1957 Porsche 356A Coupe

If this car drives as the catalog says, the new owner did very well. If not get busy spending and making it right

{vsig}2006-5_1931{/vsig}

The 356A was Porsche’s first volume production car, in Coupe, Speedster, and Cabriolet versions. Introduced in 1956, the 356A embodied substantial revisions to the original 356 series, including a one-piece curved windshield, horn grilles under the headlights, and a gas gauge.
Changes to the front and rear suspension, 15-inch wheels in the radically wide size (for the period) of 4.5 inches, a padded dashboard, and better legroom and headroom distinguished the A cars from their predecessors.
Bodies for the 1956-57 cars were built exclusively by the Reutter body works. Engine choices included both pushrod and four-cam versions, starting with the 1,300-cc pushrod models at 44 or 60 hp (measured under the conservative DIN system). The 1,600-cc pushrod engines produced 60 and 75 DIN hp and later became the standard engines through the B models to 1963.
Of the two four-cam engines, one was a 1,500-cc GS engine with 100 DIN hp, the other a 1,500-cc GT model in a higher state of tune that produced 110 hp. Later in the A series, 1,600-cc GS and GT four-cam engines replaced the 1,500-cc version. All 1,500-cc GS and GT four-cam engines had troublesome roller bearing cranks, and some of the pushrod engines had rollers as well.
This attractive 1957 Porsche 356A Coupe has had sympathetic restoration work applied on an as-needed basis to a very solid original automobile. It includes a new and correct red leather interior as well as new clutch, brakes and muffler.
It is road- and show-ready and also eligible to compete in vintage sports car racing and rally events at any number of venues worldwide. Like all vintage Porsches, this car is nimble, quick and fun to drive and offers the driver unending miles of rapid and reliable pleasure behind the wheel.

Jim Schrager

Jim Schrager - SCM Contributor

Jim wrote for the 356 Registry and SCM for over a decade, was a Contributing Editor for Porsche Panorama (the magazine of the Porsche Club of America), and wrote for Excellence and the Porsche Market Letter. He has written two popular books on vintage Porsches: Buying, Driving, and Enjoying the Porsche 356; and Buying, Driving, and Enjoying the Early Porsche 911. He owns about 20 vintage Porsches, which he attempts to keep on the road through all kinds of weather. He is a clinical professor at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, where he teaches a popular course on strategy. He actively races his family’s 41-foot sailboat with his two boys on Lake Michigan.

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