1967 Volvo 123GT

Owning a true GT car from the ’60s is something everyone should
experience, if not for the image or the feel then just for the fun

When you think of collectible sports and GT cars from the 1960s, a number of British, German, Italian and even French marques may come to mind. But a Swedish Volvo? Sure, we remember the P1800 sports car, yet Volvo made a rally car suitable for the street Read More

1996-98 BMW Z3 1.9-liter

The Z3 is a Teutonic E-type: long in front, short in back, with muscular curves and a low stance

The Z3 was introduced to the public in Goldeneye, the popular 1995 James Bond film that began Pierce Brosnan’s run as 007. As BMW’s first pure sports car in almost forty years, it was not surprising when the two-seater sold out its first year’s production run by late spring. There was plenty to Read More

1985-87 Honda CRX Si

The real appeal was a
0-60 time below nine
seconds, quicker than a Porsche 944

By the end of the fuel-crisis-plagued 1970s, Honda and its Japanese counterparts had all but beaten the American auto industry into submission with legions of cheap and highly efficient pint-sized sedans and hatchbacks.
American muscle was out. Econo-boxes were in. As the big three continued to downsize, by the mid-1980s performance and sportiness became virtually non-existent.Read More

1961-71 Austin/Morris Mini Cooper

A wolf in sheep’s clothing and a giant-killer on the track, the Cooper’s most famous racing victory came in the 1964 Monte Carlo Rallye

The story of the original BMC Mini is long and complicated, and there were countless versions produced during the car’s 40-year run. But Sir Alec Issigonis’ innovative design, which combined a transverse-mounted engine with front wheel drive and wheels pushed out to the extreme corners of the car, Read More

1991-96 Acura NSX Coupe

If you can’t afford a jet, the NSX might be the next best thing

The Acura NSX, unveiled by Honda in 1991, was an attempt to fuse user-friendly ergonomics with supercar performance. The seven years of development that went into the car resulted in an exotic that was as easy to drive as an Accord. But the Acura NSX was also a true exotic with a lightweight aluminum body and styling modeled Read More

1985-88 Porsche 944

If Porsche had never built a 911, the 944 would be regarded as remarkable

The 944 is the Rodney Dangerfield of sports cars, and it has been fighting for respect from the moment it was introduced in 1982. If Porsche had never built a 911, the handling and performance of the 944 would be regarded as remarkable. If Porsche had never built the sad-sack 924, 944 owners wouldn’t have to deal with Read More

1968-70 AMC AMX

The AMX was hardly a car for conformists

In 1968 American Motors finally had a winner. Maybe it’s just a law of averages type of thing, but the AMX was in many ways the right car for the right time.
American Motors dumped the funky four-seat Marlin in ’68 and replaced it with a car made in the true pony-car formula (long hood, short trunk, six- or eight-cylinder motor, 2+2 seating), Read More

1992 Corvette LT1 Convertible

1992 represented a milestone year in the life of America’s sports car. The one-millionth Corvette was built, ground was broken for the National Corvette Museum, and Corvette made its performance comeback with the introduction of the LT1 as the base engine.
While from the outside, all of the 1984-1996 C4 Corvettes looked very similar, connoisseurs know that ‘Vettes from ’92 on are the ones to have.
Successfully overcoming the challenges of federal emission standards, fuel economy and Read More

1985-89 Toyota MR2 Mark I

1984 marked the debut of the Toyota “Mid-engine runabout two-seater,” or “MR2,” in Japan. Less than a year later, it arrived on American shores amid enthusiasm and debate. Based on a prototype called the SV3, the short, lightweight, angular car found a comfortable seat in the Toyota model lineup. It was a sporty offering, supported by the consistency and reliability Toyota was known for.
There is some suggestion that the SV3 prototype was based on the Lotus X100, Read More

1959-61 Chevrolet Impala Two-Door Hardtop

The 1959 Chevrolet was designer Harley Earl’s final, dramatic statement before his retirement. While “all new all over again” was GM’s apt description of its entire 1959 model series, it was the full-size Chevrolet that sparked the most controversy both within the industry and from observers.
With its signature cat’s-eye taillights, it was called “the wild one” by admirers, and “the Martian ground chariot” by detractors. The only slightly less wild Chevys of the following two years represent a Read More