1969 Mercedes-Benz 280SL

The third-series Mercedes-Benz roadster, the 230SL, was introduced in March 1963 at the Geneva Show, succeeding the highly regarded 1950s-designed 300SL and 190SL. This new SL (type 113), nicknamed the “pagoda” after the silhouette of its distinctive detachable hardtop, ushered in what Mercedes-Benz felt the automobile market desired and required: a “civilized” sports car. A balanced package, it provided superior engineering, comfort, safety, reliability and proper road manners. Styled by Paul Bracq, its conservative and handsome design has endured well Read More

1970 Plymouth Superbird Hemi Coupe

This is a very rare, very original 426-cid/425-hp Hemi Superbird, one of only 74 Torqueflite Hemi Superbirds built. A Chrysler/Plymouth dealer used this car to increase showroom traffic, and to participate in parades and local Mopar events.

This vehicle has just over 9,600 miles on it, and the spare has never been on the ground. The car has been recently inspected by Mopar expert Galen Govier and his report is available. Documentation also includes the original broadcast sheet Read More

1967-74 Triumph GT6

A “poor-man’s XKE” is what some call the Triumph GT6. They share a six-cylinder engine and fastback styling, both rarities in English cars of their era. And they both boast independent rear suspensions and relatively luxurious interiors. The fact that the GT6 can be bought for less than one-fifth the price of an E-type coupe makes it an affordable classic worth considering.
Triumph built three distinct series of GT6s. The first, or Mk I, was produced from 1967 to Read More

1973 Lamborghini Espada Series III

In the early 1970s, Bertone’s brilliant chief designer Marcello Gandini was developing a new show car for one of Italy’s wealthiest men-and its newest automaker-Ferrucio Lamborghini. Lamborghini’s intent was to create superlative grand touring cars for the world’s richest and most powerful men. Having started with the graceful 350 GT and 400 GT 2+2, he then began to focus on a successor-still powerful and agile, but more comfortable for long-distance travel.

The result was the Marzal, which debuted Read More

1899 Clement-Panhard Voiture Legere Type VCP

As motoring got into its stride in France in the latter part of the 1890s, it was realized that there was a need to fill the gap between the larger, powerful, expensive motor cars and motor tricycles. The great firm of Panhard-Levassor joined the throng with a light car. Panhard-Levassor could not produce enough of these cars to satisfy demand and so licensed the manufacture of their Voiture Légère to one of their directors, Adolphe Clément, resulting in the Clément-Panhard Read More

2001 Ferrari 550 Barchetta Pininfarina

To mark the world-renowned carrozzeria’s 70th anniversary in 2000, Ferrari invited Sergio Pininfarina to submit designs for a front-engined roadster that would capture the spirit of past Maranello classics, such as the 166 Mille Miglia, 250 GT California Spyder and 365 GTS/4 Daytona Spyder. In its manufacturer’s own words: “Ferrari has always created very special runs of cars, and the 550 Barchetta Pininfarina was developed with the aim of being a unique Ferrari-one that deliberately seeks to be more Read More

1931 Chrysler CG Imperial Dual Cowl Phaeton

The remarkable styling of the CG series Imperials was the work of LeBaron, one of the greatest design firms of the classic era. Founded by Thomas L. Hibbard and Ray Dietrich, and later joined by Ralph Roberts, the company established itself as innovative, creative and responsive. Although Hibbard and Dietrich later left the firm to pursue other opportunities, the company flourished at the hands of Ralph Roberts.

Probably the most striking design in existence at the time was Read More

1966-76 Jensen Interceptor

If one bought cars by the pound, Jensen Interceptors would be the best value in the marketplace. Produced in Great Britain during the death throes of the Jensen company and following the time-honored traditions of British companies installing big American engines into Italian-designed bodies, these cars are large, heavy and dirt-cheap. With space for a golf foursome, complete with bags, and sporting a Chrysler V8, the car was huge by contemporary English standards. Aluminum and fiberglass minimized the weight, Read More

1973 Datsun 240Z

Few realize the roots of Nissan reach back to 1912, when a young man named Masujiro Hashimoto created a car. The car was named DAT, after three family member’s initials. By 1934, the cars were Datsuns and the company was Nissan. By the late 1950s, Yuraka Katayama, a young engineer educated in America, advocated both the use of racing to develop the breed and the idea of a car designed for the very different roads and drivers in America.

Katayama Read More

1963-64 Studebaker Avanti R-1/R-2

The Avanti was an automotive Hail Mary, a last-ditch effort to bring excitement and warm bodies to Studebaker showrooms. In 1961 Studebaker president Sherwood Egbert made the decision to build a sports car-and to do it as fast as possible. He called upon one of the best-known industrial designers in the world, Raymond Loewy, who assembled a group of talented designers in Palm Springs, California. The team produced the basic Avanti design in just a few weeks.
The Read More