1956 Talbot-Lago T14 LS Special

The cars were quicker than the standard T14LS, accelerating from0-100 km/hour in all of 14.5 seconds. Of course this was still slower than the much cheaper MG-TF

by the 1950s, the racing credentials of Talbot-Lago had been firmly established after years of active Grand Prix competition. The sensational new 2.5-liter car announced at the Paris Salon in 1955 was an altogether superior sports car, powered by a four-cylinder, twin high-camshaft, overhead-valve engine Read More

1978 Maserati Khamsin

Khamsins don’t appear at auction frequently. With less than 300 said to remain out of production of only around 430 cars, it is a legitimately rare bird, though its taste is still too gamey for most collectors

This elegant 2+2 coupe was first shown at Turin in 1972, the work of one of Bertone’s more talented young designers, Marcello Gandini. The Khamsin was to be Maserati’s answer to the Ferrari Daytona, yet Read More

1962 Citroen 2CV 4×4 Sahara

Two engines at different ends of the car, two carburetors, two gearboxes, two ignition keys: It’s a miserable thing to drive. I should know, as I owned one and commuted in it daily for six years

The slab-sided, roll-top Citroën “Deux-Chevaux” was conceived as a people’s car, a front-wheel drive contemporary of the Volkswagen Beetle. The first 2CV was introduced in 1948, powered by an air-cooled, twin-cylinder, 375-cc engine. By the time Read More

1970 Moretti Sportiva

The heavy body weighed 1,500 pounds, too much for its puny 47-hp motor

Giovanni Moretti founded his company in 1925, and started off designing and building motorcycles. The Cita, built in 1946, a tiny two-seater powered by an air-cooled 250-cc motor, was Moretti’s first conventional car.

In 1949, Moretti introduced the 600, a front-engine, rear-drive car powered by a bespoke 592 cc, water-cooled four-cylinder engine. Four years later, the 600’s chassis Read More

1956 Maserati A6G2000 Zagato Coupe

Maserati decided to build a slightly de-tuned version of the A6GCS and go for the Holy Grail of specialty manufacturers, the dual-purpose sports car

This beautiful 2-liter Berlinetta was one of a handful of Maserati’s sports-racing A6G series to be clothed by that master of ultra-light bodywork, Zagato. Allemano, Frua, and Vignale all built bodies for the A6G2000 chassis, but these striking Zagato coupes are considered the prettiest today.

This particular Read More

1952 Abarth 1500 Biposto Coupe

Except for being repainted at some point in its life, this amazing one-off was totally untouched from new

This Bertone-bodied Abarth 1500 Biposto coupe is one of the most important barn finds in recent motoring history. It is among the earliest, if not the first, of the Fiat-based Abarths. It is Franco Scaglione’s first design for Bertone and the centerpiece of Bertone’s exhibit at the 1952 Turin Motor Show.

In retrospect, Read More

1971 Lamborghini Miura P400S

This car hits almost all the buttons-beauty, speed, historical importance, and star power

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The Lamborghini Miura is where it all started-the first production automobile to earn the “supercar” tag. Prior to the Miura’s arrival in 1967, many sports cars offered high levels of performance and handling. But the Miura was the first built around the criteria that define our modern concept of the supercar: massive speed, jaw-dropping design coupled with Read More

1903 Martini 41/18hp 4.1-Liter Type Rochers de Naye

In 1902, Martini acquired a license to build Rochet-Schneider designs and began production, rapidly establishing its reputation as Switzerland’s most exclusive manufacturer. In 1903, a Martini stole the headlines by ascending the Rochers de Naye cog wheel railway, an astonishing 11-km ascent with an average gradient of 22%. The car was driven by English entrepreneur and gentleman, Captain H. H. P. Deasy of London. Deasy’s stand at the February 1904 Crystal Palace Show in London displayed the famous car and Read More

1973 Citroen SM Coupe

The SM is the symbol of demise of Citroën as an independent company. It is also the story of corporate management embracing the “bigger is better” theory, and the engineering department wanting to make a better and more sophisticated car, but ending up with something that was just more complex, less reliable and infinitely more expensive than the models it already had.

In the late ’60s, Citroën, at last freed from family control, embarked on a buying spree: Read More

1996 Lamborghini Diablo SV-R

The Diablo was introduced in 1991 under Lamborghini’s brief period of Chrysler ownership, preserving but refining its layout, smoothing out the body’s humps and bumps and improving occupant accommodations. In the middle of the ’90s, Lamborghini built 31 Diablos prepared for use on the racetrack. The race version, known as the SV-R (for Sport Veloce, Race), was for competition in the new one-marque Lamborghini Diablo Supertrophy series. Customers could purchase an SV-R along with a season of racing. Lamborghini Read More

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