1932 Alfa Romeo 8C 2300 Spyder Corto

The Alfa is so light and quick, you almost forget it’s pre-war. Imagine a tall Lotus 7 with 19-inch tires and a lot more horsepower

The chassis serial associated with this 8C 2300 is 2211051. This serial was the earliest number applied to the second-series of 8C 2300s, the brainchild of Alfa Romeo’s fabled chief engineer, Vittorio Jano.

Alfa Romeo 8C 2300s appeared in 1931 in a variety of forms, achieving four consecutive wins in the Le Mans 24-hour race (plus a close second in 1935), two wins in the Spa 24 hours, three consecutive victories in the Targa Florio, and three more in the Mille Miglia.

The 8C 2300 design also spawned the short-wheelbase Monza Grand Prix car, followed by the single-seat-open-wheeled Tipo B Monoposto, one of the landmarks of motor racing history at its highest level.

This 8C 2300 Spyder Corto was restored in the 1980s by the late British Alfista David Black and maintained by his family since his death in 1990. Much of 2211051’s provenance is recorded and key details are incontrovertible. It was a Scuderia Ferrari entry in the 1933 Mille Miglia and, driven by Mario Borzacchini, actually led the race for a while. It then passed through various Italian owners-even spending time in Africa-before being sold to the U.S. in the early 1960s.

By 1975, it was in pieces, with a later 6-cylinder engine, incorrect independent front suspension, and little body work. At this point, David Black bought the remains for a bargain £600 and set about building up a replacement 8-cylinder engine, correct axle, and bodywork, largely with pre-WWII parts. A recent restoration from 1999 to 2002 cost $160,000.

Thor Thorson

Thor Thorson - SCM Contributing Editor

Thor grew up in northern Iowa. His father bought a red Jag XK 150 in the late 1950s, and that was all it took; he has been in love with sports cars , racing cars and the associated adrenaline rush ever since. He has vintage raced for more than 20 years, the bulk of them spent behind the wheel of a blue Elva 7. When he’s not racing, he is president of Vintage Racing Motors Inc., a collector-car dealer and vintage-racing support company based in Redmond, WA. His knowledge runs the full spectrum of vintage racing, and he has put that expertise to good use for SCM since 2003.

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