Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow II

The Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow was introduced in 1965 at the Paris Auto Show. The product of more than ten years of development, this car was to be the future of Rolls-Royce Motors, bridging a gap between the traditional Silver Cloud buyer and the next generation of Rolls owners. The Silver Shadow, in addition to being a rather shocking break from Silver Cloud styling, at least to Rolls traditionalists, also saw the change from a solid rear-axle suspension to an Read More

1972 Ferrari 365 GTS/4 Daytona Spyder

Introduced at the 1968 Paris Salon, the 365 GTB/4 “Daytona” was an obvious winner from the start, and a noteworthy successor to the 275 GTB/4 Berlinetta it had replaced. The Daytona used underpinnings similar to the 275 GTB’s chassis and suspension, but with vastly improved braking. Ferrari finally dispensed with the substandard Dunlop discs that had been used since the 250 series. The new four-cam, 4.4-liter, V12 engine was fitted with six Weber 40 DCN carburetors and produced an impressive Read More

1929 Duesenberg Model J Sports Sedan

It is difficult to imagine the excitement with which the Model J Duesenberg was received in 1929. Here was a chassis with an engine that-at 265 hp-beat its nearest competitor by more than 100 hp. The famed Packard 734 speedster produced 145 hp and the Cadillac V16, 175 hp. Coming from a company whose racing successes were legendary, it was the perfect marketing move. Priced at $8,500 for just the chassis, the Model J was by far the most Read More

1976 Lancia Stratos

The Lancia Stratos represents a high point in Lancia sporting history and showed the world a new definition of the ultimate rally car. Yet its birth was merely a matter of coincidence. At the 1970 Turin motor show, Bertone displayed a futuristic design study, a fabulous creation of Marcello Gandini. The Italian coachbuilder had built both the body, with its extreme wedge style and single front door, and the chassis. The mechanical parts originated from the Lancia Fulvia and Read More

1952 Jaguar XK 120 Roadster

During the Second World War, Sir William Lyons and his colleagues envisioned a new car that would feature the world’s first high-volume twin-cam engine. Called the XK series, it would be a short-wheelbase chassis mated to a two-seat sports roadster body. When combined with the new engine, the result would be nothing less than sensational-a sleek, beautiful, and strikingly modern automobile.

At the Earls Court Motor Show in October 1948, this XK made its first public appearance, and Read More

1966 Volkswagon 21-Window Microbus

The boxy Volkswagen Transporter arrived on American shores circa 1949. Using regular Beetle mechanical components, Transporters quickly evolved into mini people carriers.

Dubbed the Microbus, Volkswagen’s unique vehicle became the trademark of a burgeoning hippie counterculture. The combination of economy and practicality made them an instant hit with the flower-power generation. Before long, their slab sides were adorned with Grateful Dead decals and painted flowers.

One of the rarest and most desirable buses built in this era Read More

1967 Ferrari 330 GTC

Intended to fill a gap in Ferrari’s line-up between the four-seat 330 GT 2+2 and the racer-on-the-road 275 GTB, the two-seat 330 GTC debuted at the Geneva Motor Show in March 1966 and in essence was a closed version of the 275 GTS. Pininfarina’s understated coachwork combined elements of the latter at the rear, with touches of the 500 Superfast at the front.
Beneath the hood resided the 4-liter, 300-bhp version of Ferrari’s familiar two-cam 60-degree V12 (as used Read More

BMW 2002

Light steering, reasonable acceleration and braking, a delightful gearbox and above-average build quality have led the BMW 2002 to cult car status. With its cohorts, the Austin Mini-Cooper and the Lotus Cortina, these classic cars reinvented the simple box as automotive performance art. In BMW’s case, the 2002 probably saved this now Bavarian powerhouse from automotive extinction. As David E. Davis wrote in April of 1968, “To my way of thinking, the 2002 is one of modern civilization’s all-time Read More

1967 Ferrari 330 GTC

What might have been called patina a decade ago had slipped to scruffy

Unveiled at the 1966 Geneva Salon, the Ferrari 330 GTC allied the 275GTB chassis with a 330 2+2 engine. The Pininfarina coachwork blended the 400 Superamerica front with the tail of the 275GTS. This produced a very elegant car that is by no means out of place today.

The GTC provided plenty of room and comfort for two passengers Read More

1918 Stutz Series S Roadster

The general public could be forgiven for thinking that the Stutz Bearcat was the only model made by the company. However, since 1911 when Harry Stutz had set up his own firm, there had always been two-seat roadsters and touring cars to keep the limited number of Bearcats made each year company. Mechanically there was no significant difference between the stark Bearcat and the far more practical roadster, simply a ten-inch shorter wheelbase and less bodywork for the former.

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