1968 Triumph TR5 Roadster

The Triumph TR series is one of the great success stories in the history of the sports car and many would say that the TR5 is the pick of the line. It was a development of the TR4A which, in turn, was based on the TR3A chassis, but with independent rear suspension and styling by Giovanni Michelotti. The TR5 had Triumph’s 2.5-litre straight-six engine which gave 150 bhp and 168 lb/ft torque which translated into 120 mph (0-60 mph Read More

1980 Ferrari 308 GTSi

The V8 powered, Pininfarina-styled Ferrari 308 had been on the market for five years when the 308 GTSi was introduced in 1980. Offered in both coupe (GTB) and Spyder versions (GTSi), the big difference between the “i” and its earlier Weber-carbureted brethren was the switch to Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection. Though the new injected motors provided better driveability than a smog legal “carb car” with its add-on air-pump and maze of emissions tubing, the GTSi’s performance was off by Read More

Alfa Romeo Duetto

Pininfarina died just a month after the Duetto’s introduction in March, 1966, so the model carries the distinction of being his last design. Its design is virtually perfect in concept: an aerodynamic profile with a dramatic blood trough down the sides that ties the symmetrical front and rear together.
The Duetto, whose side concavity appeared later in muted form on the Daytona Ferrari, comes very close to being a streetable show car. Its rarity is indisputable: the car Read More

1969-76 Triumph TR6

The loss of the Healey 3000 Mk III at the end of 1967 left a void in the six-cylinder sports car line-up. Sure, there was the Jaguar Series II XKE ($5,500 in 1969) and soon a new upstart from Japan, the Datsun 240Z, would show the world how much GT car $3,500 would buy. Still, a torquey, easy-to-repair pushrod six like the Healey was needed to fill the gap between cars below 2 liters (such as the MGB) and the Read More

1959 BMW 507 Series II

It would indeed have been a shame if BMW had confined the use of its first V8 engine range merely to its saloon cars of the 1950s. Had that been the case, the world would have been denied what is arguably the Bavarian marque’s finest post-war sports car-the glamorous, high-performance 507.
The V8, the work of BMW chief designer Dr. Fritz Fielder, had first appeared in 2.6-liter form in the 502 saloon of 1954, offering impressive performance and fine Read More

1969 Ferrari 365 GT 2+2

With the intention of competing in the worldwide luxury car market, Ferrari introduced the totally new 365 GT 2+2 at the Paris Salon in October 1967. It bore a strong resemblance to both the 330 GTC Special built for Belgium’s Princess de Rethy and to the famous 500 Superfast.

The car was a technical triumph. It was the first 2+2 Ferrari to have four-wheel independent suspension, which also featured a hydro-pneumatic self-leveling system. Power steering and air conditioning were standard, Read More

1966 Lancia Flaminia Zagato SS

A left hand-drive model first registered in France, this striking Zagato-bodied Lancia features the Milanese styling house’s renowned double-bubble body form in which low overall lines and rounded streamlined shape are achieved by the simple but ingenious

A left hand-drive model first registered in France, this striking Zagato-bodied Lancia features the Milanese styling house’s renowned double-bubble body form in which low overall lines and rounded streamlined shape are achieved by the simple Read More

1964 Aston Martin DB5

The DB5 Aston Martin rapidly became the very essence of the hand-built English classic car. Very expensive, built in tiny numbers by dedicated craftsmen, it was also an apt choice of mount for the suave secret agent James Bond. Equally deft was the director’s decision in 1995 to hark back 30 years, nostalgically providing a DB5 for Bond’s use in “Goldeneye”.

No less than three different Aston Martins were employed during filming and this fourth example was used Read More

1962-80 MGB Roadster

The very large production numbers and strong aftermarket parts support make the MGB a superb entry-level, low-stress sports car. It was built in the days when cars still had ignition points and grease fittings; any reasonably deft enthusiast with a copy of the factory manual can maintain one of these cars.
MGBs come in four main groups: those with three main bearing engines built from ’62 to ’64, those with five main bearings (’65 to ’69), emission-controlled cars Read More

1958 Porsche 356A Cabriolet

Having commenced manufacture with a short run of aluminum-bodied cars built at Gmund, Porsche began volume production of the steel-bodied 356 coupe at its old base in Stuttgart. The work of Ferry Porsche, the 356 was based on the Volkswagen designed by his father. Like the immortal Beetle, the 356 employed a platform-type chassis with rear-mounted, air-cooled engine and torsion bar all-independent suspension. In 1951 a works car finished first in the 1100-cc class at the Le Mans 24-Hour Read More