1956 OSCA 1.5 Tipo MT4 Sports Racer

This wonderfully useable, well-presented and historic product of the world-famous Maserati brothers’ company “Officina Specializzata Costruzione Automobili,” better known as “OSCA,” was purchased new from the Bolognese factory in Italy by Kleenex millionaire James H. “Gentleman Jim” Kimberly, in 1956.

At the Road America circuit in Elkhart Lake, Wisconsin, that September, Kimberly and his brilliant co-driver, none other than the great Carroll Shelby, drove this MT4 to first place in the Four-Hour enduro race for cars up to two Read More

1963 Porsche 356 GS/GT Coupe

Porsche had great success racing 356 Carreras in many different venues. In 1961 at Sebring, Porsche had two class wins with the Carrera 2: the GT class with Ben Pon and Joe Buzzetta, and the Prototype class with Don Webster and Bruce Jennings. After Joe Buzzetta’s win, he remarked of the Carrera: “If I had a choice of any one of the Porsches I’d raced to keep for a road car, it would be that one.”

The Carrera engine Read More

1989 Ferrari 328 GTS

Ferrari’s line of highly successful V8-engined road cars began when the 308 GT4 of 1973 took over from the preceding 246 Dino V6. The newcomer’s wedged-shaped styling, by Bertone, was not universally well received, but the performance of the 3-liter V8 certainly was. A new two-seater car using the same power unit, the 308 GTB, debuted at the Paris Salon in 1975. Built on a shorter wheelbase, the stunningly beautiful GTB marked a welcome return to Pininfarina styling.

The Read More

2002 Chrysler Prowler

The Prowler, approved for concept in July 1992, was a showstopper in January 1993 when it made its debut at the North American International AutoShow in Detroit. In September 1994, top management officially approved the Prowler for production and it was in 1997 that the first production version of the Prowler rolled off the line at Conner Avenue Assembly in Detroit.

The Prowler salutes the great American hot rod tradition, but deliberately does so in a thoroughly contemporary manner. Read More

1963 Morgan Low-Body +4 Super Sport

The Morgan Plus 4 Super Sports model was introduced late in 1961, offering arguably the best price-for-performance value available at that time. Its lightweight aluminum body provided crisp handling in a design reminiscent of the great fully fendered sports cars of the 1930s.

Between 1961 and 1968 only 104 Triumph TR4A-engined aluminum-bodied Super Sports were produced. Of the 95 two-seat cars built for sports car competition in the United States and abroad, 50 carried the low-bodied roadster coachwork Read More

1932 Stutz SV-16 Derham Convertible

Harry C. Stutz was born in Ohio in 1876 where he grew up caring for and repairing agricultural machinery on the family farm. Fascinated by gasoline engines, he built his first car in 1897 followed by a second effort using an engine of his own design and manufacture.

By 1925 the Stutz Motor Car Company was under the stewardship of Frederick Moskovics, who had left Franklin to become Stutz’s new president. Moskovics was responsible for the new Vertical Eight Read More

1965 Aston Martin DB5 Convertible

The DB5 convertible may be rightly regarded as the perfected Aston Martin-the product of deliberate and steady improvement in performance, reliability, comfort and appearance to a plane unequalled by its Continental rivals. The DB5 flowed smoothly from the DB4, gaining a small measure of displacement (from 3.7 to 4.0 liters) and power (from 240 to 282 horsepower). Its body flowed even more smoothly, adopting the covered headlights pioneered on the short-wheelbase DB4GT by Zagato and offered on some later Read More

1964-66 Mini-Cooper S

If it hadn’t been for the success of the Mini-Cooper S as driven by Paddy Hopkirk in the Monte Carlo Rally and similar challenging long-distance races in the mid-’60s, the Mini probably never would have achieved the worldwide recognition it has enjoyed. And there certainly never would have been a BMW Mini in showrooms in 2002. With the release of the new model, the originals are enjoying a renaissance of interest in the classic car marketplace.
The Austin/Morris Mini, Read More

1947 Bugatti Type 73 Monoposto Race Car

In 1944 Ettore Bugatti initiated the designs of a new, supercharged 1500-cc car intended for postwar production. It was designated the Type 73, with variations ranging from a four-seater road model to a monoposto racing car.
Early in 1947 an artist’s impression of a streamlined, two-door saloon appeared in a Bugatti advertisement in a Continental newspaper, and an engine-less prototype appeared on the Bugatti stand at the Paris Motor Show in October, 1947.

Ettore Bugatti had died in Read More

1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS/RSR 2.9 Lightweight

Porsche took over in sports car racing where Ferrari left off in the early 1970s. After winning the World Sports Car Championship in 1970, 1971 and 1972, Porsche reacted to the FIA decision to swing from sports-prototypes to more production-based machinery by selecting their eight-year-old street-going 911 to be further developed as a racing car. For the car to be homologated, they needed to deliver a batch of 500 cars-something the sales and manufacturing people thought might be impossible.

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