1956 Jaguar D-type Roadster

Jaguar’s magnificent legend was enhanced at Le Mans during the 1950s, where their initial C-type specialized roadsters first won the 24 Hour race in both 1951 and 1953. For 1954 a far more sophisticated sports racing car was developed, which became known as the “D-type.” Entered at Le Mans as factory team cars in 1954, the first D-types were only narrowly beaten by a much larger-engined Ferrari V12. Jaguar quickly got their revenge a few weeks later when the Read More

1920 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Victoria

The model J Duesenberg has long been regarded as the most outstanding example of design and engineering of the classic era. Introduced in 1929, trading was halted on the New York stock exchange for the announcement. At $8,500 for the chassis alone, it was by far the most expensive car in America. With coachwork, the delivered price of many Duesenbergs approached $20,000, a staggering sum at a time when a typical new family car cost around $500.

Few would Read More

1962 Maserati 3500 GT Coupe

The definitive Gran Turismo of its era, the Maserati 3500 GT debuted in 1957 and was the company’s first genuine series-production road car. Maserati’s three decades as constructors of perhaps the world’s finest racing cars showed in every detail of the elegant Touring-bodied coupe, from its exquisite, race-derived 3.5-liter engine through its impeccable road manners, fine brakes and faultless build quality. Here was a car to rival the best that Stuttgart, Newport Pagnell and Maranello had to offer.

This Read More

1966 Lancia Flaminia 2.8 3C Super Sport

The Flaminia was the first Lancia designed by Antonia Fessici and was the company’s flagship when launched in 1957. Fessici had finally broken with tradition and discarded the previously used vertical coil independent front suspension in favor of wishbones. The engine was a 2.5-liter V6 driving through an aft-mounted gearbox and de Dion rear axle. In 1964 the 3C version was introduced with a 2.8-liter engine producing 152 horsepower.

Without doubt the most attractive coachwork on these chassis was Read More

1955 Mercedes-Benz 300S Cabriolet

Having resumed production in 1946 with the 170 in unchanged, pre-WWII form, Mercedes-Benz introduced its first all-new designs of the post-war era-the 220 and 300-at the Frankfurt Auto Show in 1951. While the 220 was an advance on the 170, the 300 re-established Mercedes-Benz in the front rank of prestige car manufacturers, marking as it did a return to the marque’s tradition of building high-performance luxury automobiles of the finest quality. The 300’s oval-tube chassis followed the lines of Read More

1962 Ferrari 250 GTE/250 GT SWB Berlinetta

Introduced in 1960, the short-wheelbase was available in street or competition spec, with alloy bodywork on the lighter competition cars. All SWBs were more than capable as road cars,All SWBs were more than capable as road cars, with a level of trim and sound and weather proofing that seemed luxurious for their day.

Much of the development work carried out on the Ferrari GT cars filtered down into some of Ferrari’s non-competition-oriented cars, such as the 250 GTE. Lessons learned Read More

1968 MGC Convertible

By the late 1960s the MGB, now with a 1.8-liter engine, had been in production for five years and was firmly established in the hearts of enthusiasts around the world. Its performance, however, was outpaced by sports models and-on occasion-tuned sedans from other factories. The engineers at MG’s Abingdon works knew there was plenty of development in the B’s compact unitary bodyshell and running gear, and in 1967 the 3-liter MGC-GT and roadster were unveiled at the Earls Court Read More

1960 Ford Thunderbird Convertible

The classic Thunderbird was introduced in 1955 in response to the Corvette. With the same wheelbase, the T-Bird was designed to be more comfortable and luxurious. The 1958-60 models added more chrome and two seats. This car is one of the rare “J” code cars-only 250 were built in 1960- with a 430-c.i., 350-horsepower Lincoln engine, a $177 option. Other features include Cruise-O-Matic transmission, tinted power windows, power seats and air conditioning. In show condition following a three-year ground-up Read More

1974-79 Ferrari 308 GT4 2+2

In 1973 Ferrari replaced the Dino 246 GT V6 with the Dino 308 GT4 V8. Unusually, they did not choose Pininfarina to style the car, instead opting for Bertone, where a young Marcello Gandini did the actual design. In typical Ferrari practice, construction was done at the Scaglietti works. Oddly, Ferrari asked Bertone to make the car a 2+2, as they felt this was one area the Porsche 911 had held an advantage over the 246 GT. When it Read More

1980-85 Mercedes-Benz 380SL Convertible

If you are looking for a practical roadster with style, fine handling, comfort, reliability and high build quality, the Mercedes-Benz 380SL is the answer. For less than $15,000, nothing touches it in terms of an overall package.
The 380SL is part of the fourth generation of the Mercedes-Benz SLs. Designated the type R107 chassis, it began production in 1971 and was completely different from the 230, 250 and 280SLs (type R113) that it replaced.
The 1981 380SL Read More