1975 Maserati Merak SS

In the creative environment that coincided with the beginning of the 1970s, Maserati began work on the design of a car with high-performance sporting characteristics capable of dominating the hard-fought 3-liter class of the market. In order to avoid risks, the layout of the Merak, the name of a star in the constellation of Ursa Major, had more than one point in common with the company’s successful flagship, the Bora, and something beyond a simple resemblance. From its sister it Read More

1976 Ferrari 308 GTB Fiberglass

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In October 1973 a new car was announced in Italy, launched by a company which was also new. That car was the Dino 308 GT4, but in spite of not being badged as such, it was clear to everyone it was a Ferrari through and through. Enzo Ferrari still doggedly hung on to the tenet that all production Ferraris worthy of the name should have engines with no less than 12 cylinders. The three-liter Dino had “only” Read More

1960 Aston Martin DB4GT

Tractor and gear manufacturer David Brown took over the Aston Martin and Lagonda companies in 1947. His first DB2 series and variants sold well from 1949 to 1958, and served to re-establish the marque as a builder of soundly engineered, quali­ty motor cars.
In 1959 the much-improved DB4 model made its debut. Chief designer Tadek Merak’s new 3.7-litre alloy straight six featured twin overhead cams and hemispherical combus­tion chambers. This engine was installed in a steel platform chassis and Read More

1961 Ferrari 250 GT Fantuzzi NART Spyder

By the early ’60s, Scaglietti was at capacity building street cars for Ferrari, and so Fantuzzi, a Modena-based coachbuilder, built most of the bodies for Ferrari’s formula and sports/racing cars.
One of the exceptions was a car built to a special order

By the early ’60s, Scaglietti was at capacity building street cars for Ferrari, and so Fantuzzi, a Modena-based coachbuilder, built most of the bodies for Ferrari’s formula and sports/racing cars.Read More

1970-71 Porsche 917K

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This Porsche 917K coupe is one of the most historic available survivors of this titanic breed. Most significantly, it is one of only five World Championship-level race-winning 917s outside factory ownership.
In 1971, entered by the Martini-Porsche team and co-driven by Vic Elford and Gerard Larrousse, it won America’s most charismatic World Championship-qualifying endurance race: the Sebring 12-Hours.
Why so special? Consider this. Of the 41 works-built Typ 917K and 917LH coupes—four of which appeared under two Read More

1963 Ford Thunderbird Sport Roadster

When Thunderbird designer Frank Hershey set out to design a sports car with “banker appeal,” he unknowingly created a legendary automobile that was so popular in its first year, it outsold the Chevrolet Corvette four to one. When Hershey left Ford for General Motors in 1960, the Thunderbird had sold over 90,000 units in the same year. The car had not only survived, but become an overwhelming success in the eyes of the American public.
Unfortunately, the ‘58-’60 models Read More

1959 Maserati Tipo 61 Birdcage

The Maserati Birdcage Tipo 61, with proper team preparation and organization, would undoubtedly have won more classic races. It led every round of the 1960 World Sports Car Championship – at Buenos Aires, Sebring, the Targa Florio, Nurburgring and Le Mans – but only won a single event, and was sidelined by mechanical failure in the rest. Some fine results in Europe included the great 1960 1,000 km Nurburgring victory in the hands of Dan Gurney and Stirling Moss for Read More

1962 Lotus Elite Series II SE

Launched at the 1957 London Motor Show – when metal panel work was the sports car norm and all-independent suspension the domain of racing cars – the strikingly pretty Lotus Elite boasted a fiberglass monocoque bodyshell with rear suspension first seen on the Lotus 12 Formula 2 single-seater. A steel front subframe, bonded into the shell, carried wishbone/coil-spring suspension with the anti-roll bar doubling as half the top wishbones, while at the rear there were Chapman struts, lower wishbones Read More

1952 Porsche 356 Pre-A Cabriolet

In 1952 there were only four Porsche 356 Cabriolets sold in the United States out of 294 produced by the Porsche Werke in Zuffenhausen. Back in ’51, about the only way to buy a 356 in this country was through New York importer Max Hoffman.

The early cabriolets were among his best-selling cars, helping to give Porsche a foothold in the emerging postwar American sports car market. Today the cabriolets are considered among the most valuable Pre-A models due Read More

1956 Chevrolet Corvette Roadster

In 1956, Ford was building the two-seat Thunderbird, and outselling Corvette four to one. After two disastrous sales years, the Corvette had to change or die. And change it did. First, it received a new body to replace the classic roadster style body of the previous three years. Still in fiberglass, it now had external door handles, wind-up windows and a stylish “cove” or indent in the side, outlined with a polished, stainless-steel strip. Corvette also began to get Read More