1991 Ferrari F40

Introduced in Europe in 1987, Ferrari’s newest supercar was a shock to the senses. An engineering tour-de-force, the F40 combined raw-edged radical styling with state-of-the-art engine, body and chassis design.

Driving one is a visceral experience, hammering the senses with brutal acceleration, go-kart-quick reflexes and a howling exhaust note that pierces your very being. The experience is addictive, a powerful narcotic for the soul of a driver.

More than anything, it’s the car’s purpose that underlines the experience. Few concessions are made to creature comforts—no radio, no carpets, no power windows, not even door panels. Instead, racing seats with red Nomex covers clarify the point, which is—of course—absolute uncompromising performance.

Cost-no-object engineering produced a specification that still seems state of the art today, more than 14 years later—such as the carbon fiber and Kevlar reinforced steel space-frame chassis with composite body panels. The car’s Evoluzione twin turbo and intercooled, four-cam, port-injected V8 engine is controlled by a race-proven Weber-Marelli engine management system. Formula One-sized wheels and tires benefit from tremendous wind tunnel induced downforce. Few cars today can match its 200-mph top speed; 0 to 60 times were reported in the 3-second range.

The vendor of this US-delivery car is also its original owner. An aficionado of Italian cars, as well as a personal acquaintance of Enzo Ferrari, Mr. Copanos has nonetheless resisted the urge to drive it, choosing to preserve this example in pristine showroom condition—the odometer attests to the fact that it has been driven just 192 miles since new. As a ’91 model, it also benefits from the many updates made by the
factory since the official introduction of the F40 into the US market the previous year.