1972 Maserati Boomerang

Giugiaro’s Maserati Boomerang was first displayed as a non-functional model at the Turin motor show in 1971. By the Geneva show in March,1972, it had been transformed into a fully operational vehicle. The mechanicals were borrowed from the Maserati Bora.

With its 4.7-liter V8 engine developing 310 horsepower, the Boomerang was good for an indicated top speed of 185 miles per hour. One journalist observed it looked as though it was doing 100 miles per hour standing still. The Read More

1930 Bentley 6½-Liter Speed Six

Although the 6½-liter had been conceived as a touring car to compete with Rolls-Royce’s new Phantom, in Speed Six form it proved admirably suited to competition: in 1929 Barnato/Birkin’s Speed Six won the Le Mans 24 Hour race ahead of a trio of 4½-liter Bentleys and Barnato/Kidston repeated the feat in the following year’s Grand Prix d’Endurance at the Sarthe circuit ahead of similarly mounted Clement/Watney. Small wonder, then, that the fast yet refined Speed Six was W. O. Read More

1966 Lamborghini 400 GT 2+2

In 1964, Ferruccio Lamborghini unveiled his V12 competitor to Ferrari, the 350 GT, at the Geneva Auto Show. The car, which featured a four-cam, 3.5-liter V12 engine designed by Giotto Bizzarini, a tubular steel chassis, four-wheel independent suspension, four-wheel disc brakes and a ZF gearbox, was Lamborghini’s first serial-production GT. The automotive world loved it.

In 1966 the engine was increased to 3.9 liters and the ZF transmission was replaced with a gearbox built by Lamborghini itself. The differential Read More

1950 Allard J2 Roadster

An excellent example of a successful Anglo-American hybrid, the J2 Allard offered incredible performance for the period at a moderate cost. As a result, they were very popular in US and European racing and their list of competition successes is most impressive, including first-place finishes at Sebring, Bridgehampton and other race courses throughout America. During the production run of 1950-51 a total of 99 examples were built. Ideal for the now popular runs and rallies throughout this country and Read More

1961–73 Volvo P1800/S/E/ES

The Volvo P1800 has always been a bit of an odd duck in the sports car world. With its chrome-tipped rear wings and high belt-line, its looks were futuristic when introduced. By the 1970s they were dated, but now, 30 years later, they are pleasingly classic.

Over the lifespan of the 1800, its engine grew from 1780 cc to 1986 cc, induction changed from twin SU to Zenith-Stromberg carburetors to Bosch K-Jetronic injection, and horsepower went from 100 to 130. Read More

1989 Ferrari Testarossa Berlinetta

Ferrari’s flagship model until recently, the Testarossa revived a famous name when it arrived in 1984. Testa Rossa (two words denoting the red valve covers) had been applied to what many regard as Ferrari’s greatest sports racer. The new “Testarossa” retained its Boxer predecessor’s mid-mounted 5-liter flat-12 engine
with power now boosted to 390 bhp at 6,300 rpm, courtesy of four-valve heads. Despite the power increase, smoothness and drivability was improved, with a maximum speed of 180 mph.

The Read More

1970 Chevrolet Chevelle LS6 Convertible

The 1970s were the glory years for American muscle. Gas was cheap, and insurance companies hadn’t yet realized just how different an LS6 Chevelle was from a 350-cubic-inch commuter special. The 454-cubic-inch, 450-horsepower LS6 engine was put together, along with the car it rode in, at Chevrolet’s big-block V8 production plant in Tonawanda, New York. Specially built from air cleaner to oil pan, with tire-melting performance in mind, it is thought that just 17 LS6 convertibles equipped with an Read More

1957 Ford Intruder Custom Wagon

Created by Troy Trepanier, Intruder came out of the box in San Bernardino, California, with three miles showing on the odometer. Six days and 2,900 cross-country miles later, on the Hot Rod Power Tour, Intruder had performed flawlessly, and even returned 20 miles per gallon.

The goal for Rad Rides, the builders of Intruder, was to set new standards in style and performance, as part of bringing the new generation of super rods to a higher level. By any Read More

1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta

By the late ’50s it was apparent that Ferrari had perfected the dual-purpose gran turismo automobile with its line of 250 GTs. The Colombo-designed V12 had evolved into a powerful engine. More important in racing, where it was said, ” to finish first, you must first finish,” it was reliable. That reliability
carried over to 250 GTs that never saw the race track, creating confident and satisfied owners.

By 1961 competition pressure had persuaded Ferrari to create high-performance versions Read More

1973 Lancia Fulvia 1.3 Coupe

The introduction of the Fulvia sedan in 1963 maintained Lancia’s reputation for innovation in automobile design. The boxy replacement for the Appia featured an all-new, narrow-angle, V4, overhead-camshaft engine, along with front-wheel drive, independent front suspension by double wishbones and disc brakes all around. A 2+2 coupe version on a shorter wheelbase was launched in 1965.

Though mechanically similar, the newcomer had all the visual presence its progenitor lacked and came with—initially—a 1261-cc engine producing 80 bhp. Tuned HF versions Read More