1962 Ferrari 250 GTE/250 GT SWB Berlinetta

Introduced in 1960, the short-wheelbase was available in street or competition spec, with alloy bodywork on the lighter competition cars. All SWBs were more than capable as road cars,All SWBs were more than capable as road cars, with a level of trim and sound and weather proofing that seemed luxurious for their day.

Much of the development work carried out on the Ferrari GT cars filtered down into some of Ferrari’s non-competition-oriented cars, such as the 250 GTE. Lessons learned Read More

1960 Ford Thunderbird Convertible

The classic Thunderbird was introduced in 1955 in response to the Corvette. With the same wheelbase, the T-Bird was designed to be more comfortable and luxurious. The 1958-60 models added more chrome and two seats. This car is one of the rare “J” code cars-only 250 were built in 1960- with a 430-c.i., 350-horsepower Lincoln engine, a $177 option. Other features include Cruise-O-Matic transmission, tinted power windows, power seats and air conditioning. In show condition following a three-year ground-up Read More

1974-79 Ferrari 308 GT4 2+2

In 1973 Ferrari replaced the Dino 246 GT V6 with the Dino 308 GT4 V8. Unusually, they did not choose Pininfarina to style the car, instead opting for Bertone, where a young Marcello Gandini did the actual design. In typical Ferrari practice, construction was done at the Scaglietti works. Oddly, Ferrari asked Bertone to make the car a 2+2, as they felt this was one area the Porsche 911 had held an advantage over the 246 GT. When it Read More

1963 Morgan Low-Body +4 Super Sport

The Morgan Plus 4 Super Sports model was introduced late in 1961, offering arguably the best price-for-performance value available at that time. Its lightweight aluminum body provided crisp handling in a design reminiscent of the great fully fendered sports cars of the 1930s.

Between 1961 and 1968 only 104 Triumph TR4A-engined aluminum-bodied Super Sports were produced. Of the 95 two-seat cars built for sports car competition in the United States and abroad, 50 carried the low-bodied roadster coachwork Read More

1963 Porsche 356 GS/GT Coupe

Porsche had great success racing 356 Carreras in many different venues. In 1961 at Sebring, Porsche had two class wins with the Carrera 2: the GT class with Ben Pon and Joe Buzzetta, and the Prototype class with Don Webster and Bruce Jennings. After Joe Buzzetta’s win, he remarked of the Carrera: “If I had a choice of any one of the Porsches I’d raced to keep for a road car, it would be that one.”

The Carrera engine Read More

1956 OSCA 1.5 Tipo MT4 Sports Racer

This wonderfully useable, well-presented and historic product of the world-famous Maserati brothers’ company “Officina Specializzata Costruzione Automobili,” better known as “OSCA,” was purchased new from the Bolognese factory in Italy by Kleenex millionaire James H. “Gentleman Jim” Kimberly, in 1956.

At the Road America circuit in Elkhart Lake, Wisconsin, that September, Kimberly and his brilliant co-driver, none other than the great Carroll Shelby, drove this MT4 to first place in the Four-Hour enduro race for cars up to two Read More

1989 Ferrari 328 GTS

Ferrari’s line of highly successful V8-engined road cars began when the 308 GT4 of 1973 took over from the preceding 246 Dino V6. The newcomer’s wedged-shaped styling, by Bertone, was not universally well received, but the performance of the 3-liter V8 certainly was. A new two-seater car using the same power unit, the 308 GTB, debuted at the Paris Salon in 1975. Built on a shorter wheelbase, the stunningly beautiful GTB marked a welcome return to Pininfarina styling.

The Read More

2002 Chrysler Prowler

The Prowler, approved for concept in July 1992, was a showstopper in January 1993 when it made its debut at the North American International AutoShow in Detroit. In September 1994, top management officially approved the Prowler for production and it was in 1997 that the first production version of the Prowler rolled off the line at Conner Avenue Assembly in Detroit.

The Prowler salutes the great American hot rod tradition, but deliberately does so in a thoroughly contemporary manner. Read More

1980-85 Mercedes-Benz 380SL Convertible

If you are looking for a practical roadster with style, fine handling, comfort, reliability and high build quality, the Mercedes-Benz 380SL is the answer. For less than $15,000, nothing touches it in terms of an overall package.
The 380SL is part of the fourth generation of the Mercedes-Benz SLs. Designated the type R107 chassis, it began production in 1971 and was completely different from the 230, 250 and 280SLs (type R113) that it replaced.
The 1981 380SL Read More

1965 Aston Martin DB5 Convertible

The DB5 convertible may be rightly regarded as the perfected Aston Martin-the product of deliberate and steady improvement in performance, reliability, comfort and appearance to a plane unequalled by its Continental rivals. The DB5 flowed smoothly from the DB4, gaining a small measure of displacement (from 3.7 to 4.0 liters) and power (from 240 to 282 horsepower). Its body flowed even more smoothly, adopting the covered headlights pioneered on the short-wheelbase DB4GT by Zagato and offered on some later Read More