1969 Lola-Chevrolet T142 Formula 5000

At the end of the day, Formula 5000 is still the ultimate bang for the buck
in vintage racing

One of the most attractive categories within historic motor racing is Formula 5000, catering to single-seater (near-Formula One) cars powered by production-based engines of up to 5 liters capacity. Formula 5000 racing was introduced in 1968 in American SCCA as Formula A. In the U.K. and Europe, Formula 5000 matching American Formula Read More

1962 Lotus 25 F1

It is no overstatement to say that the Lotus 25 revolutionized Formula 1 car design. It was a complete break from conventional thinking, advanced even for Colin Chapman, and its significance must be one of the best-kept secrets in motor racing. Colin Chapman said the inspiration came from the steel backbone frame of the new Lotus Elan and the improved stiffness it gave. Would it work on a single seater? The idea came about from a meeting with Mike Costin, Read More

1963 Shelby King Cobra Cooper Type 61M

Film clips show MacDonald almost sideways and he never lifts or moves the wheel as he slides through the turn, lap after lap. It is breathtaking to watch

In 1963, Carroll Shelby needed a car to compete in the USAC-sanctioned Fall Series on the West Coast, which evolved later into the SCCA Canadian American Challenge Series, the Can-Am.

Shelby’s Cobras had already won SCCA’s A/Sports Racing title and the USRRC Championship, but Read More

Maserati Tipo 65 Sports Racing Prototype

It’s an iconic Italian failure, a testament to chaos, caffeine, grappa, panic, and an unwillingness to throw in the towel

This remarkably imposing V8 rear-engined, sports-prototype is the last of the line of Maserati competition cars built during the Gruppo Orsi Empire’s long ownership of the Italian marque. As such, it marks the high tide of their development right through the wide range of A6GCS, 150, 200, 250, 300, 350, and 450S Read More

1961 Porsche RS 61 Sports Racing Spyder

The factory figured on 120 man-hours to create one of these engines. Setting the cam timing took between eight and 15 hours.

Porsche’s giant-killer Spyder series of four-cylinder, four-cam sports racing cars ruled small bore international racing for a full decade, beginning in the early 1950s. Since a powerful multi-cylinder engine was not available, Porsche’s racing car designers concentrated on “free horsepower” in the form of lightweight chassis and running gear fitted Read More

1965 Alfa Romeo TZ-1

Alain de Cadenet explained to me a few years back that he bought his first Ferrari GTO because he couldn’t afford the TZ-1 he really wanted

Alfa Romeo replaced the Giulietta in 1962 with the Giulia range of cars, powered by 1,570 cc engines. In 1963, the company introduced a radical aluminum-bodied Zagato coupe incorporating the Kamm tail coda tronca design from the earlier SZ-2 and a low grille with covered headlights.

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1907 Renault AI 35/45 Vanderbilt Racer

This car was the Ferrari Enzo of its day-exclusive, fast, beautiful,
and exciting-but not really a racer

Renault’s reputation was made in the open-road races of Europe at the turn of the 20th century, in cars built and driven by Louis Renault and his brother Marcel. Even though Marcel was killed in the 1903 Paris-Madrid race and Louis quit racing, the company itself only took a year off.

Competition was the Read More

1963-64 Lola-Chevrolet Mk 6 GT

This stunningly beautiful car represents the beginning of the modern GT and will be extremely competitive in high-level vintage racing

His groundbreaking Anglo-American competition coupe, with its two sisters, marked one of the most significant landmarks in the entire history of world-class endurance racing. This rear-engined Lola GT is the second sister of the original Lola-Ford Mark 6 GT, which competed at Le Mans in 1963.

That car’s evident potential persuaded Read More

1927 Bugatti Type 35C

I can personally attest that it’s possible to sit for hours contemplating the Type 35 like a piece of sculpture

There were 23 automobiles on the starting grid for the 1930 Monaco Grand Prix. Fourteen of them-60% of the field-were Bugattis. Bugattis were essentially graceful machines that emphasized light weight and great road holding over power. Their attributes made mediocre drivers feel good and turned great drivers into giants.

The Type 35 Read More

1956 Jaguar D-type

This gently patinated, tastefully restored 1956 Jaguar D-type sports racing car exemplifies all that was most impressive, most innovative-and perhaps above all most beautiful-about the legendary British manufacturer’s mid-’50s design. The immortal D-type survives today as the supreme example of semi-monocoque frontier technology. After three Le Mans wins in 1955, ’56, and ’57, it was only eliminated by the change to a three-liter engine in 1958.