1976-1981 Pontiac Trans Am “Bandit”

The second-generation Pontiac Trans Am was in production for twelve years, from 1970 to 1981, and effectively captured a generation of car enthusiasts in an era when Motor City muscle was in decline.

Admittedly, the Trans Am of the mid-1970s was a pale imitation of earlier models, an underpowered, portly beast that nearly fell victim to the same tightening government regulations that had killed the GTO and ‘Cuda, and reduced the Ford Mustang to a gussied-up Pinto. But the film Read More

1971-1975 Volkswagen Super Beetle

Any Beetle of yore is more closely related to a lawn tractor than it is to the modern auto with which it shares a name and silhouette

It hardly seems believable that by 1971 the Volkswagen Beetle-the success story of the 1960s-was losing favor with the public. In earlier years the Beetle’s quaint simplicity had been a plus, but those same qualities were beginning to seem as hopelessly outdated as the car’s Read More

1956-1958 Studebaker Golden Hawk

Though not rare, you’re far less likely to see a Golden Hawk on the road than a Thunderbird or Corvette, making the Studebaker a good choice for those collectors who aspire to be both unique and on a budget

Studebaker’s Golden Hawk was the product of an era when sports cars were unfamiliar to most Americans. Like its contemporaries, the Ford Thunderbird and Chevrolet Corvette, the Hawk began as an awkward attempt Read More

1982-93 Ford Mustang 5.0

You can build a supercharged 500-hp ‘Stang in your backyard for about the price of a Ferrari brake job

For long-suffering Mustang fans, the all-new 1979 Mustang was a near-miraculous event after four years of the embarrassing Pinto-based Mustang II.
It got even better in 1982, when Dearborn proudly proclaimed that “the Boss is back” with the 5.0-liter engine and the reincarnation of the “GT” name. While the 5.0 could be ordered Read More

1967 Volvo 123GT

Owning a true GT car from the ’60s is something everyone should
experience, if not for the image or the feel then just for the fun

When you think of collectible sports and GT cars from the 1960s, a number of British, German, Italian and even French marques may come to mind. But a Swedish Volvo? Sure, we remember the P1800 sports car, yet Volvo made a rally car suitable for Read More

1996-98 BMW Z3 1.9-liter

The Z3 is a Teutonic E-type: long in front, short in back, with muscular curves and a low stance

The Z3 was introduced to the public in Goldeneye, the popular 1995 James Bond film that began Pierce Brosnan’s run as 007. As BMW’s first pure sports car in almost forty years, it was not surprising when the two-seater sold out its first year’s production run by late spring. There was plenty to Read More

1985-87 Honda CRX Si

The real appeal was a
0-60 time below nine
seconds, quicker than a Porsche 944

By the end of the fuel-crisis-plagued 1970s, Honda and its Japanese counterparts had all but beaten the American auto industry into submission with legions of cheap and highly efficient pint-sized sedans and hatchbacks.
American muscle was out. Econo-boxes were in. As the big three continued to downsize, by the mid-1980s performance and sportiness became virtually Read More

1961-71 Austin/Morris Mini Cooper

A wolf in sheep’s clothing and a giant-killer on the track, the Cooper’s most famous racing victory came in the 1964 Monte Carlo Rallye

The story of the original BMC Mini is long and complicated, and there were countless versions produced during the car’s 40-year run. But Sir Alec Issigonis’ innovative design, which combined a transverse-mounted engine with front wheel drive and wheels pushed out to the extreme corners of the car, Read More

1991-96 Acura NSX Coupe

If you can’t afford a jet, the NSX might be the next best thing

The Acura NSX, unveiled by Honda in 1991, was an attempt to fuse user-friendly ergonomics with supercar performance. The seven years of development that went into the car resulted in an exotic that was as easy to drive as an Accord. But the Acura NSX was also a true exotic with a lightweight aluminum body and styling modeled Read More

1985-88 Porsche 944

If Porsche had never built a 911, the 944 would be regarded as remarkable

The 944 is the Rodney Dangerfield of sports cars, and it has been fighting for respect from the moment it was introduced in 1982. If Porsche had never built a 911, the handling and performance of the 944 would be regarded as remarkable. If Porsche had never built the sad-sack 924, 944 owners wouldn’t have to deal with Read More