1989 Ferrari Testarossa Berlinetta

Ferrari’s flagship model until recently, the Testarossa revived a famous name when it arrived in 1984. Testa Rossa (two words denoting the red valve covers) had been applied to what many regard as Ferrari’s greatest sports racer. The new “Testarossa” retained its Boxer predecessor’s mid-mounted 5-liter flat-12 engine
with power now boosted to 390 bhp at 6,300 rpm, courtesy of four-valve heads. Despite the power increase, smoothness and drivability was improved, with a maximum speed of 180 mph.

The Read More

1954 Austin-Healey 100-4 BN1 Roadster

Considered as the original Austin-Healey, the 100 BN1s and BN2s were built from 1953 to 1956. Equipped with a four-cylinder engine, the 100 BN1 series cars featured a production run exceeding 10,000 units, while only about 4,500 of the later BN2 series cars were produced. Most enthusiasts do not differentiate the two series substantially, as the only noticeable variation on the BN2 was the adoption of a four-speed/overdrive gearbox in lieu of the three-speed/overdrive on the earlier cars.

Fitted Read More

1957 Ford Intruder Custom Wagon

Created by Troy Trepanier, Intruder came out of the box in San Bernardino, California, with three miles showing on the odometer. Six days and 2,900 cross-country miles later, on the Hot Rod Power Tour, Intruder had performed flawlessly, and even returned 20 miles per gallon.

The goal for Rad Rides, the builders of Intruder, was to set new standards in style and performance, as part of bringing the new generation of super rods to a higher level. By any Read More

1992-97 Subaru SVX

If striking design and technical sophistication were the prime factors in determining a car’s collectibility, the Subaru SVX (1992-97) would certainly make the grade.
Introduced in 1991 as a Giugiaro-designed show car, it wowed the public and the motoring press with its trend-setting Italian design. The SVX was both praised and criticized for its originality, especially the odd two-part side windows. The full-time all-wheel drive in most models presaged what has become commonplace in high-performance cars, but a full Read More

1973 Lancia Fulvia 1.3 Coupe

The introduction of the Fulvia sedan in 1963 maintained Lancia’s reputation for innovation in automobile design. The boxy replacement for the Appia featured an all-new, narrow-angle, V4, overhead-camshaft engine, along with front-wheel drive, independent front suspension by double wishbones and disc brakes all around. A 2+2 coupe version on a shorter wheelbase was launched in 1965.

Though mechanically similar, the newcomer had all the visual presence its progenitor lacked and came with—initially—a 1261-cc engine producing 80 bhp. Tuned HF versions Read More

1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta

Ferrari says a car is “more authentic” if the non-original but correct type
engine is replaced with a new casting, made in their foundry

Sold new in Italy to A. Demetrialdi in May 1961, this 250 GT SWB “Lusso” was imported into Switzerland in April 1963 and entered for its first race by its new owner, Daniel Siebenmann of Switzerland, at the “Auvergne 3 hours” in France, where it finished 23rd Read More

1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta

By the late ’50s it was apparent that Ferrari had perfected the dual-purpose gran turismo automobile with its line of 250 GTs. The Colombo-designed V12 had evolved into a powerful engine. More important in racing, where it was said, ” to finish first, you must first finish,” it was reliable. That reliability
carried over to 250 GTs that never saw the race track, creating confident and satisfied owners.

By 1961 competition pressure had persuaded Ferrari to create high-performance versions Read More

1960 Jaguar XK 150 DHC

Jaguar turned the motoring world upside-down and inside-out when it introduced the XK 120 in 1948. It combined a powerful 160-bhp twin-cam straight-six with the most sensuous body ever seen on a production automobile. The combination of the 120-mph top speed, beauty and value had the celebrities lining up for their copies. Basic specifications called for mating the gorgeous 3.4-liter twin-cam engine to a four-speed Moss gearbox. Front suspension was independent by torsion bars, while the driven solid rear Read More

1935 Auburn Model 851 Boattail Speedster

Frank and Morris Eckhart of Auburn, Indiana, started the Auburn Motor Company in 1903. As their business grew, they acquired more dealerships to stay ahead of the competition, but by the mid-’20s size had caught up with them and they were in need of new leadership. In 1925 E. L. Cord became general manager. Under Cord the new Auburn became a very different company, emphasizing style when others in the industry concentrated on engineering.

By 1931 Auburn was able Read More