1966 Lancia Flaminia Zagato SS

A left hand-drive model first registered in France, this striking Zagato-bodied Lancia features the Milanese styling house’s renowned double-bubble body form in which low overall lines and rounded streamlined shape are achieved by the simple but ingenious

A left hand-drive model first registered in France, this striking Zagato-bodied Lancia features the Milanese styling house’s renowned double-bubble body form in which low overall lines and rounded streamlined shape are achieved by the simple Read More

1969-76 Triumph TR6

The loss of the Healey 3000 Mk III at the end of 1967 left a void in the six-cylinder sports car line-up. Sure, there was the Jaguar Series II XKE ($5,500 in 1969) and soon a new upstart from Japan, the Datsun 240Z, would show the world how much GT car $3,500 would buy. Still, a torquey, easy-to-repair pushrod six like the Healey was needed to fill the gap between cars below 2 liters (such as the MGB) and the Read More

1969 Ferrari 365 GT 2+2

With the intention of competing in the worldwide luxury car market, Ferrari introduced the totally new 365 GT 2+2 at the Paris Salon in October 1967. It bore a strong resemblance to both the 330 GTC Special built for Belgium’s Princess de Rethy and to the famous 500 Superfast.

The car was a technical triumph. It was the first 2+2 Ferrari to have four-wheel independent suspension, which also featured a hydro-pneumatic self-leveling system. Power steering and air conditioning were standard, Read More

1964 Aston Martin DB5

The DB5 Aston Martin rapidly became the very essence of the hand-built English classic car. Very expensive, built in tiny numbers by dedicated craftsmen, it was also an apt choice of mount for the suave secret agent James Bond. Equally deft was the director’s decision in 1995 to hark back 30 years, nostalgically providing a DB5 for Bond’s use in “Goldeneye”.

No less than three different Aston Martins were employed during filming and this fourth example was used Read More

1958 Porsche 356A Cabriolet

Having commenced manufacture with a short run of aluminum-bodied cars built at Gmund, Porsche began volume production of the steel-bodied 356 coupe at its old base in Stuttgart. The work of Ferry Porsche, the 356 was based on the Volkswagen designed by his father. Like the immortal Beetle, the 356 employed a platform-type chassis with rear-mounted, air-cooled engine and torsion bar all-independent suspension. In 1951 a works car finished first in the 1100-cc class at the Le Mans 24-Hour Read More

1912 Bugatti 5-Liter Race Car

In 1910, aged 28, Ettore Bugatti resigned his position at the Deutz works in Cologne and moved to Alsace, renting an old dye works in Molsheim where he began making his own automobiles. He took with him a prototype car of 1208 cc which he had built in his basement workshop in Cologne and which was to become the first Pur Sang Bugatti, the Type 10. He also brought with him another much more powerful car, a five-liter overhead Read More

1949 Mercury V8 Lead Sled

The car pictured sold at Dana Mecum’s Arlington Premier Auction in Arlington, Illinois on November 7, 1998 at no reserve, bringing $23,625, including buyer’s commission.

Estimated at $30k–$35k, a value that even at this level is probably less than half what’s invested in it, this is typical of the re-sale performance of hot rods. The money spent on building one is about the only thing “going down in flames” today.

1962-80 MGB Roadster

The very large production numbers and strong aftermarket parts support make the MGB a superb entry-level, low-stress sports car. It was built in the days when cars still had ignition points and grease fittings; any reasonably deft enthusiast with a copy of the factory manual can maintain one of these cars.
MGBs come in four main groups: those with three main bearing engines built from ’62 to ’64, those with five main bearings (’65 to ’69), emission-controlled cars Read More

1958 Austin-Healey 100-6

It was with an Austin-Healey 100-Six in basic production trim that Tommy Wisdom and Cecil Winby won their class in the 1957 Mille Miglia, while three factory entered 100-Sixes went on to take the Manufacturers’ Team Prize at the 1958 Sebring 12 Hour race. The same year saw the first factory rally team of 100-Sixes show real potential, including Pat Moss, sister of Stirling, taking her first Coupe de Dames for a penalty-free run. Shortly afterwards, the first lady Read More

1935 Mercedes-Benz 500K Drophead Coupe

The merger of Daimler and Benz in the mid 1920s came at a time of acute difficulty for the German motor industry. Competition success such as Rudolf Caracciola’s 1930 European Hillclimb Championship in a supercharged SSK helped sales, which had risen to 6,000 in 1932 from a workforce reduced to 9,000 by the virtual closure of the Benz factories. The addition of smaller cars as commercial vehicles saw output rise to 25,000 in 1935, of which a mere 190 Read More