1967-69 MGC Roadster

The introduction of the MGC is a tribute to how royally confused British Motor Holdings had become by the mid-’60s. The Austin-Healey, introduced in 1952, was getting long in the tooth by 1964, even with its new convertible top and roll-up side windows. Marketing managers also recognized that there was a slot in the market for a car that would be faster than the MGB, but with the same comforts. In typical fashion, the company ended up with the Read More

1994 Bugatti EB110 GT

Bugatti Automobili S.p.A., in marketing the sensational new EB110, succinctly defined the new project as “the revival of the spirit of Modernism, which characterized the life and work of Ettore Bugatti (1881-1947).” In May 1992 Bugatti Automobili S.p.A. recorded that at the Nardo Test Track in Southern Italy, the Bugatti EB110 GT underwent official acceleration and performance tests.

It was an Italian industrial magnate, Romano Artioli, who had the vision to revive the name and Bugatti as a style Read More

1961 Lotus Elite S2 Coupe

This “barn discovery” Lotus Elite was first registered on December 14, 1961, according to the duplicate green logbook in its history file. It was owned by Mr. Peter John Gillett of Cobham in 1971 before it was sold to the last owner, Mr. Che Keng Saw, in August 1972. The Lotus was extricated from a garden in Essex by the executors of his estate and delivered for sale.

According to the Elite Club records, it would seem to Read More

1979 Mercedes-Benz 450SEL 6.9

Fast, well engineered and luxuriously equipped in the finest Mercedes-Benz tradition, the 450SEL 6.9 was rated by Road & Track magazine as “the fastest, best sedan in the world.”

This left-hand drive example was the property of Sir Bernard Ashley, Chairman of Laura Ashley department stores. Bought new in France, where Sir Bernard lived at the time, the car was kept in storage at Llangoed Hall Hotel from 1992 and serviced regularly, Sir Bernard having moved to the US. Read More

1953 Bentley R-Type 4.5-Litre

The first Abbott two-door coupe to grace the R-type chassis made its debut at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show, alongside an equivalent drophead design. The chassis on which these and the fourteen subsequent cars built differed from standard, having a lowered radiator and steering column rake, and carrying a 3.41 rear axle ratio. The Abbott coachwork, of similar design to that of the Mulliner-built Continentals, was penned by Peter Woodgate. It was not until May 1953 that a Read More

1967 Nickey Camaro 427 RS/SS

Today, the words “tuner car” conjures up images of an AMG or Renntech-equipped Mercedes. Or perhaps a Stillen-equipped SUV or a McLaren Mustang. But long before these high-impact, sophisticated cruisers existed, a group of dealer-based “tuners” were turning out supercars of a different sort. Baldwin-Motion, Dana, Nickey and Yenko were all Chevrolet dealers who sold modified bowtie products ready for the dragstrip, thinly disguised as streetable (and thereby finance-able, and in theory, insurable) cars.

When Chevrolet introduced Read More

1991 Ferrari Mondial T Cabriolet

The Ferrari Mondial Cabriolet occupied a unique niche in the luxuxy car market: a four-seat mid-engine Cabriolet with pedigree. The improved Mondial T received a 296-hp, 3405 cc V8 engine mounted longitudinally in the frame. Along with a new engine came a completely new five-speed transmission, electronically controlled variable suspension, and a three-position manual suspension selector. Top speed was 158 mph and the 0 to 100 km/h sprint could be covered in 6.3 seconds.

The French-registered Mondial Read More

1970 Mercedes-Benz 280SE 3.5 Convertible

This Mercedes-Benz offers classic style motoring with modern reliability and convenience. Furthermore, the 3.5-liter version of the 280SE coupe and convertible has the cachet of being one of the rarest Mercedes-Benz models of the past 30 years, with a production run of just 4,502.

Like many desirable cars, the 280SE 3.5 was created at a time of transition. It was based on the W111 platform, introduced in 1961, with
all-independent suspension and disc brakes on all wheels. Read More

Iso Rivolta

Renzo Rivolta made a considerable fortune following World War II. He also loved cars. In the early ’60s, he became a victim of the popular musing that begins with, “Let’s marry a sophisticated European chassis and coachwork with a cheap, reliable, and powerful American V8.”
Giotto Bizzarini, father of the 250 SWB and the immortal 250 GTO, left Ferrari at the end of 1961 following a major clash of egos. Giotto met Renzo, and the Iso Rivolta was born. Read More

1929 Rolls-Royce Phantom I Ascot Phaeton

A direct descendant of the Silver Ghost, the Rolls-Royce Phantom I was launched in May 1925. For the most part, the Phantom I chassis was identical to that of its predecessor. It did offer customers two different wheelbase lengths from which to choose: 143.5 inches or 150.5 inches. The Phantom I’s transmission was also the same as before, except that the old cone clutch was replaced with a new, single dry-plate clutch-more conducive to smoother operation.

It didn’t Read More