1972 Triumph Stag 4×4

Introduced in the early 1970s, the Triumph Stag was a high-powered gentleman’s tourer and was the first Triumph to be fitted with the in-house produced three-liter V8. The body was designed by Giovanni Michelotti and proved to be such a success that the l

Introduced in the early 1970s, the Triumph Stag was a high-powered gentleman’s tourer and was the first Triumph to be fitted with the in-house produced three-liter V8. The body was designed by Giovanni Michelotti and proved to be such a success that the legendary gentleman spy, James Bond, was to be seen driving a Stag in the film Diamond Are Forever. Low morale at the factory led to some reliability problems at first, but these have long since been solved by the number of Triumph Stag specialists who have gained considerable experience of the model over the years.

In July 1971 two cars, one a manual and one an automatic, were taken off the production line and handed over to FF Developments Ltd. This company, established by ex-Le Mans winner Tony Rolt, was the industry leader in four-wheel drive development and the two cars supplied were converted to all-wheel control by them.

The drive to the front wheels is taken by a propshaft running alongside the engine to the front axle, from where driveshafts transmit the power through modified front hubs. Antilock brakes were also fitted by FF Developments, making this model the most sure-footed and safest of the Stags. The car pictured here is the one and only manual version built.

Possessing a comprehensive service history, the car is described as excellent in all respects, having undergone a full restoration in 1986, including an engine rebuild and bare metal respray, since when only six thousand miles have been covered. A new hood is fitted, as is a factory hard top, and many bills are supplies, along with the original specification sheet and technical data from FF Developments, and an article about the car reproduced from the Stag Owner’s Club magazine.