1998 Dodge Viper GTS-R Coupe

Dodge gave its Viper supercar more teeth in the GTS-R, a 700-hp monster that won five FIA GT Championships between 1997 and 2002. In 1998, it became the first American car to win at Le Mans in three decades and the first production-based American car to grace the winner’s circle there.

That same year, Dodge built 100 road-going versions for sale to the public, an impressive example of which is offered here in this all-original, one-owner coupe that shows just Read More

1966 Jaguar XKE 2+2 Series 1

If Les Vingt Quatre Heures du Mans has been responsible for the new E-type Jaguar, then that Homeric contest on the Sarthe circuit will have been abundantly justified. Here we have one of the quietest and most flexible cars on the market, capable of whispering along in top gear at 10 mph or leaping into its 150 mph stride on the brief depression of a pedal. A practical touring car, this, with its wide doors and capacious luggage space, Read More

1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Spyder Conversion

The ultimate expression of Ferrari’s fabulous line of V12 sports cars, the 365 GTB/4 “Daytona” was the world’s fastest production car at the time of its launch. Capable of over 170 mph, it is surely destined to remain a front-ranking supercar for the foreseeable future.

Although there had been no official open-top version of its predecessor, the favorable reception of Luigi Chinetti’s 275 GTB-based NART Spyder no doubt influenced Ferrari’s decision to produce a convertible Daytona. Again the work Read More

Who Owns This Ferrari Testa Rossa?

“Jim” thought he had a smoking deal — $3,650,000 for a 1956 Ferrari 500 Testa Rossa. He thought he could easily flip the TR for a quick profit. All he needed was $3,650,000.

So, Jim called his stepbrother-in-law, “Bob,” for financial help. Bob thought the TR deal sounded like a good idea, so he contacted his bank, which agreed to loan the $3,650,000 against the Ferrari.

According to Bob, Jim advised him to run the transaction through a shell company. The shell company borrowed the $3,650,000 from the bank, and the bank secured the loan with a security interest in the TR, which it perfected by filing with the Oklahoma UCC filing office.

1955 Aston Martin DB3S Sports Racer

Launched in 1952, the first Aston Martin sports racer was the DB3. Developed for Aston Martin by Eberan von Eberhorst, a former Auto Union racing engineer from the pre-war era, the DB3 featured an all-new, tubular chassis using De Dion rear architecture, with a purposeful, chunky, slab-sided body.

Competition victory proved elusive for the DB3, however, and its performance was hampered by reliability issues. Aston Martin commissioned A.G. “William” Watson to engineer an improved car. In May 1953, a new Read More

It Was a Very Good Year

As this is our December issue, it’s the right time to reflect on the past 12 months, and to project forward into 2013.

Sports Car Market is by design a reflective magazine; we report on sales and events that have happened, and analyze and comment on them. Our world is large and all-inclusive, as we imagine yours is. You’ll find us at the most exclusive catalog auctions — as well as sales where decrepit trucks are sold by the pound.

What all of us at SCM — subscribers, contributors and staff — have in common is a delight in old cars, from their brilliant styling to their misguided mechanicals. We glory in their imperfections, we swap tales about how they let us down, and we believe that after reading Thor Thorson’s latest encomium about an Alfa Romeo Tipo 33 or Porsche 917/10, we have become instant experts on the subject — of course!

But SCM’s primary focus has always been the market. What’s selling, where, for how much, and why. We continue to be the only magazine that offers firsthand reports from trained analysts, with exclusive photos, chassis numbers, hands-on descriptions and informed analysis. You can expect even more in the future, as our Platinum database is revved up to accept multiple photos, videos and direct feeds from the auction houses for upcoming sales.

Best Buys on the Peninsula

I think we can officially do away with the term “Affordable Classic” when speaking about Monterey. In my opinion, when using the term “affordable,” we should generally be referencing something that the masses could easily afford.

The five rides I’ve chosen are valued from the mid-five digits to the mid-seven digits. That’s affordable, Monterey-style.

Five auction houses replete with hundreds of cars of every marque, age and condition transformed this sleepy peninsula into the world’s largest classic car showroom. I spent six days canvassing this full extravaganza of inventory, and there weren’t more than a handful of deals.

From least to most expensive, here are five sold lots that each owner should be thrilled to now own.

1936 Mercedes-Benz 540K Special Roadster

Baroness Gisela von Krieger, the only daughter of an aristocratic German family, was renowned for her exquisite beauty, glamorous lifestyle and impeccable fashion sense.

After moving to Paris in 1933, Baroness von Krieger became the darling of European Society. In her 20s, the refined socialite lived at the grandest Parisian hotels, was voted one of the “10 Best Dressed Women in the World,” and attended the coronation of King George VI. Pursued by countless admirers, the baroness proved an Read More

1955 Maserati A6G/2000 Berlinetta

n total, Carrozzeria Frua completed fewer than 20 bodies for Maserati’s A6G/2000 chassis. Although the Frua spiders may garner greater recognition, the beautifully styled Berlinettas were featured in Maserati’s official catalog and offered a unique blend of sporting and grand touring characteristics.

Today, these rare Maseratis appear fresh, modern and utterly distinctive when compared with other 2-liter Italian sports cars of the period. Chassis 2114 was completed by Gilco — the company assembling bare chassis frames for Maserati and Read More

1968 Ford GT40 Gulf/Mirage Lightweight

The GT40 offered here, chassis P1074, began life as Mirage M10003, and in its debut May 1967 at Spa, with Jacky Ickx and the “Flying Dentist,” Dr. Dick Thompson, finished First Overall.

Following the FIA’s regulation change for the 1968 season, which reduced prototype engine size to three liters, and five liters for production (Group 4) sports cars with a limited build of 25 examples, Mirage M10003 was taken back to J.W.A. in England for its conversion into a Group Read More