans 24-hour race five times.

Designed by Walter Owen Bentley and his colleagues, the 3-Litre was the progenitor of the 4.5-, 6.5- and 8-Litre Bentleys. The 3-Litre combined several developments not previously seen in road-going cars, including an overhead camshaft driving four valves per cylinder, the first use of aluminum Read More

1985-89 Toyota MR2 Mark I

1984 marked the debut of the Toyota “Mid-engine runabout two-seater,” or “MR2,” in Japan. Less than a year later, it arrived on American shores amid enthusiasm and debate. Based on a prototype called the SV3, the short, lightweight, angular car found a comfortable seat in the Toyota model lineup. It was a sporty offering, supported by the consistency and reliability Toyota was known for.
There is some suggestion that the SV3 prototype was based on the Lotus X100, Read More

1973 Ferrari 246 GTS Dino

This European-registered car has a 2,418-cc V6, double overhead camshaft, cast iron block and light alloy heads, and produces 178 bhp at 7,000 rpm. It has a five-speed manual gearbox with front and rear independent suspension with unequal-length A arms, coil springs, tubular shock absorbers and four-wheel disc brakes.

The forerunner to the hugely popular Ferrari 246 GT and GTS was the 206 S Speciale, a styling exercise that Pininfarina exhibited at the 1965 Paris Motor Show. Read More

1969 Mercedes-Benz 600 SWB Limousine

The Mercedes-Benz 600 Limousine made its premiere at the Frankfurt International Motor Show in the fall of 1963. The previous “Grand” Mercedes-Benz were the pre-war 770 models (1930-43), built during a time in automobile history when luxury, power and elegance were at their pinnacle. They were the Daimler-Benz premier product, portraying state of the art of automotive engineering and conceived to transport and coddle dignitaries in opulent style.

The styling of the new 600 was a collaboration Read More

1959 Maserati 5000 GT

When the Shah of Persia came to Maserati in 1958 looking for a unique and distinctive gran turismo, Maserati included a two-page description of the sports-racer 450S in the information he received. The 3500 GT, then entering production, was not exclusive enough for Shah Reza Pahlavi, whose garages housed some of the world’s finest cars, but the 450S caught his attention and Maserati bravely undertook the creation of the most powerful, exclusive and unique gran turismo ever contemplated, the Read More

1967 MGB-GT Coupe

The MGB was introduced in 1962 as an answer to the growing knowledge and desire of economically minded enthusiasts for a more powerful and also more comfortable sports car. Although stronger and larger than the MGA, from which it is derived, the MGB actually weighed 40 pounds less and its performance was substantially improved over previous models.

Three years later, MG introduced the MGB-GT coupe. In appearance, the MGB-GT had the same basic body as the MGB. The Read More