1970 Ferrari 365GTB/4 Daytona

Worthy successor to the 275GTB/4, the 365GTB/4 Daytona debuted at the Paris Salon in 1968, with production proper commencing in the second half of 1969. Aggressively styled by Pininfarina’s Leonardo Fioravanti, Ferrari’s new supercar boldly re-stated the traditional sports car’s long hood, small cabin, short tail look in a way which suggested muscular horsepower à la AC Cobra while retaining all the elegance associated with the Italian coachbuilder’s work for Maranello.

In response to Lamborghini, Ferrari’s road-car V12 engine had gained four overhead camshafts during production of the 275GTB (cars thus equipped acquiring a “/4” suffix) and in the Daytona displaced 4,390cc. Power output was 352 horsepower at 7,500 rpm, with maximum torque of 318 1b. ft. available at 5,500 rpm. Dry-sump lubrication permitted the engine to be installed low in the chassis, while a five-speed transaxle transmission enabled 50/50 front/rear weight distribution to be achieved. The chassis embodied long-standing Ferrari practice, being comprised of oval-section tubing; the all-independent wishbone and coil-spring suspension was a more-recent development, having originated in the preceding 275GTB.

Not surprisingly, the car’s competition potential was soon being exploited by privateer racers, and the Daytona proved to be a formidable opponent in international endurance events. Finished in Rosso Corsa with a tri-color hood stripe, this French-registered Daytona has been prepared for racing and features “Group 4” style coachwork with riveted aluminum hood, flared wings, front spoiler, plexiglass headlamps and outside filler. Wider 9-inch and 11-inch wheels are fitted, wearing slicks at present, and there are also side exhausts and twin fuel tanks. The interior boasts period bucket seats trimmed in Ferrari’s typical blue cloth, three-point racing harnesses and heat-resistant quilting covering the bulkhead and transmission tunnel. The engine is supposed to run well, although no information is available as to its state of tune.