1959 BMW 507 Series II

It would have been a shame if BMW had confined the use of its first V8 engine range merely to its saloon cars of the 1950s. Had that been the case the world would have been denied what is arguably the Bavarian marque’s finest post-war sports car – the glamorous high performance 507.

The V8, the work of BMW chief designer Dr. Fritz Fielder, had first appeared in 2.6-liter form in the 502 saloon of 1954, offering the impressive Read More

1964 Ferrari 250 Le Mans

By the end of 1963 it had become apparent to Ferrari that a successor to the 250 GTO would be needed in order to counter increasing opposition in the GT class, particularly from the massive onslaught of Carroll Shelby’s Cobras. It was thus that the new Ferrari 250 Le Mans was introduced to the public at the 1963 Paris Motor Show in October of that year.

Quite how Enzo Ferrari ever expected the car to be accepted by the Read More

1930 Bentley 4.5-Liter Supercharged Tourer

Perhaps the worst-kept secret among “the right crowd” in motor sport circles in 1929 was the development of the supercharged Bentley. As early as 1 January, 1929 the “Morning Post” suggested that two UK companies would be entering supercharged cars for Le Mans that year and in July 1929, when the “Morning Post” announcement had proved premature, “The Autocar” reported: “It is no secret that experiments have been carried out for a very long time with 4.5-liter Bentleys and Read More

1954 Maserati A6G/54 Zagato

Of the Maserati sports racing cars that took part in competition during the late 1940s and early 1950s, one of the most successful was the A6G/CS of 1947. On its debut in the 1947 Circuit of Modeno Alberto Ascari and Luigi Viloresi finished 1st and 2nd overall, while regular class wins included such events as the 1955 Mille Miglia. A series of related A6G models, both for road and track, soon followed, the last of which appeared at the Read More

1966 Shelby GT350 H

In 1964, Ford Motor Company produced one of the most successful cars in history – the Mustang. It sold 22,000 cars the first day! At that same time, Ford had Texan racecar driver Carroll Shelby under contract. They were already selling his AC Cobra in Ford dealerships. Ford decided to have Shelby experiment with the Mustang 2-plus-2 fastback to see if he could make it a potential Group B SCCA racer. The result was called the Shelby GT-350. It Read More

1956 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing

I drove one cross-country and did four straight hours in Nevada at 110 mph. With the car singing through its original mild-steel exhaust system, the sound is as unique as the rest of the car

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In the collector car world, there is no more immediately recognizable sight than a 300SL with its doors open. Introduced in 1954 as a coupe with signature “Gullwing” doors, the legendary 300SL was conceived as Read More

1956 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing

When Mercedes-Benz introduced their new range of cars in 1951 it included the 3-liter six-cylinder 300S model which was to become the basis of their return to motor sport in 1952. Rudi Uhlenhaut, the Competition Director, was obliged to use production components for his new sports racecar and to compensate for the weight penalty he designed an ultra-light, welded spaceframe chassis with an all-alloy coupe body.

To alleviate the access problem caused by the multi-tubed framework, he introduced the Read More

1962 Ferrari 250GT SWB Competizione

The Paris Salon in 1959 saw the introduction of a Ferrari 250GT Short Wheelbase Berlinetta, a direct development of the Long Wheelbase car known as the Tour de France. Built on the 94.5-inch wheelbase chassis powered by the 3-liter V12 engine, the new and exciting Gran Turismo car was destined for many racing successes. Perhaps more than any other Ferrari, before or since, here was a car equally at home on a racetrack or road. A quick change of Read More

1947 MG TC

MG recovered quickly after the Second World War and began production on its new TC series which were among the first cars built anywhere following the war. The TC Midget was, and is still, aesthetically pleasing with its distinctive radiator and sweeping wheel arches framing the spider, 19-inch wire wheels. Even with windscreen raised and all-weather gear up, it still looks the epitome of the classic British sports car.

The car described here was donated to a museum by Read More

1956 Maserati 300S

The Trident symbol, representing the city of Bologna, features foremost on the Maserati emblem and is often referred to as the heartbeat of Italian motoring – in that Bologna is situated in the central part of Italy and the Maserati name has been associated with racing since the early 1920s. Certainly the name Maserati has been upholding Italian honors for longer than any other sports and racing car manufacturer and yet it has always been a small family-oriented company.

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