Want to read this issue? To get started, subscribe here, or sign in!

Profiles

Auctions

Bonhams-Bond Street, London, U.K., December 4, 2016

Bonhams, London, U.K., December 7, 2016

H&H, Droitwich Spa, U.K., December 7, 2016

RM Sotheby’s, Paris, FRA, February 8, 2017

Bonhams, Paris, FRA, February 9, 2017

Artcurial, Paris, FRA, February 10, 2017

The Finest, Boca Raton, FL, February 11, 2017

Search This Issue



Page 12

“Like” us on Sports Car Market PROFILES Keith Martin’s The Insider’s Guide to Collecting, Investing, Values, and Trends April 2017 . Volume 29 . Number 4 This Month’s Market Movers Up Close FERRARI ENGLISH by Steve Ahlgrim by Colin Comer 1969 Ferrari 365 GTS $3,602,500 / RM Sotheby’s 1979 Aston Martin V8 Vantage “Oscar India” $308,000 / RM Sotheby’s 78 80 AUCTIONS What Sold, and Why 198 Vehicles Rated at Nine Sales 98 102 112 124 136 148 ETCETERINI by Paul Hageman GERMAN by Carl Bomstead AMERICAN RACE by Thomas Glatch by Thor Thorson NEXT GEN by Sam Stockham 14 2013 Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Super Sport 300 $2,090,000 / RM Sotheby’s 1928 Mercedes-Benz Typ S 26/120/180 Supercharged Sports Tourer $4,812,500 / Bonhams 1969 AMC AMX/3 $891,000 / Gooding & Company 1963 Jaguar XKE Lightweight Competition $7,370,000 / Bonhams 1989 Ford Mustang LX 5.0 $71,500 / Barrett-Jackson 82 84 176 86 90 92 162 MARKET OVERVIEW Top 10 auction sales and best buys, and some thoughts about the Porsche market — Garrett Long BARRETT-JACKSON Scottsdale, AZ: Sales top $100m in Arizona, with a 99% sales rate — Dan Grunwald RM SOTHEBY’S Phoenix, AZ: An 89% sales rate at the Arizona Biltmore brings in $54m — Carl Bomstead BONHAMS Scottsdale, AZ: $7.4m E-type Lightweight tops this $36.2m sale — Cody Tayloe GOODING & COMPANY Scottsdale, AZ: Sales top $33m as 106 of 126 cars trade hands for an 84% sell-through — Joseph T. Seminetta and Nicholas M. Seminetta RUSSO AND STEELE Scottsdale, AZ: Mid-level muscle drives a $22m total and 78% sold rate — John Boyle ROUNDUP Highlights from Silver in Fort McDowell, AZ, and Worldwide Auctioneers in Scottsdale, AZ — B. Mitchell Carlson and Bob Dekorne MOTORCYCLE ROUNDUP Two-wheel highlights from Mecum and Bonhams in Las Vegas, NV — Somer Hooker acebook and look for updates and offers! Cover photo: 1963 Jaguar XKE Lightweight Competition; courtesy of Bonhams Sports Car Market


Page 14

FEATURES 32 Scene and Be Seen 1: Images from Rétromobile 64 Scene and Be Seen 2: Images from Arizona Auction Week 70 2017 Arizona Concours d’Elegance: Four years in, this has become a premier event — Carl Bomstead 72 Arizona First-Timer: SCM’s Auction Editor looks at the inside baseball of Arizona Auction Week — Garrett Long DEPARTMENTS 24 Auction Calendar 24 Crossing the Block 28 Concours and Events: Portland swapmeets, La Jolla Concours, California Mille 30 Art on Wheels: Rent a car at the Cité de l’Automobile, Tour the Unimog Museum and sneak off to the Nissan Heritage Collection 64 Images from Arizona Auction Week 36 Contributors: Get to know our writers 38 You Write, We Read: More Keith and Bjarne, Alfa Romeo GTV6, driving with kid gloves, and more car-buying advice for Keith Martin COLUMNS 18 Shifting Gears Celebrating 40 under 40, and driving the new 488 Keith Martin 50 Affordable Classic The 1975–79 Honda Civic CVCC, the Japanese version of a Mini Cooper, is fun and tough to kill Jeff Zurschmeide 52 Collecting Thoughts 1 Donald Osborne’s analysis of the Arizona Auctions: Value isn’t always found at the lowest price Donald Osborne 54 Collecting Thoughts 2 The CERV I is part of Corvette Sting Ray history, and it’s also a pristine relic of GM car development Miles Collier 58 Legal Files Will Trump and the GOP Congress end the estate tax? John Draneas 62 Unconventional Wisdom A 1964 Ford Mustang in a rare color catches Donald Osborne’s eye — and heart Donald Osborne 88 The Cumberford Perspective Dick Teague’s handsome AMC AMX/3 concept car shows what might have been Robert Cumberford 194 eWatch The famous Sunset Boulevard Whisky a Go Go sign sells for $40,000 Carl Bomstead 16 52 Collecting Thoughts 1 Sports Car Market 40 Display Advertisers Index 44 Time Pieces: When is a Patek Philippe not a Patek Philippe? 44 Neat Stuff: Plate hardware and a desktop hauler 46 In Miniature: Replica 1954 Maserati A6GCS Berlinetta 46 Speaking Volumes: Augie Pabst: Behind the Wheel 110 Market Moment: 1965 Volkswagen Type 2 21-Window bus 122 On the Radar: 1992 Lancia Delta HF Integrale Evoluzione, 1992 Alfa Romeo 155 Q4, 1992 Maserati Shamal 134 Rising Sun: 1971 Nissan Skyline 2000GT-R coupe, 1976 Toyota Celica ST coupe, 1991 Nissan Skyline GT-R coupe 140 Fresh Meat: 2017 Mercedes-Benz C63S AMG cabriolet, 2016 BMW M6 coupe, 2016 Cadillac ELR coupe 156 Glovebox Notes: 2017 Infiniti Q50 3.0t Sport sedan 166 Market Moment: 1962 Aston Martin DB4 “field find” 172 Glovebox Notes: Volkswagen Passat 1.8T SEL Premium sedan 180 Mystery Photo: “Throwing up in the engine bay gave little relief from the judge’s cruel words” 182 Showcase Gallery: Cars for sale 186 Resource Directory: Meet your car’s needs Jim Pickering


Page 16

Shifting Gears Keith Martin The Millennials Are Coming! Vote Today Modern supercars like the Ferrari 488 are evolving at an astonishing rate. So, too, is the next generation of car enthusiasts Crest Highway up to the Mount Wilson Observatory and back, ending at the Santa Monica pier. During the past year, I’ve had the chance to put miles on a variety of supercars from other manufacturers. The Ferrari was a completely different experience. Our car had a base MSRP of $272,700, with an out-the-door price of $392,784. Ferrari has taken a clue from Porsche and started offering nearly every combination of seat colors, contrasting stitching and other visual enhancements imaginable, including embossed Ferrari logos on the headrests. They charge a pretty penny for each. The Blu Corsa paint was a $12,486 option. The 20- inch painted rims were $6,242, and the carbon-fiber dashboard inserts were $6,748. In addition, our car had a $10,124 telemetry package primarily designed for track-day data analysis. What sets supercars apart today is how docile they The Ferrari 488 — an all-weather supercar W e at SCM believe the car hobby is thriving and growing, and new generations of enthusiasts are becoming a part of it all the time. Here’s your chance to help us recognize them. Later this year, SCM will name 40 enthusiasts under 40 years old who are making a difference in the classic car world. We’re asking you for nominations. Candidates can be involved in restoration, detailing, aftermarket parts, buying and selling privately or through dealerships and auction houses. They can be the hardcore young gearheads whom you see at rallies and tours throughout the world. The only general criteria is that their involvement is in the vintage and classic part of the car world. No Group B rally drivers or drift-kings, please. The love of things motorized is alive and well with Millennials. You can see it every weekend as tens of thousands of young people gather at Cars & Coffee-style events all over the country. My 25-year-old daughter Alexandra works as a support specialist at Daimler Trucks North America (DTNA). Based in Portland, OR, DTNA builds semi-trucks under the brand names Freightliner and Western Star. I have met her cohorts who work in the fields of truck design, cab-interior ergonomics, engineering, drivetrains and more. They are young, they are smart, they are enthusiastic and they love things with engines. And they are all under 40. They are the future. Help us identify 40 key players. Fill out the nomination form on our website at sportscarmarket.com/scm40, or you can print out the form and fax it to us at 503.253.2234. If you prefer snail mail, send it to P.O. Box 4797, Portland, OR 97208. Nominations close on May 15, and the winners will be announced in our October issue. If you have any questions, contact me directly at keith.martin@sportscarmarket.com. A Ferrari in the flood I picked up a stunning Blu Corsa Ferrari 488 in Los Angeles near the Petersen Museum on Friday afternoon, January 20. On Sunday, the Los Angeles area experienced record-setting rain, with 2.78 inches falling in a 24-hour period. Saturday was clear and sunny, and I spent the day driving on Angeles 18 can be when not being driven in anger. While you’re always aware there is a 3.9-liter, 661-hp turbocharged V8 just behind you, if you select “Auto” for the 7-speed gearbox and “Sport” for the drivetrain and suspension, you can noodle your way through rush-hour traffic as if you were in an economy car. However, if you set the steering-wheel-mounted selector to “Track” and feed the Ferrari some throttle, it’s as if the Godzilla inside the engine has been unleashed. With Ferrari claiming a 0–60 time of just over three seconds and a top speed of 203 mph, the 488 is a true supercar. It took time for me to get used to the precision of the steering and the suspension. The car responds so quickly to steering inputs that it is unsettling at first. There’s no body roll — the car simply goes where you point it. And it goes there faster than you can imagine. The 488 gobbled up 40-to-60 mph turns at twice the posted limits with no fuss or muss. Further, the more I pushed the engine, the more delightful its sounds became. The retractable hard top is an engineering marvel, taking just 14 seconds to go from fully closed to fully open. The stylists at Ferrari have managed to make room for the folded hard top behind the seats, without the oversized haunches typical of other makes. Compared to other supercars, the Ferrari stands alone in both fit and finish, as well as in modern accoutrements. When I owned and drove 308s, 328s, 308 GT4s, Mondials and Testarossas, I would always marvel when those mechanical masterpieces would achieve something simple like having the power windows go up and down. Or when the climate control would get within 25 degrees of the setting you were looking for. These vintage Ferraris were all about their engines. Creature com- forts were an afterthought. Not so with the 488. It’s screwed together as well as any European luxury car. When the top is up, the car is completely weather-tight (given the rainstorm, we proved that to ourselves) and quiet inside. The 488 is a supercar you can live with on a daily basis. But if you choose to release the Lewis Hamilton within you, you’ll very quickly realize that this car is far more capable than you are, and that to explore its limits, you’ll need to be on the test track with a competent instructor beside you. This may be the best supercar I’ve ever driven. Clearly, Ferrari has accepted the challenge of offering F1-derived performance in a package that can be as relaxed or compelling as you want it to be. ♦ Sports Car Market


Page 22

Crossing the Block Garrett Long Images courtesy of the respective auction companies unless otherwise noted Star Car: 1963 Jaguar XKE Series I roadster at Auctions America in Fort Lauderdale, FL Auctions America Where: Fort Lauderdale, FL When: March 31–April 2 Last year: 301/435 cars sold / $19.7m More: www.auctionsamerica.com Featured cars: • 2005 Ferrari 575 Superamerica • 1969 Ford Mustang Boss 429 • Star Car: 1963 Jaguar XKE Series I roadster CCA Where: Birmingham, U.K. When: April 1–2 More: www.classiccarauctions.co.uk Brightwells Where: Bicester, U.K. When: April 5 More: www.brightwells.com Barrett-Jackson Where: West Palm Beach, FL When: April 6-8 Last year: 468/481 cars sold / $23.1m More: www.barrett-jackson.com Featured cars: • Star Car: 2008 Porsche 911 Turbo cabriolet • 1947 Ford custom woodie wagon Mecum Where: Houston, TX When: April 6–8 Last year: 506/883 cars sold / $18.1m More: www.mecum.com Featured cars: • 1970 Plymouth Hemi ’Cuda • 1930 Cadillac Series 353 • Star Car: 1963 Chevrolet Corvette SplitWindow 24 Auction Calendar All dates listed are current at time of publication. Contact information for most auction companies may be found in the Resource Directory at the back of this issue. Please confirm dates and locations before attending any event. Email auction info to: chad.taylor@sportscarmarket.com. MARCH 2–4—GAA Greensboro, NC 4—SPECIALTY Loveland, CO 8—BRIGHTWELLS Leominster, U.K. 9—BONHAMS Amelia Island, FL 10—GOODING & CO. Amelia Island, FL 10–11—RM SOTHEBY’S Amelia Island, FL 10–11—HOLLYWOOD WHEELS Amelia Island, FL 11—MOTOSTALGIA Amelia Island, FL 11—SMITH Cape Girardeau, MO 17–19—ELECTRIC GARAGE Red Deer, AB, CAN 17–19—SILVER Fort McDowell, AZ 19—BONHAMS Chichester, U.K. 24–25—MECUM Kansas City, MO 24–26—DAN KRUSE CLASSICS San Antonio, TX 25—SOUTHERN CLASSIC Murfreesboro, TN 29—H&H Duxford, U.K. 31–APR 2—AUCTIONS AMERICA Fort Lauderdale, FL APRIL 1–2—CCA Birmingham, U.K. 5—BRIGHTWELLS Bicester, U.K. 6–8—BARRETTJACKSON West Palm Beach, FL 6–8—MECUM Houston, TX 8—ACA King’s Lynn, U.K. 15—VANDERBRINK Early, IA 20—BRIGHTWELLS Leominster, U.K. 21–23—ELECTRIC GARAGE Edmonton, AB, CAN 21–22—BRANSON Branson, MO 21–22—WORLDWIDE AUCTIONEERS Arlington, TX 21–23—LEAKE Dallas, TX 22—BARONS Surrey, U.K. 22—SILVER Vancouver, WA 29—SOUTHERN CLASSIC Jeffersonville, IN MAY 4–6—VICARI Nocona, TX 5–7—COLLECTOR CAR PRODUCTIONS Mississauga, ON, CAN 6—VANDERBRINK Hustisford, WI 6—SMITH Jonesboro, AR 10—SILVER Spokane, WA 11—H&H Derbyshire, U.K. 11–13—AUCTIONS AMERICA Auburn, IN 13—BONHAMS Newport Pagnell, U.K. 13—SILVERSTONE Northamptonshire, U.K. 16–21—MECUM Indianapolis, IN 17—BRIGHTWELLS Leominster, U.K. 20—SILVER Missoula, MT 20–21—LUCKY Tacoma, WA 21—BONHAMS Francorchamps, BEL 27—RM SOTHEBY’S Lake Como, ITA 27—DAN KRUSE CLASSICS Midland, TX Sports Car Market


Page 24

Crossing the Block Garrett Long Images courtesy of the respective auction companies unless otherwise noted Star Car: 1963 Chevrolet Corvette Split-Window at Mecum’s Houston, TX, auction Branson Where: Branson, MO When: April 21–22 Last Year: 147/210 cars sold / $3m More: www.bransonauction.com Featured cars: • 2002 Aston Martin DB7 • 1955 Ford Thunderbird Worldwide Auctioneers Where: Arlington, TX When: April 21–22 More: www.worldwide-auctioneers.com Leake Where: Dallas, TX When: April 21–23 Last year: 227/404 cars sold / $4.1m More: www.leakecar.com Silver Where: Vancouver, WA When: April 22 More: www.silverauctions.com Southern Classic Where: Jeffersonville, IN When: April 29 26 Star Car: 2008 Porsche 911 Turbo cabriolet at Barrett-Jackson in West Palm Beach, FL Sports Car Market


Page 26

Concours and Events SCM Staff Send news and event listings to insideline@sportscarmarket.com Vintage Parts to the Horizon The Portland Swap Meet, the largest car-parts extravaganza on the West Coast, roars to life during the weekend of April 7–9. With over 3,500 vendor stalls crammed with literally tons of car parts, there is something for every vintage gearhead. More information can be found at www.portlandswapmeet.com (OR) Next door to the Portland Swap Meet is the PIR Auto Swap Meet, which runs from April 6 to 8. Hundreds of booths will fill every available space inside the road course at the Portland International Raceway. Need an unobtanium part? It’s probably here — or next door at the Portland Swap Meet. Gates open at 7 a.m. daily and admission is $7. For more information, visit www.portlandraceway.com (OR) Cars by the Pacific Ocean The 13th La Jolla Concours d’Elegance lights up the seashore during April 7–9 in beautiful La Jolla, CA. Saturday morning, April 8, brings the La Jolla Tour d’Elegance. The Concours d’Elegance and the La Jolla Motor Car Classic at the Concours start at 9 a.m. on Sunday, April 10. There are more than 300 vintage automobiles on display, and the Pacific Ocean makes the perfect backdrop. Publisher Keith Martin returns as emcee. For pricing and registration of the different events, please visit www.lajollaconcours.com (CA) Days of California Back Roads One thousand miles of the best back roads along California’s Central Coast are ready for the 27th Annual California Mille from April 23 to 27. After a free car show at the Hotel Fairmont, 65 classic cars and driving teams that catch the spirit of the Mille Miglia — and are 1957-or-older models — will crank up and head out of San Francisco to savor the best two-lane driving on California’s North Coast. The $7,500 entry fee includes all meals and lodging for both the driver and co-driver. For more information, visit www. californiamille.com (CA) 28 APRIL CALENDAR 1–5 Copperstate 1000, Scottsdale, AZ; www.mensartscouncil.com 23–25 Concours d’Elegance of Texas, Arlington, TX; www.concoursoftexas.org Sports Car Market Chad Taylor


Page 28

Art on Wheels Museum Openings and Exhibits Send announcements to insideline@sportscarmarket.com Unimog Madness The Universal-Motor-Gerät — in short, the Mercedes-Benz Unimog — has been chugging around the planet for more than 70 years, and these rugged trucks have their very own museum in Gaggenau, Germany. Who can resist this? Did we mention that driver training sessions are offered? The Unimog-Museum is located at An Der B462, 76571 in Gaggenau. The museum is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesdays through Sun- days, and tours are available in several languages. For more information, visit www.mercedes-benz.com/en/mercedes-benz/classic/community/unimog-museum. Drive the Car of Your Dreams at the Cité de l’Automobile We’ve all dreamed of taking a few laps in the car — or cars — of our dreams, but it might be hard to find a friend who is willing to loan a 1960 Corvette, a 1974 Lamborghini Urraco, an Austin-Healey 3000 or other collectible cars for say, seven laps around a nice track. Well, if you’re willing to wing off to France, the massive Cité de l’Automobile, in Mulhouse, France, will let you take seven laps in some of their cars — for a small free of 40 to 65 euros. For more money, you can take one of the museum’s cars around the scenic town of Mulhouse or tour the local vineyards for three hours. For more details, log onto http://citedelautomobile.com/en/my- classic-automobile. Tour the Nissan Heritage Collection from Home — or Work One of the toughest tickets in car collecting is admission to the massive Nissan Heritage Collection, which resides at the Zama Heritage Car Garage in Japan. The collection ranges from cars built in the 1920s to the present day. Ever been there? Probably not. You need to know someone who knows someone really important. That’s just how it is. Luckily, you can tour the collection online. Charts show the evolution of individual models. Click around, and you can get to know just about any car that rolled off the Nissan line. Click onto the 1970s and then click on Fairlady Z — and you’re in the world of the 240Z. Nothing beats being on the scene, but this website is a fantastic way to slack off at work for a few minutes a day for weeks and weeks and weeks. It boggles the mind. www.nissan-global.com/EN/HERITAGE/index.html 30 Sports Car Market


Page 30

Scene and Be Seen Images from Rétromobile Raise your hands if you love SCM. Enthusiasts at the Rétromobile reception SCM Auction Analyst Pierre Hedary captures the action at Artcurial Ferrari expert Marcel Massini checks the wares at RM Sotheby’s SCM Publisher Keith Martin and his daughter Alexandra point the way to the best party in Paris: the private SCM Rétromobile reception 32 Sports Car Market Photos by Keith Martin


Page 34

Sports Car Market EDITORIAL Publisher Keith Martin keith.martin@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 210 Executive Editor Chester Allen chester.allen@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 203 Art Director David Tomaro david.tomaro@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 202 Managing Editor Jim Pickering jim.pickering@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 208 Digital Media / Art Director Jeff Stites jeff.stites@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 221 Auction Editor Garrett Long garrett.long@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 207 Data Specialist Chad Taylor chad.taylor@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 206 Editors at Large Colin Comer , Donald Osborne Copy Editors Yael Abel, Dave Tomaro Senior Auction Analysts B. Mitchell Carlson, Carl Bomstead, Paul Hardiman (Europe), Jack Tockston Auction Analysts Daniel Grunwald, Doug Schultz, Michael Leven, Cody Tayloe, Kevin Coakley, Adam Blumenthal, Joe Seminetta, Travis Shetler, Leo Van Hoorick, Jeremy Da Rosa, Pierre Hedary, Andy Staugaard, Mark Moskowitz, Gary West, Jon Georgiadis, Bill Cash, Pat Campion, John Boyle, Morgan Eldridge, Jeff Trepel, Larry Trepel, Daren Kloes, Brett Hatfield Contributing Editors Steve Ahlgrim (Ferrari), Gary Anderson (English), Robert Cumberford (Design), John Draneas (Legal), Prescott Kelly (Porsche), Thor Thorson (Race Cars) Contributors John Apen, Diane Brandon, Marshall Buck, Dale Novak, Miles Collier, Martin Emmison, Jay Harden, Paul Hardiman, Alex Hofberg, Ed Milich, Stephen Serio, John L. Stein, Bill Rothermel, Reid Trummel, Alexandra Martin-Banzer, Chad Tyson CORRESPONDENCE Email service@sportscarmarket.com Customer Support www.sportscarmarket.com/helpdesk Fax 503.253.2234 General P.O. Box 4797, Portland, OR 97208 FedEx/DHL/UPS 401 NE 19th Ave., Suite 100, Portland, OR 97232 DIGITAL AND BUSINESS Information Technology Brian Baker brian.baker@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 215 Web Developer Ian Burton ian.burton@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 212 SEO Consultant Michael Cottam me@michaelcottam.com; 503.283.0177 Controller Cheryl Ann Cox cheryl.francisco@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 205 Strategic Planner Bill Woodard Executive Producer, SCM Television Roger Williams roger_williams@earthlink.net ADVERTISING Display Advertising Account Executives Darren Frank darren.frank@sportscarmarket.com; 877.219.2605 x 214 Cindy Meitle cindy.meitle@sportscarmarket.com; 877.219.2605 x 213 Advertising / Events Manager Erin Olson erin.olson@sportscarmarket.com; 877.219.2605 x 218 Advertising Coordinator Jessi Kramer jessi.kramer@sportscarmarket.com Classified Advertising classifieds@sportscarmarket.com SUBSCRIPTIONS Subscriptions Coordinator Susan Loeb susan.loeb@sportscarmarket.com; 503.261.0555 x 217 To order new subscriptions or for questions about current subscriptions 877.219.2605, x 1; service@sportscarmarket.com, fax 503.253.2234 M–F 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. PST @SportsCarMarket www.sportscarmarket.com Connect with SCM on The information in Sports Car Market magazine is compiled from a variety of reliable sources. However, we disclaim and deny any responsibility or liability for the timeliness, use, interpretation, accuracy, and completeness of the information presented. All material, data, formats and intellectual concepts in this issue © 2017 by Sports Car Market, Inc., Automotive Investor Media Group and Automotive Investor in this format and any other used by Sports Car Market magazine. Copyright registered with the United States copyright office. Canada Post Publication Agreement #41578525 PRINTED IN USA SCM Contributors CODY TAYLOE, SCM Auction Analyst, joined the team in 2013, and his clean, timely copy quickly endeared him to the editorial staff. As a member of Generation X, he represents the fast-growing segment of car collectors whose interest in vehicles doesn’t stop at 1972. Highlights of his collection include a 1983 Porsche 911 SC and a 1987 Mercedes-Benz 300TD wagon. Tayloe worked as a disc jockey, television writer and producer before spending a decade trading commodities in the building-products industry. He recently entered the car business full time and now has one of the fastest-growing independent dealerships in East Texas. He continues to represent vehicles and clients at collector car auctions. Tayloe is a native of East Texas. Read his report on Bonhams’ Scottsdale sale on p. 124. 36 GARRETT LONG, SCM Auction Editor, found his love for cars behind the wheel of his family’s Jeep Wrangler. Throughout high school, he spent much of his spare time getting stuck, stuffing things under muddy tires and fantasizing about locking diffs. After realizing that cars and words were his calling, he enrolled in the University of Kansas and pursued a degree in journalism. Around that same time, he traded mud for corners and started spending weekends at track days in his Mazda RX-8. This fall, he headed west in a leaky rental van to Portland, OR, where he recently joined the SCM ranks as Auction Editor. He’s now hunting the perfect dual-sport motorcycle and is hoping the rotary in his Mazda doesn’t eat its apex seals when it makes the trip out to the Rose City this summer. He made his first trek to the Arizona auctions with Team SCM this January — his first-timer story is on p. 72. DAN GRUNWALD, SCM Auction Analyst, has been a hardcore old-car enthusiast and collector for most of his life. He likens the car bug to an affliction that periodically disappears for a while but seems to recur when he walks by a certain old car or motorcycle that whispers to him, ”I love you. Please buy me!” He says the best part of being an auction reporter is meeting great and knowledgeable people and traveling to view some of the world’s finest automobiles at truly world-class auctions. The worst part is compiling and typing the reports from home after the sales are done, although he does get invaluable help from his wife, Martha. Turn to p. 102 for his auction report on BarrettJackson’s giant, multi-day Scottsdale sale.


Page 36

You Write We Read All letters are subject to editing. Please address correspondence to SCM, P.O. Box 4797, Portland, OR 97208. Fax 503.253.2234, e-mail: youwrite@sportscarmarket.com Bjarne Story is a Tribute to Keith’s Character To the Editor: There would be no reason for Keith Martin to remember this, but we met at his first Amelia Island seminar. I told my wife that you had achieved the American Dream, having built a business doing something you love. And more important, you showed character, from little things, such as the way you answered questions, to big things, such as how you gave advice and knowledge freely (and literally free) during the auction. So it was no surprise, but a real tribute to your character, that you were willing to share the heartbreaking story of your friend Bjarne and how you unknowingly traded a few hours with a McLaren for a lifetime of never seeing him again (January 2017, “Shifting Gears,” p. 20). We’ve all made regrettable, unforced errors. Thank you for sharing yours with us, in the hope we won’t repeat it. — Larry Honig, via email Alfa Romeo 75 — and the GTV6 To the Editor: The Alfa Romeo 75 racer cover story in your March issue (Race Car Profile, p. 80) was interesting to me — but perhaps not for obvious reasons. I realize that as a rare factory racer, the Alfa is certainly collectible, and I enjoyed reading about it. But what fascinated me was the honorable mention of the Alfa Romeo Alfetta/GTV6. Finally! As much as the Alfa 75 was admittedly uncompetitive, the GTV6 that came before it certainly was not. The Autodelta-prepared cars won everything from Group A rallying to the European Touring Car Championship four years in a row. And if that weren’t impressive enough, it also finished 2nd at the 24-hour race at Spa Francorchamps. So we have a very successful racing provenance, a design by Giugiaro’s Italdesign, fairly exotic mechanicals with an aluminum-Hemi-head, fuel-injected V6, 5-speed transaxle, inboard 38 Yet somehow, miraculously, it languishes as a bottom-feeder in the collector car world rear-disc brakes, De Dion rear suspension, trunk-mounted battery and so on. Yet somehow, miraculously, it languishes as a bottom-feeder in the collector car world. Yes, I know it has tiny back seats, a rust-prone body, mechanical quirks and ungainly federalized bumpers, but come on, that describes practically all Italian 2+2s of the same era, and they’ve skyrocketed in collectibility with no racing history. Perhaps volume production hurts, but the tinworm and mechanical neglect ensure there aren’t many left. When was the last time you saw one? Anyway, the seeming unpopularity of the GTV6 is quite strange to me, and I would welcome a future analysis on what appears to be an Italian car with everything going for it that flies in deference to the typical formula for success in the collector car market. — Gary Koch, Avon Lake, OH Driving with Kid Gloves To the Editor: “Driving with Kid Gloves” by Todd K. Warren (March 2017, “Collecting Thoughts,” p. 50) struck home. I bought my first Morgan Plus 4 in 1982. I was test driving it with the owner in Norwalk, CT, when he said, “I would not want to be in an accident in this woodenframed car.” That statement has always been in the back of my mind. My son grew up in the back seat of that Tourer. We never had an accident, knock on wood. Now we also have a 2003 Plus 8 that meets all government regulations. My grandson has never ridden in it — except for around the circle he lives on. His mother is an insurance broker. She did not appreciate the picture of him sitting on my OSSA motorcycle when he was 1 year old. She also did not like the idea of replacing my Plus 8’s ugly, air-bagged steering wheel with a wooden Moto Lita. With my reaction time (I am 72), and the good handling, brakes and tires on the Plus 8, I have avoided several close calls. I hope they are all close calls in the future. — John McNulty, Plainfield, NY Keith, Buy a 356 SC! To the Editor: I am responding to your request for comments on your dilemma of which car to buy among an Alfa, Austin-Healey or 356B Porsche. I may well be too late anyway, but I wanted to share some insight on two of your candidates. I have owned three Healeys and two 356 Porsches. The Healeys were a ’58, a ’60 and ’65. All were 6-cylinder cars. The 356s were a ’60 B coupe and my current ’65 C coupe (owned 30 years). To me, the contrast between the cars is dramatic. There was not much difference between the Healeys — save roll-up windows on the ’65. I ended up selling the ’65 because my wife was driving it daily to her teaching job and melting in the process — even though it was in Southern California. The body was loose and the Lucas electrical system problematic, but damn, do they look good! On the other hand, the 356 Porsches were as solid as rocks. The difference between my ’60 Sports Car Market


Page 38

Ad Index Aerovault ....................................................................149 AIG PC Global Services, Inc ....................................... 35 Allard Motor Works LLC ............................................. 34 Aston Martin of New England ..................................... 53 Authentic Classics, LLC ............................................175 Auto Kennel ................................................................165 Automobilia Monterey ...............................................185 Automotive Restorations Inc.............................. 116, 117 Autosport Designs Inc ................................................157 Autosport Groups .......................................................145 Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum ........................153 Barrett-Jackson .......................................................23, 35 Bennett Law Office ....................................................126 Beverly Hills Car Club ...............................................179 Bonhams / UK .............................................................. 33 Branson Collector Car Auction .................................... 31 Cabinets By Hayley ....................................................161 Can-Am Cars Ltd .......................................................174 Canepa ........................................................................143 Carolina Coach Collection ........................................... 17 Carriage House Motor Cars ................................... 10–11 Cars, Inc. ....................................................................... 49 Centerline Alfa Parts...................................................167 Central Classic Cars ...................................................170 Charles Prince .............................................................129 Chequered Flag International .....................................155 Classic Investments ...................................................... 37 Classic Showcase........................................................ 119 Cooper Technica, Inc. .................................................169 Copley Motorcars .......................................................153 D. L. George Coachworks ............................................ 71 Dobson Motorsport.....................................................144 DrivenHistory.com ....................................................... 22 Driversource Houston LLC ....................................12–13 Duncan Imports & Classic Cars .................................121 Eaton Peabody ............................................................ 118 European Collectibles................................................. 115 Evans Cooling Systems Inc. ......................................... 29 Exotic Classics ............................................................120 Fantasy Junction ........................................................... 69 Ferrari Financial Services ...........................................171 FitzSimons Engineering Corp. ...................................169 Foreign Cars Charlotte ...............................................133 Fourintune Garage Inc ................................................142 GC Logistics ...............................................................174 Girardo & Co ................................................................ 27 Glenmoor Country Club ............................................. 113 Going To The Sun Rally .............................................173 Gooding & Company .................................................2–3 Greystone Mansion Concours d’Elegance................... 57 Grundy Insurance ......................................................... 89 Gullwing Group ..........................................................163 Gullwing Motor Cars, Inc. .........................................159 Hahn-Vorbach & Associates LLC ..............................131 Hamann Classic Cars ................................................... 47 Heggen Law Office, P.C. ............................................178 Heritage Classics ........................................................105 Hoffmann’s Auto ........................................................175 Holt Motorsports Inc ..................................................163 Hyman, LTD ...............................................................127 Intercity Lines ............................................................... 59 Jaguar XK 120 ............................................................149 JC Taylor .....................................................................139 JJ Best Banc & Co ......................................................183 Keels and Wheels Concours ......................................... 68 Keeneland Concours D’Elegance ..............................158 Kevin Kay Restorations ............................................... 48 Kidston .......................................................................... 15 Kinekt .........................................................................184 Kurt Tanner Motorcars ...............................................141 Leake Auction Company .............................................. 75 Legendary Motorcar Company ..................................146 LmaRR Disk, Ltd. ......................................................158 Lory Lockwood ............................................................ 73 Lucky Collector Car Auctions ...................................... 95 Luxury Brokers International .....................................159 Macy’s Garage Ltd. ....................................................134 McCollister’s Auto Transport ....................................... 63 Mercedes-Benz Classic Center .................................... 41 Mercedes-Benz Museum GmbH ...............................168 Mershon’s World Of Cars...........................................175 Mid America Motorworks ............................................ 55 Miller’s Mercedes Parts, Inc ......................................174 Motor Club Events, LLC ............................................135 Motorcar Gallery ........................................................146 Motostalgia .................................................................4–5 New England Auto Auction .......................................171 New England Concours LLC ....................................... 74 Northwest European ...................................................152 Olympian Cars ............................................................141 Park Place LTD ...........................................................103 Paul Russell And Company ........................................151 Porsche 356 Registry ..................................................174 Premier Financial Services ........................................... 25 Premier Sports Cars ....................................................130 Putnam Leasing ..........................................................196 Quail Lodge Resort & Golf Club ................................. 20 QuickSilver Exhausts Ltd...........................................107 Race Ramps ................................................................123 Ramshorn Rally ..........................................................165 Reliable Carriers ........................................................... 99 Rennstall Classic Cars/High Mtn Classics.................173 RM Auctions, Inc. ......................................................8–9 Robert Glover LTD....................................................... 45 Ronald McDonald House ............................................. 94 SCM’s 40 Under 40 ....................................................193 Scott Grundfor Company ...........................................128 Sentient Jet, LLC ........................................................195 Silver Collector Car Auctions ....................................147 Speed Digital ..............................................................109 Sports Car Classics - SL Klassics .............................137 Sports Car Shop ..........................................................155 St Bernard Church ......................................................167 Steve Anderson Illustrations.......................................143 Stoddard NLA-LLC ..................................................... 43 Swisstrax Corporation .................................................. 42 Symbolic International .........................................19, 174 T.D.C. Risk Management ............................................. 35 The Creative Workshop ................................................ 51 The Finest Automobile Auctions................................6–7 The Palm Event ..........................................................125 The Stable, Ltd. ...........................................................111 The Werk Shop ...........................................................179 Tony Labella Classic Cars ..........................................122 Turtle Garage ................................................................ 39 TYCTA .......................................................................164 VanDerBrink Auctions ................................................. 60 Vintage Car Law .........................................................154 Vintage Motors of Sarasota .......................................... 61 Vintage Rallies ............................................................157 Watchworks ................................................................184 Welsh Enterprises, Inc. ...............................................151 West Coast Classics, LLC ..........................................132 White Bird Dance Company ......................................160 White Post Restorations .............................................185 Worldwide Group ......................................................... 21 40 You Write We Read The body was loose and the Lucas electrical system problematic, but damn, do they look good! B coupe and ’65 was dramatic as well. The C just seemed like a luxury automobile with excellent tracking — yet great simplicity with only two buttons: lights and wipers. I drive mine at Interstate speeds (70 to 75 mph) with no problem. I would opt for an SC, which gives you more power, and I definitely would NOT buy a B. Look for a good SC coupe and you will never look back. Good luck and keep up the good work with the magazine. — Bob Ross, via email Errata Keith, Buy a Junior Zagato! To the Editor: I enjoyed Keith Martin’s column in the February issue (“Shifting Gears,” p. 20). I’m just writing to say that if you are into great, fast driving on the twisty roads, there is no decision whatsoever. When it was new, I borrowed a Junior Zagato from Alfa and drove down to Modena, where I knew some of the back roads pretty well. That little car just swivel-hipped through them like you wouldn’t believe. It has the best, most respon- sive handling I’d experienced up to then in a sporty car — just fabulous. It will blow those other two right off the road. The only reason that I don’t own one is that Annette cannot be convinced that it is really good-looking. Keep the pedal to the metal in 2017. — Karl Ludvigsen, Suffolk, U.K. ♦ SCM incorrectly ran a photo of an E36 BMW M3 in the February issue’s Buy/Sell/Hold feature (p. 92). The car should have been an E30 M3, as seen here. Concours (March 2017, p. 60) ran an incorrect image of the Best SCM’s feature on the 2016 Art in Motion in Class (French) winner. The class winner was actually this 1973 Gr. IV Alpine-Renault A110 1600S (VC), owned by Chris Robins. Sports Car Market


Page 42

Time Pieces by Alex Hofberg When is a Patek Philippe not a Patek Philippe? In the field of collecting watches, there is an obvious line between items that are completely original and those that are completely counterfeit. Those items that fall somewhere between real and fake spur collectors and experts to disagree — and to sometimes acquire objects, knowingly or unknowingly, that fall short of the ideal “original.” To complicate matters, there are countless examples of watches that are wholly original, yet short of the ideal, as some of the original components were not actually made by the manufacturer labeled on the watch. In the late 19th century, the United States imposed protectionist tariffs on watches imported to the United States. The U.S. was trying to protect the American watchmaking industry. In response, several European manufacturers occasionally shipped movements without factory-fitted cases, as the uncased movement was subject to a much lower importation cost. Importers and jobbers would then contract with U.S. case manu- facturers to finish the watches — sometimes to their own satisfaction, and sometimes to the specifications of the jeweler/retailer who ordered them. Further complicating matters for collectors is a country like Argentina, which had strict regulations on importing and owning gold — and very extreme protectionist manufacturing laws. These laws stated that objects could not be imported to Argentina that could have been made there. Brands such as Rolex, Omega and others had to license Argentinian case makers to make cases for movements they exported if they wanted to distribute and sell watches. Examples of these watches can be commonly found. One might think that, using an Details Production date: 1952 Best place to wear one: To the annual shareholders meeting Ratings ( Rarity: Durability: Parts/service availability: Cool factor: automotive analogy, this is akin to a Duesenberg chassis with Murphy Neat Stuff by Jim Pickering Plate Perfection You spend a bunch of money on a car at auction, have it shipped home enclosed, and keep it under lock and key when it’s dark, rainy or cloudy. Fine. So why is it you scrounge around to find whatever random hardware is on your bench when it’s time to mount your plates? Admit it. You’ve done it. Griot’s Garage has the solution to this problem with its Stainless Steel License Plate Mounting Hardware kit. $9.99 gets you a variety of different inserts, nuts, Nylocs, and more that will look as good as your car. Get it at griotsgarage.com. 44 Desktop Hauler me Pieces by Alex Hofberg When is a Patek Philippe not a Patek Philippe? In the field of collecting watches, there is an obvious line between items that are com- pletely original and those that are completely counterfeit. Those items that fall somewhere between real and fake spur collectors and experts to disagree — and to sometimes acquire ob- jects, knowingly or unknowingly, that fall short of the ideal “original.” To complicate matters, there are countless examples of watches that are wholly original, yet short of the ideal, as some of the original components were not actually made by the manufacturer labeled on the watch. In the late 19th century, the United States imposed protectionist tariffs on watches imported to the United States. The U.S. was trying to protect the American watchmak- ing industry. In response, several European manufacturers occasionally shipped move- ments without factory-fitted cases, as the uncased movement was subject to a much lower importation cost. Importers and jobbers would then contract with U.S. case manu- facturers to finish the watches — sometimes to their own satisfac- tion, and sometimes to the specifications of the jeweler/retailer who ordered them. Further complicating matters for collectors is a country like Argentina, which had strict regulations on importing and owning gold — and very extreme protectionist manufacturing laws. These laws stated that objects could not be imported to Argentina that could have been made there. Brands such as Rolex, Omega and others had to license Argentinian case makers to make cases for movements they exported if they wanted to distribute and sell watches. Examples of these watches can be commonly found. One might think that, using an Details Production date: 1952 Best place to wear one: To the annual shareholders meeting Ratings ( Rarity: Durability: Parts/service availability: Cool factor: automotive analogy, this is akin to a Duesenberg chassis with Murphy Neat Stuff by Jim Pickering Plate Perfection You spend a bunch of money on a car at auc- tion, have it shipped home enclosed, and keep it under lock and key when it’s dark, rainy or cloudy. Fine. So why is it you scrounge around to find whatever random hardware is on your bench when it’s time to mount your plates? Admit it. You’ve done it. Griot’s Garage has the solution to this problem with its Stainless Steel License Plate Mounting Hardware kit. $9.99 gets you a variety of different inserts, nuts, Nylocs, and more that will look as good as your car. Get it at griotsgarage.com. 44 Desktop Hauler pr pr pe m as gl M-11 k Pieces by Alex Hofberg When is a Patek Philippe not a Patek Philippe? In the field of collecting watches, there is an obvious line between items that are com- pletely original and those that are completely counterfeit. Those items that fall somewhere between real and fake spur collectors and experts to disagree — and to sometimes acquire ob- jects, knowingly or unknowingly, that fall short of the ideal “original.” To complicate matters, there are countless examples of watches that are wholly original, yet short of the ideal, as some of the original components were not actually made by the manufacturer labeled on the watch. In the late 19th century, the United States imposed protectionist tariffs on watches imported to the United States. The U.S. was trying to protect the American watchmak- ing industry. In response, several European manufacturers occasionally shipped move- ments without factory-fitted cases, as the uncased movement was subject to a much lower importation cost. Importers and jobbers would then contract with U.S. case manu- facturers to finish the watches — sometimes to their own satisfac- tion, and sometimes to the specifications of the jeweler/retailer who ordered them. Further complicating matters for collectors is a country like Argentina, which had strict regulations on importing and owning gold — and very extreme protectionist manufacturing laws. These laws stated that objects could not be imported to Argentina that could have been made there. Brands such as Rolex, Omega and others had to license Argentinian case makers to make cases for movements they exported if they wanted to distribute and sell watches. Examples of these watches can be commonly found. One might think that, using an Details Production date: 1952 Best place to wear one: To the annual shareholders meeting Ratings ( Rarity: Durability: Parts/service availability: Cool factor: automotive analogy, this is akin to a Duesenberg chassis with Murphy Neat Stuff by Jim Pickering Plate Perfection You spend a bunch of money on a car at auc- tion, have it shipped home enclosed, and keep it under lock and key when it’s dark, rainy or cloudy. Fine. So why is it you scrounge around to find whatever random hardware is on your bench when it’s time to mount your plates? Admit it. You’ve done it. Griot’s Garage has the solution to this problem with its Stainless Steel License Plate Mounting Hardware kit. $9.99 gets you a variety of different inserts, nuts, Nylocs, and more that will look as good as your car. Get it at griotsgarage.com. 44 Desktop Hauler pr pe m as gl M-11 k teers teers e a nd e Pieces by Alex Hofberg When is a Patek Philippe not a Patek Philippe? In the field of collecting watches, there is an obvious line between items that are com- pletely original and those that are completely counterfeit. Those items that fall somewhere between real and fake spur collectors and experts to disagree — and to sometimes acquire ob- jects, knowingly or unknowingly, that fall short of the ideal “original.” To complicate matters, there are countless examples of watches that are wholly original, yet short of the ideal, as some of the original components were not actually made by the manufacturer labeled on the watch. In the late 19th century, the United States imposed protectionist tariffs on watches imported to the United States. The U.S. was trying to protect the American watchmak- ing industry. In response, several European manufacturers occasionally shipped move- ments without factory-fitted cases, as the uncased movement was subject to a much lower importation cost. Importers and jobbers would then contract with U.S. case manu- facturers to finish the watches — sometimes to their own satisfac- tion, and sometimes to the specifications of the jeweler/retailer who ordered them. Further complicating matters for collectors is a country like Argentina, which had strict regulations on importing and owning gold — and very extreme protectionist manufacturing laws. These laws stated that objects could not be imported to Argentina that could have been made there. Brands such as Rolex, Omega and others had to license Argentinian case makers to make cases for movements they exported if they wanted to distribute and sell watches. Examples of these watches can be commonly found. One might think that, using an Details Production date: 1952 Best place to wear one: To the annual shareholders meeting Ratings ( Rarity: Durability: Parts/service availability: Cool factor: automotive analogy, this is akin to a Duesenberg chassis with Murphy Neat Stuff by Jim Pickering Plate Perfection You spend a bunch of money on a car at auc- tion, have it shipped home enclosed, and keep it under lock and key when it’s dark, rainy or cloudy. Fine. So why is it you scrounge around to find whatever random hardware is on your bench when it’s time to mount your plates? Admit it. You’ve done it. Griot’s Garage has the solution to this problem with its Stainless Steel License Plate Mounting Hardware kit. $9.99 gets you a variety of different inserts, nuts, Nylocs, and more that will look as good as your car. Get it at griotsgarage.com. 44 Desktop Hauler pr pe m as gl M-11 k teers e a nd uck uck to spool it up. “Start” the engine, and pistons rattle to life. Shift it into forward or reverse, and it’ll drive away. 420 pieces total, build time is approximately 12 hours. But you’ll lose way more time than that playing with it on your desk instead of working. $78.90 at ugears.us ♦ Sports Car Market is best): Why Some Swiss Watches Wore American-Made Cases coachwork. With regard to watches, however, almost any custom-cased watch is less desirable than one cased and completed at the factory. The 18k rose-gold Patek Philippe shown is one such example. Made around 1950, this watch features an oversized case (for the period, at least) measuring 36.3 mm, a broad, simple dial with scattered Roman numerals and dot markers, small seconds and a simple silvered surface. Everything we see reinforces why Patek fall became the gold standard of elegant watches. Under the hood is a signed Patek 400-caliber manual-wind movement, yet the interior of the case bears no case maker’s mark or country of origin at all. Attached permanently to the watch (which is not atypical even for Patek production technique, as they welded many bracelets permanently to the case of watches that might otherwise have employed a strap) is a lovely, heavy, well-constructed 18k rose bracelet marked “I.Argentina.” Upon review of others weighing in on this signature, the “I” seems to represent an abbreviation of the word, “Industria.” Translated, this means “Made in Argentina.” Further investigation on the subject brings up a rather long chain of correspondence beginning with a disgruntled eBay buyer citing a watch that, according to him, was counterfeit, as it came with an Argentinian case. He felt the seller should disclaim any originality, and the seller, of course, argued that this is a well-known phenomenon and is acceptable (if not wholly desirable). I would argue directly between the two. The buyer is correct in that it should be notated in the sale that the case and bracelet are not produced — or signed — by the company that made the watch. This means the value of the object is less than it would be if it were a signed example. However, the seller’s argument that the watch is original and genuine is also true. In the case of the pictured watch, the value is roughly half, or possibly a third, of what it would be if it were triple-signed (or roughly $6,000). This is a great way to enter the market on a budget — and it is one more thing to watch out for. ♦


Page 44

In Miniature by Marshall Buck Replica 1954 Maserati A6GCS Berlinetta Minichamps has answered a question that no one asked. Should we produce a model of a replica car instead of the obvious and intelligent choice to accurately model the real car? Their answer was a resound- ing “Yes!” There were only four Maserati A6GCS berlinettas built between 1953 and 1954 — all styled by Pinin Farina. The car chosen to model is a great replica, but that is all it is. I saw this replica several years ago at the Essen show. Only one of the four original cars carried this specific low-roof-and-rounded-rear-fenders body. The real car is the very well-known two-tone blue berlinetta that Franco Lombardi owned for many years. Why not make that version? We may never know. To add insult to injury, Model Details Production date: 2015–16 Quantity: 999 white with blue stripe, 250 red, 100 red with white stripe SCM five-star rating: Overall quality: Authenticity: Overall value: Web: www.minichamps.de Minichamps also produced two other fantasy replica color versions. I bought the one shown here with the intent to repaint it two-tone blue. If you can get past the odd deci- Speaking Volumes by Mark Wigginton Augie Pabst: Behind the Wheel by Robert A. Birmingham, 368 pages, Dalton Watson, $60.31 (Amazon) Augie Pabst is one of those names a lot of people know from racing in America and Europe in the 1950s and 1960s. But he often fits into that category of, “Yeah, I know the name, but tell me more.” Author (and longtime bestie of aforementioned the Pabst) Robert Birmingham has come to your rescue. He raced alongside Pabst, worked with him and has now chronicled his racing life in some detail. Your first instinct is correct when you assume he comes from just one of the beer families that made Milwaukee famous. Actually, he comes from two, since his cousin, mentor and fellow racer David Uihlein was the power behind Schlitz. After college, Pabst opened a car deal- ership (the unholy trinity of Borgward, DKW and Isetta were the primary lines) and started racing. His first event was on the “roval” course at the Milwaukee State Fair Park. He was hooked, he showed promise and he had means, so a career was launched. His career wasn’t long (1956–66, with a modest return in the mid-’80s to SCCA and IMSA racing), but it was performed at a high level, with drives for some of the biggest teams of the era: Meister Bräuser, Briggs Cunningham and Mecom. It put Pabst in rarified company, racing all of the big names of the era, and the results included wins against the best. He was highly regarded 46 in the period. For example, the promotional piece for the Los Angeles Time Grand Prix in 1959 features Pabst right alongside Roger Ward, Richie Ginther, Stirling Moss, Phil Hill and Dan Gurney. He won two national championships, but of course, history often chooses to remember the wrong things. Pabst became infamous for driving his rental car into a motel pool after a bad weekend at Laguna Seca — at the urging of “friends” including Roger Penske. He regrets it to this day. What he shouldn’t regret is his friend’s work in creating a history of his racing career. It’s a fun, informative retelling. Provenance: Robert Birmingham shared in much of Augie Pabst’s racing career, and you don’t get much closer to history than that. Fit and finish: The book features plenty of images from the time, a full table of results of Pabst’s career and a simple, clean design. Drivability: If getting to know more of the backstory of Augie Pabst is your quest, this is your book. Birmingham has a readable style, but to say the book is exhaustive is both praise and a warning. You may run out of interest before Pabst runs out of career. ♦ Sports Car Market sion, then the model will look good on your shelf. This is a 1:18-scale resin production model, with no opening panels. This is probably good because we won’t find a Chevy V8 or some other crime under the hood. With the exception of incorrect, generic wire wheels, the overall fit, finish and detailing is very good. The paint is smooth high gloss, but the dark blue stripe is a dull decal. Chrome detail parts are all cleanly fitted. The windows are clear, allowing a good view into the well-detailed white-and-blue cockpit. The other two color variants are more striking with chrome wheels and exhausts, but as mentioned, this one is going in for a repaint. Priced at around $299. ♦


Page 48

Affordable Classic 1975–79 Honda Civic CVCC One Fun Econo-Box “Dude, is that my Boston 8-track on the floor?” by Jeff Zurschmeide 1977 Honda Civic CVCC, sold for $15,400 at Bonhams’ 2017 Scottsdale auction W Details hen Honda brought the first Civic subcompact to America in the middle of 1972, the car was not very well received. Honda’s previous cars had been far too small and idiosyncratic for the American buyer, and early Civics had a tendency to rust so badly that the U.S. government forced Honda to recall and repair them with new fenders. For a short time it looked as though the Civic might not catch on, even though Datsun and Toyota were making strong inroads at the time, and even the quirky rotary-engine Mazda was getting some traction. The gas crunch of 1973 changed all that. Suddenly the fact that you could get 40 mpg out of a Civic made up for a lot of faults. A year later Honda brought out the CVCC engine. Those letters stood for “Compound Vortex Controlled Combustion,” which was an innovative SOHC cylinder-head design that improved engine efficiency to the point that the Civic did not require a catalytic converter to meet mid-1970s emissions standards. The 1.5-liter CVCC engine gave you 53 horsepower. That was only slightly better than the standard Honda engine, but it was enough to start selling millions of Civics. Honda’s market in the United States was established. Years produced: 1975–79 Price when new: $3,299 Number produced: Over 1,000,000 Current SCM Valuation: $5,000 to $8,000 Pros: Fun to drive, reliable, economical Cons: Rust is a danger; comparatively slow, uncomfortable Best place to drive one: A curvy road without too many hills Worst place to drive one: A long distance A typical owner is: Reliving his/her youth — or still younger than 21 50 A belly-button car By the late 1970s, a Honda Civic was a lot like a navel — everybody had one, or at least you’d seen one lately. In that era, most families bought a new car every three or four years, so by 1980 there were lots of used Civics bouncing down the road on tired shocks, while their teenage drivers blew out the speakers and kept the gas Sports Car Market pedal nailed to the floor. A few Civics actually survived that treatment. (Sadly, mine did not. Requiescat in pace, little guy.) The CVCC engine was mated to one of three transmissions in this era. Buyers could choose the standard 4-speed manual, a 5-speed manual or a 2-speed Hondamatic. The engine was mounted transversely and drove the front wheels. You got front-disc brakes and rear drums. The front suspension was a McPherson strut design, and the Civic had independent rear suspension. That suspension, plus the short wheelbase, made the Civic eager to turn, so what it lacked in torque it made up for in handling. After all, it was still a Japanese interpretation of a Mini Cooper. However, torque steer was extreme due to the Civic’s unequal-length Courtesy of Bonhams


Page 49

axle half-shafts. Any attempt to launch the Civic from a standing start could rip the steering wheel out of your hands and send the car careening off at an angle. Experienced Civic pilots knew to counter steer as they dropped the tack hammer. The interior of a mid-1970s Civic was spartan, to say the least. Standard equipment was an AM radio and a heater. AM/FM, cassette or 8-track was optional. Air conditioning was also optional, but who paid that kind of extra money for a Civic? Seats were either sticky vinyl or had patterned cloth inserts. The term “econo-box” was invented for this car. Yet for all that, anyone who ever owned an early Civic is guaranteed to smile when you mention the cars. They were fun, economical, tough to kill — and they got you where you were going. A well-kept example The subject sale is a true rarity, as one person owned the car from new until he passed away in 2010. A dealer then lightly restored the car and it was placed in a collection. You can’t ask for better than that, especially with this generation of Civic. The car appears to be a very good legitimate survivor. The fact that the car was kept in the Colorado desert helped it avoid the rust that plagued everything in the 1970s, and it appears the car was garaged and lightly driven. Some wear on the pedal covers and patina on the wooden shift knob (standard on CVCC models) show that the car was loved. The 78,413 miles showing on the odometer are credible. Most of these cars were in junkyards by 150,000 miles. This car also has several important options and OEM accessories. It has the cloth insert upholstery (refreshed during the restoration), and the luggage rack on top. You don’t want to actually put a piece of luggage up there if you want to maintain 55 mph. There’s also a rare front bumper overrider installed. A rear overrider was also available as a separate accessory, but it was apparently not installed on this car. The protective side spear and the side decals were also Honda accessories If this is not the best first-generation Honda Civic left in America, it’s pretty close. in 1977. The only visible non-OEM feature on this car is the dealerinstalled pinstriping on the hood, rear hatch, and along the tops of the fenders around the side windows. If this is not the best first-generation Honda Civic left in America, it’s pretty close. The $15,400 price was fair for the condition and options presented. Few Civics of this era are ever sold at auction, so this is a high-water mark for the breed. If this car tickles your memory like it does mine, and you’re lucky enough to find a good example, you will probably get it much cheaper than this one through eBay or various classified ads. But really, who ever thought a Civic would be considered a classic, anyway? ♦ April 2017 51


Page 50

Collecting Thoughts Best Buys at the Arizona Auctions Quirky and a deal under the low estimate at $132k — 1959 Tempo Matador Mikafa Reisemobil “Landyacht,” sold by Gooding & Company Arizona’s Best Deals Weren’t Always Cheap To be a good buy, a car has to meet your specific needs, taste and collecting philosophy by Donald Osborne W hen I was asked to write this piece on the best buys from the 2017 Arizona Auction Week, I immediately found myself in a quandary. I knew that I could make a list of cars that seemed to sell for less than similar cars had sold either last year or in the last auction cycle, but that didn’t seem to be the right way to tell the story of what I witnessed in the auction rooms. The main reason for that feeling was the extension of a trend that many colleagues and I have been seeing for almost three years now. It was more and more difficult to speak of “The Market” as it referred to live auction sales in any meaningfully macro way. I have observed in this setting that it was increasingly clear that buyers weren’t just looking for “a car” — they were seeking “The Car.” Not always a buyer’s market All experience is personal, and here is mine. I helped a group of clients place consignments in a number of the auctions. To a man, none of them did better than they hoped, several sold at a number well below expectations and one failed to sell at all. But it wasn’t as if we could then declare it a buyer’s market. Some of those same clients — and I — kept tabs on cars we might like to take home. We did our due diligence, and with more than a bit of confidence, raised our paddles, expecting that the wind might be at our backs. No such luck. All the lots we bid on sold well above our reasonably set marks. So, what does it all mean? What did happen in Arizona and how can a “best buy” be properly identified? Simply looking at the ham- 52 1991 Lancia Thema 8.32, a $7,150 sale at Barrett-Jackson mer price doesn’t necessarily indicate a deal. Sometimes cars are cheap because they sell exactly where their attributes of value dictate they should have. In order to be considered even a good buy, a car has to meet your specific needs, taste and collecting philosophy. I’ve sometimes found myself in a place where a client has clearly articulated his parameters for his next purchase. Then, he presents to me a car that meets none of those criteria — but can be had “for a great price.” My response is quick and automatic — “What exactly is the right price for a car you don’t want?” So, while many may have left the Valley of the Sun having spent less than they planned to, not every one of them may have gotten a best buy. Value isn’t always found at the lowest price. Despite all the foregoing, I can make a short list of some of the cars that caught my attention thanks to their hammer prices. I will make no excuses for what is on the list — or what didn’t make it. Consider it a snapshot view of what I experienced in a somewhat surrealistic week of sales. Read and discuss. Sports Car Market Mathieu Heurtault, courtesy of Gooding & Company Courtesy of Barrett-Jackson


Page 51

Barrett-Jackson’s Scottsdale Auction Some on the list are perhaps less surprising than others, but interest- ing nonetheless. I didn’t attend every one of the auctions held that week, so with one exception I’ve limited my list to those cars I actually saw and touched. I’ll start with that exception, a lot sold at Barrett-Jackson. Now that the Euro-Only Class of 1991 is 26 years old, personal imports of formerly forbidden fruit have begun to pick up. A most unlikely example was Lot 141, a ’91 Lancia Thema 8.32. You’re forgiven for not knowing what that is. It’s a 4-door sedan developed with the Alfa Romeo 164, Fiat Croma and Saab 9000. It’s an executive express with a 3-liter Ferrari V8 and features such tricks as a retractable trunk-lid spoiler and five-star alloy wheels. The good news from the photos was that the engine compartment appeared to have seen recent attention. The bad news was the baked dash top cover and that it had been “in dry storage for a decade.” Import costs had to have come to close to the hammer price, so at $7,150, including premium, what could go wrong? Don’t answer that. RM Sotheby’s Arizona Auction RM Sotheby’s Lot 124 proved that if you wanted to own a 1955 Porsche 356 Speedster that you could drive and park anywhere, it wasn’t necessary to spend more than $280,500. Restored 10 years ago and sporting its original engine, this car was set to provide thousands of miles of pleasure with no “precious jewel” regrets. Lot 134 in the same sale, a 1939 Bugatti Type 57 with body by Letourneur et Marchand, seemed a good value at $1.017 million, although it could certainly be argued that the factory Jean Bugattidesigned Stelvio convertible is more attractive. For me the ultimate bargain in RM Sotheby’s sale at the Biltmore was Lot 232, the unrepeatable 1924 Isotta Fraschini Tipo 8A Landaulet. It had come from the corporate collection of Finmeccanica in Italy, having never been sold to the public by the Isotta Company. Stunning in 1924 Isotta Fraschini Tipo 8A Landaulet, sold for a surprisingly low $434,500 at RM Sotheby’s its presence and originality, the $434,500 paid was astonishingly low. Gooding & Company’s Scottsdale Auction Over at Gooding & Company, the substantial $1.595 million brought by Lot 136, a very simple, clean but striking Figoni-bodied 1932 Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 Gran Sport still seemed a gift for a unique example of one of the most prized Alfas ever built. It was a car to which photographs did little justice and that had to be seen in the metal to be truly appreciated. A car that was spectacular in image and person was the 1969 American Motors AMX/3, Lot 132 at Gooding, sold at $891,000. One of five built for AMC before the project was canceled, it is not only a fascinating “what if?” but also one of the most beautiful designs of the era. Rare, gorgeous and well restored, its only drawback is that it’s already done a large part of the global show circuit. But find something comparable for under $1 million. At a more “affordable” level, I would have been quite happy with Lot 56, the quirky and totally wonderful 1959 Tempo Matador Mikafa Reisemobil “Landyacht.” This rarely seen German camper was packed with original details and accessories and would be just the item for a memorable and very leisurely cross-country tour. A known admirer of the strange snapped it up for $132,000, well under low estimate. If any of the above turn out to be deals, only the new owners will know for sure. ♦ April 2017 53 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s


Page 52

Collecting Thoughts Sale of the CERV 1 The CERV I: More than Arkus-Duntov’s Mule The car was instrumental in developing the wider, low-profile tires that revolutionized motor racing, and it carried many significant engines by Miles Collier Collectin Collectin Collectin Collectin ollecting Though ollecting Thoughts Sale of the CERV 1 The CERV I: More than Arkus-Duntov’s Mule The car was instrumental in developing the wider, low-profile tires that revolutionized motor racing, and it carried many significant engines by Miles Collier W W henever a vehicular alumnus of the Briggs Cunningham Collection as it was in Costa Mesa, CA, shows up on the auction scene, it attracts my attention. The 1960 CERV I is one such “old boy,” and it was part of that fabulous collection when I bought it in December of 1986. Through convoluted reasoning that now seems impressively ill- founded, I elected to kick the CERV I, and its big brother, CERV II, down the road. It seems my heart was set on a Grand Sport Corvette, and dumping the CERVs seemed like a way to get there. Well, not so much, as it turned out, but ultimately I did end up with a Grand Sport. CERV I (Chevrolet Experimental Research Vehicle I) sold during the recent Barrett-Jackson auction in Scottsdale, AZ, on January 14 for the rather impressive sum of $1,320,000. Coming second to an Aston Martin DB5 for highest price of the auction, CERV I seems a surprising competitor for podium honors at Barrett-Jackson. While the car is a true red, white and blue American, B-J’s sweet spot, the “insiders only” nature of the CERV I’s history makes it the kind of offering that would normally benefit from some pretty careful hand-selling. That said, Craig Jackson’s crew doesn’t need to apologize to anyone for the excellent result. An important historical relic Let’s take a closer look at this historic automobile. In the normal scheme of things, auction automobiles fall into two groups: The first group of cars offers an active ownership experience — whether racing, touring, showing or just messing around. The second group of cars is more esoteric. These cars are primarily contemplative or legacy objects to be preserved for the future. These artifacts appeal to collectors through their historic importance — or through their reference-grade condition. Many of these cars are difficult or unpleasant to drive, extremely fragile, have no practical venue or scheme for use — and sometimes have all three strikes. Collectors of these cars are attracted to owning an important piece of history — or a rare and unique artifact. 54 Sports Car Market Arkus-Duntov’s mule Built in early 1960, this car represented Zora Arkus-Duntov’s re- sponse to Bill Mitchell’s appropriation of the development mule for the 1957 Corvette SS that GM raced at Sebring. Mitchell transformed the unwanted mule into the “Sting Ray,” a C-modified SCCA sports-racing car that foreshadowed the styling of the 1963 Corvette Sting Ray. As a personal venture, Mitchell had a Maryland dentist, Dr. Dick Thompson, drive the “Sting Ray” to three annual C-modified class championships. Not to be eclipsed — and no doubt defending his territory against arch-rival Mitchell as General Motors’ only “Mr. Corvette”— ArkusDuntov scrounged up the remaining Corvette SS spares and built an all-alloy, 283-ci mid-engine, tube-frame, single-seat “rolling test bed” that just happened to comply with Indy 500 chassis specs. GM’s late 1950s “Q” car and Corvair development initiatives caused Arkus-Duntov to consider rear-engine architecture for the Corvette. Courtesy of Barrett-Jackson


Page 54

Collecting Thoughts Sale of the CERV 1 Sadly, the “Q” car front-engine, rear-transaxle concept was red-lighted, eliminating any hope of a suitable GM production transaxle for a hypothetical mid-engine Corvette. No matter. CERV I, Arkus-Duntov rationalized, would demonstrate the virtues of rear-engine vehicle dynamics — and increase the public’s acceptance of the Corvair. Hiding in plain sight That CERV I existed at all in light of GM’s 1957 signing of the AAMA (American Automobile Manufacturers’ Association) accord is remarkable. Agreeing to refrain from using racing, speed or performance to sell their wares created an underground resistance in GM that found expression through independent frolics such as the Mitchell “Sting Ray” or disguised corporate Research and Development programs such as Arkus-Duntov’s CERV I. As internal strictures of the ban waxed and waned inside GM, dis- guisable racing opportunities were undertaken. Arkus-Duntov recruited Firestone Tires to sponsor a Pikes Peak Hill Climb record attempt using the CERV I as the tire-testing platform. A concatenation of misread data while testing on the mountain resulted in engineers mistaking CERV I’s record-breaking pace for uncompetitive performance. The venture was scrubbed. Arkus-Duntov continually stirred the AAMA pot by sending CERV I to major tracks around the U.S. during the early 1960s. A presentation at Riverside Raceway during the 1960 U.S. Grand Prix, the last Formula One race under the old 2.5-liter displacement rules, is noteworthy. There, Dan Gurney and Stirling Moss tried the car for both research and publicity purposes, turning laps four seconds off Formula One pace — but equal to the best sports-racing times of the period. Over the 10 years Arkus-Duntov employed CERV I in its duties as engine, tire and suspension testing laboratory, the vehicle was modified with different engines and other driveline components. For high-speed work, it was fitted with a restyled fiberglass shell and a 377-ci, 500-horsepower injected engine. In the early 1970s, Arkus-Duntov drove CERV I around GM’s Milford proving grounds at 206 mph. In 1972, CERV I was donated to the Cunningham Museum. Part of the Sting Ray’s DNA — and much more CERV I, despite its obscurity to all but Corvette enthusiasts and automotive historians, is the physical design link between the Corvette SS endurance racer, one of GM’s most remarkable and ambitious perCollectinCollectinoughts Sale of the CERV 1 Sadly, the “Q” car front-engine, rear-transaxle concept was red-lighted, eliminating any hope of a suitable GM production transaxle for a hypo- thetical midlecting Thoughts Sale of the CERV 1 Sadly, the “Q” car front-engine, rear-transaxle concept was red-lighted, eliminating any hope of a suitable GM production transaxle for a hypo- thetical mid-engine Corvette. No matter. CERV I, Arkus-Duntov rationalized, would demonstrate the virtues of rear-engine vehicle dynamics — and increase the public’s acceptance of the Corvair. Hiding in plain sight That CERV I existed at all in light of GM’s 1957 signing of the AAMA (American Automobile Manufacturers’ Association) accord is remarkable. Agreeing to refrain from using racing, speed or perfor- mance to sell their wares created an underground resistance in GM that found expression through independent frolics such as the Mitchell “Sting Ray” or disguised corporate Research and Development pro- grams such as Arkus-Duntov’s CERV I. As internal strictures of the ban waxed and waned inside GM, dis- guisable racing opportunities were undertaken. Arkus-Duntov recruited Firestone Tires to sponsor a Pikes Peak Hill Climb record attempt using the CERV I as the tire-testing platform. A concatenation of misread data while testing on the mountain resulted in engineers mistaking CERV I’s record-breaking pace for uncompetitive performance. The venture was scrubbed. Arkus-Duntov continually stirred the AAMA pot by sending CERV I to major tracks around the U.S. during the early 1960s. A presenta- tion at Riverside Raceway during the 1960 U.S. Grand Prix, the last Formula One race under the old 2.5-liter displacement rules, is note- worthy. There, Dan Gurney and Stirling Moss tried the car for both research and publicity purposes, turning laps four seconds off Formula One pace — but equal to the best sports-racing times of the period. Over the 10 years Arkus-Duntov employed CERV I in its duties as engine, tire and suspension testing laboratory, the vehicle was modified with different engines and other driveline components. For high-speed work, it was fitted with a restyled fiberglass shell and a 377-ci, 500-horsepower injected engine. In the early 1970s, Arkus-Duntov drove CERV I around GM’s Milford proving grounds at 206 mph. In 1972, CERV I was donated to the Cunningham Museum. Part of the Sting Ray’s DNA — and much more CERV I, despite its obscurity to all but Corvette enthusiasts and automotive historians, is the physical design link between the Corvette SS endurance racer, one of GM’s most remarkable and ambitious per- The- The significance of the CERV I is not to be underestimated. It was instrumental in developing the new generation of wider, low-profile tires that revolutionized motor racing. It was used to test countless engines that went on to be significant in other applications. Consider the small-block 377 that powered the Corvette Grand Sports. Unarguably an artifact of importance, and of supreme importance to the GM performance story, CERV I is also amazingly original in its last GM configuration. An original time capsule It is not often that an historic automobile is both significant from a design and function standpoint — and equally original in its physical state. CERV I rewards close inspection where, as the minutes pass, new wonders of originality are discovered. Tires, wheels, paint, interior and so on. I must confess to not having seen CERV I since I sold her, but it had original brake lines, ignition wires, fuel hoses and such that would never survive from a life-safety standpoint were it recommissioned for use. Additionally, as it was never built to comply with any single-seater racing series or event, there is no use for this car today. I suppose some misguided person could destroy its amazing, un- touched condition by preparing the car for racing and finding a place to run it. Sadly, this would be like recommissioning Mozart’s harpsichord. To the collector who wants to own a major piece of Corvette history, who may have a number of other important Corvettes — or manufacturers’ prototypes — the opportunity to possess so much history and to contemplate this amazing relic of a fascinating and bygone time makes this car a unique opportunity. CERV I was very well bought, and given its lack of functional utility, well sold as well. ♦ It is not often that an historic automobile is both significant from a design and function standpoint — and equally original in its physical state. CERV I rewards close inspection where, as the minutes pass, new wonders of originality are discovered.


Page 56

Legal Files John Draneas Will Taxes Get Trumped? Lower taxes could mean lower collector car values tions, and many states impose their own estate tax. However, the silver lining in that cloud is that when your family inherits your car collection, their income-tax basis becomes their value at the date of your death. Thus, this so-called basis step-up at death means your family can immediately sell your cars without having to pay any income taxes. Put that all together, and for many collectors, the strategy becomes keep doing like-kind exchanges until you die and the income tax goes away. As we will see, that strategy could become ineffective. Is the estate tax getting dumped? For decades now, the Republicans have been try- ing to repeal the estate tax outright. They managed to do just that for one year — 2010. (If you’re reading this, that means you’re alive, and that one year didn’t do anything for your planning, thankfully!) Many thought that the 2013 changes would reduce the incidence of the estate tax to where Congress would leave it alone, but the Republicans haven’t let up. Now, having the trifecta of the entire Congress and the White House in their control, many believe that the estate tax is on its way out the door. It stands to reason that the Republican controlling I have to think I was in the clear majority of the country — I didn’t see much chance that Donald Trump was going to be elected president. What may have been even more astounding was that the Republican Party gained control of both chambers of the Congress. That sets the stage for some pretty major changes to our tax system that will have substantial effects on car collectors. Before getting into details, one important qualification has to be made. Since being elected, Mr. Trump has not really said much at all about what he has in mind for our tax system. Everyone’s predictions are based on Mr. Trump’s campaign statements, his campaign website policy statements, various Republican Party policy statements, and a smattering of bills that have already been introduced but aren’t moving anywhere quickly. A lot can change between campaigning and legislating, but here is what the tea leaves seem to be saying. Current law Let’s start with a brief recap of where car collectors stand today: When you sell a collector car that you have owned for more than a year, you enjoy the benefits of the favorable long-term capital gains rates. While they are the best deal currently available, they add up quickly: Federal capital gains rate .........................20% Net investment income tax ......................3.8% State income tax, up to ..........................13.3% Theoretical maximum .............................37.1% Most states impose lower tax rates than California’s 13.3% top tax rate. State income taxes are deductible against your federal income, but the alternative minimum tax can reduce or eliminate the benefit of the deduction. So the answer is somewhere between 23.8% and 37.1%. You can avoid paying the capital gains tax by reinvesting all of the sale proceeds in one or more replacement cars using a like-kind exchange, also called a 1031 exchange. The tax is not avoided — it is merely deferred. When you sell the replacement cars, you recognize the tax unless you do another like-kind exchange. The federal estate tax imposed on the full value of your assets at your death is currently at a 40% rate once you get over the exemp- 58 block is already busy working on the repeal. The main impediments seem to be avoiding a Democrat filibuster in the Senate and figuring out what happens afterward. Repeal of the estate tax would be a huge benefit for wealthy car col- lectors. At its current 40% rate, that takes a big bite out of your car collection values at your death. Eliminating that would be a huge benefit. Income tax basis Repeal of the estate tax eliminates the primary justification for the basis step-up at death. In fact, the Trump campaign website called for estate tax repeal, with the elimination of the basis step-up at death for estates over $10 million. There are no specifics, but that could be implemented in two ways: • Your family would acquire your cars with a “carryover basis.” That is, they would inherit your basis and pay the same income tax when they sell the cars as you would have if you had sold them before you died. • Just like in Canada, a capital gains tax could be recognized at death instead of the estate tax. Your estate would pay income tax on the gains in your cars, as though they were sold at their fair market values on the date of your death. Either way, holding onto your cars until your death would no longer be advantageous. Without that final benefit, we would expect to see more collector cars come to market. Income tax rates would go down Trump campaign statements say that the 3.8% net investment in- come tax would be repealed, but the capital gains rate would stay at 20%. Still, a 3.8% reduction is nothing to complain about. Some Republican Party position papers suggest eliminating the maximum capital gains rate and going back to a 50% capital gain deduction. That would mean that 50% of your capital gain would be tax-free, but the remaining 50% would be taxed as ordinary income. Since the Trump campaign position has been to reduce the 39.6% top ordinary income tax rate to 33%, that would result in an effective maximum 16.5% tax rate on capital gains — about a 7.3% reduction from Sports Car Market


Page 57

today’s total federal tax rate. The elimination of the alternative minimum tax would make your state income tax fully deductible. However, the Trump campaign position calls for limiting itemized deductions to $200,000 on a joint return, $100,000 on a single return. That makes it hard to say what the effective state income tax rate would end up being. State income tax rates aren’t going down to match, so selling your collector cars would still produce a significant tax bill. That would still make like-kind exchanges attractive to anyone who wanted to stay invested in collector cars. Nonetheless, one would expect a decline in like-kind exchanges. As income tax rates go down, there is less incentive to use exchanges. More importantly, if the basis step-up at death goes away, what be- comes the point of deferring the income tax through like-kind exchanges one after the other? Absent the income tax absolution at death, it becomes a pure deferral, with the capital gains tax having to be paid at some point. Given that, many collectors will decide it is best to sell, pay the tax, and reinvest the remaining proceeds in any form of investment deemed appropriate. Market impact Put all of this together, and it looks like we should expect a decline in collector car values. With more cars coming to market in a supplyand-demand economy, one would expect values to drop. Lower capitalgains taxes would probably bring new buyers into the market, which would push values up. However, it seems safe to assume that there would be greater selling pressure than buying pressure, with a resulting net decline in values. Family entity discounts Before the election, the biggest tax news was the Treasury’s release of proposed regulations aimed at reducing valuation discounts for family limited partnerships and LLCs. These techniques have been popular tools to reduce estate and gift tax valuations of car collections. The release of the proposed regulations was met with fierce criti- cism. At last count, Treasury received over 8,000 comments from the public — virtually all negative. The Treasury has been accused of overreach, and has responded with public comments suggesting they have been misunderstood and that clarification would be forthcoming. Several bills have been introduced in Congress to invalidate the proposed regulations. The general consensus today is that these proposed regulations will never see the light of day. The election results would suggest that any finally adopted regulations would be quickly reversed, and the Treasury probably has little motivation to proceed. That means that we could continue designing family business enti- ties as we have been, making substantial portions of asset value disappear for estate and gift tax purposes. However, if the estate tax is repealed, that strategy may go by the wayside. In fact, a major part of estate planning may become unwinding all of these family entity structures we have been so busily creating over the years, as they may become dinosaurs. What to do now? So what does the astute taxpayer do now? Maybe nothing. Once again, we are in the frustrating position we have been in many times lately where we don’t know what the law will be in the future. While many tax techniques make sense and always will, it’s tough to predict if major estate-planning moves under today’s rules make sense. They would likely not ever make things worse, but if there aren’t going to be any major tax savings, expensive professional fees may be a poor investment. ♦ JOHN DRANEAS is an attorney in Oregon. His comments are general in nature and are not intended to substitute for consultation with an attorney. He can be reached through www.draneaslaw.com. April 2017 59


Page 60

Unconventional Wisdom Donald Osborne Expanded Horizons Even a car produced in the millions can be very special when it connects to the very soul of its owner of the Class of ’64 became cherished classics. But that’s a subject for another column. One of the reasons for my attraction to custom-bod- ied cars is that I so often see the work of manufacturers, coachbuilders and designers I admire in an ultra-rare car of which perhaps only one or a handful were made. I can never be bored by or dismissive of something I’ve never seen. The almost infinite variety in versions of Fiat 1100s of the late 1940s and early 1950s is hard to imagine. But — like the review of that NY Auto Show program — it’s not just about finding buried treasure. Sometimes an almost equal thrill can come from noticing something I could have seen many times — but never took the time to actually study. In a previous column, I identified the cars on my List — those that I want to own before I leave this plane of existence. One of the cars on that List is a 1965 Ford Mustang Manufactured by the millions, but each has an individual story and connection to its owner I ’ve written and spoken often of the connection between enthusiasm, passion and collecting. However, I recently began to think about how those feelings of connection between people and the objects of automotive desire are made. To be attracted to something, you have to have some sort of expo- sure to it. In the case of cars, it doesn’t necessarily have to be first-hand experience that begins the infatuation. In fact, in many cases, we may never have laid eyes on — much less touched — the cars of our dreams. There is a solid reason that Ferrari is one of the top brands of any consumer product in the world, yet it’s a fair bet that the large majority of the 7 billion inhabitants of the planet have never stood next to a Ferrari automobile. Nonetheless, millions wear licensed and unlicensed logos on hats, shirts, shoes, cell phone covers and book bags — all to have a connection with a near-mythical car. So, we can love something from a distance. Proximity, however, greatly increases our interest. This is one of the reasons why, after so many years, I still enjoy attending shows, gatherings, auctions, museums, garages and shops around the world. The opportunity to spend time in close proximity to cars I’ve admired from afar always yields dividends for me. Even better are the opportunities that arise when I’m in the pres- ence of a car I’ve never seen — or sometimes never even heard of. It’s then that my spirit is renewed, and I positively throw off the risk of becoming jaded by working in the old-car business. Those of you who know me understand that I am particularly drawn to custom-bodied cars — especially Italian ones. A passion kindled in 1964 Whenever I receive a message or call about another car I’ve never seen, I feel the way I did at my very first auto show at the New York Coliseum in 1964. I was a 9-year-old discovering wonder and delight around every corner and on each stand. While my two older brothers were going into raptures over the new Pontiac GTO, I was thunderstruck with the Citroën DS. Looking back through the program from that show, which I still have on a library shelf in my office, I am struck by not only the variety of cars from which the U.S. buyer had to choose — but also how many 62 fastback, which is clearly not a rare or unusual car. A few weeks ago, I went to the inaugural edition of The Classic Car Show held at the Los Angeles Convention Center. It was planned as the kind of mix seen at shows such as Rétromobile in France, Auto e Moto d’Epoca in Italy, Techno Classica Essen in Germany and the Class Motor Show in the U.K. While it was on a much smaller scale than any of those well-estab- lished events, The Classic Car Show nonetheless presented an interesting mix, including a concours presentation, stands of parts vendors and suppliers, classic-car dealers, car club displays and celebrity interviews and book signings. I was on hand to sign copies of my book, Stile Transatlantico, at the stand of Autobooks-Aerobooks of Burbank, CA, and I had a chance to wander around the show a bit. Common — but still special One of the more impressive groupings was that of the San Gabriel Valley Mustang Club. I was struck by the variety of models and colors on display. Particularly noteworthy was a 1966 hard top in the rare and lovely shade of bronze called Emberglo Metallic. I struck up a conversation with the owners, Karen and Dennis Hart, and was quickly in the pull of their enthusiasm. Karen and Dennis rescued the car in 1977 when they bought it with $500 of their wedding gift money. When found, it was in a sorry state, covered in dings, with a worn interior and painted a dull powder blue over the original color. Both knew they had something special when they decoded the data tag and decided to restore it. The car has since been through two restorations, a theft and recovery. It’s gone from a daily driver to a still-used-but-now-pampered show car. Just being with them and the car, and all the rest of the Mustangs there, made me once again realize how special even a car produced in the millions can be when you get to know how they can connect to the very souls of their owners — and become an inseparable part of their lives. Once again I wondered when I would add that ’65 fastback to my garage. There’s a reason the Mustang, quite literally a Ford Falcon in sexier drag, captured the public imagination so deeply in mid-1964. The affection for those early Mustangs keeps the name and the model current in the latest offerings from Ford. For me, it’s a great object lesson that every corner of the automotive world deserves to be explored — and enjoyed. ♦ Sports Car Market


Page 62

Scene and Be Seen Images from Arizona Auction Week A testament to the continuing allure of “original,” this 1962 Aston Martin DB4 was found in a field and so 64 Sports Car Market Jim Pickering


Page 63

Countach or 512 BB? Two car guys discuss the possibilities at RM Sotheby’s old for $374k at Worldwide Auctioneers Someday ... A future collector stops to admire a 2015 Bugatti Veyron Super Sport Grand Vitesse at Barrett-Jackson April 2017 65 Garrett Long Jim Pickering


Page 64

Scene and Be Seen Images from Arizona Auction Week Designed by Giotto Bizzarrini, the 1969 AMC AMX/3 was a steady draw for onlookers in the Gooding & Company tent. The car sold for $891k Stephen Serio, SCM’s resident bulldog commentator and a perennial fan favorite but frequent also-ran in the informal polling at SCM seminars, tells the crowd he has backup support this year, pointing to the bulldog on his shirt. Donald Osborne (left) handled emcee duties in the Gooding & Company tent, and Mark Hyman and Carl Bomstead served as panelists The 1963 Jaguar XKE Lightweight C B 66 Sports Car Market Jim Pickering Jim Pickering Garrett Long


Page 65

It’s all in the details — Dominick Leogrande touches up the rim paint as car owner Larry Pattinson handles other detailing on a 1959 Mercedes-Benz 190SL convertible. Pattinson purchased the car from the Charlie Thomas Collection in 2016 and sold it at Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale for $104,500 Competition car gets a thorough look-over in the Bonhams tent. The classic British racer crossed the block for $7.4m Ringman Marty Hill and CEO Drew Alcazar zero in on a bidder at the Russo and Steele auction April 2017 67 Jim Pickering


Page 68

Feature 2017 Arizona Concours d’Elegance Setting the Stage This concours, which marks the start of Arizona Auction Week, is now a premier event T he 2017 Arizona Concurs d’Elegance once again decorated the historic grounds of the famed Arizona Biltmore Hotel with rare and beautiful cars. It is only four years old, but the Arizona Concours is now the traditional opening event of Arizona Auction Week. This year’s concours was on January 15 — and it provided a relaxing day before the frantic pace of the auctions. The gardens of the Arizona Biltmore, which was designed by Albert McArthur, a Frank Lloyd Wright protégé, provided an ideal setting for the boutique event. Fewer than 100 of the finest collector vehicles are displayed in 17 classes. They are presented in a relaxed setting, which allows ample opportunities for viewing and photography. The featured class was the Cars of Ettore and Jean Bugatti, and close to a dozen of the world’s finest were presented. Two Type 35s were on the field. One was from the famed Chip Connor Collection. Hellé Nice, who was known as the “Bugatti Queen,” once drove this car. The class was won by the spectacular 1936 Type 57SC Atlantic from the Mullin Automotive Museum in Oxnard, CA. The car went on to win Best of Show. The car was constructed of a magnesium alloy that could not be welded, so the seams had to be riveted, which is now a trademark of the cars. Peter and Merle Mullin and Rob and Melani Walton own the car. “We didn’t want to count on anything,” said Warner Hall, a senior docent from the Mullin Museum who kept tabs on the Type 57SC Atlantic during the concours. “Especially in a field this fabulous. This is such an amazing event, and there are some really amazing cars here.” The two other featured classes were Details Plan ahead: The 2018 Arizona Concours d’Elegance is scheduled for the Sunday before Arizona Auction Week Where: The Arizona Biltmore, 2400 East Missouri Ave., Phoenix, AZ 85016 Tour: The Arizona Tour d’Elegance explores local roads the day after the concours Number of entries: 90 Cost: Concours admission is $90 Web: www.arizonaconcours.com 70 Coachwork by Vignale and Lincolns of the Classic Era. Ron and Sandy Hansen’s 1926 Model L LeBaron sedan took top honors in the Lincoln Class. Kevin Cogan’s spectacular 1952 Ferrari 250 Europa coupe claimed the top award in the Vignale Class. Cogan traveled from Louisville, KY, to display his car. All the cars in both classes were exceptional and worthy of a trophy. SCM Publisher Martin and SCM Best of Show — 1936 Bugatti Type 57SC Atlantic from the Mullin Museum in Oxnard, CA Story and photos by Carl Bomstead Editor at Large Donald Osborne presided over the festivities. Their interviews and comments kept things lively, but their major accomplishment took place at Saturday’s Gala dinner. They were able to raise over $130,000 for Make-A-Wish Arizona, which will fund over a dozen deserving kids’ wishes. Most admirable! There were several interesting seminars on Saturday. “Legends: Pioneer Women in Racing” featured famed racers Janet Guthrie, the first woman to compete in the Indianapolis 500, and Lyn St. James, one of seven women to qualify for the Indy 500. St. James moderated another seminar: “Driven: What Drives Successful Race Team Owners.” On Monday, the traditional Tour d’Elegance visited a local collec- tion and stopped in Scottsdale’s Old Town for lunch, which provided an opportunity for the local community to view the cars. Presenting a concours of this magnitude is no small task, and it takes the committed efforts of a crew of dedicated volunteers. The fourth year of any concours is pivotal, as newness fades, and it is more difficult to find fresh and exciting cars. The Arizona Concours passed this milestone without hesitation, and the future looks bright. The Arizona Concours d’Elegance is taking its place among the ranks of premier events. Be there next January! ♦ Vignale Class winner — Kevin Cogan’s 1952 Ferrari 250 Europa Sports Car Market


Page 70

Feature Arizona First-Timer Jim Pickering Barrett-Jackson’s auctions offer something for everybody, which is a good thing because EVERYBODY shows up Swinging for the Fences in the Desert Going big is the only option when it’s time to sell and buy cars during Arizona Auction Week by Garrett Long G oing to the Arizona Auctions in Scottsdale is like being in the baseball playoffs. “Go big or go home” is the unofficial mantra during the week, with each auction house trying to outdo the other. Russo and Steele takes the cake in sheer energy and showmanship. The start of each auction day reminds you of a big-league relief pitcher coming in to dominate. Barrett-Jackson’s massive tent and huge lineup makes them the New York Yankees of the week. RM Sotheby’s, Bonhams and Gooding stage elegant pitcher’s duels for the best cars at the biggest prices. Worldwide is the new rookie with tons of talent. Over the week, I saw each auction through the lens of a camera. While mentally shooing inattentive passersby out of my shots, I noticed the style each respective company has embraced to offer something unique to their buyers and sellers. Barrett-Jackson is an old pro at Scottsdale and seems to have the strategy of throw- ing ideas at the wall until something sticks. You’ve got the Dodge ride-alongs audible anywhere outside of the tent — and vendors to sell you just about anything, including a sexy clown painting and a dehumidifier. A horse polo game was scheduled sometime over the week as well. Barrett-Jackson seems to try to target the everyman, by which I mean literally every man. With an impressive range of cars and activities, Barrett is a heavy, heavy hitter. RM Sotheby’s, Bonhams and Gooding offer a premium auction atmosphere. It’s kind of like being in the best box seats — and watching the best players. I’m talking about exclusivity and quality. The quality is obvious. At each of their events, my head was on a swivel. Just deciding what to admire for a bit took some serious effort — but I think the 3.8 GT3 RS at Gooding was my favorite. But these premier events were not as packed or big as they could have been, and for a reason. When I arrived at RM Sotheby’s, the auction was ongoing, and I was supposed to call the press officer working inside. I figured that with my largest camera lens, handful of media passes and charming personality, I could sweet-talk my way in without making that phone call. After licking my politely inflicted wounds from the credentials checker, I called the press officer and got in with no problem. I realized that if it were easy to get into these smaller venues, they would be packed to the gills. Russo and Steele was my favorite environment to peruse and photograph. Most auction companies prefer a “touch with your eyes” type of policy, but Russo encour- 72 ages you to pop the hood and check out the interior, even if it’s on the block. The staff puts on a dynamic performance while the bidding is going on — and all this fist-pumping and hollering makes for some great photos. Silver has a more blue-collar, handshake-deal vibe. While the cars at Silver aren’t as exclusive as the offerings at Gooding, Bonhams or RM Sotheby’s, it’s still a lot of fun. Taking a casual stroll through the lots without sharing shoulder space is a breath of fresh air. So whether it is spectacle, scale or a laid-back envi- ronment, Scottsdale has something to offer each person, whether you have the bulging bank account of a Major League Baseball All-Star — or the skinny wallet of a reserve outfielder in Minor League Baseball’s Single A short season. ♦ Favorite car of the week? Gooding & Company’s 2011 Porsche 997 GT3 RS 3.8 Sports Car Market


Page 74

Sports Car Market PROFILES IN THIS ISSUE Keith Martin’s The Insider’s Guide to Collecting, Investing, Values, and Trends ™ Significant Sales That Provide a Snapshot of the Market 76 Sports Car Market


Page 75

FERRARI: 1969 Ferrari 365 GTS, p. 78 ENGLISH: 1979 Aston Martin V8 Vantage “Oscar India,” p. 80 ETCETERINI: 2013 Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Super Sport 300, p. 82 GERMAN: 1928 Mercedes-Benz Typ S 26/120/180 Supercharged Sports Tourer, p. 84 AMERICAN: 1969 AMC AMX/3, p. 86 RACE: 1963 Jaguar XKE Lightweight Competition, p. 90 NEXT GEN: 1989 Ford Mustang LX 5.0, p. 92 2013 Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Super Sport 300; Patrick Ernzen ©2016, courtesy of RM Sotheby’s April 2017 77


Page 76

Ferrari Profile 1969 Ferrari 365 GTS The buyer of chassis 12489 realized that an opportunity to buy an elusive 365 GTS doesn’t come up often by Steve Ahlgrim Details Year produced: 1969 Number produced: 20 Original list price: $15,900 Current SCM Median Valuation: $2,750,000 Tune-up cost: $3,500 Distributor cap: $195 reproduction, $450 OEM Chassis # location: On frame above right front spring mount Engine # location: Below head on rear passenger’s side of block Club: Ferrari Club of America Web: www.FerrariClubofAmerica.org Alternatives: 1968 Jaguar XKE, 1969 Maserati Ghibli Spider, 1969 Aston Martin DB6 Volante, 1969 Porsche 911 S Targa Comps 1965 Ferrari 275 GTS Lot 144, s/n 07331 Condition 2+ Chassis number: 12489 Engine number: 12489 T his GTS is a six-time Platinum Award winner with an ownership chain of just six caretakers. Just 20 365 GTSs were built, making them significantly less common than a Daytona Spyder, California Spyder or Pinin Farina cabriolet. A 365 GTS is rarely offered for public sale. This beautiful spyder now beckons its next caretaker to continue the car’s exceptional record on the show fields and at FCA events. SCM Analysis This car, Lot 263, sold for $3,602,500, including buyer’s pre- mium, at RM Sotheby’s auction in Phoenix, AZ, on January 16, 2017. Driving a classic open-top Ferrari in the proper weather is one of the greatest pleasures of the car hobby. By today’s standards they are not overwhelmingly fast, but that’s not the point. Touring in an open Ferrari is about adding a decibel to the exhaust, bringing the intake whoosh into the cockpit — and letting the elements erase all thoughts other than your journey. It can be argued that all convertibles do the same cleansing of the soul, and that may be true, but a Ferrari does it better. The steering is better, the brakes are better and the sounds are incomparable. Add that to a feeling of pride that you get when you’re driving a Ferrari. 78 It’s like wearing a great suit — it makes you look and feel your best. A rare Ferrari The 365 GTS is relatively unknown, but it is automo- bile royalty. The theme starts with the 275 GTS, an opentop model based on the iconic 275 GTB but with a more conservative body and a substantially more luxurious — make that more comfortable — interior. There are few luxurious elements to a 275 GTS — or any of the open Ferraris. They are form-follows-function automobiles, and the function is to be a sports car. The seats may be comfortable and the trimming top quality, but except for a few Vignale examples, open-Ferrari interiors can be somewhat bland. The 275 GTS evolved into the closed 330 GTC, another iconic Ferrari best known for Phil Hill’s declaration of it being the best Ferrari ever, but then, Phil hadn’t driven a 365 GTS at the time. The 330 GTC is an outstanding car. It is exceptionally comfortable, easy to drive, and delivers the sounds and performance you imagine a Ferrari would give. The 330 GTS that followed was, for all intents, a 330 GTC with a convertible top. The GTS blended all the great qualities of the GTC 1966 Ferrari 275 GTS Lot 243, s/n 07805 Condition 2- Sold at $2,053,165 RM Sotheby’s, Monte Carlo, MCO, 5/13/16 SCM# 6799761 Not sold at $1,400,000 RM Sotheby’s, Monterey, CA, 8/18/16 SCM# 6804171 1968 Ferrari 330 GTS Lot 139, s/n 10817 Condition 2 Sold at $2,000,000 RM Sotheby’s, Amelia Island, FL, 3/11/16 SCM# 271556 Sports Car Market Robin Adams ©2016, courtesy of RM Sotheby’s


Page 77

with the good and bad traits of a soft-top car. The result was nirvana for owners in temperate climates and a seasonal car for owners in cool climates. More power What makes a Ferrari better? Well, more power, of course, and the exceptional 330 GTC got better. The 4-liter, 300-hp 330 GTC/GTS had plenty of power, but Ferrari wasn’t satisfied with plenty. Ferrari had recently introduced the 365 GT 2+2 as a successor to the 330 2+2. The 365 2+2 was larger than its predecessor, so it was given a new 4.4-liter, 320-hp engine to compensate for the weight. The new 365 engine was the same physical size as the 330 engine, so slipping it in the 330 GTC was snap. Move a vent from the front fender to the hood, make a couple other By today’s standards they are not overwhelmingly fast, but that’s not the point. Touring in an open Ferrari is about adding a decibel to the exhaust, bringing the intake whoosh into the cockpit — and letting the elements erase all thoughts other than your journey. updates — and the 330 GTC becomes the 365 GTC. What’s good for the coupe is good for the spyder, and soon the 365 GTS followed. The two-cam 365 engine is a masterpiece of Ferrari engineering, revving effortlessly with a shriek that sends dogs looking for cover. The increased displacement added mid-range torque, making urban driving more pleasurable. The added horsepower made a fast car even faster. Only 20 365 GTS cars, were built, so few people have had an oppor- tunity to drive one. Those who have report it’s one of the most rewarding cars on the planet. Classic open Ferraris are rare Any discussion on the value of an open-top Ferraris has to be framed with information that you may remember from an earlier article: There are “fewer than 1,000 Classic-era open-top Ferraris.” Shelby produced more Cobras than the total of all open-top, 12-cyl- inder production Ferraris built from the company’s inception through 1999. The figure only exceeded 1,000 when the 550 Barchetta is added. Even today the total is fewer than 2,000 cars. In contrast, Jaguar made 7,800 examples of the “rare” flat-floor ver- sion of their E-type, and Mercedes-Benz built more than 1,700 300SL Roadsters. All 12-cylinder open-top Ferraris are special, and with production numbers that are often near 100 or less, they are some of the most elusive catches on the planet. April 2017 h the good and bad traits of a soft-top car. The result was nirvana for owners in temperate climates and a seasonal car for owners in cool climates. More power What makes a Ferrari better? Well, more power, of course, and the exceptional 330 GTC got better. The 4-liter, 300-hp 330 GTC/GTS had plenty of power, but Ferrari wasn’t satisfied with plenty. Ferrari had recently introduced the 365 GT 2+2 as a successor to the 330 2+2. The 365 2+2 was larger than its predecessor, so it was given a new 4.4-liter, 320-hp engine to compensate for the weight. The new 365 engine was the same physical size as the 330 engine, so slipping it in the 330 GTC was snap. Move a vent from the front fender to the hood, make a couple other By today’s standards they are not overwhelmingly fast, but that’s not the point. Touring in an open Ferrari is about adding a decibel to the exhaust, bringing the intake whoosh into the cockpit — and letting the elements erase all thoughts other than your journey. updates — and the 330 GTC becomes the 365 GTC. What’s good for the coupe is good for the spyder, and soon the 365 GTS followed. The two-cam 365 engine is a masterpiece of Ferrari engineering, revving effortlessly with a shriek that sends dogs looking for cover. The increased displacement added mid-range torque, making urban driving more pleasurable. The added horsepower made a fast car even faster. Only 20 365 GTS cars, were built, so few people have had an oppor- tunity to drive one. Those who have report it’s one of the most reward- ing cars on the planet. Classic open Ferraris are rare Any discussion on the value of an open-top Ferraris has to be framed with information that you may remember from an earlier article: There are “fewer than 1,000 Classic-era open-top Ferraris.” Shelby produced more Cobras than the total of all open-top, 12-cyl- inder production Ferraris built from the company’s inception through 1999. The figure only exceeded 1,000 when the 550 Barchetta is added. Even today the total is fewer than 2,000 cars. In contrast, Jaguar made 7,800 examples of the “rare” flat-floor ver- sion of their E-type, and Mercedes-Benz built more than 1,700 300SL Roadsters. All 12-cylinder open-top Ferraris are special, and with production numbers that are often near 100 or less, they are some of the most elu- sive catches on the planet. April 2017 The The tiny production is contradictory to the enjoyment the cars give. Open-top Ferraris are not simply a chop-top version of a production coupe: They are well engineered and designed to be open cars. The frames and bodies are braced for topless use. While they are not as stiff as their coupe brethren, flex and cowl flutter is nearly nonexistent. Our subject 365 GTS This 365 GTS, chassis 12489, sold for $3,602,500 at RM Sotheby’s Arizona Auction on January 16, 2017. The Arizona Week auctions followed Mecum’s grueling nine-day slugfest across the country at Kissimmee, FL. Ferrari historian Marcel Massini noted that between Mecum’s Kissimmee sale and the Arizona auctions, close to 6,000 collector cars were auctioned over a bit more than two weeks. That’s a huge number of cars. While oversupply and auction fatigue certainly resulted in some low sale prices in Arizona, the 365 GTS was not one of the casualties. The $3,602,500 365 GTS sale was the second-highest of RM Sotheby’s auction. The sale broke the top end of RM Sotheby’s healthy $2,900,000– $3,500,000 estimate and made the Arizona Week’s top 10 list. RM Sotheby’s auctioned a different 365 GTS, chassis 12473, in 2015. The bidding ended with the GTS not selling — despite a healthy $3,450,000 high bid. The Ferrari market has cooled since 2015. The big money paid for our subject GTS speaks volumes for the resilience of special cars to market waves. Several high-grade Ferraris sold at low prices, and others went back home with their owners during this year’s Arizona Week. The buyer of chassis 12489 recognized that an opportunity to buy one of the elusive 20 365 GTSs doesn’t come up often. He got a Ferrari legend at a fair price. The seller got a price that was not unexpected but may not be repeated for a couple years. Chalk this one up for the seller. ♦ (Introductory description courtesy of RM Sotheby’s.)


Page 78

English Profile 1979 Aston Martin V8 Vantage “Oscar India” This car’s upgrades and mods, while desirable for driving, push away purists and push down value by Colin Comer Details Years produced: (“Oscar India” Vantage) 1978–86 Number produced: 291 Original price: 26,000 GBP Current SCM Median Valuation: $181,092 Service cost: $1,500–$2,500 Distributor cap: $85 Chassis # location: Chassis plate inside the driver’s door jamb (U.S. delivery), on another plate inside the engine bay right side and also stamped on the right side front chassis rail Engine # location: Rear top side of engine block near bellhousing surface Club: Aston Martin Owners Club More: www.amoc.org Alternative: 1971–72 Ferrari 365 GTC/4, 1986–90 Jaguar Lister XJS coupe, 1966–76 Jenson Interceptor coupe SCM Investment Grade: C Comps Chassis number: V8VOR12072 T he true Vantage “supercar” version of Aston Martin’s standard-bearer V8 was never sold new in the United States due to emissions regulations; the fire-breathing “4×2” Weber carburetors and low-restriction exhaust were simply not compliant. So this first-generation V8 Vantage was rare then, and this now-federal-emissions-exempt example is one of only a few existing today in the United States. Beginning in October 1978, these cars gained improvements to their body styling, including the trademark Vantage aerodynamic package, a leather headliner, and a burled walnut dashboard as part of the so-called Series II or “Oscar India” generation (“OI” was internal code for the new model, referring to “October Introduction”). One of the 172 genuine 425-horsepower V8 Vantage models produced between 1978 and 1985, the car offered here was one of the first dozen built in 1979 and was originally delivered to a doctor in Halesowen, England. According to the current owner, it was subsequently sold in 1987 to Viscount de Farcy of France and was professionally converted from right-hand drive to lefthand drive by a well-known Aston Martin specialist. Later it was sold to Count Audoin de Dampierre, a noted Champagne manufacturer, and previous president of the French Aston Martin Owners Club, who drove it some 30,000 miles before selling it to the next French custo- 80 dian in 1998. A Swiss Aston Martin enthusiast acquired the car in 2001 and added another 12,000 kilometers over the next dozen years. More recently, the V8 Vantage underwent a complete chassis renovation, bare-metal repaint and complete servicing at Steel Wings of Pennsylvania, including an installation of their own upgraded suspension with shock absorbers and anti-roll bar, plus the addition of updated Ronal-type factory wheels. The body was stripped to bare metal and given a concours-quality repaint to better-than-new condition, all brightwork was reconditioned, and, more recently, the interior was reupholstered in red leather, including a factory-optional leather headliner and correct trunk liner. The engine was resealed and fitted with new water pump, oil lines and oil coolers, and the engine bay detailed, all in spring of 2015. Accompanied by a copy of its factory build sheet, a comprehensive history file, a factory owner’s manual, and two sets of keys, this is a splendid “true Vantage,” worthy of a new home in any Aston Martin collection, where its performance will continue to astonish. SCM Analysis This car, Lot 234, sold for $308,000, including buyer’s premium, at RM Sotheby’s auction in Phoenix, AZ, on January 20, 2017. Full disclosure: I was surprised when I was asked to 1979 Aston Martin V8 Series IV Oscar India Lot 225, s/n V8VOR12186 Condition 2Sold at $287,730 Bonhams, Newport Pagnell, U.K., 5/20/16 SCM# 6803474 1978 Aston Martin V8 Series III coupe Lot 44, s/n V811812LCA Condition 3 Sold at $126,500 Worldwide, Houston, TX, 4/22/16 SCM# 6799581 1978 Aston Martin V8 “Stage 1” coupe Lot 234, s/n V811891RCAS Condition 2Sold at $200,837 Bonhams, Newport Pagnell, U.K., 5/8/15 SCM# 265321 Sports Car Market Erik Fuller ©2016, courtesy of RM Sotheby’s


Page 79

this “rolling restoration” approach, but the end result differs from a comprehensive, bare-shell-out restoration in many details. The upgrades, while highly desirable from a driving perspective, are not to a purist. But the real kicker lies in the LHD conversion. My go-to Aston Martin expert, Mr. Serio, commented, “In today’s market with everyone looking for 100% originality down to the British air in the tires, any RHD to LHD conversion is the kiss of death — 98% of the buyers will walk.” Further poking around on the Internet shows that this car is no stranger to the market or ownership changes. The later history not mentioned in the auction catalog shows that after the 1998 French ownership, it went to a Swiss owner in 2001. That owner added another 12,000 kilometers (7,456 miles) to the odometer. Then AM dealer Tom Papadopoulos imported it to the U.S. in 2012, eventually selling it in 2013 through his Autosport Designs to John Littlechild of New England. I found no further ownership history listed, so it is quite possible that Mr. Littlechild was the seller at RM Sotheby’s, but prior to this it appears that the car was offered online in 2016 through another dealer with an asking price of $395k. So while a “pure” LHD Vantage V8 Oscar India would likely bring write this profile. I’m not a doctor, a count or champagne manufacturer, and I am most certainly not Stephen Serio, which is good, I suspect, for every possible situation except writing an Aston Martin profile. So, the only reason I can think of how I got this assignment is that our almighty Editor, Chester Allen, really likes fish out of water even more than his authoring books on that process would suggest. But hey, I’m not totally ignorant about V8 Vantages. I like them. I’ve driven a few and even inspected this one on-site at the auction prior to this sale. So, to borrow a line from so many Darwin Award recipients who have preceded me on similar ventures, with likely similar results, “Here we go!” Hotter and faster than the one before I’m going to go out on a limb and make some comparisons here. The introduction of the new-for-1978 Vantage V8 was the continuation of a theme, much like the XJS was of the E–type — or a GT500 KR is of the original Shelby Mustang. Sorry, couldn’t resist that last one. However, unlike my comparison examples, the Vantage actually offered improved performance, in the bigger sense, over its predecessors. It was faster (for a time more so than anything else, even the Ferrari Daytona), and was more athletic on a whole than its size would suggest. That can’t be said for the Shelby, which only gained comfort and straight-line speed yet suffered everywhere else; or the XJS that became a very rapid grand-touring car with sporting intentions, rather than the other way around like an early E-type. Many, including the magazines of the time, considered the Vantage to be the U.K.’s first supercar — as did Aston Martin, obviously. With a 0–60 mph time in the low five-second range and a 170-mph top speed, it was unquestionably the fastest 4-seat production car available, a detail not lost on the motoring press. The Vantage V8 was the car we all hoped the XJS would be, and it was a worthy recipient of the Vantage name. So there’s clearly good reason the V8 Vantage has always appealed to many people — including me. They are equal parts muscle car, sports car and grand-touring machine. And while I haven’t experienced a “true fire-breathing” Oscar India Vantage, I thoroughly enjoyed the lesser, U.S.-spec-neutered versions I have driven —even the one with a 727 Chrysler TorqueFlite automatic. I’m also partial to their muscular looks — and the Vantage’s power bulge hood and integrated ducktail spoiler. Adding to the attraction is that, for years, they’ve been modestly priced. But clearly, that’s changing. As mentioned, I viewed this Oscar India example at the auction. The color, stance and 5-speed intrigued me as well as its “true” OI Vantage specification. A “tweener” with mods Upon inspection, however, this car’s condition could best be called “tweener.” It isn’t restored, nor is it original in any area that matters. It is a car that has been enjoyed with spot restoration and maintenance performed piecemeal as needed. Mind you, there is nothing wrong with April 2017 his “rolling restoration” approach, but the end result differs from a comprehensive, bare-shell-out restoration in many details. The up- grades, while highly desirable from a driving perspective, are not to a purist. But the real kicker lies in the LHD conversion. My go-to Aston Martin expert, Mr. Serio, commented, “In today’s market with everyone look- ing for 100% originality down to the British air in the tires, any RHD to LHD conversion is the kiss of death — 98% of the buyers will walk.” Further poking around on the Internet shows that this car is no stranger to the market or ownership changes. The later history not mentioned in the auction catalog shows that after the 1998 French ownership, it went to a Swiss owner in 2001. That owner added an- other 12,000 kilometers (7,456 miles) to the odometer. Then AM dealer Tom Papadopoulos imported it to the U.S. in 2012, eventually selling it in 2013 through his Autosport Designs to John Littlechild of New England. I found no further ownership history listed, so it is quite pos- sible that Mr. Littlechild was the seller at RM Sotheby’s, but prior to this it appears that the car was offered online in 2016 through another dealer with an asking price of $395k. So while a “pure” LHD Vantage V8 Oscar India would likely bring write this profile. I’m not a doctor, a count or champagne manufacturer, and I am most certainly not Stephen Serio, which is good, I suspect, for every possible situation except writing an Aston Martin profile. So, the only reason I can think of how I got this assignment is that our almighty Editor, Chester Allen, really likes fish out of water even more than his authoring books on that process would suggest. But hey, I’m not totally ignorant about V8 Vantages. I like them. I’ve driven a few and even inspected this one on-site at the auction prior to this sale. So, to borrow a line from so many Darwin Award recipients who have preceded me on similar ventures, with likely similar results, “Here we go!” Hotter and faster than the one before I’m going to go out on a limb and make some comparisons here. The introduction of the new-for-1978 Vantage V8 was the continuation of a theme, much like the XJS was of the E–type — or a GT500 KR is of the original Shelby Mustang. Sorry, couldn’t resist that last one. However, unlike my comparison examples, the Vantage actually offered improved performance, in the bigger sense, over its predeces- sors. It was faster (for a time more so than anything else, even the Ferrari Daytona), and was more athletic on a whole than its size would suggest. That can’t be said for the Shelby, which only gained comfort and straight-line speed yet suffered everywhere else; or the XJS that became a very rapid grand-touring car with sporting intentions, rather than the other way around like an early E-type. Many, including the magazines of the time, considered the Vantage to be the U.K.’s first supercar — as did Aston Martin, obviously. With a 0–60 mph time in the low five-second range and a 170-mph top speed, it was unquestionably the fastest 4-seat production car available, a detail not lost on the motoring press. The Vantage V8 was the car we all hoped the XJS would be, and it was a worthy recipient of the Vantage name. So there’s clearly good reason the V8 Vantage has always appealed to many people — including me. They are equal parts muscle car, sports car and grand-touring machine. And while I haven’t experienced a “true fire-breathing” Oscar India Vantage, I thoroughly enjoyed the lesser, U.S.-spec-neutered versions I have driven —even the one with a 727 Chrysler TorqueFlite automatic. I’m also partial to their muscular looks — and the Vantage’s power bulge hood and integrated ducktail spoiler. Adding to the attraction is that, for years, they’ve been modestly priced. But clearly, that’s changing. As mentioned, I viewed this Oscar India example at the auction. The color, stance and 5-speed intrigued me as well as its “true” OI Vantage specification. A “tweener” with mods Upon inspection, however, this car’s condition could best be called “tweener.” It isn’t restored, nor is it original in any area that matters. It is a car that has been enjoyed with spot restoration and maintenance performed piecemeal as needed. Mind you, there is nothing wrong with April 2017 a a significant premium over this result, one certainly can’t argue that at this price, even with its LHD conversion and modifications, it still While a “pure” LHD Vantage V8 Oscar India would likely bring a significant premium over this result, one certainly can’t argue that at this price, even with its LHD conversion and modifications, it still offers the proper Vantage V8 supercar experience. offers the proper Vantage V8 supercar experience. Today it is well sold, but given the production numbers of Oscar India examples and the market at large, we could be on the cusp of this sale being solidly in the buyer’s favor, especially if he or she elects to drive it in the interim as the count did between champagne factories and AM Club meets. To my mind, that is pretty much what all Aston Martin owners do, right? Please direct all excited and opinionated responses to Executive Editor Chester Allen at SCM World HQ. Thank you. ♦ (Introductory description courtesy of RM Sotheby’s.)


Page 80

Etceterini & Friends Profile 2013 Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Super Sport 300 The last of the Veyrons brings market money — and a glimpse of how the new supercar market works by Paul Hageman Details Years produced: 2005–15 Number produced: 300 Original list price: 1.4 million euros Current SCM Median Price: $2,200,000 Tune-up cost: Included in purchase price Chassis # location: VIN tag in left front corner of windshield Club: American Bugatti Club (although you’d look very out of place) Web: americanbugatticlub.org Alternatives: 2013 Ferrari La Ferrari, 2013–15 McLaren P1, 1992–95 Bugatti EB110 SCM Investment Grade: B Comps 2012 Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport Lot 120, s/n VF9SK20CM795054 Condition 1- Not sold at $1,500,000 Chassis number: VF9SG2C27DM795300 T his Veyron was purchased new by its first owner and delivered in August 2012. It was born as one of 48 1,200-horsepower Veyron 16.4 Super Sports and was one of eight delivered new to the United States, perhaps being the only example in this color combination. As evidenced by documentation accompanying the car, 269 of the current miles driven were accumulated by Bugatti at Molsheim during Bugatti’s standard and extensive pre-delivery testing. As a result, it is presented in virtually as-new condition. Since its delivery, it has been very well preserved and regularly maintained. Braman Bugatti in Miami carried out its annual service in November 2013, and it received another annual service by them in May 2015. The Veyron was acquired by the current vendor in August 2015 and was serviced by Bentley Beverly Hills in May of this year. SCM Analysis This car, Lot 228, sold for $2,090,000, including buyer’s premium, at RM Sotheby’s auction in Phoenix, AZ, on January 20, 2017. In August 2008, the Bugatti Veyron Grand Sport was unveiled at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, and that Sunday evening, Gooding & Company auctioned off Chassis 001. The car sold for an astonishing $3,190,000, and it set the tone for “unique” Veyrons at auction. Few have come to public sale, and you have to go back 82 to 2013 to find an auction result for less than $1 million. Additionally, the lowest public result of a Grand Sport was in August 2013 at $1,155,000. Since then, we’ve seen two “one-off” Veyrons sell for over $2m. The Bleu Nuit Grand Sport brought $2.31m at RM Sotheby’s November 2013 New York sale, and the Grand Sport Vitesse “Le Ciel Californien” brought $2.42m at RM Sotheby’s Monterey auction in 2014.) Aside from the standard Veyrons, only two other Grand Sports or Super Sports have surfaced for public sale, the first being our subject vehicle. Notable as the final Veyron coupe constructed, our sub- ject Super Sport 300 was featured among a heavy lineup in RM Sotheby’s Pinnacle Portfolio offered at their 2015 Monterey auction. The car, offered out of single ownership, brought an expected result of $2.31m, generally affirming the going price for a differentiated example. Some 17 months later, Super Sport 300 came back on the market. And other than a service performed at Bentley Beverly Hills, the car was virtually unchanged from its prior appearance on the auction block, with little accrued mileage to note. Initially offered in 2015 with a $2.5m–$3m estimate, the car’s new $2.1m–$2.3m spread reflected that RM Sotheby’s and the seller understood that sale price expectations should be kept in check in 2017. The Veyron sold for an all-in price of $2,090,000 — a 2011 Bugatti Veyron Bleu Nuit Grand Sport Lot 126, s/n 4010 Condition 1 Sold at $2,310,000 RM Auctions, New York, NY, 11/20/13 SCM# 231683 2013 Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Grand Sport Vitesse Lot 133, s/n VF9SV2C2DM795020 Condition 1- Sold at $2,420,000 RM Auctions, Monterey, CA, 8/15/14 SCM# 245021 RM Sotheby’s, Monterey, CA, 8/18/16 SCM# 6804180 Sports Car Market Patrick Ernzen ©2016, courtesy of RM Sotheby’s


Page 81

The new supercar market I’ve written before that I find the supercar market perplexing — it’s merely an options and mileage game. But the Veyron has been an interesting performer in that regard, in part due to the more readily differentiating traits among examples. Contemporary, low-production automobiles, many of which are classified as supercars, have appealed to an increasingly broader market. For the most part, a “collector car” used to be anything built before about 1970. In less than 10 years that cut-off has jumped over four decades to seemingly include anything interesting and built in limited numbers. For many cars, the attention was long overdue. But manufacturers can’t seem to build the next “collectible” quickly enough. Whether it’s the GT3RS or 911R, or the La Ferrari and Chiron, demand is undoubtedly high. This new market is really a different market And we have to remember, this sector is actually a different market altogether. The list of elite clientele at today’s luxury manufacturers looks a lot figure in line with market results, and perhaps tempered a bit by the car’s second offering. Today’s collector car market While I find the Super Sport’s sale very expected, the result is an in- teresting study of the market in 2017. Since the Arizona Auction Week, I’ve heard a fair number of people circulating the general “down 20%–30%” recap. I’m not necessarily arguing that’s right or wrong, but I prefer we not look at the market so simplistically. For example, the sale of this Veyron would say otherwise, particu- larly given that fresh-to-market is a necessity for a strong result. During the auction week, I attended the Worldwide Auctioneers, Bonhams, RM Sotheby’s and Gooding & Company sales, and I watched the auction companies working very hard against expectations put in When a Bugatti Veyron or La Ferrari or P1 comes up for sale at a “collector car auction,” there are more outside contributing factors at play than what we see with something as universal as a Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing. place months earlier. And while one may look at the sales results versus the printed estimate and see lackluster performance, I see reality. If the reserve adjustments made in the auction room had taken place when the catalogs were being printed, the collective outlook would be much rosier. Now, I haven’t been diligently crunching numbers since I got home from Scottsdale. And my theory on managing sellers’ expectations may further support the “20%–30% adjustment.” But I’m most eager, however, to read what my fellow contributors offer up in summary of the week. Because this isn’t just a numbers game, and data points alone cannot reflect the sheer diversity of cars on offer. I have two big takeaways from 2017’s market opener: First, I see consistency in the tempered results. When buyers feel they have options, more rational decisions are made. The broad growth we’ve seen in the market just wasn’t sustainable, and the playing field has leveled substantially in the buyer’s favor. Rational sellers are finding success in that understanding. Second, and most important, today’s market confirms that the “best of the best” is always desired — and hotly contested. Perhaps the healthiest indicator in recent results is the value spread between poor, average, good and great examples of the same model. And that makes differentiating amongst more modern “production” cars a challenge — no matter how limited production figures are. April 2017 different than that of registered bidders at the auctions we frequent. Not to say there isn’t some overlap, but maybe the most notable difference is the depth of those respective markets. The global market for luxury goods drives the prices for the con- temporary supercars. And the level of wealth actively engaged in that sphere makes our $261m Arizona Auction Week look miniscule. So when a Bugatti Veyron or La Ferrari or P1 comes up for sale at a “collector car auction,” there are more outside contributing factors at play than what we see with something as universal as a Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing. A long-term Ferrari collector bidding on an Enzo isn’t necessarily competing with the Forbes list, paddles in hand, but they have influenced the price he, or she, will have to pay for the car. So when these cars cross the auction block, it is simply a question of whether our hobby will absorb them at the going rate. The economics of it all are far beyond me. So if you’re looking for a blanket “buy supercars” or “sell your Veyron now,” you won’t get it here. But what I will say is perhaps fairly obvious — the value of these cars has far less to do with our little car market and much more to do with everything else. With growing differentiation in the market and more outside factors at play than ever before, perhaps diversification is the safest bet. And that alone has and will continue to contribute to the prevalence of more modern cars in our hobby. Helping to drive this growing diversification is collectors’ desire for varied experiences from their collection. I know several London-toBrighton participants who own McLaren F1s, and I’m pretty sure that’s not something I would have said 10 years ago. It’s a wonderful thing to see. ♦ (Introductory description courtesy of RM Sotheby’s.) High Auction Sales for the Past Five Years $3,000,000 $1,000,000 $1,500,000 $2,000,000 $2,500,000 $500,000 $0 Bugatti Veyron $2,310,000 $2,420,000 $2,310,000 This Sale: $2,090,000 $1,182,500 $1,100,000 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 83


Page 82

German Profile Column Author 1928 Mercedes-Benz Typ S 26/120/180 Supercharged Sports Tourer The Typ S was the fastest car of the era, and it was the foundation for the famed SS and SSK cars that followed by Carl Bomstead Details Years produced: 1926–30 Number produced: 146 to 174, depending on source Original list price: $7,000 for the chassis only Current SCM Median Valuation: $4,543,394 Tune-up cost: $3,000 Club: Mercedes-Benz Club of America Web: www.mbca.org Alternatives: 1928–35 Mercedes-Benz SS Tourer, 1928–32 Mercedes-Benz SSK Roadster, 1929–37 Duesenberg Model J SCM Investment Grade: A Comps Chassis number: 35323 Engine number: 66540 “S ilent streams of super-power... unbounded flexibility ... comfort to carry you to the ends of the earth” — quoted period Mercedes-Benz advertising in America for the legendary Typ S The Typ S was created in a magical period for the company, shortly after the merger of Daimler and Benz, while Ferdinand Porsche was chief engineer. He built a powerful yet versatile automobile — a true all-rounder, at home on the race track, at hillclimbs and providing exhilarating driving for the road. The signature engineering feature was its on-demand Roots-type supercharger, which only came into operation when the accelerator was fully depressed, boosting power output from 120 to 180 brake horsepower for a few glorious seconds! Mercedes debuted the cars at the opening meeting of the Nürburgring in 1927, where Rudolf Caracciola set the tone with a class win. It would be the first of many laurels bestowed on the model. In the United States, Ralph de Palma drove a Typ S to victory in the 15- and 30-mile races at Atlantic City, averaging 80 mph. This “Car of Kings” was one of few that were deliv- ered new to North America. It was originally commissioned on February 13, 1928, and was shipped to Berlin to be equipped with coachwork by Erdmann & Rossi — one of only a handful so bodied. SCM Analysis This car, Lot 54, sold for $4,812,500, including buyer’s premium, at Bonhams’ auction in Scottsdale, AZ, on January 18, 2017. In 1926, the first Mercedes-Benz was produced — fol- 84 lowing the merger of Karl Benz’s and Gottlieb Daimler’s firms. The Mercedes-Benz Typ S, which was designed by Dr. Ferdinand Porsche, soon followed. As an aside, the “doctor” title that Porsche insisted upon was, in fact, an honorary degree. The Typ S featured a 6.7-liter, 6-cylinder engine with two updraft carburetors and a Roots-type supercharger that kicked in — literally — when the accelerator was fully depressed. This resulted in an impressive 60 additional horsepower — for a total of 180. The 24/100/180 in the model description was the taxable horsepower, actual horsepower and the horsepower with the supercharger engaged. A dominating racer in period The new Typ S cars placed 1st, 2nd and 3rd in the 1927 Eifelrennen, which was the first race at the Nürburgring. The Typ S cars ran away with the race, with driver Rudolph Caracciola taking the win. Racing in the era was a bit different than what we experience today. As described in Beverly Rae Kimes’ book, The Star and the Laurel, “Only race drivers could make repairs. Caracciola got out, pulled the first plug and tossed it to Porsche, who checked it with a magnifying glass and tossed it back: It was all right, as was the second, the third, the fourth … until the eighth turned out to be the bad one.” Even with the lost time, Rudolph Caracciola went on 1930 Mercedes-Benz SS 38/220 7.1-Liter Supercharged Lot 640, s/n 36257 Condition 2- Sold at $2,537,000 Bonhams, Quail Lodge, Carmel, CA, 8/11/10 SCM# 165581 Sports Car Market 1927 Mercedes-Benz Typ S 26/180 Sportwagen Lot 119, s/n 35218 Condition 1 Sold at 5,040,000 Gooding & Co., Pebble Beach, CA, 8/20/11 SCM# 183151 1928 Mercedes-Benz Typ S 36/220 6.8 Liter Lot 108, s/n 35906 Condition 3 Sold at $4,543,394 Bonhams, Goodwood, U.K., 9/14/12 SCM# 21327 Courtesy of Bonhams


Page 83

to win the first Grand Prix of Germany. The Typ S, for “sport,” was low to the ground, which greatly en- hanced the handling and balance. Caracciola was almost unbeatable in the Typ S, and the international reputation of Mercedes-Benz was firmly entrenched. Was the S a race car that could be used as a Grand Touring car or just the opposite? Well, as stated in Kimes’ book, “It was as close to a race car as could be built without actually building one.” The car to have The late 1920s was a unique period in our history, and those with wealth wanted to enjoy it. The Mercedes-Benz S, with its ontrack success and powerful engine, provided an unparalleled grand touring experience for those who could afford it. Sources vary as to how many of these magnificent machines were and factory records indicate it was first acquired in January of 1929. The trail then goes cold until it was discovered in the early 1960s in relatively unmolested condition. It later ended up in the hands of a noted Texas collector, who was responsible for its restoration. It appeared at the 1996 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it won First in Class and the Most Elegant Open Car award. These are very prestigious awards. Today, the car’s 20-year-old Was the S a race car that could be used as a Grand Touring car or just the opposite? Well, as stated in Kimes’ book, “It was as close to a race car as could be built without actually building one.” produced between 1927 and 1930, some mentioning 146 and others as many as 174. The chassis, with a price tag of more than $7,000, was sent to elite coachbuilders such as Saoutchik and Freestone and Webb — who performed their magic for clients that included European royalty, actors, pilots and race drivers. The Berlin firm Erdmann & Rossi bodied our subject S. Erdmann & Rossi didn’t body many S cars. The car was destined for the Mercedes-Benz Company in New York, restoration presents well, and the exterior exhaust, Carl Zeiss headlamps and Bosch horns are an imposing sight. Interestingly, it wears a single Mercedes-Benz badge in the center of the V of the grille, as was done on the SS models — rather than the threepointed star on either side of the grille as was done with other Typ S cars. The Typ S was the fastest car of the era, and it was the foundation for the famed SS and SSK cars that followed. These rare cars rarely come to market. However, Gooding & Co. sold a Typ S Sportwagen in 2011 for $5,040,000. It was the actual car that won the 1927 Nürburgring race, which is history our subject car can’t duplicate. Even so, with its Erdmann & Rossi coachwork and well-maintained condition, the price paid for this rare Typ S is certainly within reason. ♦ (Introductory description courtesy of Bonhams.)


Page 84

American Profile 1969 AMC AMX/3 This example of AMC’s only supercar hit 170 mph during testing at Monza and won Best in Class at Pebble Beach by Thomas Glatch Details Year produced: 1969 Number produced: 6 Original list price: $14,000 Current SCM Median Valuation: $795,000 Tune-up/major service: $350 Distributor cap: $21.95 Engine # location: Metal tag attached to the front of valve cover Club: American Motors Owners Association Web: www.amonational.com Alternatives: 1971 DeTomaso Pantera, 1969 Bizzarrini 5300 GT, 1969 Iso Grifo SCM Investment Grade: A Comps 1974 DeTomaso Pantera Lot 39, s/n THPNNK06554 Condition 2- Not sold at $100,000 Motostalgia, Indianapolis, IN, 6/17/16 SCM# 6803633 Chassis number: WTDO36325555 W hile it was respected for producing sensible, economical cars, American Motors responded to declining market share in the mid-1960s with a change in focus to perfor- mance. Given new creative freedom, American Motors styling director Richard “Dick” Teague and his design team unleashed the bold “Project IV” concept cars that toured U.S. auto shows during 1966 and previewed AMC’s future designs, including the AMX that would debut alongside the sporty Javelin for 1968. Momentum heightened in January 1967, when AMC chose Gerald C. Meyers as vice president of automotive development and manufacturing. In June 1967, Meyers gave Teague and his chief designer, Bob Nixon, approval to propose a radical mid-engine prototype in competition with a proposal from Italian stylist Giorgetto Giugiaro. Teague and his staff replied with the AMX/2, itself succeeded by the AMX/3, which was selected for development. Italian engineer Giotto Bizzarrini, renowned for his own road and racing cars, as well as his prior work for Ferrari, Lamborghini, and Iso, performed chassis and suspension design. BMW was tapped for engineering and testing, in- ternally coding the AMX/3 as Project E18. Giugiaro’s ItalDesign would structurally perfect the steel semi- 86 monocoque body. Bizzarrini and close collaborator Salvatore Diomante would assemble the AMX/3 through a new joint-venture company. Chassis and body parts were purpose-designed, while other items were sourced from AMC and external suppliers. Power was supplied by AMC’s 390-ci V8 engine, rated at 340 hp and mated to a 4-speed gearbox/ rear transaxle supplied by OTO Melara. BMW’s testing yielded high body rigidity, a state-of- the-art brake system, and improvements to the clutch. Initial estimates projecting a run of 1,000 cars quickly shrank to 26, but the highly anticipated introduction of the AMX/3 at Rome on March 23, 1970 — one day before the launch of the Ford-powered DeTomaso Pantera — was a full success. Before AMC canceled the project, five AMX/3s were completed. Bizzarrini and Diomante built a sixth example from remaining components, which they hoped to market as the Sciabola (Sword). Extensively researched with exceptional commit- ment, and beautifully restored, this stunning AMX/3 carries unbroken provenance from new — and a particularly fascinating early history as the Monza test car for the AMX/3 development program. Sports Car Market 1968 Bizzarrini 5300 GT Strada Lot 147, s/n 1A30301 Condition 1- Sold at $1,424,465 Artcurial, Paris, FRA, 2/5/15 SCM# 257409 1973 Iso Grifo Series II Lot 128, s/n FAGL310395 Condition 2- Not sold at $283,700 Bonhams, Monte Carlo, MCO, 5/12/16 SCM# 6799980 Mathieu Heurtault, courtesy of Gooding & Company


Page 85

dealers began selling in 1971. The Pantera project was ambitious for Ford Motor Company, and it yielded an exciting exotic that was minimally profitable — and had to be upgraded for the newly announced 5-mph front-bumper regulations for 1973. For AMC, the equally ambitious AMX/3 was just too much. The price had grown $2,000 to $4,000 above the already steep $10,000 target price — and the bumper regulations meant a major redesign would be needed. After spending $2 million, AMC was forced to quit after just six AMX/3 cars were built. Teague told author Bob Stevens, “The program was done on a shoe- string, and we were on the verge of entering a new era. The muscle car period was ending, and industry priorities were starting to change.” The famous Monza test car Dick Teague bought two of his mid-engine creations (#3 and #5), which were deteriorating outside AMC’s Michigan headquarters. Teague’s son Jeff, also a car designer, owned one of them. Jeff Teague died in August 2016. Our subject car is the Monza test car (#4), which had reached 170 Following assembly, it was tested by BMW in Germany and then sent to Italy, where it was photographed at the legendary Monza circuit, where it exceeded the targeted 160-mph top speed and posted blistering lap times. This car was a milestone, coming from a unique project that brought together some of the brightest minds in the automotive world of the late 1960s and 1970s. SCM Analysis This car, Lot 132, sold for $891,000, including buyer’s premium, at Gooding & Company’s Scottsdale Auction on January 20, 2017. Despite the company’s small size and limited resources, American Motors Corporation developed some real surprises. Their brilliant Vice President of Design, Richard Teague, took 12 inches and the rear seat out of the Javelin and created America’s only The buyer got a stunning, ultra-rare mid-engine machine with tons of historical provenance and a Best In Class win at Pebble Beach at a bargain price — especially when compared to many similar exotics from that era other mass-produced two-seater at the time, the unique AMX. Working with Hurst Industries, AMC took the compact American 2-door and turned it into one of the fastest-accelerating cars of the 1960s: the 1969 Hurst SC/Rambler. But the real surprise was AMC’s plan for a $10,000 mid-engine supercar. “We were into racing at that time with Trans-Am and all that, and it was really kind of a tool, but a serious one, to create an image for the company that was something other than four-door Ramblers and ‘Ma and Pa Kettle’ cars,” Teague once said. AMC’s only supercar Teague and his associates, Bob Nixon, Vince Geraci and Chuck Mashigan, designed the AMX/2, a fiberglass “pushmobile” that made the auto-show rounds in 1969. That car formed the basis of the AMX/3, which was turned over to Bizzarrini to be created in metal, with engineering assistance from BMW. The project was completed in just 18 months. The AMC AMX/3 paralleled Ford’s Italian/American DeTomaso Pantera, the $10,000 image-building supercar that Lincoln-Mercury April 2017 lers began selling in 1971. The Pantera project was ambitious for Ford Motor Company, and it yielded an exciting exotic that was minimally profitable — and had to be upgraded for the newly announced 5-mph front-bumper regulations for 1973. For AMC, the equally ambitious AMX/3 was just too much. The price had grown $2,000 to $4,000 above the already steep $10,000 target price — and the bumper regulations meant a major redesign would be needed. After spending $2 million, AMC was forced to quit after just six AMX/3 cars were built. Teague told author Bob Stevens, “The program was done on a shoe- string, and we were on the verge of entering a new era. The muscle car period was ending, and industry priorities were starting to change.” The famous Monza test car Dick Teague bought two of his mid-engine creations (#3 and #5), which were deteriorating outside AMC’s Michigan headquarters. Teague’s son Jeff, also a car designer, owned one of them. Jeff Teague died in August 2016. Our subject car is the Monza test car (#4), which had reached 170 Following assembly, it was tested by BMW in Germany and then sent to Italy, where it was photographed at the legendary Monza circuit, where it exceeded the targeted 160-mph top speed and posted blistering lap times. This car was a milestone, coming from a unique project that brought together some of the brightest minds in the automotive world of the late 1960s and 1970s. SCM Analysis This car, Lot 132, sold for $891,000, including buyer’s premium, at Gooding & Company’s Scottsdale Auction on January 20, 2017. Despite the company’s small size and limited resources, American Motors Corporation developed some real surprises. Their brilliant Vice President of Design, Richard Teague, took 12 inches and the rear seat out of the Javelin and created America’s only The buyer got a stunning, ultra-rare mid-engine machine with tons of historical provenance and a Best In Class win at Pebble Beach at a bargain price — especially when compared to many similar exotics from that era other mass-produced two-seater at the time, the unique AMX. Working with Hurst Industries, AMC took the compact American 2-door and turned it into one of the fastest-accelerating cars of the 1960s: the 1969 Hurst SC/Rambler. But the real surprise was AMC’s plan for a $10,000 mid-engine supercar. “We were into racing at that time with Trans-Am and all that, and it was really kind of a tool, but a serious one, to create an image for the company that was something other than four-door Ramblers and ‘Ma and Pa Kettle’ cars,” Teague once said. AMC’s only supercar Teague and his associates, Bob Nixon, Vince Geraci and Chuck Mashigan, designed the AMX/2, a fiberglass “pushmobile” that made the auto-show rounds in 1969. That car formed the basis of the AMX/3, which was turned over to Bizzarrini to be created in metal, with engineering assistance from BMW. The project was completed in just 18 months. The AMC AMX/3 paralleled Ford’s Italian/American DeTomaso Pantera, the $10,000 image-building supercar that Lincoln-Mercury April 2017 mph mph on the famed track. William P. deMichieli of Indianapolis, IN, bought the car in 1971. Two more Indianapolis residents owned it before it was sold to Walter A. Kirtland of Baton Rouge, LA, in 1989. Kirtland had the AMX/3, which was still in development-prototype condition, restored in preparation for the 1990 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. Kirtland sold the AMX/3 to a German collector in 2014, who re- painted it AMC P79 Bittersweet Orange. He then returned the car to the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance last summer, where it became the first American Motors vehicle to earn Best in Class at this prestigious event. With only six built — and very few sales — determining AMX/3 value is difficult. Dick Teague’s yellow AMX/3 (#5) was sold in 1997 for $225,000. Walter Kirtland sold our subject car, the Monza AMX/3, in 2014 for $795k. That’s all there is for public transactions. A rare auction opportunity Gooding & Company’s $891,000 sale, just short of their low-end estimate, is a decent 12% return on investment after just two years. I’d call that well sold. That said, the buyer got a stunning, ultra-rare mid-engine machine with tons of historical provenance and a Best In Class win at Pebble Beach at a bargain price — especially when compared to many similar exotics from that era. Buyer and seller both benefited from the sale of this Italian/American supercar that never got a chance to shine. ♦ (Introductory description courtesy of Gooding & Company.)


Page 86

American Profile The Cumberford Perspective The 1969 AMC AMX/3 was a worthy concept and tangible proof of what might have become a great car 3 By Robert Cumberford man ever to lead a major car design department, he worked for decades in dying companies — Packard the noblest of them — and always contended with woeful underfunding for whatever project he was assigned. This didn’t keep him and his team from creating the best-ever SUV style — Jeep’s Cherokee —and what could have been a really good mid-engine GT car — this quite practical and good-looking AMX/3. Certainly with this G project American Motors took a bigger bite of the shakily marginal luxury sports car market than it could possibly manage to chew. But its overall approach, engaging Giotto Bizzarrini and BMW AG in the development phase, was both intelligent and sensible — even though it was a far more expensive endeavor than Gremlins and Pacers could ever hope to support. Overall, the handful of prototypes called out for the detail refinement that could only have come from making many more test vehicles and testing them thoroughly. But that wasn’t a generally accepted concept in the 1960s, as we see in the hopelessly low-quality, rust-prone and generally un-crashworthy DeTomaso Panteras Ford sold in the 1970s. American Motors was well advised to abandon the AMX/3 before it became a burden. But what a shame for enthusiasts — and for Dick Teague. ♦ 88 1 ive Dick Teague his due. Probably the nicest 5 6 2 4 FRONT 3/4 VIEW 1 This dramatic line derived from the front fender peak sweeps all the way across the rear, and it is an elegant — yet quite simple — accent for the whole form. 2 Dick Teague was pre- scient in making this whole upper section a “chopped top,” hot-rod style, as is fashionable now. Other 1960s mid-engine cars had taller glass proportions. 3 The front fender peak line is excellent, but it runs into the protruding squared-up ends of the fender form that has a lot more Detroit than Italian form sensitivity. 4 Slatted outlets on the hood are handsome enough, but they seem a bit too coarse — again more Detroit than Europe. 5 To me the fender tips are a bit too much like a duck’s beak, or a baseball cap’s bill, and the leading edge of the whole car is a bit messy. 6 The barely-visible air dam beneath the nose must have been an absolute necessity to keep air massing under the nose from lifting the front tires off the pavement. REAR 3/4 VIEW 7 The deep undercut in front was aerodynamically disastrous. But so very little was known half a century ago about the interaction of aero and chassis dynamics. 8 The windshield angle is not as extreme as most 1960s mid-engine cars, a sure sign that this was intended as a regular-use car, not a racer. 9 The backlight is larger and more useful than is typical for rival mid-engine designs of the period. 10 Painting the entire empty area inside the buttresses black was a good idea, aesthetically and practically. Again, the vent slats seem a bit coarse. 11 The rear fascia is clean — but a little banal and unimaginative. Still, it’s a very nice composition, and it 9 8 10 remains attractive. 12 Worthy of high praise is the restrained side treatment, without gaping holes, added scoops or any other excess. INTERIOR VIEW (see previous page) There’s nothing really wrong with the cockpit of the AMX/3, but it is overly generic, with nothing to set it apart from any number of one-off specials or cars built in tiny series in Italy. This would seem to be a case where a bit more Detroit and some attention to individuality in the steering wheel, the pedals and the console would have paid off handsomely. 7 11 12 Sports Car Market


Page 88

Race Car Profile 1963 Jaguar XKE Lightweight Competition An unquestioned “crown jewel,” this car’s value has held up during the softto-declining market, but it has not appreciated by Thor Thorson Details Year produced: 1963 Number produced: 12 Original list price: N/A Current SCM Median Valuation: $1,817,800 (Lightweights seldom come to market, so this has skewed the median price very low) Chassis # location: Right front wheelarch Engine # location: On head between cam covers, and on right side of block above oil lines Club: Jaguar club of North America Web: www.jcna.com Alternatives: 1959–62 Ferrari 250 SWB, 1959–63 Aston Martin DB4GT, 1962–63 Shelby FIA Cobra SCM Investment Grade A Comps Chassis number: S850667 Engine number: V682558P nality, having never been disassembled or rebuilt in any significant manner. The winner of the 1963 Australian GT Championship, this car boasts nearly unparalleled overall quality among its Lightweight brethren. C SCM Analysis This car, Lot 24, sold for $7,370,000, including buyer’s premium, at Bonhams’ auction in Scottsdale, AZ, on January 19, 2017. The mid-1950s were an incredible party for Jaguar from the competition standpoint, with the success of the C-type followed immediately by their D-type, both of which were utterly dominant during their glory years. It all culminated at Le Mans in 1957, with D-types finishing 1-2-3-4-6 in a triumphal procession. The D-types also had good success later in the year. The spring of 1958, however, dawned gray and hungover, as Jaguar tallied the costs of their success. Running a factory team had been frighteningly expensive, and they were stuck with a raft of brand-new D-types that they couldn’t seem to get rid of. Although the D-type was still a great car, racing was moving on, and, at best, the D-type was a mediocre street ride. This lesson was not lost on management. Henceforth Jaguar’s racing efforts would concentrate on cars that would sell well to the general public and be great racers — in that order. 90 hassis S850667 is the 10th example of the 12 E-type Lightweights built. It benefits from a short chain of just three long-term caretakers, and the car displays phenomenal origi- Enter the E-type Jaguar’s new sports car would clearly be a develop- ment of the D-type concept. Serious production development started in early 1960, and the Jaguar E-type was introduced to the world in March 1961. Steel was used instead of aluminum for the monocoque chassis and body panels, and a new IRS rear suspension with inboard disc brakes was introduced. The engine and drivetrain were standard Jaguar. It was gorgeous. On its introduction, Enzo Ferrari reportedly said that it was “the most beautiful car ever made.” Jaguar’s competition department managed to divert seven earlyproduction cars to become racers. These were basically stock roadsters with breathed-on engines, clutches and close-ratio transmissions. Ready for racing It was a fortuitous time for introduction of a modern, fast GT car. The FIA, having run its championship for small production sports cars for years, had decided to move the championship to homologated GT cars starting in 1962, so the serious players were all stepping up in anticipation of GT being the main event. Ferrari had their 250 SWB well sorted and Aston Martin had countered with the DB4GT, so the stage was set for some very serious competition. Jaguar had abandoned running a factory team, and in- stead used a few closely associated private teams to field the actual cars, while the competition department stood 1960 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Competizione Lot 56, s/n 1759GT Condition 2- stronger Sold at $13,500,000 Gooding & Co., Pebble Beach, CA, 8/19/16 SCM# 6804262 1960 Aston Martin DB4GT Lot 169, s/n DB40126R Condition 2- Sold at $3,226,720 RM Sotheby’s, London, U.K., 9/6/16 SCM# 6804522 1963 Shelby Cobra 289 factory team Lot 55, s/n CSX2129 Condition 1 Sold at $2,585,000 Gooding & Co., Pebble Beach, CA, 8/20/11 SCM# 183119 Sports Car Market Pawel Litwinski, courtesy of Bonhams


Page 89

Coombs even loaned the factory his GTO so they could study it. In return, Jaguar offered to take his original 1961 E-type and modify it accordingly. The steel chassis was thrown away and replaced with an aluminum one, the bonnet was changed to aluminum, and a new aluminum-block 3.8 liter engine was installed with a wide-angle cylinder head, dry-sump lubrication and Lucas fuel injection. The original windscreen was retained (FIA rules), but an alloy hard top was bolted in place, significantly stiffening the chassis. The rear suspension was both lightened and strengthened, and everything was stiffened up at both ends. Roll centers and center of gravity were both improved, and the wheels got wider. A sleeper for the track John Coombs’ new, ready to supply them what they needed in preparation, parts and advice. One of their favorites was John Coombs, a Jaguar dealer from Guildford. He and Equipe Endeavour got the first two cars, both of which were entered in the Oulton Park event in April. Running against both SWBs and DB4GTs, the E-types finished 1st and 3rd, replicating the XK 120 and C-type tradition of winning the first time out. In May they went to Spa for their international debut, and one finished 2nd sandwiched between two Ferraris. Jaguar had clearly set a marker. One who certainly noticed was Enzo Ferrari. In response to Jaguar’s new challenge, he set his engineers to creating the legendary 250 GTO with an eye towards the 1962 FIA manufacturer’s championship. Ferrari’s 1962 challenge For 1962, Jaguar fielded essentially the same teams with the same cars as 1961, but with ongoing detail improvements made over the winter to make the cars both faster and more dependable. Ferrari, on the other hand, introduced the GTO. The new GT champi- onship was for homologated production cars with a minimum production of 100 units, which the GTO couldn’t meet, but there was a side door available. In deference to the day when cars used a chassis and engine/drivetrain with bodywork attached over it, the FIA had a provision that allowed This car sold for a lot of money for an E-type, but it really isn’t one — it’s an English, all-aluminum GTO equivalent “alternate bodywork” on production cars, so Ferrari presented the GTO as simply a special body on a 250 SWB. Although Ferrari’s claim was blatantly false, the FIA was worried whether the new GT category would provide exciting racing, so they weren’t about to question their strongest entrant. The GTO was accepted as “Omologato.” The GTO made life very difficult for Jaguar in 1962. The E-types had more torque and were arguably better handling, but they were 150 pounds heavier and didn’t have the top speed of the GTO. In addition, according to Graham Hill, the E-type racer still felt like a touring car, as it had never been fully developed for racing. Both Coombs and Hill fought with the factory to get chassis changes made, but they seemed to only irritate the competition department, who were confident that they alone knew how to make the cars work (BRM was notorious in this period for not allowing their F1 drivers to even suggest tire-pressure changes, so the arrogance wasn’t unusual). At one point Jaguar sent Coombs a letter suggesting that he should stick to managing a team — if he could do even that. Wildly frustrated, Coombs did what any serious team owner would do: He went and bought a GTO. Needless to say, this caught Jaguar’s attention. Their attitude changed immediately. John Coombs was not unreasonable, so he cooperated fully with Jaguar’s newfound enthusiasm for creating a better E-type racer. April 2017 loaned the factory his GTO so they could study it. In return, Jaguar offered to take his original 1961 E-type and modify it accordingly. The steel chassis was thrown away and replaced with an aluminum one, the bonnet was changed to aluminum, and a new aluminum-block 3.8 liter engine was installed with a wide-angle cylinder head, dry-sump lubrication and Lucas fuel injection. The original windscreen was retained (FIA rules), but an alloy hard top was bolted in place, significantly stiffening the chassis. The rear suspension was both lightened and strengthened, and everything was stiffened up at both ends. Roll centers and center of gravity were both improved, and the wheels got wider. A sleeper for the track John Coombs’ new, ready to supply them what they needed in preparation, parts and advice. One of their favorites was John Coombs, a Jaguar dealer from Guildford. He and Equipe Endeavour got the first two cars, both of which were entered in the Oulton Park event in April. Running against both SWBs and DB4GTs, the E-types finished 1st and 3rd, replicating the XK 120 and C-type tradition of winning the first time out. In May they went to Spa for their international debut, and one finished 2nd sandwiched between two Ferraris. Jaguar had clearly set a marker. One who certainly noticed was Enzo Ferrari. In response to Jaguar’s new challenge, he set his engineers to creating the legendary 250 GTO with an eye towards the 1962 FIA manufacturer’s championship. Ferrari’s 1962 challenge For 1962, Jaguar fielded essentially the same teams with the same cars as 1961, but with ongoing detail improvements made over the winter to make the cars both faster and more dependable. Ferrari, on the other hand, introduced the GTO. The new GT champi- onship was for homologated production cars with a minimum production of 100 units, which the GTO couldn’t meet, but there was a side door available. In deference to the day when cars used a chassis and engine/drivetrain with bodywork attached over it, the FIA had a provision that allowed This car sold for a lot of money for an E-type, but it really isn’t one — it’s an English, all-aluminum GTO equivalent “alternate bodywork” on production cars, so Ferrari presented the GTO as simply a special body on a 250 SWB. Although Ferrari’s claim was blatantly false, the FIA was worried whether the new GT category would provide exciting racing, so they weren’t about to question their strongest entrant. The GTO was accepted as “Omologato.” The GTO made life very difficult for Jaguar in 1962. The E-types had more torque and were arguably better handling, but they were 150 pounds heavier and didn’t have the top speed of the GTO. In addition, according to Graham Hill, the E-type racer still felt like a touring car, as it had never been fully developed for racing. Both Coombs and Hill fought with the factory to get chassis changes made, but they seemed to only irritate the competition department, who were confident that they alone knew how to make the cars work (BRM was notorious in this period for not allowing their F1 drivers to even suggest tire-pressure changes, so the arrogance wasn’t unusual). At one point Jaguar sent Coombs a letter suggesting that he should stick to managing a team — if he could do even that. Wildly frustrated, Coombs did what any serious team owner would do: He went and bought a GTO. Needless to say, this caught Jaguar’s attention. Their attitude changed immediately. John Coombs was not unreasonable, so he cooperated fully with Jaguar’s newfound enthusiasm for creating a better E-type racer. April 2017 technically technically 1961, now “lightweight” E-type looked and sounded like a production E-type, but was in fact a pure, one-off, bespoke racing car. It was 250 pounds lighter than the original car and 100 pounds lighter than the GTO — with much better power and handling then the standard E-type. The same sleight of hand that allowed Ferrari to race the GTO allowed Jaguar to claim the Lightweight to be a production car. They finally had a car that could compete and win against the GTO. Jaguar then proceeded to build 11 new “production “ lightweights in 1963, creating a total of 12 cars built. Particularly in 1963, and to a lesser degree in 1964, the Lightweight Jags made for spectacular racing and achieved a fair degree of success against Ferrari, although bad luck and some fragility limited success in the long championship races such as Le Mans. 1963 also saw the arrival of the AC Cobra and 1964 the introduction of the Ford GT40, so the bar was rapidly being raised as the Ford-Ferrari wars left everyone else behind. The lightweight E-type quickly drifted into competitive irrelevance. A very special car Its short competition life did nothing to tarnish the E-type Lightweight’s iconic quality in the racing world. Over the years, the lightweight E has become extremely collectible and frequently replicated (though few have actually re-created the aluminum chassis). What are called “semi-lightweights” (steel chassis replicas) are everywhere in the vintage-racing world, as the remaining 11 “real” cars (one was destroyed at Le Mans) are seldom seen outside of museums. Our subject car, Number 10, was delivered directly to Australia, where it led a successful — if undistinguished — life. The bad news is that it doesn’t have much history. The good news is that it is relatively unscathed and original, with the result that it is an excellent — but not great — example. As an unquestioned “crown jewel,” its value has held up well in the recent soft-to-declining market, but it has not appreciated in the past few years. A somewhat better car sold in early 2015 for a reputed £5 million ($7.6 million), and one of the desirable Cunningham lightweights is reputedly currently selling privately for more than our subject car, so the market seems real and solid, if small. This car sold for a lot of money for an E-type, but it really isn’t one — it’s an English, all-aluminum GTO equivalent. I would say fairly bought and sold. ♦ (Introductory description courtesy of Bonhams.)


Page 90

Next Gen Profile 1989 Ford Mustang LX 5.0 This car is pretty cool as a time capsule, but this also is where the car starts to become a piece of garage art by Sam Stockham Details Years produced 1987–93 Number produced: 24,734 LX 5.0 hatchbacks were made in the 1989 model year Original list price: $12,639 Current SCM Median Valuation: $8,800 Tune-up: $250 Distributor cap: $20 Chassis # location: Left front bottom of windshield Engine # location: Cast date over starter on driver’s side Club: Mustang Club of America Web: www.mustang.org Alternatives: 1987 Buick Grand National, 1986 Chevrolet Camaro IROC-Z 5.7, 1989 Pontiac Trans Am Firebird GTA SCM Investment Grade: C Comps Chassis number: 1FABP41E1KF233770 T his LX hatchback is powered by a 5.0-liter electronic fuel-injected high-output engine and 5-speed manual transmission. It’s equipped with power steering, power brakes, power windows and air conditioning. Finished in Cabernet Red with Scarlet Red interior, it features the original window sticker, and all factory build/shipping markings and decals are still on the car. It never went through dealer prep, the plastic is still on the seats and the wheel center caps and antenna were never installed. 638 actual miles. Deluxe Marti Report included. SCM Analysis This car, Lot 400.3, sold for $71,500, including buyer’s premium, at Barrett-Jackson’s auction in Scottsdale, AZ, on January 18, 2017. There are times when your ego takes a little too much control — and you think that you have it all figured out. It happened to me at about age 16. I had a driver’s li- cense at 15. I was a year ahead of everyone else because I worked a Montana Loophole and was now in Arizona. I had joined the rank-and-file workforce and was get- ting a paycheck. I thought I was pretty smart and on my way — or so said my ego. By age 22, I was working for Bob Bondurant and was around professional drivers every day. At that point you realize you are not the 92 smartest person in the room — or the fastest guy on the track. By your 30s, you start to think you can predict cycles in life. Heck, you might even have a good idea of who is going to be elected president, and then current events once again prove that you really don’t know anything. By age 40, you are pretty sure that you don’t want to be the smartest guy in the room. If you are, you are in the wrong room. Barrett-Jackson has some of the smartest people in one room, so I am trying to figure out this latest sale (and others like it) at the Scottsdale auction. When a $71,500 Mustang sells, we all want to know what was so special about the car, as Mustangs of any era are typically $20,000 to $50,000 in regular street trim. Big-block and Boss cars need not apply. The Mustang with perfect math For starters, this car has 638 original miles on it. Second, well… uh… hmmm…let’s come back to that in a second. For a while now, I have been preaching the invest- ment potential and usability of the Fox-body Mustang, and I may have been a little ahead of the curve. Many agree because the model was iconic. This generation put the Mustang back on the map with the same simple math as the original cars: Eight 1990 Ford Mustang 5.0 LX 7-Up car Lot 2501, s/n 1FACP44E6LF156525 Condition 3+ Sold at $8,800 Leake, Dallas, TX, 4/17/15 SCM# 264973 Sports Car Market 1991 Ford Mustang 5.0 LX Lot W3, s/n 1FACP44E8MF136407 Condition 4+ Sold at $6,050 Mecum Auctions, Dallas, TX, 11/1/16 SCM# 6809666 1989 Ford Mustang GT Saleen Lot T97, s/n 1FABP41E8KF159117 Condition 2- Not sold at $25,000 Mecum Auctions, Monterey, CA, 8/17/16 SCM# 6803989 Courtesy of Barrett-Jackson


Page 91

power-accessories package. It is as fully loaded as you could get for a 5.0-liter LX hatchback — with the exception of the automatic transmission, which would detract from the package. The car is also a 1989, which many consider to be the most desirable year. It was the first year for the Mass-Air-type fuel-injection metering. This was mandatory if you wanted make any real engine modifications without driving the old speed-density computer insane. It was also the last year before a driver’s-side airbag was mandated and you lost the tilt-steering-wheel feature. It was also the last year before the bean counters at Ford took out the armrest in the center console. It returned a year later by popular demand. This car is also not the higher-end GT with ground effects, but some consider the weight savings of the LX to be the better package. To employ the same thought process, the notchback car represented the lightest package and the tightest chassis. This car is not a convertible either, which begs the question, who cares? Low miles, low miles, low miles Well, I guess 638 original miles is why we care. The center caps have never been snapped onto the phone-dial wheels, and the rubber-mold release is still present on the intake boot and upper radiator hose. This car is pretty cool as a time capsule, but this also is where the car cylinders plus three pedals plus low price equals fun. You don’t have to be a member of Mensa to comprehend that. If the manufacturer can keep out any negative elements (blundered body design, economic recession and so on) from that equation, it works. The 5.0 5-speed combo worked well in these cars — even if the basic design elements of engine and chassis were getting to be 20 years old at the time. The 5.0-liter engine was stuffed in everything from full size F-150s to granny-haulin’ Mercurys and Lincolns of the day. It was a very versatile engine, and the Borg-Warner 5-speed was a delight to shift. When highly abused, they bent shift forks or lost a second gear syn- chro pretty easily, but they were also cheap and easy to fix. One thing I did have figured out at age 16 was that this combo worked and was attainable. What I do not have figured out at age 41 is why a common Mustang LX should bring $71,500. Coming from the same Mustang collection was Lot 400.5, a 1990 7-Up LX convertible with only 16 miles on it that sold for a whopping $82,500. To me the 7-Up car was more attractive — if you are in the market for hermetically sealed Mustangs. It was a convertible in a great limited-edition color with a snazzy white leather interior and the hard-to-clean GT turbine wheels, which were thankfully ditched in 1991 in favor of the comely five-star, 16-inch pony wheels. Putting all of this into perspective is the 7,900-mile 1989 Saleen SSC that also sold at the Scottsdale auction for $39,600. Wait a second. A highly collectible halo car from the same year with production at only 161 cars brings half the money of these other two sales? Making the Saleen even more appealing, you could actually drive the Saleen to Cars & Coffee and not shred the value. In my book, that makes the car even more desirable. Once again, I don’t have it all figured out. The Saleen sale solidifies that going market price — and it is a fair market sale. Pickled to perfection Our subject car is honestly nothing special by virtue of its window sticker — but the fact that the window sticker was never removed is where this car’s value lies. This car is a run-of-the-mill LX hatchback finished in Cabernet Red — a color that is happy on Mustangs and Chrysler K-cars alike. The interior is the common — yet borderline bad taste — Scarlet Red. The Smoke Gray interior of the day aged much better, and black was not available until 1990. This car is well optioned, with the comfy sport bucket seats and April 2017 starts to become a piece of garage art. I don’t want to debate the artistic value of dated aesthetics, but the fact remains, you can’t drive this car without completely erasing the nearly 28 years of storage which has caused it to sell for five times its MSRP here. There is a lot I have yet to figure out in life. I have yet to figure out neglected barn finds covered in owl droppings. I just want someone to Our subject car is honestly nothing special by virtue of its window sticker — but the fact that the window sticker was never removed is where this car’s value lies. wash that poor car. I can, however, see the intrinsic value and the story (or lack thereof) of this car. It’s the opposite of a barn find, and there is a slight mystique to it having never gone through dealer inspection. For my money, I would want the car to be something a little more exotic in production, such as a 1993. This car just represents the everyday middle ground in the 1989 Mustang lineup. These Barrett-Jackson sales represent the new high-water mark for Fox-body Mustangs, and they are still way off the bell curve. Maybe the person who bought this car was overcome by Fox-body red mist. Maybe he bought it too early. Maybe he is the smartest guy in the room. I still haven’t figured it out. Very well sold — for now. ♦ (Introductory description courtesy of Barrett-Jackson.) High Auction Sales for the Past Five Years $30,000 1989 Ford $10,000 $15,000 $20,000 $25,000 $5,000 $0 Mustang LX 5.0 $20,670 $12,100 $6,500 2012 2013 2014 $8,800 2015 $28,080 This Sale: $71,500 2016 93


Page 94

Sports Car Market Keith Martin’s The Insider’s Guide to Collecting, Investing, Values, and Trends ™


Page 95

AUCTIONS IN THIS ISSUE $101m Barrett-Jackson, Scottsdale, AZ, p. 102 $54m RM Sotheby’s, Phoenix, AZ, p. 112 $36m Bonhams, Scottsdale, AZ, p. 124 $33m Gooding & Co., Scottsdale, AZ, p. 136 $22m Russo and Steele, Scottsdale, AZ, p. 148 Roundup, p. 162 Motorcycle Roundup, p. 176 1925 Bugatti Type 35 Grand Prix, sold for $3,300,000 at Gooding & Company’s Scottsdale auction; Mike Maez, courtesy of Gooding & Company


Page 96

Market Reports Overview Steady as She Goes The Arizona auctions didn’t all see notable increases — but good cars still brought good money Top 10 Sales This Issue (Land Auctions Only) By Garrett Long T 1. 1963 Jaguar XKE Lightweight Competition coupe, $7,370,000— Bonhams, AZ, p. 126 2. 1939 Mercedes-Benz 540K Special roadster, $6,600,000—RM Sotheby’s, AZ, p. 114 3. 1952 Ferrari 340 America Spider Competizione roadster, $6,380,000—Bonhams, AZ, p. 130 4. 1928 Mercedes-Benz Typ S Supercharged Sports Tourer phaeton, $4,812,500—Bonhams, AZ, p. 126 5. 1969 Ferrari 365 GTS Spider, $3,602,500—RM Sotheby’s, AZ, p. 117 6. 1925 Bugatti Type 35 Grand Prix roadster, $3,300,000—Gooding & Co., AZ, p. 138 7. 1995 Ferrari F50 convertible, $3,135,000—RM Sotheby’s, AZ, p. 118 8. 1961 Ferrari 400 Superamerica Aerodinamico coupe, $3,080,000—RM Sotheby’s, AZ, p. 117 9. 1965 Ferrari 500 Superfast coupe, $2,915,000—Gooding & Co., AZ, p. 142 10. 1931 Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 Gran Sport Spider, $2,805,000— Bonhams, AZ, p. 130 Best Buys 1974 Maserati Bora 4.9 coupe, $132,000—Gooding & Co., AZ, p. 144 98 he annual Arizona auctions produced strong sales this year, despite dips from almost all companies across the board. Russo and particularly Bonhams were lights in the metaphorical (and literal) rain this year as the only companies with an increase in totals from 2016. But despite the minor slump, every company still brought a strong showing and produced respectable numbers. Barrett-Jackson swung par and had strong sales de- spite a 2% dip in sales total from last year. The company reached $101m in total sales with the help of their top lot, an Aston Martin DB5, sold at $1.5m. Russo and Steele continued its forward progress with a second consecutive year of increased sales in Arizona. In total, 78% of the lots sold, totaling $22m. Bonhams had an auction that will go down in their record books, as the final take literally doubled from $18m last year to $36.2m this year. An impressive feat, especially since they offered seven fewer cars and had a 4% lower sales rate than last year. RM Sotheby’s had a 14% decrease in sales from 2016 despite an impressive 89% sales rate. While better than any other year from 2011 to ’14, they still sold almost $10m less than their 2015–16 results, with a final total of $53.7m. Gooding & Company had a 21% decrease to $33.4m from last year’s total of $42.3m and hit an 84% sales rate. Their top sale was a 1925 Bugatti Type 35 Grand Prix Roadster, sold at $3.3m. In our Roundup, Worldwide Auctioneers had their breakout year at Scottsdale with $11.4m in sales and a 78% sales rate. Silver Auctions stayed within their $3m comfort zone with $3.3m in sales — a 15% decrease from last year. Bonhams had their Las Vegas motorcycle auction at the end of January, with a total of $3.4m, while Mecum, hosting their own motorcycle auction down the road in Vegas, sold a total of $13.4m. Garrett’s Market Moment: At Scottsdale, being a member of Team SCM means spending a chunk of time in our subscription booth inside the Gooding & Company auction tent. Being there gave me a good excuse to wander among the consignments and to make as many passes by the Lancia Stratos as possible. Rally perfection aside, I have a soft spot for fast Porsches, and I pay close attention to them on the floor and online. Many of our analysts say the Porsche market is deflat- ing. Nowadays, consignors taking Turbos home after the cars fall short of lofty reserves is a common sight. While you might hear people say that as a blanket statement for Number of automotive choices in Scottsdale increased for 2017 January 14–22, 2017 Worldwide January 18, 2017 January 18–22, 2017 Bonhams January 19, 2017 Fort McDowell, AZ January 19–22, 2017 January 20–21, 2017 Gooding & Co. Scottsdale, AZ January 25–28, 2017 Bonhams January 26, 2017 $0 Las Vegas, NV Mecum Auctions Las Vegas, NV January 19–20, 2017 Silver Auctions RM Sotheby’s Phoenix, AZ $3.3m $33.4m $13.4m $3.4m $20m 1: National concours standard/perfect 2: Very good, club concours, some small flaws 3: Average daily driver in decent condition $40m $60m SCM 1–6 Scale Condition Rating: 4: Still a driver but with some apparent flaws 5: A nasty beast that runs but has many problems 6: Good only for parts the brand, I don’t think it’s as simple as that. While Carrera GT and Turbo prices have taken a dip, in the SCM Platinum Auction Database, the average Porsche price (as a brand) has actually gone up from 2015 to 2016 to its current average price peak of $196.6k from the 2015 average of $194.3k. And after my time at Scottsdale, I’m further convinced that Porsches are hardly heading for a crash anytime soon. So while the time to get a nice price for your Turbo may be gone, don’t run to the market for cheap Porsches just yet. There might still be a bit more air in that Porsche balloon. ♦ $80m $100m Scottsdale, AZ Russo and Steele Scottsdale, AZ Scottsdale, AZ Sales Totals of Auctions in This Issue $101.2m Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale, AZ $11.4m $22m $36.2m $53.7m 1965 Plymouth Belvedere Lightweight 2-dr hard top, $121,000— RM Sotheby’s, AZ, p. 122 1974 Volkswagen Thing custom convertible, $19,800—Russo and Steele, AZ, p. 150 1989 Lamborghini Countach 25th Anniversary coupe, $187,000— Bonhams, AZ, p. 132 1981 Datsun 280ZX coupe, $11,988—Silver Auctions, AZ, p. 170 Sports Car Market


Page 98

Market Reports Trending Now Buy/Sell/Hold SCM’s Philip Richter offers his thoughts on what to buy — and what to sell — in the market today By Philip Richter Median Sold Price $300,000 $250,000 $203,500 -3% $200,000 $150,000 $100,000 $57,572 0% $50,000 $57,572 $0 $63,898 11% $70,400 -42% 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 $104,500 -5% $121,000 89% $209,000 -20% $110,000 56% $261,651 150% Buy: 1989 Porsche 911 Speedster — This was a one-year car with many bespoke attributes, including a bikini-like low windshield, aggressive Turbo Look fenders and a sculpted large rear boot cover. A total of 823 modern Speedsters made it to the U.S. in 1989 — all of them in wide-body form. The 1989 model is the one to own, as they continue to be more desirable than the 1994 or 2010 variants. Up until recently, investment-grade ’89 Speedsters were selling for well over $200,000. Over the past 18 months, prices have fallen. Several sub-10,000mile examples are currently being marketed in the mid- to upper-$100,000 range. The current valuation feels eerily similar to 959 prices eight years ago. This car belongs near the top of the list of “must own” air-cooled Porsches, so prepare for prices to rise dramatically over the next decade. Number produced: 2,065 Number in SCM Platinum Auction Database: 40 Number sold at auction in the past 12 months: 8 Average selling price of those cars: $213,751 Current SCM Median Valuation: $209,000 Median Sold Price $80,000 $90,000 $70,000 $60,000 $50,000 $40,000 $30,000 $20,000 $10,000 $0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 $37,260 -20% $46,575 $35,200 -6% $34,450 -2% $37,098 8% $42,350 12% $37,900 2% $62,276 47% $77,000 24% $81,764 6% Sell: 1975–89 Ferrari 308/328 — The 308/328 has great “Magnum P.I.” styling but underwhelms in the performance category. Recently, investment-grade cars have been trading for well over $100,000. Five short years ago, examples with over 40,000 miles were cheaper than a new Hyundai Sonata. The high production stats of the 308 probably caused Enzo to have an ulcer — almost 12,000 of these cars left the factory in Maranello. In Ferrari terms, the 308/328 is about as rare as a Coke can. The only sure bet is to own an investment-grade mid-1970s fiberglass Vetroresina version. Prepare for a downward price adjustment on the 308/328 and a steady upward move for the Vetroresina. Number produced: 308 (Vetroresina): 712; 308, 11,437; 328, 7,413 Number in SCM Platinum Auction Database: 308 (Vetroresina), 13; 308, 301; 328, 133 Number sold at auction in the past 12 months: 308, 34; 328, 36 Average selling price of those cars: 308, $89,109; 328, $98,169 Current SCM Median Valuation: 308 (Vetroresina), $185,500; 308, $77,800; 328, $92,900 Median Sold Price $40,000 $45,000 $35,000 $30,000 $25,000 $20,000 $15,000 $10,000 $5,000 $0 $14,732 $14,732 0% $18,838 30% $13,849 -6% $14,455 4% $15,068 -20% $17,600 17% $34,910 98% $41,935 20% $40,643 -3% Hold: 1983–89 U.S.-spec E24 BMW M6 — Last month, Pierre Hedary listed these as a Sell. I’d call them a Hold. The U.S. versions are relatively rare, as only 1,767 E24 M6s made it to our shores. The E24 has aged well and it’s immediately recognizable as a BMW, while the M uses a derivative of the hand-built twin-cam 24-valve inline-6-cylinder engine that was first introduced in the M1 supercar. M6 prices have been steadily moving upward over the past five years. Valuations seem ahead of themselves, and most available examples are highmileage, heavily used cars. Whatever remaining time capsules still exist are poised to set new records in the coming decade. In the high-mileage driver-car category, the E24 M6 should slowly appreciate over time. However, based on recent price action, this iconic German super coupe needs some time to catch its breath. Prepare to be on an undulating plateau for quite some time. 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 100 Number produced: M635CSi, 5,803 (1,767 U.S.-delivery M6) Number in SCM Platinum Auction Database: 25 Number sold at auction in the past 12 months: M6/635CSi, 9 Average selling price of those cars: M6/M635CSi, $40,643 Current SCM Median Valuation: M635CSi: $32,750 Sports Car Market BUY SELL HOLD


Page 99

Market Reports Arizona by the Numbers Market Reports Trending Now Since 2014, the number of sub-$100k cars sold increased by 26%. Those sold above $500k decreased by 58% Arizona Sales by Dollar Amount $251,000–$500,000 $501,000–$1,000,000 $0–$100,000 $101,000–$250,000 1,941 2014 37 33 64 2,116 2016 2017 41 306 36 1,977 2015 $1,000,000+ 99 376 2,454 32 35 83 338 Arizona Year-to-Year Totals 2014 2015 2016 2017 0 April 2017 35 14 2,381 cars sold/$106,399 avg. sale price 2,577 cars sold/$114,252 avg. sale price 2,599 cars sold/$96,726 avg. sale price 2,932 cars sold/$89,133 avg. sale price $50m $100m $150m $200m 76 353 $253,336,167 $294,426,923 $251,390,343 $250m $261,339,310 $300m $350m 101


Page 100

Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale, AZ Barrett-Jackson — Scottsdale 2017 There truly is something for everybody here, and beauty is entirely in the eye — and financial ability — of the beholder Company Barrett-Jackson Date January 14–22, 2017 Location Scottsdale, AZ Auctioneers Mast Auctioneers: Joseph Mast, lead auctioneer Automotive lots sold/offered 1,711/1,720 Sales rate 99% Sales total $101,059,533 High sale 1964 Aston Martin DB5 coupe, sold at $1,485,000 Buyer’s premium 10%, included in sold prices Star cars awaiting their moment in the spotlight Report and photos by Dan Grunwald Market opinions in italics B arrett-Jackson’s 46th annual flagship auction was wet and wild at Westworld in January. The event opened to the public on Saturday, January 14, with the first cars crossing the block two days later. The weather was cool and cloudy for a couple of days, and then on Friday, the skies opened up with showers and downpours that caused some flash flooding in the Phoenix area. The rain did not deter the spectators and bidders, and this annual “Lifestyle Event” built around a car auction still attracted huge crowds of friendly people from all over the country. The excitement here is definitely of the “high octane” variety, and Barrett-Jackson is the biggest, baddest and highest octane of them all. This event had more cars, automobilia, record prices, people, automobile classes, parties, food, drinks, movie and TV stars and more action than all of the other Arizona venues put together. It was impossible to be in a rush due to the masses of people when walking anywhere — but that was especially true near the podium or any of the covered areas. With big numbers coming off the Connecticut sale in June and the Vegas sale in 102 October, I expected big things on Barrett-Jackson’s home turf. I was not disappointed. A record total of 1,720 automobiles crossed the block here. The automobile sale total was $101m, with an additional $2.5m in automobilia sales. From that, approximately $2.2m dollars was raised for various charities. According to Barrett-Jackson, 40 world auction records were broken here this week. The top seller was a 1964 Aston Martin DB5 coupe at $1.5m, followed by the 1960 Chevrolet CERV I at $1.3m. Grammy winner Justin Bieber’s customized 2011 Ferrari 458 (who knew he was a car guy?) sold for $434,500, and John Lennon’s Austin Princess brought an unexpectedly low $159,500. I also have to mention a 1965 Volkswagen Type II 21-window Bus by Kindig-It Designs that sold for an astounding $302,500. There truly is something for everybody here, and beauty is entirely in the eye — and financial ability — of the beholder. Barrett-Jackson has always been all or mostly a no- Sales Totals $150m reserve auction, and this year was no exception. There were 15 cars with reserve prices and only nine of the 1,720 total entries did not sell. Many of the Arizona auctions were down a bit in total sales this year, as was this one. But the 2% total difference from last year’s results isn’t really much to note. Any up or down totals could easily be made up with one or two more cars reaching their reserve pricing. This event goes on for nine days and is open to the public at reasonable prices for all to enjoy. Leave all of the snow and cold at home and come to sunny Arizona in January. It just doesn’t get any better than this. ♦ $120m $90m $60m $30m 0 Sports Car Market 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013


Page 102

Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale, AZ ENGLISH #1388-1938 ROLLS-ROYCE 25/30-HP custom Boattail speedster. S/N GR063. Black/tan leather. RHD. Odo: 67,197 miles. Very good paint and interior. Lumpy paint on the left front leaf-spring mount. The custom wood is beautifully worked and finished. Right-hand drive with a single entry door on the left side. Born as a 4-door sedan and used in WWII as an ambulance. Exported to the U.S. and restored to original spec. In 2011 the new custom speedster unibody was built, featuring an 18-inch engine setback to accommodate the styling and improve handling. Cond: 1-. touched chips. The chrome shows well. A couple of windshield chips are visible and the left headlight trim is poorly fit. Cond: 2. to own a car with John Lennon’s magic attached? Well bought or well sold? Depends on your point of view. #179-1956 MORRIS MINOR woodie SOLD AT $126,500. A customized, hot rod Rolls-Royce? Really! This custom is finished with an exceptional build quality that would make Rolls-Royce proud. A really beautiful car. No real comparisons here, so we will have to call it fair both ways as the bidders set the price. #1371-1955 JAGUAR XK 140 roadster. S/N S810907. Red/tan canvas/tan leather. Appears to be the recipient of a recent high-level restoration with all-new chrome, paint, interior, tires, etc. Cond: 1. SOLD AT $15,950. I must admit I have a fondness for this lot, as my first car was a Morris Minor. Very cute but not very fast. I would call this well bought and sold. #856.2-1960 AUSTIN-HEALEY BUG- SOLD AT $220,000. This was the first year of the XK 140, which featured more chrome, more power and a larger cockpit for a much more comfortable driving experience. I could not find a flaw. The bidders also saw the quality and bid it over the top. Well sold. #1380-1956 AUSTIN PRINCESS van. S/N DH212785. Black/black leather. RHD. Odo: 4,176 miles. Paint scratches, chips and cracks everywhere. Wavy body panels and wavy left rear bumper. Chrome on the right door and bumper shows lots of pitting. Dent in roof. Dry, cracked weatherstripping. Originally a hearse with coachwork by Mulliner. Purchased in 1971 by John Lennon, who added cheap-looking cloth airline seats in the back. Seen in a 1972 documentary, “Imagine.” Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $159,500. A tired old dog that was never meant to be luxurious transport by John Lennon. Simply a family transport vehicle. Doesn’t matter. Wouldn’t everyone like 104 EYE SPRITE roadster. S/N AN5L22187. Silver/black canvas/black leather. Odo: 11,463 miles. Visible dust in the paint. Headlight weatherstrips are painted silver. Good chrome and interior. Aftermarket stereo mounted in the dash. All body panels look smooth and well fitted. New 12-volt gauge mounted under dash. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $22,000. Good driver-quality British sports car that will always put a grin on the driver and those who wave as it drives by. Perfect fun Arizona car. Fairly priced. GERMAN #545.1-1958 BMW ISETTA 300 micro- car. S/N 502064. Blue & gray/blue & gray cloth and vinyl. Odo: 5,393 miles. A fresh restoration with new paint, chrome and glass. Also has a new cabriolet top and correct plaid cloth and vinyl interior. Some paint is flaking on the inside of the speedometer and also on the metal package tray cover. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $33,000. Most auctions seem to wagon. S/N FLJ4643224. Light green/green vinyl. Odo: 3,417 miles. Unusual light green paint shows well, but the wood trims are due for a refinishing soon. The front bucket and folding rear bench seats have been re-covered in vinyl. The chrome on the door handle and hood ornament shows some pitting. The floor pans and door bottoms appear solid. There is a “No Brakes” sticky note on the dashboard. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $88,000. A nice car that has no serious issues, and the headlight trim can be refitted without much trouble. Let’s call it a plus for the buyer. #166-1974 TRIUMPH TR6 convertible. S/N CF29385U0. Blue/black vinyl/black leather. Odo: 42,682 miles. Some visible dust in newer paint. The front turn signal trim is dull. Rust shows on the front bumper mounts. The interior looks good but has a couple of chips on the wood on the dash. The top appears to be new. The engine shows normal driving wear for this mileage. The rims have some scrapes and yellowish chrome on the trim rings. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $33,000. A nicely restored Bugeye that looks ready to show and drive. Lots of fun in a small package. Well sold. #1335-1964 JAGUAR XKE Series I con- vertible. S/N 881129. Red/tan canvas/tan leather. Odo: 66,509 miles. The paint shows some light surface scratching and small re- Sports Car Market


Page 104

Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale, AZ have at least one of these. They consistently sell well, and this one should be no exception. It appears to be one of the better ones. I think this might be just a bit in the well-bought column. I never thought I would say that for a $36k Isetta, but these little cars always seem to bring money these days and that is the market. #1034.1-1964 PORSCHE 356C coupe. S/N 220321. Signal Red/black leather. Odo: 83,782 miles. Said to be “Mostly Original,” with one repaint. The paint is shiny but could have been better prepped and detailed. Most chrome looks quite good. Couple of windshield chips. The chrome on the rear window latches shows pitting. Cond: 2. miles. Some brightwork looks a bit dull with scratches and visible dents. The front bumper has a couple of light dents. Weatherstrips are showing age. Repainted in 2013 and still looks pretty good. New front-seat covers. Cracks in the steering wheel and a lace-on cover. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $17,050. These little BMWs have quite the following as great-handling driver’s cars. Someone really liked this car and was willing to pay. Well sold. #823-1977 PORSCHE 911 993 GT2 rep- lica coupe. S/N 9117202088. White w/ Martini livery/black cloth. Odo: 94,465 miles. This car started as a 42,000-mile 911 and has been built into this SCCA-capable 911S race car. All rebuilding appears to be a very high quality and all done to racing spec regardless of cost. The dry weight is now 2,170 lbs. Features a 12-point roll cage, Sparco racing seats with five-point racing seat belts, 32-gallon fuel cell, halon fire extinguisher, fender-and centermounted oil coolers and three-piece 18x10 and 18x12.5 wheels. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $64,900. A presentable 356C in good colors with only minor cosmetic issues. A fair deal for both the buyer and seller. Previously sold at Leake in Tulsa a year ago for $63,800 (SCM# 6808102). #1013.1-1970 MERCEDES-BENZ 280SL convertible. S/N 11304410011063. Green/tan canvas/brown leather. Odo: 39,638 miles. Lots of visible flaws in the paint. Wrinkles in the front chrome grille and pitting in the rear window chrome. Light scratching on the front bumper and windshield trim. Desirable 4-speed. New carpets and seat leather. Some cracking on the steering wheel. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $132,000. Said to have been “lightly tracked” at Laguna Seca, Sears Point and Thunderhill but shows none of the typical racing wear and tear. Looks ready to show or race competitively as it sits today. No comps, and endless money was spent to build this. A beautiful car. I would call it slightly well sold. #638-1988 PORSCHE 959 replica speed- SOLD AT $46,200. Quality of the paint lets it down a bit, but the bidders didn’t seem to care. Call it well sold. #340-1973 BMW 2002 2-dr sedan. S/N 2589578. Fjord Blue/black vinyl. Odo: 3,098 ster. S/N DMV55214NV. Red/black vinyl. Odo: 1,447 miles. Listed as a “959 re-creation.” Low-quality but shiny paint over wavy body panels that show chips and cracks everywhere. Full custom plastic bodywork with bare-bones racing interior. Flat covered headlights. No mention of engine/drivetrain. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $10,450. Said to have been recently imported from Italy, and the kilometer speedometer would support that. Cute, and it looks like it should run out just fine for the new owner. Both the seller and the buyer should be smiling on this one. #1426-1986 FERRARI TESTAROSSA coupe. S/N ZFFSA17AXG0063631. White/ beige leather. Rust bubbles are painted over on the driver’s side vent slats and some paint masking lines show in the newer paint. Lots of paint chips in the rear grille and center bumper piece. The rear wheels show rash and paint ITALIAN #1381-1971 FERRARI 365 GTB/4 Day- tona Spyder conversion. S/N 13941. Fly Yellow/tan canvas/tan leather. Odo: 80,591 miles. Said to be a matching-numbers GTB/4. Coachbuilder Richard Straman converted it to a Spyder in the 1980s. New Fly Yellow paint shows well as does the new leather interior. Borrani chrome wire wheels. Clean and smooth in all areas despite the 80,000 miles on the odometer. Looks well loved and cared for with some restoration to keep it looking like a new car. Cond: 1-. NOT SOLD AT $575,000. Seems like a fair offer, but it failed to reach the reserve with a $575,000 bid. #160.1-1972 FIAT 500 2-dr sedan. S/N 3065936. Tan/black vinyl. Odo: 37,139 km. All new weatherstripping and paint. New sliding sunroof. Scratches on windshield glass and a few dull trim pieces. One tear in the center of the rear seat. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $21,450. Titled as a “2005 Assembled Vehicle 88959” according to the car card. No direct comparison to use here, but judging by the quality I would call this well sold. 106 Sports Car Market


Page 106

Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale, AZ chips. Comes with power locks, windows, seats and a/c. Originally metallic black. Said to have had an engine-out service but no date or mileage stated. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $151,800. This is a documented “Miami Vice” TV show hero car. Actor Don Johnson made his bones on that series and is still doing appearances for fame and fortune based on it. Previously ran across the block at Mecum Monterey in August 2015 as a no-sale at $600k (SCM# 6796333) and again at Mecum Kissimmee in January 2016 (SCM# 6798472), again a no-sale at $475k. It finally found a home at what seems to be a fair price for this car. Strong for condition. Not much for the Don Johnson attraction. #831.1-1987 FERRARI 328 GTS Spider. S/N ZFFXA20A5H0073507. Silver/red leather. Odo: 65,550 miles. Appears to have had some repaint in areas. Has a visible crack and dent on the left side of the hood. Some light wear and cracking on the driver’s seat back bolster. CARFAX shows left rear pillar damage in March 2003. Cond: 2. #1372-2011 FERRARI 458 coupe. S/N ZFF67NFA5B0179322. Blue/black & white leather. Custom Ferrari owned by Justin Bieber. Built by West Coast Customs. This car was originally white and has now been wrapped in a satin-blue-metallic wrap. Features a Liberty Walk wide-body kit including bolt-on fender flares (the right flare appears lumpy and has a scratch) and a rear wing. Full custom interior built to Bieber’s specs. Painted-over front Ferrari emblems. Aftermarket wheels and stereo. Some light wrinkles and dirt on the driver’s seat. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $39,600. This is the photo in the dictionary under “Old School.” Finished in 1986 with all bodywork done in lead with no body filler and it still looks good. The ’50s Merc “Lead Sled” was a true icon of 1950s hot rodding. Issues with lead would make this difficult to reproduce today. I think it was a good buy. Previously shown as a no-sale at Mecum in Portland in 2016 at a $30,000 bid (SCM# 6809292). SOLD AT $434,500. 2014 CARFAX shows a rear-end collision—airbags did not deploy. Justin Bieber mentioned on the podium that the damage was “caused by paparazzi.” One of the few cars in the Barrett-Jackson auction with a reserve price. AMERICAN #1362-1932 FORD MODEL B custom SOLD AT $44,000. Previously a no-sale at Russo and Steele in Newport Beach in June 2014 with a $41,000 bid and 65,280 miles on the odometer (SCM# 6710034). Two and a half years later and 270 more miles brought $1,000 less (including the auction fees), but it sold anyway. A high-mile car for any Ferrari and maybe a bit well sold because of that. #1314-2004 FERRARI 360 Challenge Stradale coupe. S/N ZFFDU57A940138421. Yellow/black leather. Odo: 14,017 miles. Spotless paint with no chips anywhere. The sparse racing interior also shows no visible wear. The car has documented servicing completed at a SOLD AT $143,000. Spotless and fairly well known. Built as a tribute to Harry Miller. Awards include the Grand National Roadster Show, Detroit Autorama and Goodguys. Last sold here at Barrett-Jackson in January 2012 for $275k (SCM# 4776047). Seems like a good buy today. #964-1950 MERCURY CUSTOM con- Ferrari dealer in Orange, CA. 378 Challenge Stradales produced. Cond: 1. SOLD AT $187,000. The Challenge Stradale was the last 360 model and the highest-performance streetlegal car of this series. It is essentially a street-legal race car. Anything not needed to make the car go faster or handle better was left off these cars. This car looks factory-new in all areas. 108 vertible. S/N 50LA26385M. Maroon/white canvas/white vinyl. 350-ci V8, 4-bbl, auto. Customized and chopped with a Carson top, 350 V8, auto transmission, shaved door and trunk handles with poppers, electronic dash, dual spotlights and a full custom interior. Also features working lake pipes. Some wide panel gaps with good-quality paint that is holding up well. Cond: 2. pickup. S/N 19KK3ESZ52. Green & gold/ brown vinyl. Known as the “Miller Hauler Special,” with a Donovan 4-cylinder engine and a Tremec T5 transmission. Polished louvers everywhere. Aircraft-style dash. The cowl was stretched. Amazing attention to detail. Cond: 1. NOT SOLD AT $850,000. A very historic and fast racing legend. Cobra guys, eat your heart out. Another of the rare cars that did not reach the reserve price at $850,000. #1369-1969 CHEVROLET CORVETTE L88 coupe. S/N 194379S718301. Blue/black vinyl. Odo: 16,484 miles. 427-ci 430-hp V8, 4-bbl, 4-sp. Restored by Kevin Mackay, who knows his Corvettes. Original engine with J56 power brakes, M22 transmission, radio delete and sidepipes. Still has the original Redline tires that came on the car. Has the original transmission and rear assemblies that came from the factory as well. 16,484 original miles. One of only 116 L88s built in 1969. Cond: 1. #1376-1964 CHEETAH coupe. S/N U62065. Silver/black/red. 427-ci V8, 4-bbl, 4-sp. This car was the #6 Competition Cheetah built by Bill Thomas. Sold to a Cadillac dealer in Hollywood, CA, in 1964. Originally built with a 327/375 fuel-injected V8, replaced in 1965 by Bill Thomas with a 396/425 V8 in 1965 and finally with a 427 L88 crate engine in 1967. I could not find a flaw in this car. Cond: 1. NOT SOLD AT $600,000. Comes with Sports Car Market


Page 108

Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale, AZ Market Moment Bloomington Gold and NCRS Top Flight awards. A super, low-mileage, documented, original Corvette. A star in any auction, but not enough bidders today. One of the rare nosale cars that failed to reach the reserve with a $600k offer. #719.1-1969 FORD MUSTANG custom coupe. S/N 9R02F131555. Blue & white/ black vinyl. Odo: 33,600 miles. 429-ci V8, 4-bbl, 4-sp. Originally a 302 Mustang that is now a quasi-Shelby GT500 clone with a 429 and 4-speed. Wide fender panels on all four wheels. Rough paint on equally rough bodywork showing deep scratches, wavy body panels with poor fit everywhere. Very lumpy thick paint with overspray on the side and rear. Cond: 4-. Courtesy of Barrett-Jackson 1965 Volkswagen Type 2 21-Window Bus Sold at $302,500 Barrett-Jackson, Scottsdale, AZ, January 21, 2017, Lot 1315 A t Barrett-Jackson’s Scottsdale 2017 auction, the sale of this resto-mod 1965 Volkswagen 21-window deluxe bus at $302,500 set a new high-water mark for the venerable Type 2 Transporter. Most collectors can remember not too many decades ago when you could find a VW bus sitting on the street with a faded “For Sale” sign in the window. Many of us are now wishing we’d picked one up when they were cheap. Even though this sale is higher than any we’ve recorded before, it’s not a big surprise — and it’s not even much of an outlier. In today’s market, 21-window vans routinely trade above $100,000, and the 23-window “Samba” soars even higher. The previous high price for a VW van was set back in 2011, when a 1963 Samba brought $217,800 at Barrett-Jackson’s Orange County auction (SCM# 182248). The SCM Platinum Auction Database has 32 entries of VW vans selling over $100,000 — and many more sold in the high five-figures. What makes this sale unusual is that the van in question is a resto-mod that carries an over- bored 1,915-cc engine with twin downdraft Weber carbs. The 17-inch wheels are nicely done to show a stock look. The interior is perfect, as is the rest of the vehicle. No criticism from this corner, but resto-mods don’t usually command highest prices. Many Transporter owners likely believe their values just took a giant step up. They may or may not be mistaken. Certainly owners of top-quality and rare vans have good reason to pop a few corks. The SCM Platinum Auction Database shows 43 listings for VW vans of various years and models crossing the block in 2016 at prices ranging from less than $7,000 to $159,500. This sale will bring more out during 2017. If you want to add a Transporter to your collection, this could be a very good year to do so, as quite a few may be headed for market. Just be ready to fork over some cash. — Jeff Zurschmeide SOLD AT $24,200. Rough everywhere. I hope the buyer got a good up-close look before bidding. Well sold. #1100-2000 AM GENERAL HUMMER Custom utility. S/N 137ZA9034YE186873. White camouflage/black vinyl. 6.5-L fuelinjected V8, auto. Built in 2015 as a “Hunting” vehicle and now called “Zombie Outbreak Response Team Vehicle.” All ¼-inch-plate steel body panels that have very good welds and smooth finish. Thirty-twoinch front LED headlights. Front and rear winches. Gullwing doors and hinged roof panels. Diamond-plate steps. 44 x 19.5 x 20-inch tires with custom-cut steel-plate wheel covers. The build quality is very good, though the arctic-camo vinyl wrap on the exterior looks a bit cheap. According to the catalog CARFAX, shows a May 2004 accident. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $78,100. A silly vehicle that needs a movie to star in. Mel Gibson or Nicolas Cage, are you listening? It’s huge, wide and high. I don’t think it could be reproduced in this quality for the selling price, but does that make it a good buy? You must decide for yourself. © 110 110 Sports Car Market


Page 110

RM Sotheby’s Phoenix, AZ RM Sotheby’s — Arizona RM Sotheby’s sets records and maintains quality while also adding more affordable offerings Company RM Sotheby’s Date January 19–20, 2017 Location Phoenix, AZ Auctioneer Brent Earlywine Automotive lots sold/offered 142/159 Sales rate 89% Sales total $53,711,250 High sale 1939 Mercedes-Benz 540K Special Roadster, sold at $6,600,000 Buyer’s premium 10%, included in sold prices A 1988 Ferrari 328 GTS sold at $88,000, while a 1990 F40 was bid up to $1,100,000 but failed to find a new caretaker Report and photos by Carl Bomstead Market opinions in italics T he RM/Sotheby’s auction, long a stalwart of Arizona Auction Week, again brought a classy array of consignments to the spectacular Arizona Biltmore Hotel on January 19 and 20, 2017. For the most part, the results were strong, and a number of records were established. What made this auction a bit unusual, however, was its mix of more affordable vehicles. The company sold 16 more cars than last year, but the revenues were off by almost $10m. This was the result of over 60 of the offerings selling for less than $100,000 each. For example, a very respectable 1964 Imperial Crown convertible sold for $20,350 — not the normal RM Sotheby’s Arizona fare. That is not to say that RM Sotheby’s did not pres- ent some spectacular motorcars. There were 18 CCCA Full Classics presented, and the 1939 Mercedes-Benz 540K Special Roadster with one-off coachwork by Sindelfingen took top honors, selling for $6.6m. It was discovered in East Berlin and was used for many years in Moscow as daily transportation. In 1967, it was simply driven over the border into Sweden. With its elegant sweeping lines and fascinating history, it was the star of the event. The full-custom 1933 Chrysler CL dual-windshield phaeton — no stranger to the winner’s circle at many major concours — sold for $1.3m. Designed by Ralph Roberts of LeBaron fame as a gift for his wife, the car 112 had many unusual features, including extended fender skirts on the rear, lowered headlights, painted grille and a rear-mounted spare. Its long, sleek lines were imposing, and it has resided in several noted collections. RM Sotheby’s represented Ferraris, long a staple of their events, quite well. Close to two dozen crossed the block, with three selling for over $3m and two exceeding $2m. The 2003 Ferrari Enzo, offered by fashion designer Tommy Hilfiger, realized $2.7m. It was one of only 400 produced and had been driven only 3,620 miles since delivery in 2003. Hilfiger, who designed the Ferrari F1 uniforms during the Schumacher years, maintained the Enzo in as-new condition. RM Sotheby’s offered a number of muscle cars rumored to be from a single collection. A 1963 Dodge 330 Max Wedge Lightweight, the third of only nine produced, realized $110,000, although the estimate was much higher. It was fitted with the 426/425 Max Wedge with dual quads, and the 2,094 miles on the clock were most likely added a quarter mile at a time. A 1948 Tucker, one of 51 built and 47 re- maining, sold for $1.4m. It had been stashed away for 33 years and had only 7,900 miles showing. The new owner has a tough decision whether to restore the car or leave it as-is as a piece of Tucker lore. The results here serve as further evidence that segments of the market are experiencing an adjustment. We’ll just have to wait to see where things go from here. ♦ Sales Totals $60m $50m $40m $30m $20m $10m 0 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 Sports Car Market Chad Taylor


Page 112

RM Sotheby’s Phoenix, AZ ENGLISH #117-1956 JAGUAR XK 140 roadster. S/N 812. Old English White/black fabric/red leather. Odo: 52,504 miles. Older restoration by Hibernia Restorations and refreshed in 2015. Spats, thus cannot have wires. Red leather interior in good order, with pleasing patina. The 140 offered three inches more legroom and dash was raised an inch, making it more comfortable than the 120. Also had 12-volt battery rather the two 6-volt units. Whitewalls look a bit out of place but an easy fix. Cond: 2. Bugatti expert. A stunning design and restored to near perfection. Cond: 1-. A conversation starter, but not for the shy and retiring, as the questions and comments will never stop. Price paid was about as expected. #228-2013 BUGATTI VEYRON 16.4 SOLD AT $1,017,500. One of the most desirable Bugattis, with known history from new. Price paid was a bit under expectations, but still, a million bucks is a million bucks. Buyer will be just fine. SOLD AT $115,500. A very acceptable XK 140 that will make an excellent driver. Much more than that will require some major surgery, so might just as well use and enjoy. A fair transaction for all. FRENCH #232-1924 ISOTTA FRASCHINI TIPO 8A landaulet. S/N 655. Blue/brown leather. RHD. Odo: 216 miles. The earliest known example of a Tipo 8A. An original car that has never been touched or molested, with minor updates. Still owned by the factory in 2016, when it was imported to U.S. Has a few expected paint chips and other wear but is in amazing condition considering age. Leather interior excellent. Has been modified to meet modern Italian laws. Cond: 3. #222-1958 FACEL VEGA FVS coupe. S/N FV457H41. Bronze/red leather. Odo: 552 miles. The French firm Facel Metallon produced bodies for Ford Comète, Simca, as well as Bentley before producing their own automobiles in 1954. This example restored in 2012 to high standard. Powered by 354 Hemi, one of only 36 so equipped. Offered with fivepiece fitted luggage. Wood dash in excellent condition. Interior with mild patina. Cond: 1-. Super Sport 300. S/N VF9SG2C27DM795300. White/black leather. Odo: 398 miles. The Super Sport replaced the standard Veyron, and this was one of 48 produced and one of only eight to U.S. specs. It offered 200 additional horsepower with larger turbos. This was chassis 300 of 300 produced. Top speed of 267 mph. Less than 400 miles with 269 due to testing. Recent annual service. As-new condition. Cond: 1. SOLD AT $2,090,000. The temptation to drive a 1,200-horsepower car would be impossible to ignore, but looks like the owner managed. Bought as an investment, and with everything considered, maybe broke even. Owner did get to spend three years looking at it and did manage 100 miles behind the wheel. (See profile, p. 82.) GERMAN SOLD AT $247,500. A striking automobile that offers exceptional performance due to the Hemi under the hood. Was lacking air but still could have sold for another $20k without question. #105-1973 CITROËN DS 23 Pallas se- SOLD AT $434,500. A “new” Isotta Fraschini that is 93 years old! The question is, what do you do with it? To drive it takes away from the value and uniqueness but would be a shame to tuck it away again. Decisions, decisions. #134-1939 BUGATTI TYPE 57 cabrio- let. S/N 57587. Eng. # 458. Maroon & black/ black fabric/maroon leather. RHD. Odo: 3,663 km. The first of eight Letourneur et Marchand designs on Type 57 chassis. Restored in 2003 and reunited with original 458 engine. Has correct Cotal pre-select transmission. Presented at 2016 Pebble Beach with preparation by the Alan Taylor Company. Documented by 114 dan. S/N 00FE7084. Bronze/olive cloth. Odo: 40,583 km. A Euro-spec model with turning headlamps and 5-speed manual transmission. In very original condition. Futuristic styling when introduced. French car designed by an Italian. Brake pedal is button on floor. Hard to say much polite regarding the interior color. Touch over 40,000 km from new. Well-maintained original car, although the interior trim is worn. Cond: 2-. #258-1939 MERCEDES-BENZ 540K Special roadster. S/N 408383. Eng. # 408383. Black/black leather. Odo: 27,321 km. One of only 25 Special Roadsters and one of few with one-off coachwork. Fitted with 5-speed transmission. Has cut-down doors and two rows of louvers on hood side panels. Discovered in East Berlin in 1949. Used as daily transportation in Moscow in early ’60s. Documented matching numbers. Restored in 2012 and presented at Pebble Beach and several other major events. A stunning design. Cond: 1. TOP 10 No. 2 SOLD AT $55,000. These are an acquired taste and don’t appeal to all. Hydraulics are an issue but have been recently serviced here. SOLD AT $6,600,000. Last seen at RM’s 2013 Monterey sale, where it realized $7,480,000 (SCM# 6470055). Prior to that it, sold at RM’s 2011 Monterey sale for $4,620,000 (SCM# 3656895). The current sale cost the seller about a million bucks, but the market is in a different place than it was a few years back. #203-1954 KLEINSCHNITTGER F125 convertible. S/N 641818. Red/black vinyl. Sports Car Market


Page 114

RM Sotheby’s Phoenix, AZ Odo: 71,428 km. Produced for seven years in Arnsberg, Germany. Recent restoration of 330-pound microcar. Stated to have cruising speed of 50–55 mph, but that must be going downhill. Powered by 6-hp motor. Four-wheel cable brakes. Recent respray to high standard. Steering wheel cracked. Once in famed Bruce Weiner Collection. About as cute as it gets. Cond: 1-. the rose on 190SLs. Is this the start of a trend or was this one very well bought? Time will tell. SOLD AT $29,700. There are lawnmowers with more power than this little Kleinschnittger. Perfect car for running to market, but keep it off the freeways. Price paid was about right, and it should retain its value, so all should by happy. #110-1959 MERCEDES-BENZ 190SL convertible. S/N 121040109502307. White/ white hard top/black leather. Odo: 66,437 miles. A low-mile example of the desirable little sibling of the 300SL. Received recent full restoration. Equipped with Becker radio and VDO clock along with removable hard top. Windshield delaminating along top edge. Repaired damage to rear bumper. Whitewalls look a bit weird. Interior in good order and very well maintained. Low miles stated to be actual. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $99,000. At one point in time, these were selling for twice what we see here. There were a few minor needs noted, but I have to wonder if the bloom is off #111-1965 PORSCHE 356C cabriolet. S/N 161242. Ruby Red/black fabric/black leather. Odo: 90,943 miles. A numbers-matching drivetrain offering. Cosmetic restoration five years back with bare-metal respray. Recent engine work. Body straight and solid with very acceptable paint. Interior very presentable. Complete with Porsche CoA and Kardex. Cond: 2+. water and 70 mph on land, but I doubt if that is realistic here. Restored about 10 years ago but now with a few fit-and-finish issues. Hood fit off a bit. Would not head to the boat launch without some expert inspections. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $73,700. This was last seen at Barrett-Jackson’s 2011 West Palm Beach sale, where it realized $66k (SCM# 2438353). One of these tends to show up at most every major auction and they tend to sell in the $60k–$70k range, so this sale was predictable. #246-1968 MERCEDES-BENZ 600 4-dr Pullman. S/N 10010412001065. Black/tan leather. Odo: 71,365 miles. One of only 304 Pullman limousines built. Mounted on the longer 153.5 Pullman chassis. One respray on an otherwise-original car. Cherry wood console with TV and stereo. Also air. Engine compartment condition consistent with mileage. The lap of luxury! Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $145,750. Last year of production for the 356. Disc brakes and lovely condition make this a good one to own. Price in line with current market or just a bit above. #166-1966 AMPHICAR 770 convertible. S/N 106523027. Lagoon Blue/white vinyl/blue & white vinyl. Odo: 12,288 miles. The “car that swims.” The “770” stands for 7 knots on SOLD AT $148,500. Price paid was up there for a mostly original car. A couple of bidders had to have it, and the winner paid a slight premium. No harm done, however, as it will all be made up when he takes his friends for dinner and is treated like royalty at the local eatery. #212-1989 PORSCHE 911T Flat-Nose cabriolet. S/N WP0EB0936KS070302. Black/ black fabric/black leather. Odo: 9,310 miles. Fitted with the rare and desirable M505 flatnose option and G50 5-speed manual gearbox. The Turbo package included wider fenders and 16-inch Fuchs alloy wheels. Air and electric windows were standard. The air-cooled engine had single turbocharger with Bosch 116 Sports Car Market


Page 115

RM Sotheby’s Phoenix, AZ fuel injection. All papers with CARFAX indicating an accident, but nothing noted on Porsche dealer pre-purchase inspection. The low miles stated to be original. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $239,250. Final price paid was at the low end of expectations, and the noted accident is most likely the culprit. Wickedquick and would not take much to add another mark on the CARFAX. ITALIAN TOP 10 No. 8 #231-1961 FERRARI 400 SUPERAMERICA Aerodinamico coupe. S/N 2841SA. Eng. # 2842SA. Blu Sera/tan leather. Odo: 62,359 miles. One of only 17 SWB 400SA Coupe Aerodinamicos built. Restored to high standard in early 2000s. Numerous awards since. Freshened in 2014. Excellent fit and finish with spotless engine compartment. Once part of Greg Garrison’s collection. Cond: 1-. #211-1964 FIAT 2300 S coupe. S/N 114BS129460. Blu Notte/red leather. Odo: 97,371 miles. Known as Fiat’s executive car as it had styling and comfort. Was not offered in U.S. Recently received a two-year restoration with new leather interior, rubber seals and brightwork replated. Minor wear on driver’s bolster and a couple minor paint blemishes. A car seldom seen in the U.S., with styling that was advanced for the time. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $50,400. This very interesting Fiat sold for the low end of the auction-company estimate but at the high end of the price guide values. From where we sit, we’ll call it well bought as it is rare, stylish and well restored. Sure to draw attention. SOLD AT $3,080,000. We watched this sell for $2,750,000 at RM’s 2013 Monterey sale (SCM# 6454016) and prior to that $1,650,000 at RM’s 2008 Monterey event (SCM# 1641423). The beat goes on but the big jump in value for these has passed. Only driven 300 miles between 2013 and today, which is a shame. #150-1962 ALFA ROMEO GIULIETTA SZ II coupe. S/N AR1012600207. Red/black leather. Odo: 57,092 miles. An older restoration of one of only 44 “Coda Tronca” examples constructed. Bodied by Zagato. Fitted with non-original Alfa Romeo 1750 engine. A 1.3-liter engine that is thought to be original included. Rare bi-metal wheels and Nardi wood steering wheel. Paint and brightwork not fresh but acceptable. An exciting rally or tour car. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $2,475,000. The quality of this 330 was certainly recognized, as the bidding was strong and the result was at the high end of expectations. Even in a softer market, the cream rises to the top and garners strong results. TOP 10 No. 5 #263-1969 FERRARI 365 GTS Spyder. S/N 12489. Eng. # 12489. Blu Ultrascuro/black fabric/tan leather. Odo: 10,386 km. An exceptional example that is a six-time FCA Platinum winner. Classiche Red Book that confirms matching-numbers drivetrain. Correct Borrani RW 4039 wheels. #220-1967 FERRARI 330 GTS Spyder. S/N 10689. Grigio Notte/black fabric/black leather. Odo: 38,463 miles. Recently restored to high standard. Four-time FCA Platinum winner. Classiche certification with matching and original drivetrain. Full books and tool roll. One of only 99 produced. An exquisite example with nothing to fault. Stunning. Cond: 1. SOLD AT $379,500. As it sits, most likely won’t win any awards but is good to go for historic racing or other track events. A rather rare car that excites the Alfistis. No real surprise on price paid, so all is well. April 2017 117


Page 116

RM Sotheby’s Phoenix, AZ One of only 20 spyders produced. Nothing to fault here—the best! Cond: 1. SOLD AT $3,602,500. Sold at the high end of the estimated value but worth every penny. A stunning Ferrari 365 that will excite at every outing. (See profile, p. 78.) #120-1970 FERRARI 365 GTB/4 Day- tona Berlinetta. S/N 13183. Rosso Chiaro/Nero leather. Odo: 4,199 miles. Finished 1-2-3 at 1967 24 Hours of Daytona, thus the unofficial name. A Euro-spec car with Plexiglas nose and rare factory air. One of 1,285 coupes or berlinettas produced. Fitted with Cromodora alloy knockoffs and power windows. An older restoration that has received some recent cosmetic work. Mouse hair on dash in good order. Cond: 2+. plete with books and reproduction luggage. Best Lamborghini at Concorso Italiano’s Miura 50th anniversary. Cond: 1-. #216-1988 FERRARI TESTAROSSA coupe. S/N ZFFSG17A7J0076424. Oro Chiaro Metallizzato/black leather. Odo: 4,311 miles. A Cavallino Classic Platinum award winner. Finished in rare and striking livery. Recent engine-out service. Well preserved with original engine chalk marks still present. Low miles stated to be actual and no reason to doubt. Full books and records with Ferrari Classiche Red Book. Cond: 1-. NOT SOLD AT $1,700,000. A Miura P400 SV in this condition is a $2,000,000 car. Bidding did not come close, thus no deal. Can’t fault the seller for walking away from the offer. A splendid Miura. #147-1972 MASERATI GHIBLI SS NOT SOLD AT $600,000. These have been the hot ticket of late, and there is at least one to choose from at most every major auction. For the most part they have been selling in the $700k-plus range, so the price bid here was light. Perhaps the Euro-spec model held things back, but regardless, should have been offered more. #139-1971 LAMBORGHINI MIURA P400 SV coupe. S/N 4946. Eng. # 30680. Rosso/blue leather. Odo: 59,958 miles. The first “supercar.” The SV was the final iteration of the Miura and featured better handling and more performance. A U.S. delivery that had “split-sump” lubrication. Also fitted with air. Blue leather interior recently replaced. Com- SOLD AT $286,000. The engine bay sparkled due to recent work and the exterior was very acceptable. A striking Italian supercar. Sold for a touch under the money. All’s fair, although slightly tilted toward the buyer. coupe. S/N AM115492008. Ghibli Red/tan leather. Odo: 45,810 miles. Second-to-last year for the Ghibli and the limited-production 4.9 SS model. Equipped with power steering, windows, air and AM/FM stereo/cassette radio. Engine compartment received recent cosmetic restoration. A few minor chips noted. Only 1,149 coupes produced. Attractive styling with V8 performance. A stunning automobile. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $137,500. The Testarossa has gone full circle. First a premium when introduced, then a used car with values in the $75k–$80k range and now an appreciating collector car. They offer stylish performance and now a bit of upside. Willing to bet that in five years, we will look back and call this a screaming deal. #227-1995 FERRARI F50 convertible. S/N ZFFTG6A6S0104092. Nero/black & red leather. Odo: 2,083 miles. One of only four examples finished in Nero and one of only two U.S. examples. Complete with hard top in original box, three pieces of unopened luggage and unused canvas top. Recent engine service. One of only 55 U.S.-production examples. Low miles from new. A pristine and unmolested exotic. Cond: 1. TOP 10 No. 7 SOLD AT $3,135,000. Now how much is too much to pay for the best? This F50 was pricey but it is the only one, as the other U.S. Nero example was destroyed. If you must have it, be prepared to pay up, and the buyer did just that. AMERICAN #128-1932 CORD L-29 cabriolet. S/N 2930287. Light yellow/blue leather. Odo: 41,966 miles. One of the last Cord L-29s built. Equipped with larger FF engine. Was restored about a few decades back. However, showing a bit of age, with a few paint chips here and there. Fitted with dual sidemounts and rear trunk. Engine compartment not to concours standard. An attractive Cord. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $236,500. These are never thought of as great tour cars, but they are pleasing eye candy. This one needs some attention to bring 118 Sports Car Market


Page 118

RM Sotheby’s Phoenix, AZ #142-1939 LINCOLN ZEPHYR 3-win- it back to its former glory. No issue with price paid, as these continue to excite. #233-1933 CHRYSLER CL IMPERIAL dual-windshield phaeton. S/N CL1313. Scarlet/tan fabric/black leather. Odo: 200 miles. First delivered to famed powerboat racer Lou Fageol, who converted it to Cadillac V16 power. Restored in mid-1980s. More recent cosmetic restoration and correct Chrysler CL engine installed. One of about 20 known survivors. Well-detailed engine. Paint very acceptable but not to concours standard. A very elegant Chrysler. Cond: 2. dow coupe. S/N H71701. Black/gray cloth. Odo: 2,882 miles. An unmolested example of a Zephyr 3-window coupe. Art Deco trim and distinctive streamlined rear end. Split rear window. One-year-only shifter that connects through the center of console. Columbia 2-speed rear end. Featured in “Chasing Classic Cars.” An older restoration that is holding up well, although the window trim is worn and the brightwork is lacking luster. Only 2,500 built in 1939. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $192,500. Over the years these have developed a following. Take proper care of the V12 and it performs well. A hot-rodder’s delight, but this one escaped and is in original trim. Price paid was spot-on, so all should be happy here. SOLD AT $258,500. An interesting history with Fageol ownership. Sold for a bit under the money, but older restoration will require some attention to bring to high-point standard. Think I’d just take it on tours and have some fun behind the wheel. #268-1937 CORD 812 Supercharged phaeton. S/N 81232013H. Black/tan fabric/ maroon leather. Odo: 81 miles. A very authentic example with its original supercharger. A long-term restoration that was rewarded with 100-point scores in two CCCA Grand Classics. Has been properly maintained and is well presented for an older restoration. Proper panel fit and paint that shows a few swirls, but black is a difficult color to maintain. Cond: 2. #130-1940 PACKARD 120 convertible. S/N 18012022. Maroon/tan fabric/tan leather. Odo: 1,124 miles. Dutch Darrin built the Packard “Darrins” from 1937 to 1942, notable for the distinctive “Darrin Dip” on the doors. Most in 1940–42 were built on the Senior 180 chassis, but at least 15 were thought to have been built on the shorter 120 chassis. Restored in mid-1990s and well maintained since. Once owned by the Blackhawk Collection. A couple of minor paint chips. Engine clean and well detailed. Cond: 2. NOT SOLD AT $350,000. The larger 180 is by most accounts more desirable than the 120. The price bid, even for the smaller 120, was a bit light, but not by much. Another $25k should have gotten the job done. Can’t blame the seller for waiting another day. SOLD AT $220,000. To make this a highpoint car once more will take some effort, so might as well drive and enjoy before deciding. Price paid was on the “good deal” side but that will be offset when it’s time to upgrade it a bit. 120 #104-1947 DIVCO delivery truck. S/N UM39575. Red. Twin Coach design that dates to the mid-1930s. Made by Detroit Industrial Vehicle Company (DIVCO) and best known as Helms Bakery delivery vehicles. Was found in L.A. so just may have been one. Thought to be powered by Hercules 4-cylinder motor. Driver would stand and toot the whistle to attract customers. Now in “Mouldy J. Mildew Baked Goods” livery. Interior needs a bit of Sports Car Market


Page 119

RM Sotheby’s Phoenix, AZ help and engine compartment is a mess. A project. Cond: 4+. Engine replaced in 1973. Repainted at same time with new interior. Top and trunk have paint issues, perhaps from water leaking in barn. Fluids were replaced when found, and it is stated that car runs as it should. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $1,347,500. Price paid was in the ballpark of recent sales. The barn-find factor was expected to add a bit to the final pricing but does not look like that occurred. Don’t know if brown is the most attractive livery, but if the new owner addressed some paint issues, that can all be changed. Amazing cars are still found in storage sheds... SOLD AT $16,500. Willing to bet the new owner will restore this as a Helms Bakery delivery truck. They tend to sell for about $75k when finished, so he just may be able to do it and be on the right side of the ledger. #115-1947 FORD SUPER DELUXE Sportsman convertible. S/N 799A1934335. Glade Green/tan fabric/red leather. Odo: 24,268 miles. 239-ci V8, 2-bbl, 3-sp. The ’47 Sportsman used fenders from a ’41 sedan delivery so that the wood could be more easily applied, power windows from a Continental, and the gas-filler lid from the station wagon. An older restoration with new leather seating. All wood stated to be original. Motor thought to be original. Accessory bumper guards and correct fog lights. One of only 2,274 built in 1947. Cond: 2. #109-1949 PACKARD EIGHT sedan. S/N 23922856. Green/tan leather. Odo: 40,024 miles. 288-ci I8, 2-bbl, 3-sp. A recent nut-andbolt restoration to high standard. Fitted with 3-speed manual transmission with overdrive. Bodied by Briggs, who used steel B and D post supports. Painted in unusual shade of green with ash and maple trim. Interior in good order with new leather, but horn-button plastic crazed. Includes radio, overdrive and heater. Has sun visor. A strong presentation. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $71,500. This sold in the expected range, so no surprise here. A desirable woodie that has been well maintained and is ready for some serious touring. A fair transaction. SOLD AT $154,000. It is not often we see a Ford Sportsman with its original wood that has been maintained as well as this example has. A wonderful car that sold for a very reasonable amount. Lots of National Woodie Club events await. #160-1948 TUCKER 48 sedan. S/N 1044. Eng. # 33574. Dark brown/green wool broadcloth. Odo: 7,908 miles. 335-ci, H6, 2-bbl, 4-sp. A barn find with the low miles stated to be actual. Fitted with Cord pre-select transmission. One of 47 survivors of the 51 built. #271-1957 CHEVROLET CORVETTE convertible. S/N E57S100815. Venetian Red/ white vinyl/red vinyl. Odo: 5 miles. 283-ci 245-hp V8, 2x4-bbl, 4-sp. A desirable Corvette but with a dark cloud over it. The motor just may have been from a newer year and the transmission newer yet. Has a Posi rear end and Wonder Bar radio. Engine-block suffix “FG” indicates it should be mated to Powerglide transmission. An attractive car but with a bunch of questions. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $88,000. This was last seen at Mecum’s Seattle 2014 sale (SCM# 6712475), where it failed to sell when bid to $65,000. Prior to that it sold for $63,800 at Russo and Steele’s 2009 Scottsdale event (SCM# 1643327). The seller finally April 2017 121


Page 120

On the Radar The Bella Italia Edition These cars are now over 25 years old and legal to import into the United States for the first time. by Jeff Zurschmeide 1992 Lancia Delta HF Integrale Evoluzione got to ring the bell as he found someone who had no interest in a numbers-matching Corvette. Tend to think the buyer may just live to regret the acquisition. #167-1958 CADILLAC ELDORADO Pros: Rally homologation model. 2.0-liter turbocharged DOHC engine delivers 207 horsepower and 221 pound-feet of torque through a 5-speed manual trans to all four wheels. Accelerates 0–60 mph in 5.7 seconds, with a 137-mph top speed. If the Audi Sport Quattro is out of reach, grab one of these. Cons: $150k price tag is still steep, and prices are rising fast. Price range: $130k–$150k, plus import costs. 1992 Alfa Romeo 155 Q4 Brougham 2-dr hard top. S/N 58P060521. Lake Placid Blue/stainless steel/blue fabric & leather. Odo: 56,327 miles. 365-ci V8, 3x2bbl, auto. An expensive car when new, with a $13,000 price tag. Quad headlamps and stainless-steel roof. Air suspension that actually works. Several pieces of vanity set. A baremetal respray. Seating soiled. Has been looked after but needs work to get to the next plateau. Brightwork a bit dull. A decadent motorcar. Cond: 2-. RM Sotheby’s Phoenix, AZ SOLD AT $121,000. Not the type of car you usually see at RM Sotheby’s Arizona auction, and that may be why it slipped through the cracks. Could have easily sold for an additional $10k–$20k without concern. If this was your thing, you missed a bargain. Bet the 520 miles were a quarter mile at a time. #275-1970 PLYMOUTH SUPERBIRD SOLD AT $170,500. This was last seen at Barrett-Jackson’s 2012 Palm Beach sale, where it realized $55,000 (SCM# 4773337). Well, you’ve come a long way, baby! The price at B-J was a bit low, but the price paid here was, well, the other side of the coin. That’s why auctions are so interesting. BEST BUY Pros: Shares a platform and drivetrain with the Lancia Delta HF Integrale, but it is far cheaper. 2.0-liter turbocharged DOHC engine at 190 horsepower and 215 pound-feet of torque. Five-speed manual transmission and AWD. Accelerates 0–60 mph in under seven seconds and looks great. Martini Racing livery available. Cons: At going prices, if you can find a good one, buy it. Only 2,591 were made. Price Range: $10k–$15k, plus import costs. 1992 Maserati Shamal #239-1965 PLYMOUTH BELVEDERE Lightweight 2-dr hard top. S/N R051191722. White/bronze vinyl. Odo: 520 miles. 426-ci V8, 2x4-bbl, 4-sp. A genuine lightweight Super Stock that was aimed at drag racers. No rear seat or wheel covers. Fenders and hood were lightweight steel rather than aluminum used in prior years. Powered by 425/426 Race Hemi with Super Stock rear end. Restored in 2002 and all still in good order. The 520 miles showing stated to be actual. One of 11 built. Cond: 1-. “ Pros: Developed from the Biturbo, the Shamal is super-hot and rare in the U.S. Big box flares say sports car, and the 3.2-liter twin-turbo V8 delivers 326 horsepower and 320 pound-feet of torque. Getrag 6-speed manual trans and limited slip diff was ahead of its time. Blast from 0–60 mph in 5.3 seconds and will keep going to 170 mph. Cons: Maserati longevity was not all it could have been in that era. Price Range: $30k–$60k, plus import costs. ♦ 122 SOLD AT $110,000. A tough sell in the era, and nose and wing often had to be removed to get them off the dealer’s lot. Not the case today. The 426-ci Hemi and Six Pack bring the money, but more are out there today than ever built. © If this was your thing, you missed a bargain. Bet the 520 miles were a quarter mile at a time. 1965 Plymouth Belvedere Lightweight 2-dr hard top ” Sports Car Market 2-dr hard top. S/N RM23U0A175651. Hemi Orange/black vinyl. Odo: 70,580 miles. 440-ci V8, 4-bbl, auto. A genuine 440 Super Commando Superbird that has been properly verified. Original nose and wing. Single 4-barrel, not Six Pack. Recent restoration. Excellent paint and interior. Engine detailed to perfection. Estimated that 1,935 were built, but that number varies depending on source. Cond: 1-. courtesy of NearEMPTiness


Page 122

Bonhams Scottsdale, AZ Bonhams — The Scottsdale Auction Four of the top 10 sales of the week took place in the Bonhams pavilion, including the Lightweight XKE at $7.4m — the highest seller overall Company Bonhams Date January 19, 2017 Location Scottsdale, AZ Auctioneers Rupert Banner, James Knight Automotive lots sold/offered 84/105 Sales rate 80% Sales total $36,215,920 High sale 1963 Jaguar XKE Series 1 Lightweight coupe, sold at $7,370,000 Buyer’s premium 10%, included in sold prices Overall Scottsdale top seller, and believed to be one of the most original Lightweight examples in existence — 1963 Jaguar XKE Lightweight Competition coupe, sold at $7,370,000 Report and photos by Cody Tayloe Market opinions in italics T he hot ticket of Arizona Auction Week — and a First in Class award — goes to Bonhams for its $36m Scottsdale sale. This was Bonhams’ sixth annual event, held once again on the Pittman Lawn at the Westin Kierland Resort and Spa. Despite the number of consignments lagging behind the total number of lots offered last year — 112 in 2016 compared with 105 this year — that $36m total was double the amount realized here in 2016. Four of the top 10 sales of the week took place in the Bonhams pavilion, including the highest seller overall, a 1963 Jaguar XKE Lightweight Competition coupe that made $7.4m. Sale day was cold, damp, and blanketed with clouds, but the top-drawer cars offered still filled the sale room. Bidders were active, both on-site and on the phone as Rupert Banner and James Knight took turns manning the rostrum. Last year, Bonhams’ sale capitalized heav- ily on the market popularity of Porsches, which comprised about 20% of their total offerings. This year, only 11 were offered. This year’s offerings were mostly European, with fewer than a dozen total vehicles offered from American 124 manufacturers. Sixty-five lots were offered without reserve, which undoubtedly aided in contributing to the 80% sell-through rate. Topping sales for the week was the 1963 Jaguar XKE Lightweight Competition. This English car with Australian roots sold on the phone for nearly $7.4m. It claimed the prize of most valuable car here in Scottsdale and set a record as the most expensive post-1960 Jaguar to ever sell at auction. The second-highest sale at Bonhams and third highest overall in Scottsdale was an ex-Scuderia 1952 Ferrari 340 America Vignale Spider. The car changed hands for nearly $6.4m — a world record for the model. After the 340 America sold, the crowd began to lighten, with a noticeably increased amount of reserved bidder seating available for the remainder of the sale. Lot 64, a rare 1960 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spyder, took the stage midafternoon. It failed to sell with a high bid of $10.65m. One crowd favorite was the Tom Selleck-driven “Magnum P.I.” 1984 Ferrari 308 GTS Quattrovalvole. It sold for a healthy $181,500. In the no-reserve category, a well-preserved 1977 Honda Civic CVCC sold at $15,400 and a delightful 1967 Volkswagen Type 2 Westfalia Camper brought $57,750. With the stock market hovering around record highs and the presidential election behind us, it appears confidence among the top buyers has been restored. Bonhams Motoring Director James Knight said he’s “immensely [satisfied]” with the results, but with the exquisite and plentiful cars of extraordinary value offered here this year, the bar is now set high for this auction’s return in 2018. ♦ Sales Totals $30m $35m $25m $20m $15m $10m $5m 0 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 Sports Car Market Courtesy of Bonhams


Page 124

Bonhams Scottsdale, AZ ENGLISH TOP 10 No. 1 #24-1963 JAGUAR XKE Lightweight Competition coupe. S/N S850667. Eng. # V682558P. White & blue/black leather. RHD. Odo: 3,621 miles. Several age flaws in the body. Cracks in paint on the left rear behind the rear tire. Doors sit low with slight sagging. Leather seats are worn and cracked but not yet opened. Cloudy tachometer. Gas pedal is worn smooth. Rubber is wearing through on the brake and clutch pedals. Cond: 2-. rear deck near the fuel fill. Soft-top cover is not snapped down. Panels lined up nicely. Brightwork is in good order. Interior is average to above average. Cracking on seat leather. Dash wood is in good condition. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $7,370,000. One of 12 factory lightweight XKEs. This one was raced by Australian Bob Jane, a former truck driver who evolved into a sports car racer. It set a lap record at the Australian GT Championship in December 1963, where it took the checkered flag before taking additional victories or finishing in the top three at additional races the following year. Jane retired the race car in 1966 and sold it at auction in 1980, a sale he later regretted. This is believed to be one of the most original Lightweight examples in existence. Bonhams offered the VIN just previous to this sequence at their Goodwood Revival sale in 2005, where it did not sell for nearly $1.5m (SCM# 1564531). Although it was shy of the catalog estimate, it set a new high-water mark for an XKE sold at auction. (See profile, p. 90.) #06-1978 ASTON MARTIN V8 Volante convertible. S/N V8C0L15040. Eng. # V5405040LFM. Cambridge Blue/beige canvas/tan leather. Odo: 24,335 miles. Includes maintenance file, tools, jack, handbook and copies of factory build records. Said to be highly original. Paint appears to be original, with age flaws throughout. Light paint splintering and early signs of minor crazing. Paint chip on the rear edge of the trunk lid. Touched-up paint on the left top front fender and right front panel near the nose. Dimples in paint at the right of SOLD AT $214,500. This is said to be the 40th V8 Volante built, and this one is fitted with the early desirable slim bumpers, manual transmission and LHD. As seen here, the convertible was first in line to lose the Series 3 hood scoop and feature the new “power bulge” hood. A few years ago, one of these could be picked up for under $100k, but values have taken off in recent times. This one came in within the catalog estimate. With a well-documented history and no immediate needs. Label this one as well bought. GERMAN #54-1928 MERCEDES-BENZ TYP S Supercharged Sports Tourer phaeton. S/N 35323. Eng. # 66540. Red/black canvas/black alligator hide. Odo: 128 miles. Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance multiple award winner. Older high-quality restoration completed approximately 20 years ago with few flaws, mostly related to age. Some evidence of rust transferred by water coming from the windscreen header on the right side (later wiped off by cleaning crew). A few light scratches on the front of the rear fender. Running boards show wear from entry and exit. Black hide seats that appear to be alligator are in good condition. Leather covering steering-wheel shaft is split. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $4,812,500. Noted as the “Car Of Kings,” this was one of the few to be delivered new to the U.S. and one of only a few that was fitted with Berlin-based Erdmann & Rossi coachwork. This one is believed to have been built by Erdmann & Rossi just prior to an TOP 10 No. 4 original and weathered 630K Tourer that sold at Bonhams’ Goodwood sale in 2013 for just over $1 million, four times the estimate (SCM# 226940). While this one changed hands several times, it is said to have been advertised for sale in 1968 for $8,800. Here, it fell just short of the low estimate and went to a new owner. Well bought. (See profile, p. 84.) #34-1950 OPEL OLYMPIA 2-dr sedan. S/N OLY51L20613425. Black/brown vinyl. Odo: 94,522 km. All original and unrestored. Paint appears to be original and showing lots of age. Chips and flaws throughout. Stainless all around is pitted, some heavily. Rubber is dry and cracked. Panel alignment is factorycorrect. Bumpers are heavily pitted with chrome beginning to peel. Interior door panels are weathered with water staining. Driver’s seat torn around the upper seat frame. Brütsch Maserati child’s car mounted on the roof is leaking oil on the rear window screen. Rack holding the child car is rusted. Cond: 4+. SOLD AT $26,400. The catalog description was pretty limited when it came to the Opel, with more history being offered on the Brütsch half-size Maserati included in the sale. Brütsch was a racer who wasn’t all that successful and later went on to produce microcars and over-engineered children’s cars, such as the one included in this lot. It is rumored that a replica of a Brütsch microcar fetched over $60,000, so the real value in this lot is likely with the Maserati. Two cars for one, both in need of restorations, which sold at no reserve for more than half of the catalog estimate. Well bought. #27-1956 PORSCHE 356A Speedster. S/N 82601. Eng. # 62877. Aquamarine Blue Metallic/black canvas/red vinyl. Odo: 29,314 miles. U.S.-export model with mph speedometer and sealed beam headlamps. Very few noticeable flaws, if any. Matching numbers. Paint is in excellent condition with no visible 126 Sports Car Market


Page 126

Bonhams Scottsdale, AZ imperfections. Panel fit is correct. Interior is better than factory. Small wrinkle in cushion of driver’s seat. Dash leather has been re-covered. Interior paint is nearly perfect. Clean engine restored to concours quality. Cond: 1. Steering wheel, gauges and radio are all restored. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $528,000. The Texas-based collector who consigned this Speedster purchased it from Dennis Collins of “Fast N Loud.” The new owner deemed it the perfect candidate for a comprehensive restoration after realizing it was a solid matching-numbers example. Instead of replacing parts as needed, originals to this car were restored and refitted when possible. At first glance, the catalog estimate seemed lofty, but if any were worth the money, this would be the one. Bidders responded to the quality and this one sold above the high estimate. Considering the workmanship and time savings of having purchased a turn-key fresh restoration, fair deal for buyer and seller even if above the catalog price. #28-1967 VOLKSWAGEN WESTFALIA CAMPER van. S/N 237002757. Pearl white/ Butterscotch leather. Odo: 36 miles. Low double-digit post-restoration miles. Paint is much better than factory original. Glass all around in excellent condition considering the age. Side louver to glass stainless is a little weathered but in no way lost. Panel alignment is very good. Accessories are all correct and not reproductions. Fabric on pop-up top is all new and custom-made. Wood cabinetry inside is a little faded but with a high-gloss lacquer. SOLD AT $57,750. Cute sells, and this one was an absolute charmer, drawing throngs of onlookers during the preview. Everything appears to be period-correct. The real Type 2 Transporter values continue to ride high with the Samba buses, and while the Westfalias can bring a good chunk of change, they are usually not near their counterparts. It has happened in the past, but rarely do these break the ceiling into the six-digit category. The expectation of the auction house was realistic, but at no reserve, it was anyone’s guess. It’s safe to say that the restoration, as comprehensive as it was, likely could not be duplicated for the sales price here. Well bought. #31-1973 MERCEDES-BENZ 450SL convertible. S/N 10704412012163. Olive Green/ Bamboo leather. Odo: 39,678 miles. A few touch-ups on the nose with some swirls in the clearcoat. Light pitting on stainless. Panel alignment is factory-correct. Factory hard top. Rubber is cracking in places. Bumpers are in good condition. Interior is extremely well kept. Carpets look good but floor mats show some minor wear. Very few threshold scratches from entry and exit. Original Becker Europa II. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $33,000. A Wisconsin dealer recently had this listed in their inventory with an asking price of $39,000. While the description was limited, when the ad appeared in November 2016, the car was showing the exact same mileage as displayed here, all the way down to the trip odometer 529 9/10. Transporting and moving it around would have at least advanced the tenths position of the trip odometer. Could this be a low-mileage example, or did the odometer stop working ages ago? The saving grace may lie in the accompanying service books included in the sale, which are said to be properly stamped. At least that would assist if there is a mileage mystery. Condition and mileage are important, as there is no shortage of examples that have sold under $10,000. Well sold either way. #40-1973 BMW 3.0 CSL Batmobile coupe. S/N 2275525. Eng. # 2275525. Silver/ black cloth & black vinyl. Odo: 92,460 km. Light mechanical restoration. Original engine. Paint is past its prime. Small bubbles on the passenger’s door. Chipped paint on top of right rear quarter panel. Mask lines just ahead of trunk with flaking paint at seams. Aero pieces beginning to show brittleness. Rubber appears original, but in good condition. Imperfections on various vinyl decals. Interior dirty, with slightly hazy gauges. Vinyl wrapping on center stack peeling and coming loose. Center of rear seat has a small split at seam. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $330,000. The Batmobile was BMW’s homologation for Group 2 racing. This example was first seen at Russo and Steele’s Scottsdale 2013 sale, where it did not sell for $160k (SCM# 5606968). In 2016, it appeared at Worldwide’s Houston Classic, where it sold for $242,000 (SCM# 6799559). In terms of condition, this one is inferior to the one that Bonhams sold here last year for a slightly higher price of $341,000 (SCM# 270719). Just a few years ago, $200k was unheard-of money, but collectors have since taken note. The seller here picked up a tidy profit for a market-correct number. 128 Sports Car Market


Page 128

Bonhams Scottsdale, AZ #73-1979 PORSCHE 930 3.3 Turbo coupe. S/N 9309800256. Eng. # 6890199. Black/black leather. Odo: 49,691 miles. Porsche Certificate of Authenticity. Matchingnumbers U.S.-spec 930 Turbo. Recent engineout service. Well-kept paint presented in very good condition. Door panel alignment is factory-correct. Right rear lens cluster is dull and faded compared to the one on the left rear. Fresh new leather on the front seats. Rear seats are re-covered. Door panels are original with pockets in good condition. Pedals show slight wear. Rubber worn at the driver’s threshold from entry and exit. Cond: 2-. Monterey auction in 2016 that did not sell with a top bid of $1.7m (SCM# 6808813). RM Sotheby’s (SCM# 6804743) sold one in 2016 at their Scottsdale sales equipped with the Weissach package, for $1.6m as well. Here, a dealer could be found offering this one for $1.5m, which was the top of the estimate. It resulted in a no-sale, close to the lower estimate, which seemed like a fair offer. ITALIAN TOP 10 No. 10 #30-1931 ALFA ROMEO 6C 1750 Gran Sport Spyder. S/N 10814358. Eng. # 10814 358. Red/black cloth/red leather. RHD. Odo: 20,169 miles. Known ownership history since new. Numbers matching. Older mid-1980s restoration with imperfections mainly from age and use. Dulling brightwork on running boards. Hood stainless has a dent on the left side with scratches. Towel placed underneath to catch drips. Surface rust on the exhaust along with dirt and mud residue. Uncleaned dirt deep in the tire tread. Leather torn at the body on the left side. Leather is in good condition. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $93,500. Well maintained with low original miles. The Porsche market has been extremely hot, especially for Turbos, but the sale here is another sign that the bubble could be getting ready to burst. At Bonhams’ sale in 2016, there was a whole section dedicated to various Porsches, while this year only a handful were being offered. This one could be found online prior to the sale being offered by a dealer for almost $140k. The hammer fell almost $50,000 below the catalog estimate before commissions. Certainly not what the consignor was expecting as it was well below wholesale, but a signal of where the market may be headed. Well bought even in a declining market. #36-2015 PORSCHE 918 Spyder. S/N WP0CA2A15FS800268. Dark blue metallic/ black leather. Odo: 823 miles. Paint is nearly flawless as though it just left the factory. No noticeable damage visible. Appears to be well kept and stored indoors. Heavy scuffing on carbon fiber on underside of bumper. Scuffing continues back to the underbody panels. Glass is clean and clear. Interior shows as brandnew. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $2,805,000. This car is well known among Alfa enthusiasts and was owned for more than 40 years by Grant White, a famed collector of fine European automobiles. During his ownership, the car underwent a restoration in which White took great care to preserve its originality. The original door cards were replaced during the restoration and the unrestored originals were included in the sale here. After commissions, this one came in just a hair over the low catalog estimate. #44-1952 FERRARI 340 AMERICA Spider Competizione roadster. S/N 0196A. Eng. # 0196A. Red/brown leather & tan cloth. RHD. Odo: 8,174 km. Restored in 2000 but continued to compete in limited racing events. Older paint in belowaverage condition with flaws throughout that only add to authenticity. Racing numbers are brushed on with stroke marks. Interior is in good condition. Seats show some wear but not excessive. Cond: 3-. TOP 10 No. 3 NOT SOLD AT $1,250,000. Another limitedrun modern collectible for Porsche just as seen before with the 959, Carrera GT, and if you really want to get exclusive, the 911 GT1 Straßenversion. While the 918 club is small, the ones offered for sale are a bit crowded. Mecum offered a 2015 918 Weissach at their 130 Sports Car Market


Page 129

Bonhams Scottsdale, AZ SOLD AT $6,380,000. Offered wearing “614,” the number adorning it when it competed for the first time at Mille Miglia. It went on to compete at several races in 1952 and 1953 where it took several top finishes, including some 1st place overall. It was passed on to private owners from the factory early on and has continued to compete as recently as 2012. It also saw coachwork changes a few times and was restored to the original configuration in 2000 by DK Engineering, fitted just as it was for the 1952 Mille Miglia. Bidding here started at $4.4m with lots of phone and Internet interest, and although it changed hands shy of the catalog estimate, a new world record for this model has been set. #22-1963 ISO RIVOLTA coupe. S/N IR340075. Silver/maroon leather. Odo: 78,022 miles. High-quality repaint in very good condition. Brightwork is average and free from any major defects. Front windscreen surround is dull. Panel alignment is good. Interior has been treated to new leather upholstery. Seat frames are pitted. Gauge bezels are slightly faded while gauge faces are in very good condition. Clock is not working. Center toggle switches are very worn. Dash leather is in good condition, with some excessive bunching at the corners. Cond: 2-. leather and is in excellent condition. Gauges are slightly cloudy but better than average. Includes manuals in leather pouch, history file and tool roll. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $1,732,500. Bonhams offered this 275 GTB in 2016 at the Les Grandes Marques du Monde au Grand Palais sale, where it sold for $2.3m (SCM# 6798938). This go-round, they were dealing with a much different car, as the off-putting dark blue that was previously added to the Ferrari has been changed to the correct Argento color with which it left the factory. The odd-colored seats have also been reset to their original color of Nero black. The hype of a no-reserve Ferrari could not compensate for a soft market, and the money spent on returning it to its factory livery was more than lost. Well bought. #46-1970 ABARTH 1300 Scorpione SS coupe. S/N 104S1287292067. Eng. # 0655019 204. Silver/black leather. Odo: 129 miles. Restoration is a few years old and starting to show minor flaws. Driver’s door is hard to close. Otherwise, panel alignment is good. Touchedup chips on the nose. White scratches in the glass. Rubber has some cracks. Interior is small but tidy. Seats are in good condition. Switches are all in good order. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $93,500. Renzo Rivolta had a pretty simple recipe for producing fast cars: Bizzarrini-designed chassis, Bertone coachwork and Chevrolet engines. His vision was to produce a fast, comfortable and reliable car that people could use daily “priced somewhere between a Jaguar and a Ferrari.” Mission accomplished, as there is something terribly alluring about Italian coachwork coupled with the simplicity and ease of maintenance of American muscle. Almost 800 Rivoltas were produced in total before the company went bankrupt in 1974. Offered without reserve, it properly sold right within the estimate. #48-1966 FERRARI 275 GTB coupe. S/N 08973. Eng. # 08973. Argento/Nero leather. Odo: 72,471 km. Classiche report. Fresh repaint and upholstery in original color combination. Paint is lustrous with a few swirl marks. Trim at top of driver’s door between the window and outer door skin is loose and coming up at the front of the door. Brightwork is in very good condition, with a few light scratches from cleaning and age. Taillight lenses are slightly sun-faded. Panels line up well. Interior has smell of freshly installed April 2017 SOLD AT $116,600. If you’ve never seen one in person, pictures don’t do it justice; the Scorpione is small, very small. The rear-engine sports car is based on the Fiat 850. The original owner in the Netherlands sold the car almost immediately upon receiving it, as he had planned to race the car but was concerned about losing factory racing support based on rumors of Abarth selling out to Fiat. The car has undergone a 10-year nut-and-bolt restoration. It was offered at no reserve with bids starting around $50,000 and escalating quickly. All in, it sold over the estimate but is still a fair deal for all. #17-1974 ALFA ROMEO 2000 GTV coupe. S/N AR3026745. Eng. # AR0150016765. Blue Lord/Sand Beige leather. Odo: 13,066 km. Euro spec with a/c believed to be factory installed. Dell’Orto carburetors. Older 131


Page 130

Bonhams Scottsdale, AZ restoration has been well cared for. Paint appears slightly thick. Heavy scratches on the tail on the left rear fender. Thick paint gathered above the passenger’s door handle. Paint bubble on the front of right door. Otherwise, light clearcoat scratches and surface scratches. Rubber has been replaced in good condition. Interior is extremely nice. Thresholds are bright and shiny. Crack on the dash in front of the passenger’s position. Cond: 2-. #07-1988 LAMBORGHINI LM002 SUV. S/N ZA9LU45A8JLA12108. Gray/light gray leather. Odo: 18,412 miles. Older subpar repaint with poor prep and uneven application. Paint cracking in body creases at the left front fender and at the rear. Orange peel between the left front and rear. Possible body filler on the left rear door. Fisheyes on the right front of the hood. Painted metal is rubbing off on the driver’s door button. Doors line up nicely. Difficult-to-source tires are showing wear and dry. Driver’s door creaks when opening. Interior smells of gasoline. Carpet is becoming unglued from the transmission tunnel near the handbrake in the driver’s position. Tear in rear seat. Cond: 3. limited production and limited sales, the catalog range here was wide; $200,000 to $300,000. Both Russo and Steele and Mecum offered examples built in 1990 at their Monterey sales in 2016, selling for $300,000 and $264,000 respectively, so the estimate was unreasonable. Prior sales have mostly been under $200k and this one was no exception. BEST BUY #53-1989 LAMBORGHINI COUNTACH 25th Anniversary coupe. S/N ZA9CA05A9KLA12699. Red/black SOLD AT $83,600. Certainly a crowd favorite here; the throngs of people hovering around this one are a testament to their increasing popularity. This could be signaling a potential bygone era of examples that can be had for under $50,000, as this was one of the few cars sold at Bonhams this week to break over the high catalog estimate. Sales as recent as last year show the 2000 GTV hovering steadily in the mid-$30,000 range. It appears the market is beginning to wake up. Well sold today. Might be a bargain when we return to Scottsdale next year. leather. Odo: 10,622 km. Ordered with “wing delete” option. Older repaint with small cracks and imperfections. Rear edge of engine hatch sits high and does not latch. Paint scuffs around rear license-plate location. Desirable Euro bumpers. Paint chips here and there. Likely repaired from curb scrapes. Rubber around the door worn from entry and exit. Rubber torn and pulling away at left front door opening. Wrinkled driver’s seat cushion. White residue speckled a long driver’s door panel from possible overuse of cleaner. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $187,000. The “Rambo Lambo” began production in 1986, and only 300 examples were made by the time production ended in 1993. This one was built for U.S. delivery and changed ownership a handful of times, with more than $16,000 being spent in 2015 on “various refurbishment work.” With 132 Sports Car Market


Page 132

Rising Sun Recent online sales of Japanese collector cars by Brian Baker (All text within quotes minimally edited from online descriptions) #3050. 1971 Nissan Skyline 2000GT-R coupe. S/N KPGC1000038I. 53k kilometers (33,000 miles). “2.0-liter twin-cam inline-six, 5-speed manual transmission, one known repaint, Imported from Japan in 2013, largely original example.” Condition: 2. Bonhams Scottsdale, AZ SOLD AT $126,000. It is exciting to see the Hakosuka sold at auction on the Web in the U.S. You have a different crowd of buyers, and you get to see what the car brings price-wise in this format. Price here was similar to the private market. This car looks to be in great condition with classic, period-correct Racing Service Watanabe wheels. Well bought. Bring-A-Trailer, 1/23/2017. #222313636156. 1976 Toyota Celica ST coupe. 38k miles. “Totally rust-free car. Many new parts: starter, alternator, new carpet and bucket seats. Was originally a w40 4-speed but converted to a 3-speed automatic.” Condition: 3. SOLD AT $187,000. The Countach market has been on fire, at least until this one showed up. Sales of the 25th Anniversary edition steadily remained over $300,000 until more and more started showing up at auctions. In 2016, almost all offered could be had under $300,000 with the exception of one anomaly that sold at RM Sotheby’s Duemila Ruote sale in Milan in 2016. The higher-mileage-example (for a Lamborghini) sold there for a whopping $462k (SCM# 6813178). The market cracks are beginning to show, as seen by the one offered at no reserve here at Bonhams, which estimated the car at $250k to $325k. Even in a declining market, still very well bought and way under the money. JAPANESE #09-1977 HONDA CIVIC CVCC 2-dr sedan. S/N SGE3532853. Eng. # ED33903781. Caroline Yellow/black houndstooth cloth. Odo: 78,475 miles. Very original example in well-kept condition. Factory-original paint. Pinstriping is beginning to flake off along some of the edges. Rubber around the doors is dry and brittle. Stainless is becoming slightly dull. Interior is in excellent condition. Gauges are clean and clear. No cracking on the dash. If one wants to be picky, there is a cracked knob on the radio. Carpets show little SOLD AT $7,300. This particular car was converted from an original 4-speed to an automatic, but it can easily be converted back. It also has the unfortunate federally mandated bumpers, but it is still a prime example of its time. I would recommend finding a pre-big-bumper coupe or liftback — and grabbing it while you can. Well bought. eBay Motors, 11/20/2016. #b211545970. 1991 Nissan Skyline GT-R coupe. S/N BNR32-014229. Unknown mileage. “2.6-liter twin turbocharged inline 6-cylinder engine, All-wheel drive and 4-wheel steering.” Condition: 3. “ SOLD AT $33,000. The Skylines keep coming. These are really becoming the next FJ-40 for auction companies wanting a Japanese car in their lineup. The downside to this massive influx of R32 Skylines is that there will be fewer and fewer in Japan, and they will begin to climb in value there. Best to get in this market early before the bubble happens. Market price, well sold. Barrett-Jackson, 10/15/2016. ♦ 134 Sports Car Market wear. Seats reupholstered in matching factory material. Faux-chrome trim on driver’s and passenger’s door pulls beginning to flake off. Headliner is excellent. Interior screen printing is all intact. Steering wheel looks brand-new. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $15,400. Purchased new in Colorado in 1977; the selling dealer outfitted the car with the the pinstriping seen here and the accessory luggage rack. Also featured is the very desirable 5-speed mated to the CVCC engine. Bonhams offered a first-generation Civic 4-door station wagon at their Fairfield Concours d’Elegance in 2011. It did not sell for $11,000 (SCM# 184413). Described as “totally original.” Offered at no reserve and an inexpensive collectible to take home from a premium auction house; the price paid was fair. (See “Affordable Classic,” p. 50.) © The Countach market has been on fire, at least until this one showed up. Sales of the 25th Anniversary edition steadily remained over $300,000 until more and more started showing up at auctions. 1989 Lamborghini Countach 25th Anniversary ”


Page 134

Gooding & Co. Scottsdale, AZ Gooding & Company — The Scottsdale Auctions The auction opened with caution but seemed to improve with every fall of Charlie’s gavel Company Gooding & Company Date January 20–21, 2017 Location Scottsdale, AZ Auctioneer Charlie Ross Automotive lots sold/offered 106/126 Sales rate 84% Sales total $33,424,650 High sale 1925 Bugatti Type 35 Grand Prix racer, sold at $3,300,000 Buyer’s premium Only three owners from new — 1925 Bugatti Type 35 Grand Prix roadster, sold at $3,300,000 10%, included in sold prices Report by Joseph T. Seminetta and Nicholas M. Seminetta Photos by Ian Butt Market opinions in italics T he precipitation level was high, both inside and outside the auction tents at Gooding’s first auction of 2017 in Scottsdale, AZ. Prior to opening the first lot, concern painted the faces of both consignors and Gooding employees following a soft Thursday sale at a different venue down the road. Stress levels remained elevated given the two-day Gooding auction started during the presidential inauguration. But Gooding & Company continues to shine in the provenance of their offerings, the knowledge of their professionals and the execution of their sales. The Scottsdale sale is an A+ venue to sell your cherished collectible, as the room is filled with many deep pockets. Gooding is choosy in the cars they accept, and the work of their research department inspires the confidence of bidders. David Gooding and the senior staff were ever present all weekend, helping to promote the lots, and Charlie Ross is in a class by himself. His wit and business sense consistently extract a maximum of enthusiasm — emotional and pecuniary — from the crowd. The auction opened with caution but seemed to im- prove with every fall of Charlie’s gavel. After a dozen or so lots, bidders gained confidence in the state of the market. Lot 14 was an attractive 289 Cobra (with a NOM and incorrect induction) that reached the high 136 estimate of $1.1m. Always a benchmark investment, a garage-find Gullwing blew past the upper estimate for a final sale price of $1,457,500. Quality restorations and originality still bring premium prices on desirable lots. Much of the weekend’s buzz surrounded the sharp decline in Ferrari 275 GTB prices. Neither of Gooding’s 275 GTBs offerings sold, and the high bids were miles from the pre-sale estimates. Not everyone can afford this expensive metal, and many well-heeled collectors have already checked this box off their bucket lists. Other disappointments included a Porsche Carrera GT that sold for $621,500. These cars reportedly touched $1m in the peak of the market. This seems like an attractive price at half of a Ferrari 599 SA Aperta. Great cars still bring great prices. An excep- tional and rare Bugatti Type 35 Grand Prix racer sold for $3.3m, which was just above its high estimate, while the 1965 Ferrari 500 Superfast sold within the predicted range at $2.9m. When the final totals were tallied, dollar sales declined 21% from last year’s sales total. However, the 84% sell-through rate was only a 1% decline from 2016. Many lots did sell below aggressive, pre-sale estimates. Owners of unsold lots should ask themselves if they truly understand the market better than the informed bidders in the room, on the phone, and over the Internet. This auction illustrates that there is still a deep market for those sellers who are not chasing the unicorn prices of the 2013 peak. ♦ Sales Totals $60m $50m $40m $30m $20m $10m 0 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 Sports Car Market


Page 136

Gooding & Co. Scottsdale, AZ ENGLISH #121-1928 BENTLEY 4½ LITRE tourer. S/N FT3221. Eng. # FT3222. Dark green/ black leather. RHD. Odo: 12,882 miles. Matching-numbers engine and alloy body. Detailed ownership and local race history. Nice paint with normal evidence of enjoyment. Exceptional interior patina. Beautiful wires. Cond: 2. family ownership. Older restoration showing signs of age. Thick, pillow-like paint. Scratched chrome. Tidy engine bay. Nice interior patina. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $456,500. Slow bidding with not much action in the room. Final bid was well below the estimates but appropriate given the lot’s needs. #26-1964 ASTON MARTIN DB5 coupe. S/N DB51612L. Eng. # 400/1621. Dark green metallic/black leather. Odo: 8,435 miles. Rare, U.S.-delivered LHD DB5. Nicely presented older paint (in non-original color). Excellent dash and gauges. Fresh driver’s seat dye. Matching numbers with worn engine cosmetics. Shows signs of enjoyment throughout. Cond: 2. ownership history (including factory records). Matching numbers. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $3,300,000. Bugatti dominated the Grand Prix calendar of its day. This was a significant and special lot. While sold at a significant premium to other Type 35 race cars, try to find another one for sale with this provenance. SOLD AT $1,100,000. Spirited bidding from start to finish on this lot. Charlie Ross egged the bidders on as this approached and met the seven-figure level. A strong result for an excellent lot. Well bought. #65-1959 AC ACE Bristol roadster. S/N BEX1099. Eng. # 100D2 961. Red/black leather. Odo: 84,588 miles. Offered without reserve. MatchIng Bristol D2 block with nonoriginal Arnolt cylinder head. Decades of missing ownership history. In storage for the past several years. Originally blue, it was painted red in the 1980s and soon after used in the Colorado Grand rally. Exterior is well presented, with signs of normal wear and enjoyment. Deeply worn seats. Nice dash. Tidy engine bay. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $880,000. Sold just below the SCM Pocket Price Guide median valuation of $917,300. #115-1986 FORD RS200 coupe. S/N SFACXXBJ2CGL00169. White/red cloth. Odo: 2,004 km. An engineering tour de force with composite body and tubular space-frame chassis. Detuned from its rally spec, but still offering great period performance. Believed to be the last production RS200 road car. Uberlow miles. Amazing condition showing only minimal signs of use. Cond: 2+. GERMAN #18-1955 MERCEDES-BENZ 300SL Gullwing coupe. S/N 1980405500098. Eng. # 1989805500077. Fire Engine Red/Fawn vinyl & red plaid. Odo: 31,239 miles. Sixty years of single-family ownership. A preservation class, mostly original, barn-find Gullwing that oozes patina. Deeply torn and soiled interior with add-on chrono/temperature/altimeter gauges. Pale chrome. Rusted body panels. Mechanically unusable in current state. Cond: 4. SOLD AT $1,457,500. A crowd favorite. Opening bid of $620k. Car exploded after $1m to final hammer price. Preservation-class cars are still all the rage. You can restore a car as many times as your pocketbook will allow, but they are only original once. Very well sold. SOLD AT $242,000. Opening bid of $100k, quickly doubled and then stalled. Sold at a market-correct level, well below the aggressive pre-sale estimates. #49-1960 ASTON MARTIN DB4 Series I coupe. S/N DB4211L. Eng. # 370/230. Peony Red/black leather. Odo: 56,936 miles. Series 1, U.S.-spec DB4 with long-term, single- #62-1958 PORSCHE 356A Super speed- SOLD AT $236,500. Rally-based cars are gaining popularity in the U.S., but this rare lot may have brought more interest overseas. Most observers did not know what it was or how dominant its cousin was on the World Rally scene. Well bought at the final price. FRENCH TOP 10 No. 6 #22-1925 BUGATTI TYPE 35 Grand Prix racer. S/N 4487. Eng. # 43. Blue/black leather. RHD. Catalog cover, World Championship Grand Prix Type 35 Bugatti. Only three owners over the past 90 years. While condition does not dictate the value of this lot, it screams honest patina and originality. Extensively documented race and 138 Sports Car Market ster. S/N 84274. Eng. # 81478. Meissen Blue. Odo: 93,450 miles. California barn-find in derelict condition. In “storage” for over four decades. No rust holes but enough panel imperfections to put a restorer’s kids through college. Engine is claimed to “turn freely.”


Page 138

Fresh Meat by Chad Taylor Gooding & Co. Scottsdale, AZ Online sales of contemporary cars 2017 Mercedes-Benz C63S AMG cabriolet Needs everything to be even usable. Cond: 5+. SOLD AT $341,000. Opening bid of $100k. To the crowd’s delight, spirited activity quickly exceeded the $300k level. Sold beyond reason. If it’s restored, the new owner will likely have a car that costs well beyond its market value. Date sold: 02/07/2017 eBay auction ID: 201800579276 Seller’s eBay ID: 2012eurocars Sale type: New car with 10 miles VIN: WDDWK8HB9HF480529 Details: Designo Diamond White Metallic over black leather; 4.0-L, twin-turbocharged V8 rated at 503 hp and 516 lb/ft, 7-sp auto, RWD Sale result: $95,340, Buy It Now, sf 61 MSRP: $80,850 (base) Other current offering: In Springfield, IL, Isringhausen Imports is offering an Obsidian Black Metallic over black leather 2017 C63 AMG cabriolet, with unspecified miles, for $86,485. 2016 BMW M6 coupe SOLD AT $341,000. Speedster prices have stayed strong over the past year. This was an honest car that sold for the correct, current market price. Date sold: 02/04/2017 eBay auction ID: 361897630338 Seller’s eBay ID: bmwmidtown Sale type: New car with 15 miles VIN: WBS6J9C56GD934680 Details: Matte gray over black leather; 4.4-L, twinturbocharged V8 rated at 560 hp and 500 lb/ft, 7-sp auto, RWD Sale result: $158,835, Buy It Now, sf 134 MSRP: $113,400 (base) Other current offering: Reeves Import Motorcars of Tampa, FL, asking $141,955 for a Black Sapphire Metallic over black leather 2017 M6 coupe with 6 miles. 2016 Cadillac ELR coupe Date sold: 01/12/2017 eBay auction ID: 201778127601 Seller’s eBay ID: mi_shash_gyjcnnr8r Sale type: Used car with 4,447 miles VIN: 1G6RM1E40GU103244 Details: Crystal White Tricoat over Kona Brown leather; single electric motor with 1.4-L I4 rated at 233 hp and 373 lb/ft, 1-sp auto, FWD Sale result: $51,500, Buy It Now, sf 0 MSRP: 65,000 (base) Other current offering: Sewell Cadillac Houston, in Houston, TX, offering a 2016 Graphite Metallic over Kona Brown leather ELR coupe, with 6,953 miles, for $49,995. ♦ 140 SOLD AT $275,000. Great cars can still bring great results. With premium, this car hit the lower end of the very aggressive pre-sale estimate. While this price may be outside of many price guides, it was the price for this exceptional lot. SOLD AT $132,000. An absolute crowd favorite during the preview and the sale. It took most of its 50 hp to make it up the ramp. The tent erupted when Charlie Ross said, “It’s probably amphibious, but don’t try it.” Despite its charm, it is not roadworthy, and some estates may not want this forever parked on their property. The practical considerations were reflected in the final price, below the low estimate. #17-1961 PORSCHE 356B coupe. S/N 117294. Black/red leather. Odo: 121 miles. #45-1979 MERCEDES-BENZ 450SL convertible. S/N 10704412052062. Astral Silver/black canvas/black leather. Odo: 743 miles. In the wrapper, uber-low (743) mileage, time capsule. One-owner example kept in climate-controlled environment. Color-matched hard top. All original. Highly optioned. Fully stocked owner’s folio. Period analog phone. Cond: 1. SOLD AT $82,500. A very intriguing lot which gathered much interest. Who buys a 450SL and does not use it for over 35 years? If this was your dream car, there are no better Sports Car Market #56-1959 TEMPO MATADOR Mikafa Reisemobil “Landyacht” Camper. S/N 154900. Blue, white and yellow/light yellow vinyl. Odo: 13,148 miles. Coachbuilt, aluminum-body camper once owned by the Vanderbilts. One of six believed to still exist. Recovered from long-term storage, where it still retains many untouched (and uncleaned) items from the 1960s and ’70s. Shown at The Quail. As cute as a bug in a rug. Cond: 4+. #158-1958 PORSCHE 356A Speedster. S/N 84282. Eng. # 68012. Black lacquer/black vinyl. Odo: 12,786 miles. Color change from Ruby Red to Black Lacquer on thick, glossy paint. Some chips where panels meet. U.S. headlights and safety bumpers. Nicely presented interior with correct details. Tidy engine bay. California black plate in place. Nicely presented and correct details. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $90,750. The Gooding auctions seem to be the best place to sell a 356. Similar-quality cars brought much less money at Barrett-Jackson and other venues. Price guide lists a median price of $62,600. Hence, this average driver was very well sold. #12-1967 MERCEDES-BENZ 300SE cabriolet. S/N 11202312009474. Eng. # 18998712001260. Dark maroon/tan cloth/ Cognac leather. Odo: 38,514 miles. Unknown early ownership history. Comprehensive fiveyear cosmetic and mechanical restoration. Exterior paint looks almost brown in certain lighting conditions. A stunning car gathering a lot of attention all weekend. This lot had exceptional paint and convertible top. Slightly faded brightwork. Exceptional interior with the exception of deeply scratched dash top (only visibile from outside the car). Numbersmatching W189 engine. Toolkit. Cond: 1-. Thick, scratched paint. Some poor gaps and rubber. Replacement seat belts installed on wrong side is reflective of poor details. Sloppy headliner. Fresh, twin-plug, nicely presented engine with big Webers. CoA, jack included in sale. Cond: 2-.


Page 139

Gooding & Co. Scottsdale, AZ #156-2005 PORSCHE CARRERA GT convertible. S/N WP0CA298X5L001466. GT Silver metallic/black leather. Odo: 5,148 miles. U.S.-spec Carrera GT with five East Coast owners in the past 10 years. One of 1,270 made (644 U.S. spec). Some front panel shade variation. Normal interior wear. Replacement luggage set. Unstuffed wheels. Cond: 1-. ones to be found. Looks as if it was built yesterday. A rare lot exceeding the high estimate. #42-1988 PORSCHE 959 Komfort coupe. S/N WP0ZZZ95ZJS900182. Silver metallic/wine red leather. Odo: 21,954 km. U.K.-delivered, exported to U.S. in 2000. A few mysteries surround this lot. Why would it need an engine and clutch rebuild with such low miles? Front end had the appearance of repaint/bodywork. I wasn’t able to verify since my paint meter only works on metal and showed slight paint shade variations and lessthan-Porsche-like panel gaps. Beautiful rims. Normal interior wear. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $621,500. A significant discount to the 2013 mania when these briefly touched $1m. Well bought. #54-2011 PORSCHE 911 GT3 RS coupe. S/N WP0AC2A98BS783483. Gray Black/ black leather & alcantara. Odo: 2,608 miles. Dry-sump, normally-aspirated, 6-speed GT3 RS. Claimed to be street miles only. No signs of abuse or damage. Nicely optioned with cornering lights, upgraded audio and front-lift system. As-new exterior, interior and engine bay. Cond: 1. SOLD AT $1,089,000. Opening floor bid of $500k. Spirited bidding that could not quite break the one-million-dollar mark without the premium. This was an aggressive result given the mysteries surrounding this car. #140-1996 PORSCHE 911 GT2 coupe. S/N WP0ZZZ99ZTS392139. Polar Silver/ black leather. Odo: 36,266 km. Delivered to the Japanese market. One of 57 street 993 GT2s built. Never sold new in the U.S., this Japan-delivered car came to our shores in 2013 (under the Show and Display exemption). Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $214,500. A bit overshadowed by the later 4.0 version and the ultimate 911R. The insatiable desire for those cars has created a nice opportunity for this very desirable lot. Well bought at the final price. ITALIAN #136-1932 ALFA ROMEO 6C 1750 Se- ries V Grand Sport roadster. S/N 10814377. Eng. # 10814377. White & black/brown cloth/ brown leather. RHD. Odo: 19,901 miles. Attractive Figoni-bodied V-series 1750 6C featured in magazine advertisements of its day. NOT SOLD AT $950,000. My trusty paint meter shows possible paint- and bodywork on the left and right front sides (with power comes responsibility). Beautiful paint otherwise. Seat wear in the normal places. A huge bid given miles and possible body repair, but below the very aggressive estimates. April 2017 141


Page 140

Gooding & Co. Scottsdale, AZ This supercharged roadster was originally delivered to Paris, possibly to the Dreyfus family (of commodity-trading fame). Detailed history from the 1950s to present day. Restored in correct colors to a very high standard, showing only gentle signs of use. Exceptional paint. As-new interior with sensational dash restoration. Concours engine presentation. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $1,595,000. Sold at a difficult price point well below the low estimate. A good buy for someone that does not mind the color. Buyer will have an invitation to nearly every vintage event on the planet. #30-1949 MASERATI A61500 coupe. S/N 078. Eng. # 078. Blu Scuro/red leather. Odo: 53,533 miles. One of 61 produced. Matching engine. Older, comprehensive, photo-documented restoration. Mille Miglia eligible. History file. Small paint imperfections throughout. Nicely restored wheels. Tidy engine bay. Stunning interior in excellent condition. A nice example that can be enjoyed without hesitation. Cond: 2. # AR0012001096. Argento/blue & white cloth. Odo: 41,973 km. Internally modestly upgraded engine. Even paint with some front-end body filler. Normal period Italian panel gaps. Attractive but worn interior. Undetailed engine bay. I drove in this car with a Gooding rep the day before the auction. Once warm, it drove as it should. Cond: 2. time, with a space for skis. The final bid with premium was below the low estimate, but seemed fair based on the car’s cosmetic needs. #20-1969 FERRARI 365 GTC coupe. SOLD AT $154,000. Tough opening of $50k, which quickly rose past six figures. Three floor bidders (of which I was one) went back and forth. Eventually sold at a slightly aggressive level. This car was for sale in New York State for months at only a slightly higher level. Auctions are often good places to sell cars. TOP 10 No. 9 #126-1965 FERRARI 500 SUPERFAST coupe. S/N 5989SF. Eng. # 5989. Light blue metallic/dark red NOT SOLD AT $460,000. Opening bid of $300k, which quickly escalated to $460k. High bid was significantly below price-guide value of $657,500 and the low estimate. Owner was smart to bring it home. #130-1954 ALFA ROMEO 1900 SS coupe. S/N AR1900C01801. Eng. # AR130800844. Verde Seta/brown leather & cloth. Odo: 271 km. Touring-body 5-window pillarless design shown without bumpers (included in sale). U.S.-delivered 1900 spending much of its life in Western states. Older restoration showing nice patina. Worn and cracked driver’s seat. Beautiful dash. Exceptional chrome knockoffs. Incorrect rear window moulding. Correct-type motor not claimed to be matching. A very nicely presented, honest-looking car that could be enjoyed without regret. Cond: 2+. leather. Odo: 40,533 miles. One of 28 LHD 500 Superfasts. Classiche-certified matching numbers. Extensive cosmetic and mechanical servicing to the highest standard. Exceptional paint in non-original color. Stunning Borranis. Three-piece matching luggage. The entire car looks as if a skilled restorer spent a month on every panel to ensure it was perfect. Cond: 1. S/N 11989. Eng. # 11989. Rosso Corsa/black leather. Odo: 45,804 km. Shiny, thick paint (in non-original color) over bodywork imperfections. Panel waves in driver’s door. Inconsistent chrome. Attractive Borranis over fresh and correct XWXs. Nicely finished dash wood. Cond: 2. NOT SOLD AT $600,000. 330/365 GTC prices have started to soften after parabolic increases over the past decade. Price guide has a median of $858k. However, prices have recently softened and this lot had needs, reflected in the high bid price. #119-1970 FERRARI 365 GTB/4 Day- SOLD AT $2,915,000. A featured lot, prominently elevated all weekend. Bidding from both in and outside auction tent. Final result was the second-highest sale of this auction, at a difficult price point this weekend. A milliondollar premium over the price-guide median price. #10-1967 LANCIA FLAMINIA Super SOLD AT $357,500. Well bought at a discount from the price-guide median value. #105-1962 ALFA ROMEO GIULIETTA Sprint Speciale coupe. S/N AR177324. Eng. 142 Sport coupe. S/N 826232002121. Eng. # 8262002112. Grigio Newmarket/red leather. Odo: 18,977 km. Late-production Super Sport with the highest performance of its model run. While few would argue that this was one of Zagato’s best creations, it is a unique and elegant design. Extensive recent mechanical restoration. Very limited ownership history. Paint issues throughout, especially in panel creases. Honest-looking interior with beautiful dash and gauges. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $247,500. Opening bid of $100k with a long pause at $190k. These are rare cars and not frequent auction participants. Ahead of its tona coupe. S/N 13231. Eng. # B260. Rosso Nearco/tan leather. Odo: 79,620 km. Eurospec, plexi-nose Daytona. Exceptional condition throughout. Recent cosmetic restoration with stunning paintwork. Fresh and correct interior. Detailed engine bay. As-new Borranis. Older engine and transaxle rebuilds. Attractive color scheme. Difficult to fault. Cond: 1. NOT SOLD AT $720,000. Daytona prices have softened over the past few years. Many sellers are still looking for 2013 peak prices. This car had it all but wasn’t enough to roll back time. The price paid was close to the high end of the current market, but the seller was right to hold out for more money. Sports Car Market


Page 142

Gooding & Co. Scottsdale, AZ #4-1972 FERRARI 246 GT DINO coupe. S/N 03978. Giallo Fly/Nero leather. Odo: 41,000 km. Late, Euro-spec Dino coupe with (likely retrofitted) L-type front indicator lens and Perspex headlight covers. Over the past decade, this car has been seen at dealers through the country. Missing early ownership history. Delivered in Azzurro Dino, now painted Fly Yellow. Some paint imperfections including a deep gash near the gas filler. Normal, uneven panel gaps. Some incorrect interior details. A driver-level car. Cond: 2. most of the preview. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $132,000. Very well bought versus the priceguide median price of $184,300 and the presale estimates. #55-1975 LANCIA STRATOS HF Strad- ale coupe. S/N 829AR0001948. Azzurro/black alcantara. Odo: 35,368 miles. One of 492 produced. Part of Rosso Bianco Collection. A nicely presented Stratos in an attractive, original color. Strong paint. Interior showing signs of enjoyment. Correct condition for a rally car that isn’t too perfect to be used for its intended purpose. Cond: 2. market-correct given the known and unknown issues surrounding this car. It should’ve traded hands at the high bid. #6-1987 LAMBORGHINI COUNTACH SOLD AT $280,500. Bidding opened at $100k and stalled at the $190k level, until Charlie Ross worked his magic. Final price was right on the money for a driver-quality Dino coupe. BEST BUY #153-1974 MASERATI BORA 4.9 coupe. S/N AM11749764. Eng. # AM1071149764. Oro Kelso/Senape leather. Odo: 36,465 miles. One of 275 4.9-L Boras made. Classiche certified, matching numbers, mostly original U.S.-spec car. Original-looking paint (with factory-like orange peel) and period panel gaps. Recent mechanical freshening. Battery charger affixed during SOLD AT $451,000. Opening bid of $300k, quickly accelerated to $400k. Four tent bidders battled it out to the final price. Traded hands below the low estimate but close to the current market value. #8-1980 FERRARI 512 BB coupe. S/N F102BB30401. Red & black/black leather. Odo: 23,008 km. Mystery surrounded this lot. Why does such a low-mileage example need an engine rebuild? It is claimed to retain “much of its factory paint,” yet there are several obvious, sloppy drip runs on the hood. The claimed-original interior shows much more wear than the mileage would suggest. Inconsistent exterior rubber also increased the skepticism regarding this lot. On the positive front, the dash gauges and rims were all very well preserved. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $280,000. This lot was slow to open and there was not much enthusiasm in the room. While the final bid was below the estimate, it was about 5000 QV coupe. S/N ZA9CA05A8HLA12086. Rosso Siviglia/Mustard leather. Odo: 22,151 km. Correctly advertised as a “time warp” example given its futuristic styling and stunning preserved condition. Exceptional original paint that looks fresh and brilliant. The usual inconsistent Italian panel gaps. Minimal interior wear in the usual places. Under 14,000 miles since new. Cond: 1-. NOT SOLD AT $245,000. The Countach set the world on fire in 1974 with its dramatic styling and performance. Thirteen years later, it was nearing its production end and its changes could not entice sales efforts. Fuel injection was added to the QV but sacrificed over 40 hp. This was a spectacular lot in a less-desirable production lot. It should have sold to a collector or museum but deserved a higher price. The seller was right to not accept the high bid. #51-2011 FERRARI 599 SA Aperta con- vertible. S/N ZFF72RHA5B0181885. Grigio Titanio/black leather. Odo: 2,484 miles. A guaranteed collectible as only 80 were produced. Factory Classiche Red Book certification. Optional carbon-fiber roof. Paperwork, history, tools, books and records. As-new condition with no signs of wear, abuse or damage. Cond: 1. SOLD AT $1,485,000. This lot gathered huge interest among the crowd. Multiple bidders pushed the price beyond the high estimate. One cannot deny the rarity and desirability of this special car, but the price paid was excessive and it was well sold. Ferrari probably wished they had made more at these prices. © 144 Sports Car Market


Page 146

Russo and Steele Scottsdale, AZ Russo and Steele — Scottsdale 2017 Mid-level muscle packs a punch with strong sales at Russo Company Russo and Steele Date January 19–22, 2017 Location Scottsdale, AZ Auctioneer Jeff Stokes, Rob Row, Dan Schorno Automotive lots sold/offered 606/780 Sales rate 78% Sales total $22,046,589 High sale 1954 Mercedes-Benz 300 S Cabriolet A, sold at $423,500 Buyer’s premium 10%, included in sold prices One of 500 with factory sunroof — 1976 Porsche 912E coupe, sold at $27,500 Report and photos by John Boyle Market opinions in italics change of location. After years in the north end of Scottsdale, W for Russo and Steele’s 17th annual event, the tents were pitched nine miles to the south. The site, Salt River Fields at Talking Stick, is a 140acre baseball stadium, hotel and entertainment complex best known as the spring training home to the Arizona Diamondbacks and the Colorado Rockies. The new location provides Russo with ample parking and is covered with grass instead of the previous site’s bare desert. Russo and Steele founder and CEO Drew Alcazar said the move was long overdue and had been contemplated for several years. Located just off the 101 Freeway, the new spot has plenty of elbow room and is close to downtown Scottsdale. In addition, three hotels are nearby, enabling out-of-town buyers and sellers easy access to the sale. The sales total of $22.1m was a $1.2m improvement over the 2016 figures. With 606 out 148 hile consignments, sales rates and totals all increased this year over 2016, the big news at Russo and Steele’s Scottsdale event was its of 780 lots sold, the sales rate increased by 6% to a 78% total. In a market where most vehicles seem to be taking a break from the seemingly daily increases seen in past years, the firm seemed pleased with the outcome, claiming “Russo and Steele was Scottsdale 2017’s only major auction house to garner two consecutive years of positive growth momentum” in a company news release. Russo presented a broad mix of consignments, ranging from exotics and high-end muscle and sports cars to entry-level cars and trucks. An imposing 1954 Mercedes-Benz 300 S Cabriolet A was the top sale of the event at $423,500, followed by a 1973 Ferrari Dino 246 GTS Spyder at $379,500. In the American camp, a spotless 1969 Ford Mustang Boss 429 raised an impressive $335,500, and a 2006 Ford GT sold at a reasonable $261,250. Late-model exotics were represented by a 2006 Mercedes-Benz McLaren SLR, which sold for $248,000. A few cars were bid to impressive numbers but still went unsold. These included a 2005 Ford GT prototype that went up to $660,000 and a first-rate 1968 Corvette L88 bid to $473,000. Russo and Steele founder and CEO Drew Alcazar said Sales Totals $25m he’s pleased with the way the market has stabilized. “The exponential increases we saw in some facets of the market between 2008 and 2014 were unsustainable in the long run. Now that prices are stable, I think it’s good for the marketplace in general,” said Alcazar. What about sellers in this market? “From a seller’s point of view, a more stable market forces sellers to vet the cars better, present them with documentation, and work at presenting the cars in the marketplace,” Alcazar said. “In an environment where fewer mistakes are made, the sales experience is better for everyone.” ♦ $20m $15m $10m $5m 0 Sports Car Market 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 Jim Pickering


Page 148

Russo and Steele Scottsdale, AZ ENGLISH #S755-1967 JAGUAR XKE convertible. S/N 1E15010. Red/black cloth/black leather. Odo: 31,483 miles. Older restoration that could still win awards. Very good paint shows minor wear around openings. Looks like some bodywork was done in the distant past around front of trunk opening. Door rubber like-new. Chrome excellent as are the spotless wire knockoffs. Exceptional interior with only minor wear to console. Possibly original sun visors look like they’ve lost their stuffing. Nicely refinished wood steering wheel. Debris/dirt thrown against inside of hood by fan. Everything else under the hood, suspension, frame and engine, is spotless. Neatly done stainless heatshield added around exhaust manifolds to protect hood paint not original, but not a bad idea for a driver. Comes with Jaguar Heritage Certificate. Reportedly a lifelong Southwest car that spent its first three decades in California. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $20,350. Turbos were introduced in 1981, but the 1985 cars had suspension modifications to improve handling. Being sold by its second owner, a Porsche collector who wanted to expand his automotive tastes but found he couldn’t get comfortable in the low confines of a Lotus—a common complaint. Comes with complete service records and toolkit. In short, if you wanted to buy an ’80s Lotus, this was worth considering. Despite those positives, it sold a few thousand below what it should have, so it was well bought. GERMAN #S751-1954 MERCEDES-BENZ 300S convertible. S/N 1880103500280. Black/ beige cloth/red leather. Odo: 64,482 miles. Excellent paint on what seller describes as an older restoration. Minor scratches around trunk handle. Excellent chrome with minor polishing marks on huge radiator shell. Taillight lens slightly cloudy. Nice leather with just the right amount of patina, excellent wood. Chrome radio trim has minor pitting and scratches. Fitted with original Becker Nurburg radio. Painted silver pipes look like they were rattle-canned. Engine compartment clean and correct and fitted with a modern battery. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $137,500. Despite selling near the top of the market, it seems to have motivated one bidder to believe it was a bargain, as it’s currently for sale by a dealer with an asking price of $199,999. SOLD AT $148,500. A great car, well presented but not too nice to actually use. It was interesting to compare this older restoration to the recently completed beige ’67 E-type on offer (Lot S720). Each car had its strong points, and certainly the newer restoration had an edge in “sharpness.” But for my money, if you wanted a car to drive, this would be the one to take home. Well bought. #F511-1985 LOTUS ESPRIT Turbo coupe. S/N SCCFC20A6FHF60591. Metallic green/tan leather. Odo: 3,483 miles. Factory paint has had numerous touch-ups, prompting the owner to call it “half original.” It has some wear and a few bubbles in the center of the roof. Black bumpers and body joint strip very good. Notoriously fragile Lotus interior very nice, the seats having been reupholstered in the correct leather. Unmarked wheels with new quality tires. Rear trunk was excellent, though carpet piping shows some wear; front compartment average. There’s not much to see in the engine bay except the engine, which is clean and dry, as might be expected since it was rebuilt only 500 miles ago. Cond: 3+. #S762-1967 MERCEDES-BENZ 250SL convertible. S/N 113044310003579. Nissan Blue/blue metal & black cloth/black leather. Seller claims recent rotisserie restoration of a matching-numbers example in factory colors. Excellent paint on body, minor issues on hard top. While the front bumper shows well, some minor scratches noted on other trim and rear bumper. One section of rubber side molding loose. Interior unmarked, but one of the chrome defroster vents atop the dash doesn’t sit correctly. Minor orange peel to dash finish. Spotless under the hood with modern Mercedes-brand battery. Comes with restoration book, receipts, tools and factory records. Cond: 2. and correct. A matching-numbers car with Certificate of Authenticity and copy of factory Kardex. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $423,500. One of 203 cabriolets built between 1952–55. The 300-series “Adenauer” Mercedes (named after the country’s chancellor) was the poster child for the nation’s “economic miracle” of the 1950s. In addition to the stately sedans that were Germany’s official car of state, they also produced comfortable roadsters, coupes and cabriolets. And while the styling seems to have more in common with the pre-war 540s, its underpinnings were modern for the time and its engine became the basis for the racing unit found in the 300SL series. Probably because of its older restoration, this was a well-bought car for condition. Last seen at the RM London 2013 sale, where it sold for $436,000 (SCM# 6482109). #S758-1959 PORSCHE 356A coupe. S/N 106237. Aquamarine/red vinyl. Odo: 27 miles. A fresh restoration with just break-in miles. Excellent paint in factory color over straight body. Chrome and window stainless exceptional. Door-window rubber cut differently on each side. New interior features rare bench seat. Paint chip on steering wheel. Excellent headliner and sunroof opening. Engine bay not open but catalog photos show it to be clean 150 SOLD AT $134,750. A Euro-spec 250. One of 112 with factory ZF 5-speed. While it’s goodlooking to the casual observer, I think Mercedes purists might be disappointed. Appropriately sold for condition. It was a nosale at $105,000 at Leake’s Dallas sale in November (SCM# 6810479). #F412-1974 VOLKSWAGEN THING Acapulco edition convertible. S/N 1842403049. White & blue/white & blue vinyl/white & blue vinyl. Odo: 45,020 miles. Seller says it’s a recent restoration and it certainly looks like it. Very nice paint on straight body with no signs of repairs—easy to check due to pallet-like wood floor mats that protect the floors and allow water to evaporate. Interior stock with (unusually) uncut dash and freshly covered seats and crack-free steering wheel. Engine bay spotless, as was front trunk, which featured what had to be a new fuel tank. No signs of the side curtains, but when in Arizona, why worry? Cond: 2-. BEST BUY Sports Car Market


Page 150

Russo and Steele Scottsdale, AZ SOLD AT $19,800. Despite its basic nature and trim level, when new, the Thing cost more than Beetle or Super Beetle coupes and was within $300 of the sporty Karmann Ghia coupe. This “Thing” (properly called a Type 181) sold at last year’s Barrett-Jackson Scottsdale sale for $23,100 (SCM# 6778584), which is closer to its value than what was realized here. Someone got a very good buy. #TH184-1976 PORSCHE 912E coupe. S/N 9126001025. Eng. # 4061041. Grand Prix White/black vinyl. Odo: 190,101 miles. Recent repaint in factory color with straight body and factory panel gaps. Recently renewed interior in factory-style materials. Modern radio with aftermarket door speakers. New headliner. Wear/clouding to fuel gauge and clock. Speedometer, tach and temperature gauges better. Recently overhauled engine and engine bay is clean but not obsessively detailed. One of 2,099 produced, and seller notes it’s one of just 500 with factory sunroof. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $27,500. A lifelong AZ/CA car that was restored 700 miles ago. The 912E was a one-year-only model aimed at the lower end of the Porsche market, sold alongside the outgoing 914/4 2.0 which shares its engine. New, it sold for about $3,000 less than the contemporary 911, which still carries a broadly similar premium today. This was a very clean car with a good history and sold right where it should have, perhaps a bit of a bargain considering its recent restoration. It’s nice to see that there are still rear-engine Porsches out there for us mere mortals. #S748-2006 MERCEDES-BENZ SLR MCLAREN coupe. S/N WDDAJ76F36M000832. Brillant Silver/red leather. Odo: 21,600 miles. As-new with the exception of minor paint chips on nose and chip on edge of driver’s door. Slight curb damage on left rear wheel; all wheels have worn tread. Slight wear to bolster of deep factory racing-style seat. Engine bay not open but I’ll guess there aren’t many Pep Boys add-ons under there. Cond: 2+. Mercedes supercar, the SLR was developed in conjunction with Mercedes F1 partner McLaren. Originally priced at $455,000. The firm said it would limit production to 3,500 cars; eventually, they sold about half that total before ending production in 2009. A quick check of the Internet shows these are readily available, most with far fewer miles and priced correspondingly higher. The closest match I could find was a similar-colored 2005 example with slightly fewer miles and a dealer asking price of $269,000. That makes this one look well bought. Last seen at Mecum at Monterey in August, where it sold for $206,250 (SCM# 6808700). ITALIAN #F438-1969 ISO LELE coupe. S/N 500- 087. White/burgundy leather. Odo: 10,366 miles. Older paint shows masking around door openings. Body straight with excellent gaps. A spot of rust is showing in lower corner of driver’s door opening. It might be just a superficial chip, but would warrant a close look. Beautiful leather interior, excellent wood, dash and gauges. Seats show minor patina, and front seats could use a new pad. Wood/chrome steering wheel and Becker Grand Prix radio like-new. Leather-covered console has charming Jaeger clock sitting atop it. Hood not open for inspection. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $248,400. Designed to be the new SOLD AT $70,400. In Italy until 1984, then California. Another in the long line of ItalianAmerican exotics. One of 317 Leles, the Bertone-designed, 2+2 sibling of the better-known Grifo. This set a new price record in the SCM database for the type; the previous high was $62,100 for a Ford-powered limited edition sold by Bonhams in 2007 (SCM# 45709). This was a nice example, so this price might be the new normal. #S736-1969 FERRARI 365 GT 2+2 coupe. S/N 365GT12573. Light blue/black leather. Odo: 86,200 miles. Newer repaint in understated original factory color shows very well, with a few small chips to the nose. Body is straight with excellent panel gaps. Bumpers and trim excellent. Driver’s seat has patina; the other three don’t look like they’ve ever been sat in. Wood and leather dash is excellent and fitted with original AM/SW/FM radio. Minor wear to console. There has been some retrimming, as seller includes a few yards of spare leather. Engine compartment clean and dry. Seller includes spare. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $190,000. A five-owner AZ/CA car until 2014. Engine was rebuilt in in 2006 by local specialist. The Pininfarina design has aged very well, and with its airy cabin and independent rear 152 Sports Car Market


Page 152

Russo and Steele Scottsdale, AZ AMERICAN #S742-1966 SHELBY GT350 convert- suspension (the first in a Ferrari 2+2), it was an excellent choice for those who needed the extra seats. I liked this car a lot; it sold below the level of similar cars, so I’ll call this one well bought. #S738-1973 FERRARI 246 GTS DINO Spyder. S/N 6380. Black/red & black leather. Odo: 25,162 miles. Restored 2014–16, excellent paint. Unmarked bumpers and trim. Exhaust is polished with no sign of heat discoloration. Daytona “chairs” interior like rest of car, very well done with only a minor crease to driver’s seat. Unmarked wheels, new correct tires. Engine compartment is clean and correct with only a light layer of dust. Cond: 2. ible. S/N 6S2389. Wimbledon White/blue cloth/white vinyl. Odo: 10,629 miles. 289-ci supercharged V8, auto. Paint is approximately 10 years old. Straight body was originally a rust-free 6-cylinder car before Shelby transformation (seller told me Shelby believed that a six would have had an easier life in the 14 years before conversion) and has excellent gaps. Likewise-excellent interior dates from rebuild. Spotless engine compartment with correct components, nice Paxton supercharger and repro Autolite battery. Cond: 2-. Excellent bumpers, window trim shows only slight signs of wear. Interior is stock and unworn, with creases on driver’s seat. Dash and steering wheel good. Engine bay clean and correct, but not over the top. Recipient of NCRS Top Flight and Bloomington Gold certification. Cond: 2-. NOT SOLD AT $253,000. One of 12 Shelbyauthorized continuation GT350s built by Beverly Hills Mustang in 1980 and the only one with a Paxton blower. A “one of none” car since Shelby never sold ’66 convertibles to the public (he did make a few for internal and family use). As such, it’s difficult to value, but the SCM median for a real-deal coupe is $173k, and one price guide says an excellent one is worth $225k, so the seller’s $293k reserve looks high to me. #S744-1968 CHEVROLET CORVETTE SOLD AT $379,500. Restoration said to have cost in excess of $120,000. Originally a yellow Euro-spec car imported to the U.S. circa 1980. The color change and Euro spec didn’t seem to concern bidders; sold at the top of the market. Remember when Dinos were affordable? L88 coupe. S/N 194378S417431. Silverstone Silver/black vinyl. Odo: 49,384 miles. 427-ci 430-hp V8, 4-bbl, 4-sp. Restored in 1987 and holding up very well. Small section of crazing on right front fender along with two faint cracks nearby. Chips in driver’s door jamb. NOT SOLD AT $473,000. Said to be one of 80 L88s produced in the inaugural year for the C3. Although rated at 430 hp, some say its power is closer to 560 hp. Along with the big block, the L88 package included heavy-duty suspension, Positraction, heavy-duty brakes, an aluminum radiator as well as less sound deadening and no radio to discourage road use. Bid was right in the neighborhood, so could have been taken. #S737-1970 OLDSMOBILE 442 W-30 2-dr hard top. S/N 344870M271171. Black/ white vinyl. 455-ci V8, 4-bbl, 4-sp. Recent restoration is practically flawless. Unmarked red fender liners. Slight wavy chrome on front bumper. Trunk gaps slightly uneven. Owneradded spoiler done in period. Excellent interior, with minor puckering to rear seat back. Minor dip in dashpad, the rest of Rally Pack dash is flawless. Comes with period-correct Redline Tiger Paw tires. Engine compartment not open but catalog photos show it to be as good as the rest of the car. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $165,000. Said to be a numbersmatching car, one of 1,032 W-30s built with a 4-speed. Said to be the only Olds ever to get a perfect score in judging at the Muscle Car Nationals. A Canadian-market car with factory paperwork showing options as well as a “Rocket Report” done by an Olds specialist. Blueprinted engine comes with dyno test results. #S739-1970 PLYMOUTH SUPERBIRD 2-dr hard top. S/N RM23V0A171644. Lemon Twist/black vinyl/black vinyl. Odo: 61,673 miles. 440-ci V8, 3x2-bbl, 4-sp. Betterthan-factory paint in original color. Unlike some, nose and headlight doors fit very well. Door gaps vary slightly, just like Plymouth made them. The usual small bumps under the vinyl top. Better-than-average window trim. 154 Sports Car Market


Page 154

Glovebox Notes 2017 Infiniti Q50 3.0t Sport sedan Russo and Steele Scottsdale, AZ A brief look at cars of interest that have passed through the SCM garage. HHHHH is best. Deluxe bench-seat interior well trimmed, with minor tear to driver’s seat and plastic “wood” steering-wheel rim. Features pistol-grip shifter and radio delete. Dash in excellent shape. Engine bay is clean and correct but too detailed. Cond: 2. expect on a 46-year-old $4k–$5k car. Interior looks good with no rips. Dash is uncracked, but bezels and pistol-grip shifter show scratches and general wear. Hood not open for inspection. Cond: 4. NOT SOLD AT $379,000. One of 70 Hemi 4-speed cars built and 36 known survivors. Seller made a big point of saying this is the only known unrestored black example. One of my price guides tells me that an excellent Hemi is worth $312k, and the SCM Pocket Price Guide median is $350k, so by turning down $379k, the seller is putting a fair-sized premium on original Detroit mass-market build quality. Price as tested: $50,420 Equipment: 3.0-liter 300-hp twin-turbo V6 engine, 7-speed automatic transmission, Dynamic Digital Suspension, Sport brakes, speed-sensitive power steering, LED lights, blind spot warning, collision warning with emergency braking, Around View Monitor with moving object detection. EPA mileage: 20/29 Likes: Heaps of integrated technology include apps for email, calendar, etc. Dual screens give double the interface — no need to lose your Nav map to tune the radio or turn up the heat. Sporty power delivery is just enough to make the commute fun, but it’s not overkill. Dislikes: Rear seats are cramped at best and ornamental at worst. Tall drivers fit OK, but tall passengers have a harder time getting comfortable in the front seat. Wide turning radius for its size. Fun to drive: HHH Eye appeal: HHH Overall experience: HHH Verdict: A fun, fast option for the daily grind, with all the tech integration and safety features you’ll ever need. Want to go faster? There’s a 400-hp Red Sport version. — Jim Pickering NOT SOLD AT $176,500. One of just 716 440 “Six Pack” cars, a step up from the standard 4-bbl. This was a nice car in a great period color. Whenever I see one with a bench seat, I figure the original owner had a girlfriend he wanted to sit close to. Seller says it’s one of 308 with this engine and transmission setup, and believed to be one of one with this color and options. Despite being bid to a close-to-market price for a car of this quality, the consignor decided to take it home. #S741-1971 DODGE HEMI CHAL- LENGER R/T coupe. S/N JS23R1B242313. Black/black vinyl. Odo: 63,956 miles. 426-ci V8, 4-bbl, 4-sp. Original paint has held up surprisingly well; minor bubbling and paint loss on rear deck, around fuel filler and base of roof pillars. Paint cracked atop A-pillar. Chrome is worn but far better than you’d SOLD AT $261,250. While this one wasn’t still in the wrappers like some, it was still asnew. Car card gives no details of history or options. If I were expecting someone to pay more than $100k over MSRP for a car, I might want to provide some details; after all, there are a lot of GTs out there. Sold at a price lower than many sales. So unless there are some unseen issues, it seems well bought for now. © “ 156 One of my price guides tells me that an excellent Hemi is worth $312k, and the SCM Pocket Price Guide median is $350k, so by turning down $379k, the seller is putting a fair-sized premium on original, Detroit mass-market build quality. 1971 Dodge Hemi Challenger R/T coupe CAR COLLECTOR AMERICAN ™ #S750-2006 FORD GT coupe. S/N 1FAFP90S76Y401511. White & blue/black leather. Odo: 1,130 miles. 5.4-L supercharged V8, 6-sp. Factory paint with no noticeable chips. Wheels unmarked, bluing on exhaust pipes. Interior like-new but wear/dent on stainless steering-wheel hub (seems to be a common problem; I spoke to three GT owners at the sale and they also had that issue. They said it can’t be fixed without replacing the airbag). Engine bay not open, but looked to be clean. Cond: 2+. ” AmericanCarCollector.com/subscribe Sports Car Market SUBSCRIBE TO ACC 877.219.2605 Ext. 1 Keith Martin’s


Page 160

Roundup Selected Sales Combined in One Comprehensive Report Global Auction Highlights ENGLISH #9-1936 ALVIS SILVER EAGLE SG Sport Tourer. S/N 12720. Red/tan cloth/tan leather. RHD. A highly presentable 4-door touring car, with lovely red paint finish throughout. Excellent panel gaps. Clean and well detailed throughout, the chrome and trim is outstanding, and plentiful up front. Five tall chrome wire wheels are on display, and the folding Le Mans-style windscreen is quite sporty. Very clean under the bonnet; it was quick to start and ran silently. Inside, fresh leather seats show only minor wear, with clean carpets and a very simple dash and layout. A drop top with side curtains, with an inline six and a fully synchro gearbox. Classic, sporty and practical—all in one car. Ticks a lot of boxes with me. Cond: 2. “Farm find” 1961 Aston Martin DB4 coupe, sold for $374,000 at Worldwide’s Scottsdale, AZ, auction SILVER AUCTIONS Location: Fort McDowell, AZ Date: January 19–22, 2017 Auctioneers: Mitch Silver, Gary Dehler, Steve Dorsey, Matt Backs Automotive lots sold/offered: 219/494 Sales rate: 44% Sales total: $3,335,371 High sale (tie): 2007 Shelby GT/CS fastback, sold at $70,200, and 1952 Nash-Healey roadster, sold at $70,200 Buyer’s premium: 8%, $250 minimum, included in sold prices Report and photographs by B. Mitchell Carlson WORLDWIDE AUCTIONEERS Location: Scottsdale, AZ Date: January 18, 2017 Auctioneer: Rod Egan Automotive lots sold/offered: 64/82 Sales rate: 78% Sales total: $11,402,970 High sale: 1967 Chevrolet Corvette L88 convertible, sold at $1,980,000 Buyer’s premium: 10%, included in sold prices Report and photographs by Bob Dekorne SOLD AT $99,000. A rare and very desirable body style, with room for the whole family, yet a very sporty demeanor. Like an MG TD on steroids, or maybe the product of a Bentley and a Jag hooking up, this was a very flashy and sporty vehicle for 1936. Voted a CCCA Full Classic in 2014. Bidding ended when the new owner stepped up with a $10k advance, and the whole room knew it was destined to be his. Well played, and one of the best buys of the whole evening. Worldwide Auctioneers, Scottsdale, AZ, 01/17. #285-1952 NASH-HEALEY ROADSTER roadster. S/N 2204. Eng. # T1211F. White/ black cloth/red leather. Odo: 76,225 miles. History presented with the car indicates that the original Nash 6-cylinder engine was swapped out in late 1957, as soon as the original owner could get a Chevy 348 V8 as a crate engine. He also must have stuffed some heftier springs under the front end, as the car was generally sitting even keel. Stock Nash transmission adapted to work. Custom dual-exhaust system is essentially a pair of sewer pipes heading straight back. Thusly has a stock exhaust note—for a Chevy race car. Cosmetic redo in recent years includes a repaint, bumper replate, some interior soft trim, and engine-bay fluff 1955 Chrysler C-300 2-door hard top, sold for $43,200 at Silver Auctions, Fort McDowell, AZ 162 Sports Car Market Jim Pickering


Page 161

Roundup ’n’ buff. Top shows some weathering, but is generally weather-repellent. Center on two of the wire wheel covers (they kept getting moved from side to side by the consignor over the weekend) has been crudely spot-welded back on. Modern wide whitewall radial tires. Cond: 3. SOLD AT $70,200. I find it odd that the original owner went with a big-block 348 instead of a lighter and likely better-fitting smallblock Chevy. Over a decade ago, Nash-Healeys were the flavor of the month, selling for six digits. Now they have significantly settled lower in values, and with the consignor dropping the reserve when the bidding failed to advance, this was fully sold. The potential to do better on it is if you have an original head in your inventory (as the block and bottom end aren’t that difficult to scare up out of a dead Nash Ambassador), which will have everyone who has a 6-cylinder 1958–61 Impala knocking on your door for that 348. Silver Auctions, Fort McDowell, AZ, 01/17. #59-1952 JAGUAR XK 120 roadster. S/N 672435. Cream/tan cloth/red leather. Odo: 13 miles. Wonderful bodywork covered by deep, rich paint surfaces, with excellent trim and chrome. A first-rate presentation, with matching painted wheels, matching caps, and —honestly—even a matching tint on the wide whitewall tires. The entire car is obviously fresh and never dirty. New tan cloth top fits right, with new side curtains. A sumptuous red leather interior is outstanding, with a perfect dash, clean instruments and new carpets. Pop the bonnet and one of the greatest engine bays you’ll ever see is apparent immediately. Tons of polished aluminum and lovely, traditional mechanicals simply look great. Tried hard, simply could not find any flaws. Cond: 1. Le Mans examples. Factory equipped with the louvered competition hood, a high-lift cam, larger carbs, stainless exhaust and high-compression pistons. A beautiful presentation under the bonnet, and very clean underneath as well. Full-zip tonneau cover, factory heater and wood steering wheel complete an attractive package. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $203,500. Name-brand restoration, tons of club and concours awards, and just one of two A-H Club Gold Concours cars to ever come up for auction—what’s not to love? Add in highly documented, well judged, cool colors and fully equipped. There were a ton of bidders on this car right from the start, and the room knew you just have to step up to own one this nice. Sold right on the money, and a fair exchange of funds for all parties involved. A great car going to a great new home. Worldwide Auctioneers, Scottsdale, AZ, 01/17. #45-1961 ASTON MARTIN DB4 coupe. S/N DB4510L. Green/black vinyl. Odo: 72,929 miles. All there, but in “touch everything” condition. A very cool history. Parked in the ’70s, after a color change to green and the interior re-dyed to black. After 45 years outside, it’s amazing anything exists at all. Paint peeling off everywhere, some bodywork revealing itself, rusty chrome and trim literally hanging off the car. Rusty wire wheels, with the original tires that hold air! Original glass survives, which is likely why the floorboards are still there at all. Cool wood-rimmed steering wheel is about all that is salvageable on the interior. Did not run, but sure did get a lot of attention. Cond: 5. SOLD AT $132,000. JCNA judged 100 points many times—who am I to argue? It received fine placement in the room by the Worldwide staff, and got a ton of attention all week. It bid up to the low $100ks in no time, eventually selling to a phone bidder. That guy is going to be very happy when this car is delivered, and let me tell you, he got a great buy on this car. Long after the money is forgotten, he’ll still own a 100-point Jaguar. Worldwide Auctioneers, Scottsdale, AZ, 01/17. #23-1956 AUSTIN-HEALEY 100M Le Mans roadster. S/N BN2L232274. Eng. # 1B232274M. Florida Green & Old English White/black vinyl. Odo: 746 miles. A stellar restoration, starting with near-flawless paint and bodywork throughout. Excellent chrome and trim, with that uber-cool (and often copied) lay-down wind screen. One of 191 factory April 2017 SOLD AT $374,000. Well promoted by Worldwide as a “farm find” and certainly a unique opportunity. Sold at about 70% of an average car according to SCM, a good result for sure. Once owned by voice actor Dallas Williams— the “Culligan Man”—who apparently bought it in 1962. Well known in the Aston Martin Owners Club records. Two guys on the phone really wanted this car, with most of the room wondering where their upside would come from. Have to call this one well sold, thanks to 163


Page 162

Roundup a very good presentation by the Worldwide staff. Worldwide Auctioneers, Scottsdale, AZ, 01/17. #6-1965 SUNBEAM TIGER Mk I road- ster. S/N B9471888. Blue/black fiberglass/red vinyl. Odo: 25,204 miles. An average repaint at best, looking recent but not very deep. Missing trunk emblem. Lots of pitted trim pieces, and just average chrome. Straight, with decent panel gaps. Just okay in the engine bay, a driver in average condition. Started readily and sounded good. Very cool real wood dash in good condition, with a rough steering wheel and some suspect gauges. Newer carpets, newer red and black piped seats, and comes wheel and sill moldings would lead you to believe the odometer has been around the block once at least. The Worldwide staff worked hard to get this sold, with the last bid coming only after working the room hard. Have to call it a fair transaction both ways, a driver-condition car for driver money. Worldwide Auctioneers, Scottsdale, AZ, 01/17. #452-1969 JAGUAR XKE convertible. S/N 4R3959. Red/tan cloth/black leather. Odo: 30,264 miles. Repainted within the decade, claiming to be in the original hue. Trunk fit not the most congruent. Even door shut lines. Most brightwork has been replated, replaced or buffed out. Non-stock triple pack of Weber sidedraft carbs with custom manifold on the intake side of the motor, custom welded tube headers on the exhaust side. Also has electronic ignition, fuel-pressure regulator with gauge, and electric puller fans. Newer clampon battery terminal cable connectors attached to a discount-store-chain battery. Wavy with a black hard top that was in average condition at best. Aftermarket alloy wheels. A driver-condition Tiger that ought to have a few more miles in it. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $51,700. Seller was right taking the high bid— the car was obviously in storage for quite a while, and there were a few tell-tale items that would lead one to believe that it was cleaned up quickly and repainted for resale. Fresh interior looks great, but the pedals, steering underbelly bodywork, suspension components all painted glossy black. Presentable seats, showing light wear and looseness from the padding compacting with age. DIN-mount sound system and speakers cut into the center console. Also has a speaker cut into the face of the glovebox door (a new one even on me). Newer carpeting. Cond: 3+. NOT SOLD AT $53,000. One thing about having a collector car auction during a thunderstorm is that you get to see how water-repellent your potential purchase really is. In this case, epic fail. The interior would have almost been as dry if they left the top down on it. The morning after the downpour, the door sills and seat were wet, plus the floor pans doubled as foot baths. Combined with the Weber sidedrafts, this was one Jag that looked good on the outside, but leaves a bit to be desired when getting intimate with it. Plenty bid. Silver Auctions, Fort McDowell, AZ, 01/17. GERMAN #477-1961 DKW 1000 coupe. S/N 6820017551L. Peach and white/gray vinyl. Odo: 27,450 miles. Bare-body restoration performed on it in 2012. Authentic single-stage repaint. Limited use since completion, as some bare-metal underpinnings now have light surface rust and some trim is starting to dull. Door-frame glass could use a little more adjusting, part of the reason the doors take some effort to latch properly. Paint chipping around 164 Sports Car Market


Page 164

Roundup Market Moment the windshield gasket, likely from a ham-fisted and/or very frustrating installation. Hood gaps uneven. Highly authentic interior restoration, with expert upholstery workmanship. Retains the original radio-delete blanking plate. Light surface rust in the bottom of the speedometer housing. Authentically detailed under the hood, aside from using a modern 8-volt battery. Cond: 2-. Courtesy of Worldwide Auctioneers 1962 Aston Martin DB4 Farm Find Sold at $374,000 Worldwide Auctioneers, Scottsdale, AZ, January 18, 2017, Lot 45 I f you’re waiting for the “barn find” trend to end, you have to continue waiting, as it still has plenty of traction. So much so that Worldwide offered two heavily distressed cars at their inaugural Scottsdale auction. While Lot 4 — a 1963 Jaguar E-type convertible — at least moved under its own power, this 1962 Aston Martin DB4 was dead weight. A copy of the original build sheet shows that it was actually built in 1960, rather than 1962 as stated in the auction catalog. One is left with the impression that it was a demonstrator, with a few fixes done until it was sold in Los Angles in 1962 (hence the titling and catalog description). That first owner was ad copywriter and voiceover actor Dallas Williams — his most fa- mous body of work being for Culligan water softeners. His wife voiced the famous shrill “Hey, Culligan Man!” The car eventually ended up with the same owner for 45 years — and was left to rot outdoors on a Massachusetts farm. The decades of neglect left the motor seized, yet the car was complete. So at least you know what to replace. I credit Worldwide for at least washing it off. All too often, vehicles marketed as “barn finds” are displayed exactly as found — dripping with guano, rodent feces and smelling like mouse pee. Everyone could see what was left of the color-change repaint, but no one had to risk hantavirus in the process. Folks I know who are well dialed into the world of Aston Martins tend to agree that there’s nothing wrong with this neglected hulk that a trip to the factory restoration shop in Newport Pagnell can’t cure — for at least $300k. That doesn’t include transportation costs. Based on that figure — which is dumb lucky cheap if nothing else is found before comple- tion — go ahead and add the $374k price of admission. So, the new owner will spend at least $674k — plus postage and handling — to make it into a car worth in the ballpark of $700k. This is, at best, a razor-thin margin. Yet for someone with the means who really REALLY wants to be the first to restore and subsequently keep a left-hook DB4, it can be done. For those who think just enough work can be done to make it functional, well, think again. There is not one mechanical component that will not need refurbishment — if not replacement — to get it to go, stop, and wear license plates. The only way to save this Lazarus is to have his maker resurrect him. Otherwise, you have one helluva piece of Man Cave art. Sold well. — B. Mitchell Carlson SOLD AT $19,170. It’s amazing how much a wrap-around windshield can change a car’s design—or truck, in a similar case with the 1960–63 versus 1964–66 Chevy/GMC. I’ve seen earlier DKWs on occasion, with the simpler curved windshield. I almost thought this was a different car, until mentally blocking off the greenhouse. Yup, the same basic 1000 coupe that was introduced in 1958, but the new windshield, vent window and shorter door glass gives a blockier look rather than a tall Porsche 356 with a grille. However, it’s still the same ring-dinger 3-cylinder two-stroke golf-cart engine used in all years of production. Something of a chick magnet, it did fairly well on the block, with the reserve cut loose at $17,500 and fetching one more bid. Silver Auctions, Fort McDowell, AZ, 01/17. #463-1967 BMW 1800 4-dr sedan. S/N 0996621. French Blue/black vinyl. Odo: 14,478 miles. Older, very presentable repaint with an authentic sheen, although the consignor claims it’s Bugatti Blue. American Bugatti Club decal on the replacement windshield, 100 years of BMW BMW-CCA member decal on the rear window. Original California black license plates, which are still current. Light pitting on the emblems, buffedout bodyside moldings and door-glass trim. Decent door fit and shut lines. Reflectors added to the inside edges of the doors. Halogen headlight-bulb conversion. Somewhat burly exhaust note, due to a glasspack muffler and single Weber sidedraft carburetor conversion manifold. Retains the original 6-volt generator electrical system, with a modern 166 166 Sports Car Market


Page 165

gel-cell battery. Clean under the hood, but not show-car clean. Light wear on most of the bone-stock interior. Stock wheel covers and trim rings with newer radial tires. Cond: 3+. SOLD AT $15,120. One the few Neu Klass sedans that made it to these shores before the 2002 revolutionized BMW’s presence in the U.S. for mass acceptance, rather than for German immigrants and your psychology professor. Not surprisingly, it’s a lifetime California car, as everywhere else in the country these have all but evaporated. Not entirely bonestock, but even with the slushbox tranny, would be a fun driver. Bid to $12,250 on the block, with the statement, “Show me $14k and it’s yours.” Within a couple of cars afterwards, it was declared by Mitch on the block that it sold, so they must have showed ’em $14k. Silver Auctions, Fort McDowell, AZ, 01/17. #316-1971 VOLKSWAGEN SUPER BEETLE 2-dr sedan. S/N 1113045959. White/light blue polyester. Odo: 81,501 miles. Stock-style steel wheels, but fully chromed, shod with older low-budget radials. Presentable old repaint. Fitted with an aftermarket vinyl nose bra. Piecemeal brightwork. ThirdWorld sourced replacement running boards, with weathered rubber, dinged trim, and mediocre fit to the body and fenders. Original weather-checked left taillight lens, fresh new replacement on the right. Generally original under the hood, barring some additional wiring and an orange cold-air-intake hose. Seats and door panels expertly re-covered in what looks to be leftover floral-print sofa cloth. Somewhat heavy wear on the seat bottoms, very heavy wear on the outboard side of the seats from the shoulder belt. Even the door panel map pockets were done in this material. Drivability problem on site; stated that it “might have a throw-out bearing issue.” Cond: 3-. SOLD AT $4,536. Aunt Beatrice must have had to buy the whole bolt of fabric when she had her couch recovered—and really liked it. Otherwise, a poor woman’s (or man’s) attempt at a mod interior. While the interior may have kept some folks away from this first-year Super Bug, it may have drawn in others. Yet the questionable mechanicals made most everyone keep their hands in their pockets. The reserve was lifted at $4k, and garnered two more bids to sell well enough. Silver Auctions, Fort McDowell, AZ, 01/17. #82-1988 PORSCHE 944 hatchback. S/N WP0AA0946GN456542. Guards Red/black leather. Odo: 119,976 miles. 1990s-era Turbo April 2017 167


Page 166

Roundup swirly wheels on newer Falken tires. Topical repaint over a front clip that’s been put back together, and not especially well. Roof deformed around the sides of the ill-fitting optional sunroof hatch. Replacement windshield. Missing the 944 badge in the rear. Brake light out on the driver’s side, light cracking in the lenses for both sides. Door seals torn on the corners. Driver’s seat bottom is the best seat panel, with light to moderate wear on the seat back and the entire passenger’s side. Torn-up heel pad. Emblem fallen out of the shift knob, which has worn through the leather covering, plus the shift boot has pulled out of the console. Console-top armrest is missing. Modern sound system in the dash. Used-car-lot enginebay detailing. Title delay. Cond: 3-. Repowered with a Volvo 4-cylinder and 4-speed transmission from a P1800, although a correct-type Fiat 1.5L wearing fresh paint was sitting on an engine stand next to this car. Expertly repainted in Ferrari Rosso Corsa. Original glass seals by and large were retained, with rear windows showing heavier dry-rotting and edge chipping. Selective refurbishing of the brightwork. Wears two types of Fiat hubcaps (at least the same pair were on each side). Door alignment slightly off, but trunk and hood shut lines are good. Expert seat, door panel, and dashboard reupholstery workmanship; with minimal wear since. Newer carpeting. Lesser quality to the repaint on the interior, with some orange peel. Period AM/FM radio with modern speakers. As can be expected from an engine manufacturer swap, there’s a few Frankenstein modifications, but they did a pretty decent job with the swap. Crimp connectors abound on the electrical system under the hood. Title delay. Cond: 3+. maybe the powertrain from a 2002 with rusty shock towers would’ve been better. However, he’d have likely been just as successful doing that as what transpired (or more to the point, didn’t transpire) here. Silver Auctions, Fort McDowell, AZ, 01/17. #38-1967 MASERATI MEXICO coupe. S/N AM1121118. Dark burgundy metallic/ burgundy steel/black leather. Odo: 93,611 km. A well-cared-for car, not fresh, but nice and evenly worn. Good paint, with a few small areas of concern; a nice 10-footer. Same for the chrome: all there, looks quite original, in decent shape. Car presents as very original, with factory a/c, power steering and very cool chrome wire wheels. The interior shows it’s without any major flaws; in fact, it’s quite comfortably worn in. Cool toggle-switch dash, with a wooden steering wheel and period Kenwood cassette deck. Has that look of Dad’s favorite car that didn’t get driven very much, so it never needed restoration. Cond: 3+. NOT SOLD AT $5,500. Before it crossed the block, the consignor asked me what I thought it was going to do here, and got a bit huffy when I theorized that it’ll likely get bid in this crowd to five grand. Well, I do know these surroundings, and I also know that the best hope for this Audi with an identity crisis is to become a track rat. Otherwise, run it as a commuter bomb until something expensive breaks, then part it out on Craigslist. Silver Auctions, Fort McDowell, AZ, 01/17. ITALIAN #472-1967 FIAT 1500 Ghia coupe. S/N 0284987. Red/black vinyl. Odo: 42,428 miles. NOT SOLD AT $33,000. Considering that there was no Fiat badging on the body (only a Ghia 1500 GT badge on the nose and Ghia horn button), in a way I’m surprised that the consignor didn’t ditch the two sets of Fiat hubcaps for Volvo wheel covers and try to market it as a one-off Ghia-bodied Volvo. Actually, it almost looks like a BMW-Glas 1600 GT, so SOLD AT $137,500. This car reminds me of that favorite pair of jeans—the ones that fit well, are comfortable, and you save for the special occasions. A beautiful GT design with plenty of room for four, as long as two are quite small—that is one tight back seat. Complete with service records that look good. I’m sure this is a very fun car out on the Autobahn, or for those pesky errands to the jewelry store. Sold right on the money, hopefully to a guy who just wants to keep enjoying it, so a righteously cool deal for both buyer and seller. Worldwide Auctioneers, Scottsdale, AZ, 01/17. JAPANESE #237-1972 HONDA 600 2-dr hatchback. S/N AZ6001005118. Yellow w/ black graphics/ black vinyl. Odo: 49,990 miles. Old presentable repaint, with non-stock graphics added. Thick masking lines along the dryrotted windshield gasket. Poor front fender to rocker panel fit. Even worse body work (if you can call it that) across the top of the rear hatch frame at the roof. Several missing parts on roof rack. Windshield wipers work v-e-r-y s-l-o-w-l-y. Japanese flag decal on the rear hatch glass. Doors need a fairly hearty slam to latch properly. Original interior is quite presentable, although there’s some limited seam splitting along the seat pleats. Period aftermarket wrapped steering-wheel cover is worn and falling apart. Door panels have moderate warping. Runs out pretty well—for a golf cart. Older repaint and replacement radial tires on the stock wheels. Title delay. Cond: 3-. 168 Sports Car Market


Page 168

Roundup it, at least, and has sun fade. More fading on the blackened rear hatch hinges. Driver’s side taillight lens is broken at the corner. Door fit isn’t too bad. Door glass seals dry-rotted and cracked (no wonder the door rattles). Newer windshield and gasket. Just enough sun fade on the tops of the door panels to have light fissures starting. Seat bottom cloth has some splitting developing and heavier padding compression. The rest of the interior is actually in pretty decent shape for being over three NOT SOLD AT $5,800. Looking at this from the rear, it gave me the impression of a shrunken Pinto hatchback (if you can wrap you head around that concept). Chalk it up to taillights that are near identical and similar hatchback glass profile. To prove that I still have some sanity, from any other angle, it looks like a shrunken first-gen Civic. With increased interest in 1970s Japanese cars, I sort of figured that it would do a little better than this. Yet not the $15k reserve that the consignor thought. Silver Auctions, Fort McDowell, AZ, 01/17. #221-1980 MAZDA RX-7 fastback. S/N JM1FB3319B0504642. White/brown cloth. Odo: 98,560 miles. Optional automatic transmission and metal sun roof. Factory alloy wheels shod with older economy-grade radials. Decent 10-footer masked off repaint Each piece of the blackout trim has a ding or two on “ 170 day’s budding enthusiasts have any idea what to do with all three of those pedals on the floor of a manual-transmission car. Yet since it’s pushing shabby, if there was real money on it, it should’ve traded hands at this price. Silver Auctions, Fort McDowell, AZ, 01/17. decades old. Modern sound system displaces the stock radio. Heavy carpet and rear parcel cardboard panel wear. Used-car engine bay. Runs out well enough. Cond: 3-. NOT SOLD AT $5,000. Even used-car-grade first-gen RX7s have been doing well in the last few years. While some would think that automatic examples would automatically bring markedly less, you must remember that far fewer of to- Looking at this from the rear, it gave me the impression of a shrunken Pinto hatchback (if you can wrap you head around that concept). 1972 Honda 600 2-door hatchback #436-1981 DATSUN 280ZX coupe. S/N JN1HZ04S2BX274043. Metallic blue & silver/tinted panels/gray vinyl & blue cloth. Odo: 91,550 miles. Optional T-top, cruise control, a/c, power windows and AM/FM/cassette sound system. Dealer-accessory body side moldings. Rather spiffy and well-cared-for original paint. Good door fit, clean original cad-wash finish on the latch hardware in the jambs. Excellent finish on the original alloy wheels, now shod with replacement radials. Bumper claddings slightly dull. Modern replacement windshield. Exceptionally clean and generally original under the hood, with a lot more bright cad-wash finished hardware. Buffed and polished cast aluminum valve cover is a bit over-the-top. Well cared for original interior, with light fade and wear on the seat bottoms. Light to moderate soiling BEST BUY ” on the original carpeted floor mats and shift knob. Aftermarket carpeted dash top cover, but not hiding any sins. Original roof panel vinyl pouches look to be unused. Older replacement KYB shock absorbers underneath. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $11,988. This was the second auction in a row that I encountered an early-’80s Z-car in this same color combination. I seem to recall this being a popular combination back in the day. I almost thought they were the same car, but one quick look showed that that was a vastly nicer original example. Since ZXs are finally getting some love in the market, both here and back in their homeland, the only surprise on the selling price here—achieved after the reserve was off at $11k and garnered one more bid—was that it didn’t bring more. May prove to be well bought in a few years. Silver Auctions, Fort McDowell, AZ, 01/17. AMERICAN #467-1955 CHRYSLER C-300 2-dr hard top. S/N 3N551046. Black/tan leather. Odo: 35,637 miles. 331-ci V8, 2x4-bbl, auto. Fitted with reproduction Chrysler/Imperial wire wheels with radial wide whitewall tires. Repainted within the last few years to a betterthan-average standard. All brightwork has been replaced, replated or professionally polished. Economy dual-exhaust system, which both has a healthy burble and non-stock out- Sports Car Market


Page 170

Glovebox Notes 2017 Volkswagen Passat 1.8T SEL Premium sedan Roundup A brief look at cars of interest that have passed through the SCM garage. HHHHH is best. lets that protrude different lengths past the rear bumper. Expertly and authentically reupholsted in leather. Several light cracks on the steering wheel. Repainted dashboard and polished fittings, with some light pitting on some of the original chrome. Generally tidy engine bay. The engine repaint is getting soiled down on the block. Heater hoses and carburetors show soiling. Universal-fit flex upper radiator hose. Modern crimp connectors used on a lot of wiring. Cond: 2-. Price as tested: $31,815 Equipment: 1.8-liter TSI DOHC Turbo I4 engine, 6-speed automatic, remote start, heated seating, dual-zone climate control, 6.3-inch touchscreen navigation screen with Bluetooth, Fender audio system, blind spot detection with rear traffic alert, lane departure warning and parking pilot zone detection EPA mileage: 23/34 Likes: Intuitive. Feels well-made and generally nice to touch. Comfortable and fast enough. Handsome in a reserved way. Plenty of room for taller drivers and passengers without knees lodged in seatbacks. Dislikes: Ruthlessly practical. Depending on who you are that could be a good or a bad thing, but I get the feeling that nobody had any fun designing this. Fun to drive: HH Eye appeal: HHH Overall experience: HHHH Verdict: The VW’s simple and sensible design made for navigating the stop-and-go traffic of Scottsdale easy. Great choice for grocery duty, but you’ll need to keep some fun car keys on hand for those weekend drives. — Garrett Long below. Cond: 3+. NOT SOLD AT $63,000. Last seen at the Leake-Dallas auction in November 2016, then a no-sale at $60k (SCM# 6814732). Has also been a frequent flier at several venues in the past few months, as it’s dealer inventory. While it was stated rolling off the block that it was “on the wrong side of $75,000,” getting bid in the $60k range is more than a trend. It’s the new market. Silver Auctions, Fort McDowell, AZ, 01/17. #451-1970 PONTIAC GTO Judge rep- SOLD AT $43,200. This first-year 300s differed from their latter Letter Car brethren by nomenclature (the only year that the letter preceded 300). The reserve was surpassed at the $39k point, fetching one more bid to sell. Considering there was only one other ’55 C-300 for sale in town this weekend (an exBob Lutz example that sold at Gooding for $129,250) and having inspected both cars and found them a horse apiece for authenticity, the one at Silver was about equal in condition and therefore was the better buy (sorry, Bob). Silver Auctions, Fort McDowell, AZ, 01/17. #305-1969 PLYMOUTH ROAD RUN- NER coupe. S/N RM21J9G207046. Light green metallic/green vinyl. Odo: 23,134 miles. 426-ci V8, 2x4-bbl auto. Equipped with Air Grabber hood, bucket seats and center console, in-dash tachometer, and AM radio. Better-quality repaint in the past few years. Masking on the flat black hood stripping has several miscues. Both doors have decent shut lines but rattle a bit. Could well be the original interior, as the forward edge of the driver’s seat has heavier wear and pleats are starting to split. Modern aftermarket oil-pressure gauge mounted below the dash. Recent cleanup under the hood. Hard fuel lines and several under lica 2-dr hard top. S/N 242370Z102473. Light blue metallic, orange & blue graphics/ blue vinyl. Odo: 5 miles. 400-ci V8, 4-bbl, 4-sp. Equipped with Ram Air IV 40-ci V8, Muncie 4-speed, power steering, power brakes, center console, hood tach, and AM radio. Real-deal GTO, made-up Judge, by admission of the consignor. No PHS documentation displayed with or on the car. Competent restoration within the past few years, but just shy of concours quality. Good paint and graphics application. Brightwork replated or replaced with reproductions. Window moldings not fitted so well in a couple of places. Panel gaps are about as good as can be expected from The General at the time of production. Quite clean and well detailed under the hood. Modern non-GM supplier battery. Light wrinkling of the woven vinyl seat-bottom inserts. Aftermarket rear sway bar. Newer stock-style dual exhaust and fuel tank. Cond: 2-. NOT SOLD AT $47,500. Regardless of how authentically it’s crafted, it’s still a made-up Judge. This consignor may admit it, but once it gets shuffled through a few owners, it’ll likely turn up billed as either a “real deal” or “tribute” with the PHS documentation that shows it to be a GTO only. Likely the latter will only occur once someone buys it under the first scenario and gets burned. And isn’t it a federal offense to impersonate a judge? Silver Auctions, Fort McDowell, AZ, 01/17.© CAR COLLECTOR hood brackets have heavier surface rust; alternator case has heavier corrosion. Aftermarket performance coil. Hoses, clamps and battery are discount-store parts. Simplified newer dual-exhaust system and replacement fuel tank 172 SUBSCRIBE TO ACC 877.219.2605 Ext. 1 AmericanCarCollector.com/subscribe Sports Car Market AMERICAN ™ Keith Martin’s


Page 172

Sports Car Market Keith Martin’s The Insider’s Guide to Collecting, Investing, Values, and Trends Subscribe to SCM today and become a collector car insider www.sportscarmarket.com ™ 174 Sports Car Market


Page 174

Motorcycle Roundup Selected Sales Combined in One Comprehensive Report The Las Vegas Motorcycle Sales Chrome eight-inch headlight is holding up well. Chromed battery box. Correct Lucas taillight for era. Wheels were appropriately carriage painted. Nice older restoration by Bud Ekins for Bud’s buddy, Steve McQueen. Cond: 3-. NOT SOLD AT $47,500. ’38 Speed Twins are iconic enough by themselves. Throw in the double whammy of Steve McQueen and Bud Ekins and you should have a rocket to ride. This was documented from the famous McQueen estate sale in Las Vegas in 1984. Catalog and certificate included. High bid of $47,000 wasn’t enough. Seller wisely retained title. Mecum Auctions, Las Vegas, NV, 01/17. 1928 Excelsior Big Bertha Hillclimber The Las Vegas Motorcycle Auction Company: Bonhams Location: Las Vegas, NV Date: January 26, 2017 Auctioneer: Malcom Barber Motorcycle lots sold/offered: 170/243 Sales rate: 70% Sales total: $3,359,124 High sale: 1914 Feilbach Limited, sold at $195,000 Buyer’s premium: 25% on the first $150,000 and 20% from $150,001 to $3,000,000, included in sold prices Report and photos by Somer Hooker ENGLISH #159-1936 NORTON INTERNA- TIONAL motorcycle. S/N 3065038. Eng. # CS51528. Silver. Looked like an old war horse, ready to go again. Tank is probably an old repaint. Scallop had worn away on one side. Browning around gas cap from spillage/ fumes. Correct seat and pillion pad. Engine is dirty but only from use. Header pipe has an issue that needed to be addressed. Correct Amal racing carburetor. Correct levers for era. Alloy engine plates were probably made up. Cond: 4. 26th Annual Las Vegas Motorcycle Auction Company: Mecum Auctions Location: Las Vegas, NV Date: January 25–28, 2017 Auctioneers: Mark Delzell, Jimmy Landis Motorcycle lots sold/offered: 870/951 Sales rate: 91% Sales total: $13,404,399 High sale: 1912 Henderson Four, sold at $539,000 Buyer’s premium: 11%, included in sold prices Report and photos by Somer Hooker need for pushrods, the Achilles heel of fourstroke racing engines. I’m gonna say this was one of the deals of the auction. Sold for twothirds of low estimate. This would have been a cheap entry into the C class of vintage racing. Bonhams, Las Vegas, NV, 01/17. #S36-1938 TRIUMPH SPEED TWIN motorcycle. S/N TH5838. Eng. # 86173084. Burgundy. Odo: 112 miles. Nice older restoration of one of Triumph’s first parallel-twin engines. Fenders are probably post-war units. SOLD AT $121,000. Nice bike. Too nice in some ways, as the factory never rolled them off the line in this quality. Price received was fairly market-correct. Day before, Bonhams had sold one for $150k and Gooding sold one for $137,500 at Scottsdale. Mecum Auctions, Las Vegas, NV, 01/17. #S112-1960 BSA GOLD STAR Clubman motorcycle. S/N CB327921. Eng. # DBD34GS4907. Silver. Odo: 200 miles. Nice 4-gallon Clubman tank. Seat is a reproduction. Levers are accurate reproductions of clip-on Goldstar brake/clutch set up. Rear sets are reproduction but accurate. Correct and rare RR-T2 transmission. Proper headlight brackets. Bike is very striking. Cond: 1-. #F180-1949 VINCENT 998-cc BLACK SHADOW SERIES C motorcycle. S/N RC4489B. Eng. # F10AB1B2589. Black. Odo: 984 miles. Very crisp bike. The paint is in great shape. Tank has gold-leaf stripe that has been cleared over. All of the hardware was hard-chromed instead of cadmium plated as original. Seat was a high-grade hide that was finished with the Feridax badge on the rear. Some scuffing on spring box’s chrome from use. Some items were left in brass as opposed to being cad plated as per original. Copies of work and restoration records were available. Cond: 2. SOLD AT $18,400. Norton’s cammy engines were THE technology of the late ’20s/early ’30s. Their bevel-drive OHC eliminated the 176 SOLD AT $33,000. These tanks really make a Sports Car Market courtesy of Mecum Auctions


Page 175

Motorcycle Roundup “Goldie.” Repairs can run into the thousands, so best to pony up on a good one. I was once told that maybe only seven real Clubmans came to the U.S. That being said, you could buy all of the components across the counter. This is a well-executed example. Vendor had a video of it running you could view online. That verification alone would be worth thousands. This was a no-sale at Mecum’s Monterey 2016 sale (SCM# 6808334). Years ago, Clubmans were fetching this kind of price. Well bought and sold. Mecum Auctions, Las Vegas, NV, 01/17. GERMAN #201-1927 BMW R42 motorcycle. S/N 12819. Eng. # 41899. Black. Odo: 26 km. Nicely detailed early BMW. Correct Bosch lighting installed. Correct levers. Alloy on engine cases and cylinder heads show well. Cond: 1-. turers in Germany. They made cars and motorcycles and raced them both, too. The Sport Max was their top-of-the-line bike. Interesting valve actuation by using rods. This was well bought. They usually sell for more, but this was a remarkable preservation piece. Mecum Auctions, Las Vegas, NV, 01/17. #T252-1965 DKW HUMMEL 115 mo- torcycle. S/N 1151007130. Orange. Odo: 3 km. Chrome is very good on this bike. The chrome engine guard helps to really make the bike. Good paint and nice decal on side. Plastic is in good shape and the alloy bits are very nice. Cond: 1. ITALIAN #S143-1956 CECCATO GRAND PRIX Single-Cam motorcycle. S/N 0135. Red. Paint is superb. It probably never looked this nice in the past! Nicely detailed engine. All alloy bits nicely polished. Chrome done to a high standard. It was probably originally cadmium plated. Number plates had lots of original event stickers on them. Smiths tachometer fitted, as was common then in Italy. Front brake plate is a ribbed piece of art in itself. Tank autographed by Taglioni. This was part of a large Italian collection being liquidated. Cond: 1-. NOT SOLD AT $40,000. Old BMWs have been coming steadily out of Europe since the fall of the Iron Curtain. Typically, you assume you are getting a real crankcase and frame. This also has the original headstock tag for what is known as a “triple match.” The rest could be reproduction, but that is not necessarily the case. Regardless of what this is, it is a nice bike. Several years ago, a similar unit sold for over $90,000 at Bonhams’ 2014 Vegas auction. Well held. Bonhams, Las Vegas, NV, 01/17. #S86-1956 NSU SUPER MAX motor- cycle. S/N 1263692. Eng. # 1263692. Blue. Odo: 24,592 km. Nice original paint. Still has kilometer speedometer. Chrome is good on the exhaust pipe. Very good paint overall. Key would have been inserted in headlight, and it SOLD AT $26,400. Park this next to a bike worth several hundred thousand and you will still get all of the looks. These look more like George Jetson’s scooter than a form of inexpensive transportation. The scooter looks as though the design work was subcontracted to Italy. If you’re going slow on a 50-cc bike, you might as well look good! There was nothing slow about how fast the price on this one shot up, though. A record for a Hummel and deservedly so. Mecum Auctions, Las Vegas, NV, 01/17. #F95-1967 BMW R69S motorcycle. S/N 662818. Eng. # 662818. Black. Odo: 21,999 miles. This bike has all of the right stuff: enduro saddle bags, big tank, headlight mirrors and bar-end signals. Correct levers for 1967 (ball ended). Also a lot of rare touring spares were thrown in on the package. However, the pinstriping was kind of amateurish. Hubs may have been sand blasted. Mufflers don’t show any signs of use. Latches on the bags are rusted. Later-model petcock fitted and license plate bracket cut down. Cond: 3+. NOT SOLD AT $27,000. These were designed by Taglioni in the 1950s before he signed on with Ducati and proceeded to design some of the most famous Ducatis ever seen. Tiny and jewel-like, this looked like it was designed for a five-foot, 70-pound rider. Bid to $27,000 but didn’t meet reserve. The only other I’ve seen was at an auction years ago in Florida. Mecum Auctions, Las Vegas, NV, 01/17. #239-1973 DUCATI 750GT motorcycle. S/N 751187. Eng. # 751813. Blue. Odo: 15,547 miles. Aftermarket master cylinder fitted in lieu of original Scarab unit. Dual-disc brake set up using Brembos. Smiths magnetic instruments fitted as on early Ducatis. Dash panel for gauges is nice but not original. Correct stainless-steel fenders. Paint is superb. Correct Conti mufflers. Decals cleared over. Correct Borrani rims. Cond: 2+. appeared that some other keys had scratched the enamel on headlight bucket. Pinstriping is very good. Seat shows slight distress. Badge on fender in good shape. Cond: 2-. SOLD AT $6,600. NSU was one of the premier manufac- April 2017 SOLD AT $28,600. Your proverbial 20-footer. Really looked nice until you got close. The R69S is among the most desirable of the /2 series of BMWs. They are also the most temperamental. This was well sold. It wouldn’t take much to bring it up to speed with a better set of pinstripes. Mecum Auctions, Las Vegas, NV, 01/17. NOT SOLD AT $20,000. Description said “set up for concours;” however, it had numerous small flaws. Incorrect master cylinder and brakes. Granted, the original scarabs were awful. Ducati never used this blue on their twins. They did use a metalflake that was similar to a Bass boat. High bid was $20k. Seller was wise to hold on. At Mecum the next day, one that wasn’t as nice fetched about $5k more. Bonhams, Las Vegas, NV, 01/17. #131-1974 DUCATI 750SS motorcycle. S/N 075358. Eng. # 075022. Red. Resprayed with a can of Krylon paint. Paint is flaking off of the top of fiberglass tank. Missing speed- 177


Page 176

Motorcycle Roundup ometer. Windscreen is a replacement. Red reflective tape has been added around headlight. Missing the left-hand Conti muffler. Correct wheel rims. General deterioration from extended storage. Cond: 4. SOLD AT $109,250. Ducati only built 401 roundcase super sports. Old joke is that only 500 have been found. The numbers checked out on this. Originally they were painted silver and the frame was “duck-egg blue,” which was actually a green. They were known as Green Frames to most enthusiasts. Quality control on paint was lacking and clearcoat crazed within months. Many were repainted. Very rare to find an “original paint” unit. This was an excellent basis for a restoration. All of the hard-to-find stuff was there. Gooding sold a very original one with a repaint on the fiberglass at Pebble Beach in 2016 for $176,000. This was well sold. Bonhams, Las Vegas, NV, 01/17. JAPANESE #F128-1969 HONDA CB750 Sand-cast motorcycle. S/N CB7500000456. Eng. # CB750E000487. Candy Blue. Odo: 10,498 miles. Nice low-serial number example. Good job on duplicating a candy color. Seat was a reproduction and a little too “stuffed.” Air box was a later unit color coordinated. Later front fender and chain guard. Two different styles of mirrors, one a later year and one correct. Correct early “no number” mufflers. Clutch and brake perches were wrong color. Nice restoration with a few hiccups on the minor details. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $30,800. The Honda CB750 has been called the most significant motor of the century. When they made a bike available with electric starter, disc brakes and speed, it sounded the death rattle for the English bike industry. Honda was unsure of the model’s acceptance, so they originally sand-cast the crankcases. When the popularity took off, they switched to die-casting. Early models were prone to throwing chains and destroying cases. Only about 7,400 sand-cast models were built. Always in demand. This was good for buyer and seller. Low serial numbers always bring big numbers Mecum Auctions, Las Vegas, NV, 01/17. #S182-1977 SUZUKI MX GP motor- cycle. S/N N76TS25021135. Yellow. Paint on aluminum tank is worn where rider’s knees had rubbed against it. Part of decal was worn off but left an interesting “shadow” patina. Extractor is rusty. Frame paint worn away and rust on surface. Brake lever rusty. Number plate cracked. BelRay oil stickers on tank and fender. Cond: 4. SOLD AT $195,000. This bike has a known history. They were indeed limited in their production run. Hard to come up with a comparable sale on this. While there have been some original-paint Harleys and Merkels in the $150k range, one of these doesn’t pop up frequently, or much at all. I would call this well sold. Bonhams, Las Vegas, NV, 01/17. #223-1936 CROCKER HEMI-HEAD motorcycle. S/N Eng. # 36618. Black. Odo: 9,041 miles. One of the stars of Bonhams’ sale. Crockers used a lot of proprietary parts. Cycle-ray headlight was common. HarleyDavidson levers. Fenders were in a bobber style that sort of originated with Crocker. Chrome is very good. No frame number, as was common then. Very handsome bike. Cond: 2+. SOLD AT $77,000. This was a very limited (maybe four) factory GP bike with trick frame, super light and all of the good stuff. In the ’70s Motocross was a very competitive sport, with all factories participating. This is what they produced for “their” riders. This bike had great history. Looked like it was ridden hard and put up wet, but you wouldn’t dare change it. Each scar was history—expensive history. Two floor bidders went at it all the way up to $70,000 hammer. Mecum Auctions, Las Vegas, NV, 01/17. AMERICAN #250-1914 FEILBACH LIMITED mo- torcycle. S/N Eng. # A660. Blue. Very original bike. Floor boards are reproductions. Chain guard may be a reproduction too. Paint is very nice for 103 years! Bike has a twistgrip throttle, which was cutting-edge technology for 1914. Front wheel was a different color from rear. Slight deterioration of nickel plating. Some scratches on the paint, as would be expected for its age. Cond: 3-. NOT SOLD AT $360,000. Al Crocker took on Harley-Davidson at their own game and built even faster bikes. Unfortunately, he never turned a profit, and with the advent of WWII, he quit. The early Crockers ran a “Hemi Head.” Very few were made. This bike was actually made from several bikes; all of which is documented. It was also subject of the TV show “What’s in the Barn?” Bike was bid to $360,000 for a no-sale. It was the earliest one ever offered at public auction. Mecum sold a small-tank Crocker for $363,000 at Monterey in 2016. Seemed like a market-correct price for the day. Bonhams, Las Vegas, NV, 01/17. #251-1937 HARLEY-DAVIDSON EL “Knucklehead” motorcycle. S/N Eng. # 37EL1115. Black. Odo: 94,803 miles. Paint is very good. Early-style Harley decals. Nice solo seat. The Parkerizing and cadmium plating of the bikes took this one over the top, though. Everything is correct. Cond: 1. 178 Sports Car Market


Page 177

Motorcycle Roundup issues, but better to leave them than use reproductions. Nice chrome and cadmium plating. Porcelain-coated header. Unit had all the small OEM bits that often disappeared. Nice attention to detail. Advertised as having an Elmer Lower bottom end. Lower is one of the most respected Indian Four men out there. Cond: 1-. SOLD AT $82,800. Harley-Davidson Knuckleheads have been hot property for years. A very iconic engine, so named because of the way the valve covers look. 1937 is a very desirable year, as they had ramped up production and worked out some of the bugs from the introduction in 1936. This bike was bought and sold well. Bonhams, Las Vegas, NV, 01/17. #S201-1941 INDIAN 441 4-CYLINDER motorcycle. S/N 441250. Eng. # DDA250. Blue. Odo: 33,438 miles. Blue paint very well done. Instruments were obviously the original units, and vendor was wise to leave them in there. They had some slight fading SOLD AT $99,000. Great bike. It is always nice to see someone celebrate the simple lines of the original Indian Fours. Too often, owners are tempted to bury them in accessories like saddlebags, miles of fringe and extra spotlights. Bike brought a premium and deserved it. Mecum Auctions, Las Vegas, NV, 01/17. © April 2017 179


Page 178

Mystery Photo Answers He overheard the judges say, “You can eat off this engine.” — Lew Rhoden, Bluffton, SC This Month’s Mystery Photo Response Deadline: March 25, 2017 Our Photo, Your Caption Email your caption to us at mysteryphoto@sportscarmarket.com, or fax to 503.253.2234. Ties will be arbitrarily and capriciously decided. Do you have a mystery photo? Email it to mysteryphoto@sportscarmarket. com at 300 dpi in JPEG format. Please include your name and contact information. If we use your photo, you’ll get an official SCM cap. RUNNER-UP: John’s wife saw the restorer crossing the judging field with an invoice, and she advised him to assume the position. — Stephen Goss, Moore, SC Where did you say the rest of those carburetors were? — Paul Black, via email Keep your head down there for another three minutes and you’ll break the record for having your head buried in an engine bay for more than two hours straight. — Phil Stevens, via email Jimmy, just keep your head in there for another minute. Your girlfriend and her husband are headed for the exit now. — Warren D. Blatz Jr., via email No way is this car as it was from the factory. I’ve seen three 180 carbs in an engine bay many times, but never three heads. — Erik Olson, Martinez, CA A famous concours judge demonstrating his signature “Head to Head” method of evaluating engine compartments. — Mark Franusich, Crescent City, CA Help! My tie is caught in the fan belt. — Walter Babiuk, San Clemente, CA Three deuces and a prostate exam. — William H. Longley, Atlanta, GA John swears he put the VIN plate on here somewhere after the restoration. — Carolene Mahnken, Milford, CT Having successfully mastered the trick of putting his head into a lion’s mouth when he worked in the circus, Gunther heroically volunteered to tune a vintage multi-carb setup in the wild. — Eric Lawrence, Laurel, MD No, no, no… I told you this was an inside-plug engine! — Garry Kelly, Evanston, IL Expensive equipment is not needed to synchronize carburetors — just two good ears! — James D. Graham, Mount Pleasant, SC Automobiles imitating Mother Nature: The Venus Flytrap Edition. — Al Nelson, Pentwater, MI It’s the three-carbed, liquid- cooled, shiny red people eater. — Alex Lobodovsky, Danville, CA You’ll have to excuse my mechanic. I told him that a fifth of tequila before breakfast was a bad idea. — Bob Melka, Marietta, GA Another hopeful Pebble Beach Concours winner loses his wallet down a black hole. — Leslie Dreist, Troy, MI When Bob tried to tune the triple carbs, he was very quickly in over his head. — Tim Wright, Glendale, AZ Too late, Bernard realized he had not connected the vacuum gauge. — Jeff Smith, Plano, TX Throwing up in the engine bay gave little relief from the judge’s cruel words. — Clay Donne, Corvallis, OR Looking for love in all the wrong places. — Don Mackay, Oceanside, CA Lew Rhoden wins a sterilized SCM cap for all the times he’s looked at a pristine engine bay and felt that first little twinge of hunger. © Sports Car Market Jim Pickering


Page 179

SCM Online Extras for SCM Readers How to connect with SCM online this month Kids and Cars Lapping It Up: Jensen Riley Lind watches the vintage races at Barber Motorsports Park, awaiting his turn to drive his grandfather’s Huffaker-prepared Jensen Healey that was the SCCA National Champion in 1973. — Pat Lind, SCMer since 1996 Send your photos of your next-generation gearheads to SCM. If your photo is selected, you’ll win an official SCM cap. Send your hi-res photos to kids@ sportscarmarket. com. Please include your contact info, the name of the child in the photo, the make and model of the car and any descriptive information you would like. April SCM Cover Poll Results Visit SCM on the Web Here’s a Sample of Some of What’s Available at www.sportscarmarket.com Keith Martin’s Weekly Blogs (www.sportsarmarket.com/blogs/keith- martin) • Happy 50th Birthday to the Alfa Super • How Should SCM Celebrate Its 30th Anniversary? • Ford Broncos: Collectible or Driveable? • The Fourth Annual Arizona Concours d’Elegance Guides and Resources (View or downlad at www.sportscarmarket. com/guides-supple- ments) • 2017 Insider’s Guide to Spring Auctions (new) • All-new 2017 Price Guide For Subscribers www.sportscarmarket.com/digitalissues-online • One year of back issues of SCM, searchable 2013 Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Super Sport 300 8% (51 votes) 1969 AMC AMX/3 40% (243 votes) 1963 Jaguar XKE Lightweight Competition 52% (320 votes) NOTABLE QUOTE: “While the first two cover choices represent intriguing options, the E-type is widely regarded as the single most important car launched during the preceding half century-plus. ... Its importance in advancing the collector-car climate is simply without peer.” — J. Christopher Gemmell To participate in the next poll, subscribe to the SCM newsletter at www.sportscarmarket.com April 2017 181 Platinum Deluxe Users View 500,000 auction results at www.sportscarmarket.com/platinumauction-database (Platinum Auction Database members only). Compare the latest sales or track a car over its auction history!


Page 180

SCM Showcase Gallery Sell Your Car Here! Includes SCM website listing. Showcase Gallery Full-Color Photo Ad Just $66/month ($88 non-subscribers) Text-Only Classified Ad Just $15/month ($25 non-subscribers) 4 ways to submit your ad: Web: Visit www.sportscarmarket.com/classifieds/place-ad to upload your photo (300 dpi jpg) and text, or text only. Secure online Visa/MC payments. Email: Send photo (300 dpi jpg) and text, or text only, to classifieds@sportscarmarket.com. We will call for your VISA/MC. Fax: Attention Showcase, to 503.253.2234 with VISA/MC. Snail mail: Showcase, PO Box 4797, Portland, OR 97208-4797, with VISA/MC or check. 25 words max, subject to editing. Deadline: 1st of each month, one month prior to publication. Advertisers assume all liability for the content of their advertisements. The publisher of Sports Car Market Magazine is not responsible for any omissions, erroneous, false and/or misleading statements of its advertisers. CZECH 1969 Tatra 603 sedan Black/black. Hemi V8 in rear, 4-wheel-disc brakes. Government limo with original paint and interior. NOS major mechanicals. Pebble Beach Concours in 2014, Arizona Concours and Best of Show winner at Concours in the Hills in 2015. Excellent condition. Located in Arizona. $68,000 OBO. Contact Frank, Ph: 480.525.4793. Email: tatra@rogers.com Web: www.esotericclassics.com/1969-tatra-603.html (AZ) ENGLISH 1930 Brough Superior SS-100 motorcycle Gas tank galvanized with new sending unit. Nine 16-inch used chrome wire wheels, original window glass (1966 inspection sticker) and new safety glass. All chrome replated: bumpers, guards, windshield frame, trim, grille, etc. Polished valve covers, intake and carbs, new leaf springs, rear fender gaskets and tan fabric convertible top. Original tool roll, shop manual. All Lucas lights factory front and rear new in boxes. Interesting trades considered. Office: (856) 435-0805; cell: (609) 472-0050; Fax: (856) 6270854 $65,000 OBO. Contact Ron, Ph: 609.472.0050. Email: rslovett@gmail.com (NJ) 1960 Aston Martin DB4 Series II coupe In private hands for decades, this wonderful Series II DB4 has taken part in the NE 1000 Rally twice and performed flawlessly. Beautiful condition throughout, matching numbers, original colors per factory build sheet. Call or email for complete details. Matthew L. deGarmo, Ltd. Contact Matthew, Ph: 203.852.1670. Email: Matt@deGarmoLtd.com (CT) 1960 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk I roadster Yellow/back. 4-sp manual. Ken Walker’s “The Flying Shoebox.” This Cooper S was raced and became a champion in 1998 HSR Rolex Endurance. In addition, this Cooper raced at Watkins Glen, 2:24 min; Sebring, - 2:49 min; and Road Atlanta, 1:53 min. Engine is built by Bill Crosby, CDA Machine, Rochester, NY. Great historic little car to both show and race. This car is an as-is. Please inquire about spares and parts. $26,999 OBO. MINI of San Francisco. Contact Henry, Ph: 415.551.4297. Email: harciniega@bmwsf.com (CA) 1965 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk III BJ8 roadster Brilliant Red/Cinnamon leather. 48,096 miles. Tan canvas soft top and Cinnamon leather tonneau boot. Low-mileage example equipped with automatic transmission, air conditioning, power windows, burlwood fascia and door accents, european bumpers. A very well-maintained and crisp car in excellent condition throughout; runs and drives beautifully. $138,500. Heritage Classics Motorcar Company. Ph: 310.657.9699. Email: sales@ heritageclassics.com Web: www.heritageclassics. com/ (CA) GERMAN 1957 Mercedes-Benz 190SL roadster British Motor Industry Heritage Trust Certificate showing original data accompany the car. Classic Showcase. Ph: 760.758.6100. Email: webmaster@ classicshowcase.com Web: classicshowcase.com/index. php/inventory/detail/530 (CA) 1963 Jaguar E-type Series 1 convertible ever produced in this color; runs and drives very nicely. $69,500. Heritage Classics Motorcar Company. Ph: 310.657.9699. Email: sales@heritageclassics. com (CA) 1977 Jaguar XJ6C Sports coupe S/N 876751. British Racing Green/Biscuit (with tan top). 1,872 miles. I6, 4-sp manual. Original California black-plate car in a desirable color combo with tan top. Professionally restored with under 2,000 miles driven since. Options include a centerexit dual exhaust, chrome wire wheels, driver’s mirror, Smiths gauges, cigar lighter, map light, leather shift boot and wooden steering wheel. Classic Showcase. Ph: 760.758.6100. Email: webmaster@ classicshowcase.com Web: classicshowcase.com/index. php/inventory/detail/541 (CA) 1964 Austin Mini Cooper S 2-dr sedan 1984 Aston Martin Volante convertible S/N UH2J53600. British Racing Green/Biscuit. 94,510 miles. I6, 3-sp automatic. Low ownership and a great deal of originality. Wonderful color combination with black vinyl roof. Unique 2-door pillarless design, numerous luxury and comfort options including a/c, power steering, windows and brakes. Comfortably fits up to five adults. Recent comprehensive servicing by Jaguar professionals. Classic Showcase. Ph: 760.758.6100. Email: management@ classicshowcase.com Web: classicshowcase.com/index. php/inventory/detail/542 (CA) Matching numbers, total restoration. FitzSimons Engineering. Contact Michael, Email: brough@ fiteng.com Web: www.waltzerphoto.com/Brough/ Brough.html (CT) 1957 Jaguar XK 140 MC roadster Concours restoration on a flawless original car. All books, tools, factory hard top, all weather equipment. All-original sheet metal. None better. $82,500. Matthew L. deGarmo Ltd. Contact Matthew, Ph: 203.852.1670. Email: matt@degarmoltd.com Web: deGarmoLtd.com (CT) 1961 Austin-Healey 3000 Mk II BT7 roadster 1973 Jaguar E-type Series III convertible S/N 813150. 28,000 miles. I6, 4-sp manual. Project with original and new parts. Serial# 813150 (purchased Nov. 4, 1972). Original engine and head (#G9828-9S), original 4-speed transmission (JL 37009 CR), original body (#F13218), 100% original, garaged for 50 years, includes Heritage Certificate. Original trans. 4-speed, block, C-type head, HD-8 carbs, flywheel, oil pan, oil pump, exhaust system, etc. Factory-new 3.4 engine block and standard 9:1 pistons, all-new bearings, chains, tensioners, gaskets, clutch, engine mounts, rack boots, etc. Body in bare metal, no rust or rot, with all nuts and bolts in bags. Seats, door panels, re-covered, convertible top frame and side curtains. 182 Healey Blue/blue. 14,490 miles. Wonderful blue interior with white piping, matching blue Everflex soft top, matching full tonneau and boot, excellent example equipped with burlwood fascia, chrome wire wheels, badge bar and twin fog lamps. A very tidy Mk III in the most desirable color combination. Runs and drives very well. $59,500. Heritage Classics Motorcar Company. Ph: 310.657.9699. Email: sales@heritageclassics.com Web: www. heritageclassics.com/ (CA) Top-level concours 190SL that was formerly in the collection of the 190SL Club president. Perfect body and paint, matching-numbers engine. Dark blue, tan leather. This car has driven in several 1,000-mile tours and runs absolutely without fault. None better anywhere. $225,000. Matthew L. deGarmo, Ltd. Contact Matthew, Ph: 203.852.1670. Email: Matt@ deGarmoLtd.com (CT) 1959 Porsche 356A convertible D Blue/dark blue. I6, 4-sp manual. A wonderful four-seater example of this highly versatile breed, presented in highly engaging Works rally-car style. The last example to be comprehensively restored by renowned marque experts, Randee and the late Tom Rocke. Limited test miles driven since restoration. Photographs documenting the restoration work and Fern Gray/tan leather. 104,589 miles. Tan hard top and black Everflex soft top with matching full tonneau and boot, lovely one-owner California car with service records and equipped with manual transmission, air conditioning, chrome wire wheels, AM/FM radio, handbook and jack. One of only 258 Silver/black. 62,000 miles. An incredible find: One California owner from 1959 until 2016. Matching numbers, original colors, all books and tools and meticulously documented from the day it was new. Exceptional condition throughout; runs and drives beautifully. $275,000. Matthew L. deGarmo, Ltd. Contact Matt, Ph: 203.852.1670. Email: mattcars@ aol.com (CT) Sports Car Market


Page 182

SCM Showcase Gallery 1960 BMW 700 coupe manual. Fully restored, excellent condition, 12v, triple black, all accessories. $210,000 OBO. Contact Peter, Ph: 772.388.4780. Email: curmudg@ comcast.net (FL) 1965 Porsche 911 coupe S/N 165517. Yellow/black leather. 4-sp manual. This car was originally owned by Vasek Polak, the first Porsche dealer and BMW dealer of Hermosa Beach, CA, and a race car enthusiast. Two-cylinder BMW air-cooled motorcycle engine. Runs great! Spare set of stock wheels included. $15,000 OBO. Contact Henry, Ph: 415.551.4297. Email: harciniega@ bmwsf.com (CA) 1963 Mercedes-Benz 190SL roadster S/N 302003. Ruby Red/black. H6, manual. Delivered new from Brumos. Fully restored, retaining all original panels and floor. All numbers correct, everything as per CoA. Books, tools, history and complete restoration documents. $249,000 OBO. Contact Marc, Ph: 973.715.4779. Email: taubercars@yahoo.com (AZ) 1970 Mercedes-Benz 280SL convertible S/N 10702612000050. Red/black & white plaid. 105,900 miles. V8, 3-sp automatic. This rally car has 105,900 miles and is in excellent condition. Always garaged and just repainted, 5.0-liter, AT, PS, PB, a/c, power windows, tinted glass, Mexico stereo cassette/radio, Euro headlights. All records since I imported it with 84,000 miles on it in 1984. Always garaged and maintained. Additional photos and details available. $20,000. Contact Merlin, Ph: 814.466.6115. Email: bav1140@comcast.net (PA) 1992 BMW M5 4-dr sedan 1978 Mercedes-Benz 450SLC 5.0 coupe 1988 Alfa Romeo “Graduate” convertible S/N ZARBA5643J1062779. Red/black. 110,000 miles. I4, 5-sp manual. Great condition, $10k in restoration, new paint and windshield. No accidents or rust. ANSA exhaust, perfect, runs great. Does not burn or leak any oil. $12,500 OBO. Contact Peter, Ph: 407.376.6713. Email: plevine@statealarm. us (FL) 2006 Ferrari 430 F1 coupe Red/53,500 miles. I6, Totally restored example. Concours-quality body, paint and chrome, beautiful tan leather interior, low miles, tan soft top and hard top. Matching-numbers engine. Runs and drives very well. $159,900. Central Classic Cars. Contact Chuck, Ph: 419.618.3855. Email: chuckputsch@hotmail. com (OH) 1964 Porsche 356 SC cabriolet S/N 161076. Black/black. 20,000 miles. H4, 4-sp Moss Green/Cognac. I6, 4-sp manual. This is a gorgeous three-owner car in absolutely stunning condition with just 72,000 original miles. It features factory air conditioning and has its original factory hard top, tools, books and the rare Kinderseat. It was originally an automatic, now a proper Mercedes 4-speed, and the original transmission comes with the car. It runs and drives absolutely without fault, needs nothing. $95,000. Matthew L. deGarmo, Ltd. Contact Matt, Ph: 203.852.1670. Email: Matt@ deGarmoLtd.com (CT) S/N WBSHD931XNBK06351. Sterling Silver Metallic/light silver/gray. 94,783 miles. I6, 5-sp manual. Excellent condition and loaded with full power, ABS, airbag, limited-slip and more. Fully serviced and well kept. Complete with books and records plus the complete jack and toolkit. Rare, one of 1,678 brought into the U.S. between 1991–93. $21,000. Contact Michael, Ph: 917.620.8158. Email: maxforza@aol.com (VI) ITALIAN 1981 Ferrari 400i A coupe S/N ZFFEW58A260148532. Red/tan. 3,791 miles. F1 transmission, clutch 3% used. Includes the following Ferrari factory upgrades: Scuderia shields, yellow brake calipers, leather upholstery headliner, electrically operated seats, special red stitching on black dash and tan seats, console, door panels, etc. Comes with a fitted red car cover, all manuals plus pouch, the factory-supplied toolkit including air compressor and Ferrari flashlight. Very good condition, two owners. Well maintained, garaged, service records available. Clean CARFAX, freshly serviced, everything in perfect working condition. Needs nothing, ready to go. $125,000 OBO. EXOTICARS USA. Contact Sandy, Ph: 908.996.4889. Email: sandy@exoticars-usa.com Web: www. exoticars-usa.com/sales/2006-ferrari-f430/ (NJ) AMERICAN 1955 Packard 400 mock convertible coupe Grigio Fumo/black leather. 37,748 miles. Custom wool Ferrari emblem mats, equipped with an automatic transmission, air conditioning, power windows, bird’s eye maple center console, Kenwood sound system and factory alloy wheels, Runs and drives very nicely. $49,500. Heritage Classics Motorcar Company. Ph: 310.657.9699. Email: sales@heritageclassics.com Web: www. heritageclassics.com/ (CA) 1986 Ferrari 328 GTS spider Cream & tan/cream & copper. 75,000 miles. Three owners. Restored in 2008, won Best in Class in first show in 2009, driven sparingly since. Gorgeous car, PW, PS, PS, PB, AT. No rust, runs and drives excellent, needs nothing, hop in and take to a show. This is not a convertible but made to look like one. $27,499 OBO. AutoArcheologist.com. Contact David, Ph: 860.398.1732. Email: Dave@AutoArcheologist. com Web: www.AutoArcheologist.com (CT) 1956 Chrysler 300B 2-dr hard top S/N ZFFWA20B000059995. Red/black. 22,327 miles. V8, 5-sp manual. This spectacular red-over-black GTS is a European model that is full of originality and a great starting point in Ferrari ownership. The car was discovered as a garage find after being stored for several years. Recently serviced by Classic Showcase. Original jack and storage bag, as well as factory roadside equipment accompany the car. Classic Showcase. Ph: 760.758.6100. Email: webmaster@classicshowcase.com Web: classicshowcase.com/index.php/inventory/detail/545 (CA) White/beige. V8, automatic. Rare, powerful and beautiful, this Hemi-powered 300B has been beautifully restored to correct factory spec in every detail. All-original drivetrain, all correct. Pushbutton Powerflite transmission. Runs and drives perfectly. $58,500. Matthew L. deGarmo, Ltd. Contact Matthew, Ph: 203.852.1670. Email: matt@ deGarmoLtd.com (CT) 184 Sports Car Market


Page 183

SCM Showcase Gallery 1964 Ford Mustang convertible V8, automatic. Two owners, with last ownership from 1971. 260 V8, rebuilt a few years back, power top, power steering. New radiator, heater core, water pump, gas tank, updated to new dual master cylinder, new brake lines, rebuilt power-steering valve and slave, all-original interior, original generator car, new battery. This car is a nice driver, and retains a lot of originality. $24,500 OBO. Tom Miller Sports Cars. Contact Tom, Ph: 908.693.5723. Email: tom@millersportscars.com (NJ) 1964 Plymouth Savoy Lightweight Race 426 Hemi Crossram 2-dr sedan by the Hemi Club president for many years. In magazines and pictured painted yellow in Hemi book prior to complete black-paint restoration. Also featured post-restoration in Mopar 2006 calendar. Very correct, has won many shows and concours, in #1 condition and needs nothing. Correct date-coded wiring, original blue coil. Hidden MSD 6 ignition replaced dead blue-box ignition, but have original unit. Period-correct SW oil and temp gauges and correct Jones mechanical tach. Brake-cylinder bores stainless-bushed, correct Hurst dual gate shifter (rare and expensive), interior excellent, period 2 1/8-inch Hooker headers now ceramic coated, dual three-inch stainless track exhaust added for shows. Car used only for show after restoration. Car now has NOS Keystone mags (used on Sox & Martin cars) with correct-size Goodyear slicks. Full set of 1970 dated Centerlines with Firestone slicks originally on car are included. Many spare parts acquired over the years available. For serious Mopar collectors. Will package with ’64½ Savoy Lightweight, which is the best of the best. Own the first and last of the SS Hemi Mopars. Hemis don’t get any better than these iconic cars. Contact Roald, Ph: 415.608.1901. Email: tra. kasco@gmail.com (CA) 1969 Shelby GT500 SCJ fastback S/N 3141246868. White/red. 218 miles. V8, automatic. 1964-1/2 factory Lightweight Hemi Savoy. Shown in the 2006 Mopar Performance calendar (copy goes to buyer) and acknowledged by Mopar experts (Galen Govier and others, in Davis book) as a top-tier car. This rare car is a time capsule. Two Govier authentications, window sticker, original fender tag and copy for shows. Infrequently raced in the early mid-’60s in the Midwest as the “Hemi Harvester” but never fully caged, tubbed or cut up. First-class restoration by top restorer Scott Tiemann upon its sale to a major collector. 1990 to date largely spent in two well-maintained collections. It has won its class and/or Best of Show at many major West Coast Mopar shows and high-level concours and is acknowledged by Mopar experts as best seen. Never abused and used little, its floors and unibody are factory-original and straight. Factory-original K-head engine, correct wiring, optional front American Mags and steel rears with period M & H slicks. Car has unique and rare parts. The original lightweight Corning rear window, perfect Plexiglas side windows. Body including all the ORIGINAL aluminum is flawless and has all the ORIGINAL lightweight pieces including alloy hinges, brackets, lightweight front bumper, etc. Body and engine have correct factory build markings and paint swatches. Engine and trans are refreshed. The first of the factory Mopar Super Stocks. Will sell together with the 1968 Plymouth Barracuda Hurst Hemi Super Stock. A package of the first and the last factory Mopar Super Stocks. Contact Roald, Ph: 415.608.1901. Email: tra.kasco@gmail.com (CA) 1968 Plymouth Barracuda Hurst Hemi BO 29 Super Stock racer Grabber Orange/black. V8, 4-sp manual. This is one of the ultimate muscle cars of the golden age of American muscle. Loaded with factory options that make this car even more rare and desirable. If you’re looking for one of the greatest cars Ford produced in 1969, then you have found it. $129,900 OBO. Contact Legendary, Ph: 905.875.4700. Email: info@legendarymotorcar.com Web: www. legendarymotorcar.com/ (ONT) 2015 Shelby GT350 50th Anniversary Edition fastback 1,754 miles. V8, One of 48 that were produced with the 67T Tech Package and factory painted in Oxford White (code YZ), making it only one of 17 with the YZ-code paint and Tech Pack combination. It has only been driven an extremely low 1,754 miles to date. $109,900 OBO. Contact Legendary, Ph: 905.875.4700. Email: info@legendarymotorcar.com Web: www.legendarymotorcar.com/inventory/2015ford-mustang-shelby-gt350-1618.aspx (ONT) RACE 1965 Sunbeam Tiger convertible S/N BO29M8B299131. Black/V8, February of 1968 build, #75 of total run of mixed SS Dart and Barracudas. Largely unused from new. Never caged or tubbed, thus from ’70 on it was NHRA-prohibited to run due to no cage. Unibody, floors and torque boxes not twisted or bent like A-bodies that were raced without a cage. Original black rear carpet under large rear window unfaded, floors have factory primer, no rust and original taillight plastic perfect. History from 1980 known but ’68 delivery to ’80 unknown. Apparently car was stored. 8¾ diff with factory heavy-duty drag axle remain. Owned April 2017 S/N B9472738. Blue/white/gray. 1 miles. V8, 4-sp manual. ”Monster” Tiger. Built in 1966 using parts from the #9 LeMans Tiger coupe. Racing history from 1966 through early 1970s. Fully documented. Alloy bonnet, hard top, boot and doors (all original). Track tested in 1966 with article. More wins than any other Tiger in period. No expense spared. Owned by seller since 1983. Won best car in its race group at Sonoma Historics 2012. It’s fast! $250,000 OBO. Contact Chris, Ph: 707.473.0609. Email: misssanfrancisco@aol.com (CA) © 185


Page 184

Advertise in the SCM Resource Directory. Call 877.219.2605 Ext. 218 for information; e-mail: scmadvert@sportscarmarket.com. Auction Companies Artcurial Motorcars. 33 (0)1 42 99 2056. 33 (0)1 42 99 1639. 7, Rond-Point des Champs-Elysées, 75008 Paris, France. Email: motorcars@artcurial.com. www.artcurial.com/motorcars. (FR) Gooding & Company. Auctions America. 877.906.2437. Auctions America specializes in the sale of American Classics, European sports cars, Detroit muscle, hot rods, customs, and automobilia. Headquartered at the historic Auburn Auction Park in Indiana, Auctions America boasts an expert team of full-time specialists who offer 190 years’ combined experience, making them uniquely qualified to advise on all aspects of the hobby. www.auctionsamerica.com. (IN) 310.899.1960. 310.899.0930. Gooding & Company offers its international clientele the rarest, award-winning examples of collector vehicles at the most prestigious auction venues. Our team of well-qualified experts will advise you on current market values. Gooding & Company presents the official auction of the famed Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in August, the recordsetting Scottsdale Auction in January and a world-class auction at the Omni Amelia Island Plantation in Florida in March. www.goodingco.com. (CA) $1,000,000,000 in sales in his storied career. Dan and daughters Tiffany, Tedra and Tara manage the company. 866.495.8111 Dankruseclassics.com (TX) Recently they have been featured on several episodes of three different reality TV series — “Fast N Loud” on Discovery, “Dallas Car Sharks” on Velocity and “The Car Chasers” on CNBC Prime. www.leakecar.com (OK) July, Douglas County Fairgrounds, Roseburg, OR; September, Rick Cole Auctions . Over thirty Motostalgia. 512.813.0636. Barrett-Jackson Auction. 480.421.6694. 480.421.6697. For over four decades, the Barrett-Jackson Auction Company has been recognized throughout the world for offering only the finest selection of quality collector vehicles, outstanding professional service and an unrivaled sales success. From classic and one-of-a-kind cars to exotics and muscle cars, BarrettJackson attracts only the best. Our auctions have captured the true essence of a passionate obsession with cars that extends to collectors and enthusiasts throughout the world. A television audience of millions watches unique and select vehicles while attendees enjoy a lifestyle experience featuring fine art, fashion and gourmet cuisine. In every way, the legend is unsurpassed. 3020 N. Scottsdale Rd, Scottsdale, AZ 85251. info@barrett-jackson.com. www.barrett-jackson.com. (AZ) GAA Classic Cars. 1.855.862.2257. The Southeast’s Premier Classic Car Auction. Located in Greensboro, NC, GAA offers 550 vehicles three times a year from a permanent facilty that allows for vehicles to be out of the weather and easily viewable no matter the weather conditions. With 30+ years in the auction business, the team at GAA Classic Cars knows that building strong relationships with our buyes and sellers is crucial. Not only is customer care our business it is our passion. www.gaaclassiccars.com (NC A premier international collector car auction house offering the rarest and finest automobiles on the world market. Motostalgia publishes a full photographic catalog presenting and documenting professional descriptions and provenance. Motostalgia’s diverse automotive experts offer bidders and consigners alike an accurate understanding of the global automotive market. With venues that parallel the most exciting automotive events such as the U.S. Grand Prix and Keels & Wheels Concours d’Elegance, Motostalgia offers an upscale experience that not only showcases the most collectible cars, but also provides a unique and exciting social environment that is befitting of the rarest and finest automobiles. www.motostalgia.com email: info@motostalgia.com facebook.com/Motostalgia Twitter: @Motostalgia years ago, Rick Cole conducted the first Monterey auction, his annual events forever changing the historic week dynamic. Rick Cole Auctions provides upscale clientele a boutique and silent auction atmosphere proven to offer the finest cars available, and achieving one of the top 10 multi-million-dollar sales of all time. August 17–19. Marriott Hotel at Fisherman’s Wharf. info@ rickcole.com www.rickcole.com (CA) RM Sotheby’s. 800.211.4371. RM Sotheby’s is the world’s largest auction house for investment-quality automobiles. With 35 years’ experience in the collector car industry, RM’s vertically integrated range of services, coupled with an expert team of car specialists and an international footprint, provide an unsurpassed level of service to the global collector car market. For further information, visit www.RMSothebys.com. (CAN) Palm Springs Auctions Inc. Keith McCormick. 760.320.3290. 760.323.7031. 244 N. Indian Canyon Drive, Palm Springs, CA 92262 A family-run auction house producing two large classic cars auctions per year. McCormick’s Palm Springs Auctions has been in business for over 25 years, and each auction features over 500 classics and exotics. www.classic-carauction.com. (CA) Hollywood Wheels Auctions & Bonhams is the largest auction house to hold scheduled sales of classic and vintage motorcars, motorcycles and car memorabilia, with auctions held globally in conjunction with internationally renowned motoring events. Bonhams holds the world-record price for any motorcar sold at auction, as well as for many premier marques. San Francisco: (415) 391-4000 New York: (212) 644-9001 Los Angeles: (323) 850-7500 London: +44 20 7447-7447 Paris: +33 1 42 61 10 10 www.bonhams.com/motors Shows 800.237.8954. Hollywood Wheels is a premier auction house that specializes in Porsche sports cars, European exotics, American classics and historical race cars. Each year, during the Amelia Island Car Week, they host the Amelia Island Select & Auto Retro™ within the ballroom of the Amelia Island Omni Plantation Resort. Hollywood Wheels… Where Great Cars Are Bought & Sold! www.hollywoodwheels.com Premier Auction Group. 844-5WE-SELL. The auction professionals that have been taking care of you for the last two decades have partnered together to create a team that is dedicated to providing the utmost customer service and auction experience. We applied our 83 years of auction experience to build a platform ensuring that every aspect of our company exceeds your expectations. Join us for the Gulf Coast Classic March 17 & 18, in Punta Gorda, FL. 844-5WE-SELL / 844-593-7355 www.premierauctiongroup.com info@premierauctiongroup.com Russo and Steele Collector Auto- mobile Auctions. 602.252.2697. Specializing in the finest American muscle, hot rods and custom automobiles and European sports; Russo and Steele hosts three record-breaking auctions per year; Newport Beach in June; Monterey, CA, every August; and Scottsdale, AZ, every January. As one of the premier auction events in the United States, Russo and Steele has developed a reputation for its superior customer service and for having the most experienced and informed experts in the industry. Fax: 602.252.6260. 5230 South 39th St., Phoenix, AZ 85040. info@russoandsteele.com, www.russoandsteele.com. (AZ) Silver Auctions. 800.255.4485. Dan Kruse Classics is a family- owned collector car auction company located in San Antonio, Texas. DKC has been responsible for successful collector car sales since 1972, with annual sales in Austin, Houston and San Antonio. Dan personally has over 186 Leake Auctions. 800.722.9942. Leake Auction Company was established in 1972 as one of the first car auctions in the country. More than 40 years later, Leake has sold over 34,000 cars and currently operates auctions in Tulsa, Oklahoma City and Dallas. Petersen Auction Group of Oregon. 541.689.6824. Hosting car auctions in Oregon since 1962. We have three annual Auctions: February, Oregon State Fairgrounds, Salem, OR; Worldwide Auctioneers. 800.990.6789 or 1.260.925.6789. Sports Car Market Silver Auctions isn’t successful because we auction the most expensive cars, we’re successful because we auction the cars that you love. Silver Auction’s staff, bidders and consignors are everyday people with a passion for nostalgic and collector cars. Come see the difference at Silver Auctions. 2020 N. Monroe, Spokane, WA 99205. Email: silver@silverauctions.com, www.silverauctions.com. (WA) RESOURCE DIRECTORY


Page 185

Worldwide Auctioneers was formed over a decade ago by vintage-motorcar specialists Rod Egan and John Kruse. The sale and acquisition of classic automobiles is our core business, and no one is better qualified. Worldwide is unique in having owners who are also our chief auctioneers, so you deal directly with the auctioneer, and we are wholly invested in achieving the best result for you. Our auctions are catalog-based, offering a limited number of higher-end consignments, with an emphasis on quality rather than volume. (We don’t limit ourselves to only selling the most expensive cars in the world, but do ensure that every car we consign is the very best of its type.) We also offer specialist-appraisal, estate-management and collectionconsultancy services. Our dedicated private sales division serves the needs of individual collectors who seek privacy or to acquire vehicles that may not be available on the open market. www.worldwide-auctioneers.com. (IN) Alfa Romeo Automobilia Coachbuilt Press. 215.925.4233. Coachbuilt Press creates limited-edition automotive titles for the discriminating motoring enthusiast. We present exceptional material on the most significant collections, museums and marques with a balance of authoritative writing, precise research, unique historical documents and the modern photography of Michael Furman. Please visit our website to view our latest titles and order. www.CoachbuiltPress.com (PA) Vintage Auto Posters. Since 1980, Everett Anton Singer has been supplying international collectors with the most diverse selection of authentic vintage automotive posters. The vast inventory runs from the late 1890s through the 1960s; featuring marque, event and product advertising. Please visit us at: www.VintageAutoPosters.com. Buy/Sell/General Charles Prince Classic Cars. Based driversroad.com 513.490.5621. Large portfolio of automotive art prints, new and old, street or race, four wheels or two! Any car you had, have or desire! Custom commissions and commercial work accepted. Steve Petrosky, driversroad, 8711 Reading Road E1 Cincinnati, Ohio 45215 (OH) Centerline International. (888) 750-ALFA (2532). Exclusively Alfa Romeo for over 35 years. You can rely on our experience and the largest inventory of parts in North America to build and maintain your dream Alfa. We carry restoration, maintenance and exclusive performance parts for Giulietta through the new 4C. Newly developed parts introduced regularly. Check our website or social media for new arrivals, tech tips and special offers. www.centerlinealfa.com. (CO) Appraisals Auto Kennel. 714.335.4911. Imag- ine if you had the best of the best to market your car for sale. Jesse Alexander taking all the photographs. Lee Iacocca working with buyers. Keith Martin introducing you to the right car clubs. Well, the father and son team of AutoKennel do just that for all their clients. Paul and Ed Kramer, Costa Mesa, CA 92627. www.autokennel.com (CA) Chequered Flag. 310.827.8665. Exotic Mosaics. 805.544.4093. Unique and original mosaic hand-crafted wall hangings of automotive subjects by mosaic artist Jim Valentine. Made with glazed ceramic tile with aluminum frame and hanging wire. Can create custom mosaics of your automobile. Email: exoticmosaics@sbcglobal.net. exoticmosaics.com. Gooding & Company. 310.899.1960. Gooding & Company’s experts are well-qualified to appraise individual automobiles as well as collections and estates. Whether it is the creation of a foundation, living trust or arrangement of a charitable donation, we are able to assist you. www.goodingco.com. (CA) Automotive Restorations. 203.377.6745. Collector car sales, both road and race, have been a key activity for over 35 years. Our sales professionals actively seek consignments on a global basis. We also offer vehicle “search and find” for rare models. We undertake pre-purchase inspections worldwide. We provide auction support, including in-person or telephone bidding for absentee buyers. Restoration management and special-event assistance are also included in our services. Our aim is to make sure that your collector car passion is as enjoyable and worry-free as possible. www.automotiverestorations.com Celebrate your ownership experiMotostalgia. 512.813.0636. A premier international collector car auction house and professional appraisal company. Motostalgia’s diverse and multilingual automotive experts offer collectors and investors alike an accurate understanding of the global and domestic automotive market. Motostalgia’s international offices have the capability of appraising collector cars around the globe. With decades of global collector car market knowledge, our experts can accurately value your most prized automobiles, ranging from a single pre-purchase appraisal to full collection valuations. www.motostalgia.com email: info@motostalgia.com facebook.com/Motostalgia Twitter: @Motostalgia April 2017 ence! Automotive designer and illustrator Steve Anderson is a specialist in the creation of owner-specified, fineart illustrations. Each original piece is hand crafted to portray the exact specification of individual automobiles and collections. All marques and eras, concours and racers. Ferrari- and Porsche-licensed illustrator. For image samples, additional information or to discuss your project, please call us at 818.822.3063 or visit www.saillustrations.com (CA) Steve Austin’s Automobilia & Great Vacations. 800.452.8434. European Car Collector tours including Monaco & Goodwood Historics, private collections, and car manufacturers. Automobile Art importer of legendary artists Alfredo de la Maria and Nicholas Watts. www.steveaustinsgreatvacations.com. Chequered Flag is Los Angeles’ best known classic car dealer. We specialize in European classic and sports cars, particularly air-cooled Porsches. We have over 100 classics in inventory including over 25 Porsches. We appreciate our many repeat customers with over 15,000 cars bought and sold since 1986. www.ChequeredFlag.com sales@chequeredflag.com (CA) in London, we are specialists in the finest historic motorcars and in contact with dealers and collectors from around the world. We offer the best advice and service in the collector car field. Int T: (0)798 5988070 or email: sales@ charlesprinceclassiccars.com www.charlesprinceclassiccars.com. Canepa of Scotts Valley. 831.430.9940. Offering fine investmentgrade collectable road cars and racecars for sale. Our 70,000-square-foot facility houses world-class, on-premises restoration and motorsports facilities where automotive artisans ensure every detail of our inventoried vehicles meet the highest levels of refinement and preparation. Canepa is interested in purchasing exceptional, original and restored automobiles. sales@canepa.com www. canepa.com (CA) Classic Assets Motor Sports CenBeverly Hills Car Club is one of the largest European classic car dealerships in the nation, with an extensive inventory spanning over 50,000 sf. We can meet all your classic car needs with our unprecedented selection; from top-ofthe-line models to project cars. We buy classic cars in any shape or condition & provide the quickest payment & pickup anywhere in the U.S. 310.975.0272 www.beverlyhillscarclub.com (CA) ter. 760-452-6609 or 858-554-0331. A first-rate used-car dealership specializing in vintage rally-eligible vehicles as well as an eclectic private collection of investment-grade automobiles including classic cars, vintage rally cars and supercars. Our business is buying and selling classic, collectible motorcars. We are considered to be the go-to resource for collector cars in San Diego. We are constantly seeking new additions. Top quality, collectible trades always considered. We are available to assist buyers and sellers with all aspects regarding classic cars including import and export. www.ca-motorsportscenter. com. (CA) Classic Car Dashes. Sales@ClassicCarDashes.com. Specializing in reproduction and replacement dash pads for many of your favorite cars, trucks and SUVs. Each pad is manufactured as close as possible to original specs. All dash pads offer quality in both fit and appearance and are manufactured in the U.S. www.ClassicCarDashes.com (PA) 187


Page 186

Advertise in the SCM Resource Directory. Call 877.219.2605 Ext. 218 for information; e-mail: scmadvert@sportscarmarket.com. finest quality Corvette interiors and our distribution center is stocked with thousands of additional Corvette-related products. Corvette America is a member of the RPUI family of companies. Classic Fit Covers. sales@ClassicFitCovers.com. Welcome to Classic Fit Covers. We specialize in custom fit car covers and seat protectors for classic and modern vehicles. At Classic Fit Covers you get quality materials, superior craftsmanship and fast delivery...all at a great price! We have you Covered! www.ClassicFitCovers.com (PA) www.CorvetteAmerica.com (PA) DriverSource. 281.497.1000. Classic Investments Inc. 303.388.9788. Barn find. Redefined. Since 1989 our company specializes in the restoration, sales and service of 1950s–1970s Classic European sports cars: Ferrari, Maserati, Alfa Romeo, Lancia, Aston Martin, Jaguar, Austin Healey, Porsche and Mercedes. Colorado’s premier one-stop shop for all of a collector’s needs. Friendly, knowledgeable, passionate staff welcomes you to call for all inquiries; our in-house factory-trained Ferrari mechanic has 40 years’ experience. www.ClassicInvest.com (CO) Pursuing & Preserving Fine Automobiles Since 2005, DriverSource is a leading specialist in the classic collector car market. Our concept of sales, service and storage is tailor made to the automotive enthusiast lifestyle. To learn more about our services or inventory, please give as a call or contact us via email. sales@driversource.com. www.driversource.com Hyman Ltd Classic Cars. 314.524.6000. One of the largest inventories of vintage cars in the world. Please visit our website often, www.hymanltd.com to see our current stock. Hyman Ltd Classic Cars, 2310 Chaffee Drive, St. Louis, MO. 63146 314-524-6000 sales@hymanltd.com Mohr Imports, Classic and Sports Car Brokers. 831.373.3131. Mohr Imports Inc. of Monterey, CA, pleased to be serving the collector car community for the past 30 years. Our goal is to present and represent your car in the very best way possible. We specialize in European classics. Visit us at www. MohrImports.com. (CA) Kurt Tanner Motorcars. Girardo & Co. +44 (0) 203 621 2923. Girardo & Co. provide clients with a specialist service offering expert advice in buying, selling and sourcing classic cars at the very top end of the collector’s market, whilst delivering the best possible service to clients. www.girardo.com info@girardo.com 909.241.1051. An exclusive European Sports Car dealer located in Orange County, CA. Over 35 years experience in the classic car business with a distinguished previous reputation for AustinHealey restorations. We accurately and honestly present fine European cars for sale in today’s market. Buy/sell/trade. We purchase and pick up from any U.S. location with quick payment. Please call or visit our website to view current inventory. www.kurttannermotorcars.com (CA) Motorcar Portfolio, LLC. 330.453.8900. Buy, sell, trade, auction of affordable antique, classic, collector vehicles. Bob Lichty offers over 40 years experience in the classic car industry. Motorcar Portfolio, LLC. has been serving NE Ohio and the world since 2004. Let us help with your needs. See our current inventory at our web site www.motorcarportfolio.com (OH) Mustang America. 844.249.5135. Legendary Motorcar Company. Classic Showcase. 760.758.6100. For over 35 years, we’ve been restoring automotive history and helping collectors obtain, restore and sell classic vehicles. Our world-class facility houses three showrooms of cars and department specialty areas to perform all facets of restoration under one roof. Let our team of professional craftsmen and specialists make your classic car vision a reality. www.classicshowcase. com. (CA) Gullwing Motor Cars stocks more than 100 cars at our warehouse location, 27 years of experience; visited by customers across the country and overseas. We specialize in European and American cars and we are always looking to buy classic cars in any condition. We pick up from anywhere in the U.S. Quick payment and pickup. 718.545.0500. www.gullwingmotorcars.com 905.875.4700. You may have seen our award-winning, show-quality restorations. Our 55,000-square-foot facility is specialized in extreme high-end restorations of rare American muscle cars. www.legendarymotorcar.com (ON) Mustang America is a new company initially specializing in first generation (1965–1973) Mustang parts, interiors and accessories. Launched by Corvette America, Mustang America provides the same level of world-class customer service, product quality and fast delivery. We look forward to serving the vintage Mustang enthusiast. www.MustangAmerica.com (PA) Luxury Brokers International. Heritage Classics Motorcar ComCopley Motorcars. 781.444.4646. Specializing in unique and hard-to-find classics and sports cars. We only sell cars we love ourselves, and deal in a limited number of models. Before delivery to you, all of our classics, including Defenders, are fully inspected and serviced by one of two expert shops. We are located in Needham, MA. copleycars@gmail.com, www.copleymotorcars.com (MA) pany. 310.657.9699. www.heritageclassics.com. Heritage Classics Motorcar Company, the premier West Coast classic car dealership established in 1985. Offering one of the largest indoor showrooms in Southern California, with an exceptional inventory of the very finest American and European classic cars available. We buy, sell and consign collectible automobiles, offering the best consignment terms available, contact us at sales@heritageclassics.com When in Southern California, visit our beautiful showroom and specialty automotive bookstore, Heritage Classics Motorbooks, open Monday–Saturday. For current inventory and to visit our virtual bookstore, visit www.heritageclassics.com Corvette America. 800.458.3475. The #1 manufacturer & supplier of interiors, parts and wheels for all generations of Corvettes. Our Pennsylvania manufacturing facility produces the 188 215.459.1606. Specializing in the sales, purchase and brokerage of classic automobiles for the astute collector, with a new-age, contemporary approach. Focusing on original, high-quality examples as enjoyable, tangible investments. Classic car storage, classic car consignment, brokerage, and other consulting services are available as well. We actively pursue the purchase and sales of any investment-grade classic car. Since 2009, we have offered a unique opportunity for collectors, enthusiasts and other industry professionals. www.lbilimited.com, sales@ lbilimited.com (PA) Mid-Century Motoring. 914.402.5799. Importer, exporter and broker of classic cars, specializing in European marques. We provide clients with unparalleled access to the international classic car market, as well as a full suite of consignment and brokerage services from our showroom in Westchester County, NY. Contact us for more information about the company, the cars, or to schedule a visit. www.midcenturymotoring.com (NY) Olympian Cars Web Services offers what today’s car enthusiasts demand when browsing or buying online. Our work is built on reliable industry platforms any site owner can manage. We’re techies and car guys and know how to target your audience! • Websites • Facebook Pages • Online Stores • Blogs • Email Campaigns To learn more, please visit: www.olympiancars.com/web Paramount Automotive Group/ Foreign Cars Italia. 888.929.7202. Since 1989, we have offered all the exclusive brands that you have ever dreamed about. Offering new and used Ferrari, Maserati, Aston Martin and Porsche in Greensboro, NC, Aston Sports Car Market RESOURCE DIRECTORY


Page 187

Martin, Bentley and Maserati in Charlotte, NC and Porsche in Hickory, NC. We sell, buy and trade. Visit us at www. Paramountauto.com or www.ForeignCarsItalia.com (NC) Vintage Motors of Sarasota. Park Place LTD. 425.562.1000. Founded in 1987 in Bellevue, WA, our dealership is locally owned and independently operated. The four-acre Park Place Center features an Aston Martin sales and service center, a Lotus dealership, and we have one of the largest selections of collector and exotic cars available in the Northwest. We consign, buy and sell all types of vehicles. We also have an in-house service center and high-end Auto Salon. www.ParkPlaceLtd.com 941.355.6500. Established in 1989, offering high-quality collector cars to the most discerning collectors. Vintage’s specialized services include sales, acquisitions and consignment of high-quality European and American collector and sports cars. Always buying individual cars or entire collections. Visit our large showroom with 75-plus examples in the beautiful museum district of tropical Sarasota, FL. www.vintagemotorssarasota.com (FL) Car Storage Passport Transport. 800.736.0575. Since our founding in 1970, we have shipped thousands of treasured vehicles door-to-door with our fully enclosed auto transporters. Whether your prized possession is your daily driver, a vintage race car, a Classic, a ’60s muscle car or a modern exotic, you can depend on Passport Transport to give you the premium service it deserves. We share your appreciation for fine automobiles, and it shows. www.PassportTransport.com. Chubb Collector Car Insurance. 1.866.CAR.9648. With Chubb, you’ll have flexibility and control with worldclass coverage and claim service. There are no mileage restrictions, “Agreed Value” is included, and you’re free to use the restoration shop of your choice for covered repairs. Special pricing is also available for large collections. For more information, call 1-866-227-9648 or visit www.chubbcollectorcar.com. insurance for your vehicle. In the unfortunate aftermath of damage to your vehicle, learning that your insurance won’t restore your prized possession to its former glory, or appropriately compensate you for your loss, is the last thing you want to hear. To get a quote by phone, call 877.545.2522. CAR LIFTS PLUS.COM Paul Russell and Company. 978.768.6092. www.paulrussell.com. Specializing in the preservation and sales of European classics, pre-war through the 1970s, since 1978. You can rely on our decades of experience with Mercedes-Benz, Ferrari, Porsche, Bugatti, Alfa Romeo and other fine collectibles. Repeat customers are the lifeblood of our business. Contact us today to join them. Car Sales Manager, Alex Finigan: Alex@paulrussell.com. (MA) 203.509.5353. Need a Lift? Need Service on your current Car Lifts? Sales, service and guaranteed instal- lations. Residential and commercial car lifts. We are a well-established car lift company and an authorized dealer for all major brands, with hundreds of happy customers throughout the Northeast. Personal service offering on-site measuring and preconstruction layout advice for new projects. Our experienced 5-star technicians provide full-service professional installation, from delivery to safety training. Fully insured with offices and warehousing in CT and NJ to better serve our clientele. WHAT’S IN YOUR GARAGE? More cars of course, when you call 203.509.5353! www.CarLiftsPlus.com www.SignificantCars.com. 800.837.9902. Since 2002, SignificantCars.com has been changing the way collector cars find new homes. A pioneer in the online marketing of important collector cars, Significant Cars has a proven track record for realizing top dollar for their seller clients. Run by Enthusiasts for Enthusiasts, Significant Cars has put the power of the dealer or Auction House into the hands of Collectors. Give us a call for a confidential analysis of your car’s true value—not what we want to buy it for. Classic Car Transport Reliable Carriers Inc. 877.744.7889. Intercity Lines, Inc. 800.221.3936. Gripping the wheel of your dream car and starting the engine for the first time is a high point for any enthusiast. We are the premier enclosed auto transport company that will ensure your car arrives safely for that experience. For over 35 years, our standards for excellence have had clients returning time and time again. Trust the Best. Trust Intercity Lines. www.Intercitylines.com Symbolic International. 858.259.0100. Symbolic International is one of the premier dealers of classic cars and vintage race cars in the world. Our spectacular vehicles are available for purchase and worldwide delivery. Our knowledgeable team, with over 100 years of combined experience, can help you find the perfect car for your collection. www.symbolicinternational.com info@symbolicinternational.com (CA) Barrett-Jackson is proud to endorse McCollister’s Auto Transport. 800-748-3160. We have transported thousands of collector vehicles over the last 35 years all across the United States, whether they are moving an exotic, street rod, vintage racer or muscle car. With our experienced drivers trained to ensure the finest protection and our customized, lift-gated, air-ride trailers, we make sure your vehicle safely arrives on time. www.McCollisters.com/AutoTransport April 2017 a new breed of insurance for classic, antique, exotic, special-interest, contemporary classic and limited-edition cars. To get a quote is even easier with our new online improvements. Go to www.barrett-jackson.com/insurance/, select “Get a quote,” enter in a couple of key pieces of information about your vehicle, and get an estimated quote within seconds! It’s that easy. Don’t be caught without the right As the country’s largest enclosed-auto transport company, Reliable Carriers faithfully serves all 48 contiguous United States and Canada. Whether you’ve entered a concours event, need a relocation, are attending a corporate event or are shipping the car of your dreams from one location to another, one American transportation company does it all. www.reliablecarriers.com Collector Car Insurance J.C. Taylor Insurance. 800.345.8290. Antique, classic, muscle or modified — J.C. Taylor Insurance has provided dependable, dynamic, affordable protection for your collector vehicle for over 50 years. Agreed Value Coverage in the continental U.S., and Alaska. Drive Through Time With Peace of Mind with J.C. Taylor Insurance. Get a FREE instant quote online at www.JCTaylor.com. Ray Zuder. 860.830.6104. Single Car / Enclosed / Air-Ride Transport Dedicated to Extreme Personal Level, Drama Free, Best-inClass Service * Auctions * Concours/Shows * Door to Door * Races/Rallies * Security Provided at All Times * There When You Need Us Over 15 years of “not-even-a-scratch experience.” www.rkzmotorcar.com Hagerty Insurance Agency, LLC. 800.922.4050. is the leading insurance agency for collector vehicles in the world and host to the largest network of collector car owners. Hagerty offers insurance for collector cars, motorcycles and motorcycle safety equipment, tractors, automotive tools and spare parts, and even “automobilia” (any historic or collectible item linked with motor vehicles). Hagerty also offers overseas shipping/touring insurance coverage, commercial coverage and club liability coverage. For more information, call or visit www.hagerty.com. (MI) Grundy Worldwide. 888.647.8639. Grundy Worldwide offers agreed-value insurance with no mileage limitations, zero deductible*, and high liability limits. Our coverages are specifically designed for collectible-car owners. From classic cars to muscle cars, Grundy Worldwide has you covered. (*Zero deductible available in most states.) 888.6GRUNDY (888.647.8639). www.grundyworldwide.com. (PA) 189


Page 188

Advertise in the SCM Resource Directory. Call 877.219.2605 Ext. 218 for information; e-mail: scmadvert@sportscarmarket.com. English Fourintune Garage Inc. Allard Motor Works LLC. The Allard Motor Works J2X is a hand-crafted version of the famed British competition roadster that stirred the crowds in Europe and the Americas in the early 1950s. Our modern J2X MkIII, recognized by the Allard Register, integrates the latest technology into the original design, to provide a safe, comfortable and reliable vehicle without compromising performance. www.allardj2x.com • info@allardj2x. com • 877-J2X-1953 • facebook.com/ allardj2x.com 262.375.0876. www.fourintune. com. Complete ground-up restoration on British ,arques — specializing in Austin-Healeys since 1976. Experience you can trust, satisfied customers nationwide. Visit our website for details on our restoration process, which includes a complete quotation on Healeys. Located in historic Cedarburg — just minutes north of Milwaukee, WI. (WI) Hilton Head Island Motoring Festival. The South: a place where tea is sweet, people are darlin’, moss is Spanish and, come autumn, cars are plentiful. This fall, HHI Motoring Festival returns to the towns of Savannah, GA, and Hilton Head Island, SC. Join us this fall — October 28–November 6, 2016 — in the land of Southern hospitality. To purchase tickets or for more information, visit www.HHIMotoringFestival.com. by limiting admission through lottery ticket allocations. Admission is inclusive of six gourmet culinary pavilions, caviar, oysters, fine wines, specialty cocktails, champagne, and more. Web: signatureevents.peninsula.com. (CA) Finance J.J. BEST BANC & CO. provides financing on classic cars ranging from 1900 to today. Visit our website at www.jjbest.com or call 1.800.USA.1965 and get a loan approval in as little as five minutes! Aston Martin of New England. 781.547.5959. 85 Linden Street, Waltham, MA 02452. Proudly appointed Aston Martin Heritage Dealer for the USA. New and pre-owned Aston Martins are our specialty. Please contact us when buying, selling or restoring. www.astonmartin-lotus.com. (MA) Kevin Kay Restorations. AUTOSPORT DESIGNS, INC. 631.425.1555. All Aston Martin models welcome regardless of age, as new inevitably become old! Routine servicingcomplete mechanical restorations/rebuilds — cosmetic repair/paintwork to complete frame-off restoration. Large inventory of parts. All services as well as our current unventory of automobiles for sale can be seen at www.autosportdesigns.com. (NY) 530.241.8337. 1530 Charles Drive, Redding, CA 96003. Aston Martin parts, service, repair and restoration. From an oil change to a concours-winning restoration, we do it all. Modern upgrades for power steering, window motors, fuel systems and more. Feltham Fast performance parts in stock. We also cater to all British and European cars and motorcycles. www.kevinkayrestorations.net. (CA) JWF Restorations Inc. Specializing in AC restoration from street to concours, U.S. Registrar AC Owners Club (U.K.). Now selling AC parts and tires, including inventory from Ron Leonard. Jim Feldman. 503.706.8250 Fax 503.646.4009. Email: jim@jwfrestoration.com (OR) Lajollaconcours.com. 619.233.5008. lajollaconcours@mcfarlanepromotions.com La Jolla Concours d’Elegance April 8-10, 2016. World Class Cars, World Class Experience. (CA) Ferrari Financial Services. Riverside Military Academy Champions and Heroes. 404.237.2633. June 2–4, 2017. A 3-day Time Trial, a Concours, a Rally plus more from the Carmel Concours on the Avenue producer. info@rmachampionsandheroes.com www.rmachampionsandheroes.com. (GA) 201.510.2500. As the world’s only Ferrari-owned finance company, no one understands a Ferrari customer’s unique perspective better than the company that designed these iconic sports cars. Whether it’s a line of credit for owners interested in utilizing the equity in their collection, or a simple interest loan, we stand committed to help our clients enhance their collection — without origination or early termination fees. “FFS” offers a level of expertise that cannot be matched by other lenders. Woodside Credit. When financing The Elegance at Hershey. Welsh Enterprises, Inc. 800.875.5247. Jaguar parts for models 1949–present. www.welshent.com (OH) Events—Concours, Car Shows Classic Showcase. 760.758.6100. Classic Showcase has been an industry leader in the restoration, service and sale of classic Jaguars, and most other fine British automobiles. From sports cars to luxury sedans, our world-class restoration facility and highly skilled team are ready to assist your needs with acquiring the perfect British classic today! 760.758.6100. www.classicshowcase.com (CA) The Arizona Concours d’Elegance opens Arizona’s Classic Car Week every January with a celebration of automotive engineering and design. The event benefits Make-A-Wish™ Arizona, the founding chapter of the national organization that grants wishes for children facing life-threatening medical conditions. For more information, please go to: www.ArizonaConcours.com. Veterans Fire Protection. The Quail, A Motorsports Gath- ering. 831.620.8879. A prominent component of Monterey Car Week, The Quail is a world-renowned motorsports event featuring one of the world’s finest and rarest collections of vintage automobiles and motorcycles. The Quail maintains its intimacy and exclusivity 190 484.635.4661/4670. We understand your passion and the investment you have made in your classic or sports car, and that is why we offer a wide selection of Fire Extinguishers for your consideration. Please give us call and we can assist you in the selection of the extinguisher for your automobile or shop and recommend the best solution to suit your application. Fax 484.895.7223. www.veteransfire.com (PA) Sports Car Market 717.534.1910. A celebration of vintage race cars and concours automobiles from 6/10 to 6/12/16 commencing with the Grand Ascent, featuring the Concorso Bizarro and culminating with our concours d’elegance. Our primary goal is to benefit our charities: JDRF, AACA Museum, and AACA Library & Research Center. For more information, visit www.theeleganceathershey.com, call 717.534.1910 or email don@theelganceathershey.com. (PA) your classic or collector car, Woodside Credit is all about performance. We offer THE LOWEST PAYMENTS IN AMERICA! and provide our clients with fast, friendly and professional service. For over a decade, Woodside has been recognized as the leading lender in the classic and collector car market and is exclusively endorsed by Barrett-Jackson. Apply online at woodsidecredit.com or call 888-354-3982. Fire Protection RESOURCE DIRECTORY


Page 189

German rations, work is always true to original. Ever-changing showcase of for-sale vehicles. We are your trusted source. www.mbclassiccenter.com. (CA) Import/Export The BMW CCA is the world’s larg- est owner-supported single-marque car club. Today, BMW CCA has 67 chapters nationwide, with more than 70,000 members. As BMW’s most active and vibrant enthusiast organization, the club represents a lifestyle of passion and performance. Join the Club today at bmwcca.org or by calling 800.878.9292. Cosdel International Transportation. dC Automotive. 800-549-2410. We have the largest indoor Recycling Facility for Porsches in the U.S. We specialize in used rebuilt and new parts for Porsche cars, including all models of the 911, 912, Carrera and Turbo, 944 16-valve S, 924S, 951, 944 Turbo, 914-4, 914-6 Boxster, 968, Cayenne, 928, 928S and 928 S4. Vintage parts a specialty. We have an extensive inventory including used Porsche engines, transmissions, Fuchs wheels, seats, brake upgrades, interior trim and suspension. No part is too small. We are a God-owned family business serving the Porsche community for over 25 years. www.dcauto.com 252.955.0110 (text) 252.977.1430 international Since 1960, Cosdel International Transportation has been handling international shipments by air, ocean and truck. Honest service, competitive pricing and product expertise have made Cosdel the natural shipping choice for the world’s best-known collectors, dealers and auction houses. If you are moving a car, racing or rallying, or attending a concours event overseas, Cosdel is your comprehensive, worldwide resource for all of your nationwide and international shipping needs. We are your automobile Export Import Experts. 415.777.2000 carquotes@cosdel.com. www.cosdel.com. (CA) Italian leasing company in the country by calling 1.866.90.LEASE. Or just visit www.putnamleasing.com. Legal pump cavitation. Evans also protects down to -40°F and lasts the lifetime of the engine. See how it works at www.evanscoolant.com. Vintage Car Law. 717.884.9010. Bryan W. Shook, Esquire, acts for and represents leading antique and collector car dealers, brokers, restoration houses, and private individuals Internationally. He has been responsible for innumerable and prominent cases, distinguishing himself with his unparalleled knowledge of automobiles and network of contacts, experts and clients. He is redefining automotive law. www.vintagecarlaw.com (PA) Museums P21S Auto Care Products. Since 1984, P21S Auto Care Products have been the favorite of auto enthusiasts throughout North America. Representing factory-approved German car care at its finest, P21S wheel care products’ “safe cleaning” approach has saved thousands of expensive alloy wheels from the surface damage that harsh cleaners can cause. P21S paste waxes deliver an award-winning shine and unmatched ease of application, while P21S Bodyworks Shampoo protects against premature removal of that fresh wax job. No matter where your car was made, you’ll want to learn about the complete line of P21S Auto Care Products. More info at www.p21s.com. (CT) Barber Vintage Motorsports MuHamann Classic Cars. 203.918.8300. with more than 30 years in the industry and worldwide clientele in dealing in European race and sports cars, specializes in classic Ferraris of the ’50s and ’60s. www.ferrari4you. com Leasing European Collectibles Inc. 949.650.4718. European Collectibles has been buying, consigning, selling and restoring classic European sports cars since 1986. We specialize in Porsche (356 and 911) 1950s to early 1970s, along with other marks including Mercedes, Aston Martin, Ferrari, MG, Austin Healey and Jaguar, with 40 vehicles in stock to choose from. European Collectibles also offers complete mechanical and cosmetic restorations to concours level, along with routine service. Located in Orange County, CA, between Los Angeles and San Diego. Sales@europeancollectibles.com or visit our website www.europeancollectibles.com. (CA) Premier Financial Services. 877.973.7700. Since 1997, renowned customer service and honest leasing practices have made Premier the nation’s leading lessor of luxury and performance motorcars. We are small enough to ensure your business gets the attention it deserves, and large enough to finance any new, used, or vintage car over $50,000. Contact Premier at 877.973.7700 or info@pfsllc.com. www.premierfinancialservices.com (CT) LeMay—America’s Car Museum celebrates America’s love affair with the automobile. Named the Best Museum in Western Washington, the fourlevel, 165,000-square-foot museum features 12 rotating exhibits and 300 cars, trucks and motorcycles on display. ACM includes a 3.5-acre show field, State Farm Theatre, Classics Café, banquet hall and meeting facilities and offers a majestic view above Commencement Bay. For more information, visit www.lemaymuseum.org. LeMay—America’s Car Museum 2702 E D Street, Tacoma, WA 98421 877.902.8490 (toll free) info@lemaymuseum.org www.lemaymuseum.org. (WA) Putnam Leasing. 866.90.LEASE. Mercedes-Benz Classic Center. 1.866.MB.CLASSIC. (1.866.622.5277). The trusted center of competence for all classic MercedesBenz enthusiasts. Located in Irvine, CA, the Classic Center is the only sales and restoration facility in the U.S. exclusively operated by Mercedes-Benz. Over 50,000 Genuine Mercedes-Benz Classic Parts in its assortment. From small services to full ground-up resto- April 2017 For over 30 years, Putnam Leasing has been the leader in exotic, luxury, and collector car leasing. This honor comes from Putnam’s unique ability to match the car of your dreams with a lease designed just for you. Every Putnam Lease is written to provide maximum flexibility while conserving capital, lowering monthly payments, and maximizing tax advantages. Its Putnam’s way of letting you drive more car for less money. For leases ranging from $50,000 to more than $1 million, with terms extending up to 84 months, contact the oldest and most experienced Parts, Accessories & Car Care Swissvax. 305.219.8882. Since Evans Waterless Coolant is the solution to running too hot. With a boiling point of 375°F, our revolutionary liquid formulation is a superior alternative to water-based coolants. Evans eliminates water vapor, hotspots and boil-over, resulting in a less pressurized, more efficient cooling system and preventing corrosion, electrolysis and 1930, the Swiss family company creates magnificent wax formulations. The non-abrasive system consists of a prewax fluid and a high-content Carnauba wax. Unlike ordinary polishes, Swissvax restores the valuable oils of the paint finish that become starved over time and is safe for all paint finishes. Swissvax is also worldwide OEM supplier to Rolls-Royce Motorcars, Bugatti and Lamborghini. www.swissvax.com www.swissvax.us 191 seum. 205.281.3519. When looking for a new home for your vintage car why not consider The Barber Vintage Motorsports Museum? Home to over 100 cars and 1,500 motorcycles. The Museum, a Not-for-Profit 501(c)3 foundation, is dedicated to the preservation of cars like yours, and it could help future generations understand why we all love cars. An outright donation or a bargain sale can both offer generous tax advantages. For more information please call or email, Lee Clark,Senior Manager of Restoration and Conservation LClark@Barbermuseum.org www.Barbermuseum.org (AL) QuickSilver Exhaust Systems. 011 44 1428 687722. Our customers are sophisticated enthusiasts who choose our exhaust systems for various reasons — originality, durability, weight reduction and enhanced sound. We’re the default choice for many of the most important classics. Originality is important, but there’s no reason why subtle improvements cannot be introduced. QuickSilver use superior materials and modern manufacturing techniques unavailable when the cars were new. http://quicksilver-exhausts.myshopify.com. Race Ramps. 866.464.2788. Lighter. Safer. Stronger. Offering the ultimate way to display and work on collector cars — including detailing, restyling and general maintenance. Race Ramps provides solutions even for low clearance cars. Complete line includes Trailer Ramps, Service Ramps, Rack and Lift Ramps, and the best-selling FlatStoppers to prevent tires from flat spotting during long periods of storage. www.raceramps.com. (MI)


Page 190

Advertise in the SCM Resource Directory. Call 877.219.2605 Ext. 218 for information; e-mail: scmadvert@sportscarmarket.com. WeatherTech® Automotive Ac- cessories. 800.441.8527. MacNeil Automotive Products Ltd., providing automotive accessories for your vehicles for over 20 years. MacNeil has defined high-quality vehicle protection with the WeatherTech® line of Automotive Accessories. Choose from all-weather floor mats, extreme-duty floor liners, cargo/trunk liners, side-window deflectors, no-drill mudflaps, many different options of license-plate frames and more. We have products available for virtually every make and model. To see and buy everything, go to www.WeatherTech.com. Racing Services BerlinettaMotorcars@gmail.com. www.BerlinettaMotorcars.com (NY) Fantasy Junction. 510.653.7555. Brighton Motorsports. 480.483.4682. Authorized Morgan Motor Company Dealer, warranty and repair, and expert service facility for your collector car. Privately owned, we are conveniently located in North Phoenix. We offer a unique collection of Morgan cars, The Morgan Three Wheeler and special interest European vehicles and motorcycles. www.BrightonMotorsports.com or info@brightonmotorsports.com. (AZ) For 35 years, Owner/Enthusiast Bruce Trenery has operated Fantasy Junction from the San Francisco Bay Area. The dealership enjoys an outstanding worldwide reputation for integrity and knowledge in the collector car field. Many of the world’s greatest sports cars have passed through the doors, with both buyers and sellers enjoying expert representation. Email Sales@FantasyJunction.com, www.FantasyJunction. com. (CA) Sports Car Shop. 541.510.5296. Farland Classic Restoration. Vintage Racing Services. 203.377.6745. Our full-service shop facility and experienced staff provide all aspects of racecar construction, setup and repair for production-based cars to purpose-built sports racers to formula cars. We can build a racecar from the ground up, restore your historic vintage racer to its former glory or maintain your racecar, all to ensure your maximum enjoyment. Our trackside support, transportation, racecar rental and coaching can round out your experience. Our sister company, Automotive Restorations Inc., offers high-quality upholstery, body and paint and panel fabrication services. www.automotiverestorations.com/vrs/home Restoration — General 303.761.1245. A complete facility offering concours-level restorations, repair and fabrication services. We work on all makes, and specialize in Ferrari, Mercedes and Porsche. Highly organized and fiscally responsible, we provide biweekly detailed billing to keep you abreast of the rapid progress of your project in every way. Check out our site for details. Email: doug@farlandcars.com. www.farlandcarscom Since 1982, Sports Car Shop has been re-commissioning and restoring vintage sports cars. With focus in British and Italian cars, Sports Car Shop produces high quality projects with craftsmanship and pride. We have the talent, equipment, and knowledge to transform your car, whether your goal is to get it back on the road or present it for high level judging. www.sportscarshop.com (OR) The Creative Workshop. Classic Showcase. 760.758.6100. For over 35 years, we’ve been restoring automotive history by creating driver-, show/driver-, show- and preservationlevel restorations for collectors worldwide. Our world-class facilities consist of a team of passionate and dedicated craftsmen who are ready to perform either factory standards or performance/ modified upgrades. Visit our website or call us to discuss your project today. www.classicshowcase.com (CA) Hahn-Vorbach & Associates Automotive Restorations. 203.377.6745. Founded in 1978, we are well-established practitioners of the art and craft of vehicle restoration, preservation and service. Nearly 40 experienced craftspeople focused on the art and entertainment to be enjoyed with great cars describes our culture. Our staff and expertise encompasses a broad range of skills and specific vehicle experience. Proper project management and control produces the quality and attention to detail we have come to be known for in all we produce. See much more on the Web at www.automotiverestorations.com LLC. 724.452.4329. Specializes in the investment-grade restoration and preservation of European and American collectible antique and classic cars, muscle cars, sports cars, hot rods and vintage race cars. Our services include full and partial restorations, bespoke builds, repairs, show prep, sales and procurement assistance, as well as a full array of do-it-yourself assistance services. Recognized experts in the restoration of Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwings and Roadsters. Concours-level, national award-winning quality. Find examples of our craftsmanship and the wide range of past projects on our website. We would be happy to discuss your project. www.hahnvorbach.com D. L. George Historic Motorcars. 610.593.7423. We stand at the crossroads between you and historic European motorcars of the pre-war and early post-war era. We provide full-service restoration, maintenance and support of the finest cars driven extensively by the most refined collectors. Find us at concours from Amelia Island to Pebble Beach, venues from Lime Rock to Goodwood, and events including the Mille Miglia, Peking to Paris, and The Colorado Grand. www.DLGEORGE.com (PA) 954.920.3303. If your current or growing collection needs a team behind it or if your new auction acquisition needs sorting. Our clients ship us their cars from around the world for good reason: Our experience, attention to detail and results are rivaled by none. We give our clients the confidence to expand their collection into any marque or era. We’ve got their backs. We would like to get yours. Email: info@TheCreativeWorkshop.com, www.TheCreativeWorkshop.com, The Guild of Automotive RestorOn the Road Again Classics. 408.782.1100. Northern California’s largest Classic & British auto restoration & repair shop is a 12,000 square foot facility under one roof! We opened our doors in 2008 and in 8 short years we have restored over 20 Concours 1st place winners! Our team of 8 craftsmen with over 165 years experience have risen to the top, becoming a Certified Hagerty Expert Collision Repair Facility and in-house Certified Glasurit paint shop. www.ontheroadagainclassics.com. Berlinetta Motorcars Ltd. 631.423.1010, 631.549.6700. Professional Ferrari, Porsche and vintage car specialists since 1958. Mechanical engineer, master coachbuilders and fabricators. Pebble Beach-winning restorations. Ferrari, Maserati and Porsche Club of America: Best of Show, People’s Choice Awards. Cars selected for “American Gangster” and more. Servicing, repairing, customizing, engine overhauls, race, track, street and show cars. Locating and importing classic and vintage cars internationally since 1984. 192 Exoticars USA. 908.996.4889, Wil de Groot’s Exoticars USA has serviced and restored Ferrari, Maserati and Lamborghini in the NJ, PA, NY region since 1979. We’re passionate about keeping your car fast, reliable, beautiful and authentic. Our mechanical, paint/ body, electronic, machining and fabricating work is unsurpassed and awardwinning. We have specialized equipment and knowledge to service newer and vintage models and everything in between. www.exoticars-usa.com. (NJ) Park Place LTD. 425.562.1000. Founded in 1987 in Bellevue, WA, our dealership is locally owned and independently operated. Our restoration department works full time to restore vehicles of every year, make and model to provide an award-winning finish. We consign, buy and sell all types of vehicles. We also have an in-house service center and high-end Auto Salon. www.ParkPlaceLtd.com FOLLOW SCM ers. 905.775.0499. Whether your car is headed to a concours or open road, we are the sensible choice. Experts in our craft and combined with unimpeachable integrity, doing something that we enjoy as much as our clients enjoy the fruits of our labors. Share our passion for your passion. Give us a call, we look forward to hearing from you. David Grainger and Janice Stone, proprietors. www.guildclassiccars.com (CAN) © Sports Car Market RESOURCE DIRECTORY


Page 191

SEEKING SUBMISSIONS FOR SCM’S “40 UNDER 40” Restorers • Auctioneers • Writers • Drivers • Auction House Personnel • Collectors • Mechanics • Sales People CAR PEOPLE! Sports Car Market will feature the collector car world’s top 40 under 40 in 2017. Know of great industry movers and shakers who also happen to be younger than 40? Nominate them! We’re on the hunt for young restoration experts, writers, collectors, sales people, auction house specialists, drivers and beyond. We’re looking to build a list of this year’s best of the best among the next generation of car people, and we need your submissions to do so! Winners will be featured in an upcoming issue of Sports Car Market. All nominees must be younger than 40 on January 1, 2018. Submit your nominees at www.sportscarmarket.com/scm40 April 2017 193


Page 192

Carl Bomstead eWatch From Sunset Boulevard to Rock History The Whisky a Go Go sign, a Sunset Strip landmark, is now pretty in pink on someone’s wall Thought Carl’s In the 1980s and 1990s, the West Hollywood club Whisky a Go Go was the home to punk, New Wave, rock and grunge. Over the years, the Sunset Strip Club featured famed rockers Janis Joplin, Van Halen, The Doors, Guns N’ Roses and The Ramones. Above the door was a 13-foot neon sign that was finished in bright pink neon. It was replaced in 2004. The Saco River Auction Company recently offered that sign at auction. It sold for an expected $40,000 prior to the vig, and the new owner has an exciting piece of rock ’n’ roll history. During Arizona Auction Week, Barrett-Jackson offered several thousand pieces of automobilia, with results ranging from under $100 to close to $100k. Here are a few that caught my eye as I sat through endless hours of the auction: currently available for around $25,000. Noting this sale, the owner of that sign may want to rethink the asking price. milk-glass letters. It had “Essex” on one side and “Hudson” on the other. The only flaw was a crack in the “n” in Hudson. It is remarkable that it was in such exceptional condition. Perhaps it was never used. It sold for a most reasonable price. LOT 8884—STANLEY WANLASS BRONZE SCULPTURE “THE RACERS.” SOLD AT: $5,750. Date sold: 1/17/2017. This 24-inch bronze by Stanley Wanlass featured a Locomobile participating in the Vanderbilt Cup race. It was one of 30 produced, and it was made through the Cire Perdue (lost wax) process. It sold for a song, as another example sold at RM’s October 2014 Hershey sale went for $14,950. LOT 9492.1—1940s DOUBLESIDED CHEVROLET DEALER PORCELAIN NEON SIGN. SOLD AT: $16,775. Date sold: 1/21/2017. This Chevrolet dealer sign was made at Walker and Company, and it was in very nice condition. Not that many years ago, these large signs were almost free for the asking, but that is certainly not the case today. They make a statement, and as collectors build larger car barns, they are in demand. Price paid here was not out of line for an attractive sign in this condition. LOT 8990—PACKARD BRONZE AND BRASS NEON DEALERSHIP HANGING SIGN. SOLD AT: $8,050. Date sold: 1/17/2017. This very unusual brass/neon Packard sign dated to the late 1920s and the early days of neon. It measured 39 inches by 18 inches and had received some noticeable restoration. One of only three known, it sold for several thousand dollars less than expected. One of the others is LOT 9389—1920S HUDSON ESSEX DOUBLE-SIDED DEALERSHIP SIGN. SOLD AT: $20,700. Date sold: 1/20/2017. This large sign measured 95 inches by 46 inches and was internally illuminated with LOT 9385—LARGE DOUBLE-SIDED PONTIAC NEON PORCELAIN DEALERSHIP SIGN. SOLD AT: $28,750. Date sold: 1/20/2017. This beautiful sign was a touch over 12 feet in height and was finished in cobaltblue porcelain that was in excellent condition. The famed Pontiac Indian head was outlined in red neon with “Pontiac” in white. A stunning sign that was well worth the price paid. paid at Portland, OR, and at additional mailing offices. Subscription rates are $75 for 12 monthly issues in the U.S., $105 Canada/Mexico, Europe $135, Asia/Africa/Middle East $135. Subscriptions are payable in advance in U.S. currency. Make checks to: Sports Car Market. Visa/MC accepted. For instant subscription, call 877.219.2605, 503.261.0555; fax 503.253.2234; www.sportscarmarket.com. 194 SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION Sports Car Market (ISSN #1527859X) is published monthly by Automotive Investor Media Group, 401 NE 19th Street, Suite 100, Portland, OR 97232. Periodicals postage LOT 9487—ESSO AVIATION SINGLE-SIDED AIRPORT PORCELAIN SIGN. SOLD AT: $86,250. Date sold: 1/212/2017. This unique sign was found at a North Carolina airport and was in very acceptable condition, although the neon had been replaced. It was 13 feet in length and about three feet in height. The challenge will be finding a place to display it. It was the most expensive sign sold at this auction by a wide margin. LOT 9428—1920S HOOD TIRE DIE-CUT TIN FLANGE SIGN. SOLD AT: $25,300. Date sold: 1/21/2017. Hood was one of the major tire manufactures of the era, and their advertising with the distinctive Hood logo is very desirable. This tin die-cut sign was in amazing condition and most likely was never used. There were no bends or nicks on the sign — and thus the rather lofty price. Still, this was not silly money. ♦ POSTMASTER Send address changes to: Sports Car Market PO Box 4797, Portland, OR 97208 CPC IPM Sales Agreement No. 1296205 Sports Car Market