1968 Triumph TR250

For parts support to be any better, Girl Scouts would have to give away
TR250 distributor caps with their cookie orders

Among all the great stories of British car industry ineptitude, the genesis of the Triumph TR250 must rank among the best.
Triumph had planned to replace the TR4A in the summer of 1967 with the car that eventually became known as the TR6. However, as legend has it, the Germans Read More

1968-76 BMW 2002

Nearly every sports car enthusiast over 50 seems to have a 2002 story.
Invariably, these end with “we drove it until the fenders rusted off”

A favorite of enthusiasts from day one, the BMW 2002 was described by David E. Davis, Jr. in Car and Driver as “the best way to get somewhere sitting down.” The 2002 is in large part the reason why BMW enjoys the reputation that it does Read More

1966-85 Fiat 124 Sport Coupe and Spider

Although the “Fix It Again, Tony” reputation of these cars will not die,
at least they’re cheap to repair

Reviewing the Fiat 124 when new, Car and Driver wrote, “The Fiat 124 Sport Coupe costs $1,400 less than an Alfa 1750 GT Veloce and $2,300 less than a Porsche 912. Within the limits of sanity it handles just as well, it has way more useful room inside, and it even has Read More

1983-87 TVR 280i

Mine had a habit of popping its pop-up headlights when going over bumps

TVR was founded by Trevor Wilkinson in the late 1940s, and has since endured more receiverships, changes in ownership, and near-liquidations than probably any other car company-Lamborghini included. Yet no matter how close to financial ruin the Blackpool, England, firm has veered, TVR has always operated as a low-volume producer of hand-built sports cars. This has resulted in some Read More

1967-1973 Mercury Cougar

The fiercest Cougar was an Eliminator fitted with blacked-out grille, side stripes, a spoiler and Ford’s 428 Cobra Jet Ram Air

It was Motor Trend’s Car of the Year in 1967, and Car Life called it a “Mustang with class.” Yet the Mercury Cougar has been mostly overlooked by collectors, and this relative of Ford’s iconic pony car hasn’t yet ascended to the heights of valuation that many other muscle cars have. Read More

1980-1981 Triumph TR8 Convertible

Like Earth shoes, pet rocks and other inexplicably dopey fads of the time, the TR8’s wedge styling was all the rage in the mid-1970s

Good news from the other side… Just when we thought we’d never see another lusty, open-top British sports car, along comes the Triumph TR8.” That’s my recollection of how the buff books put it when they tested their first TR8 in 1980. Essentially a TR7 stuffed with the Read More

1993-95 Mazda RX-7

The final iteration of the RX-7 was either the greatest track weapon the world has ever known or the harshest street machine to bottom out on the lip of a driveway

The mid-priced sports car market of the early 1990s was one the meanest parties on the planet. Japanese supercars like Mitsubishi’s 3000GT, Toyota’s Supra and Nissan’s 300ZX were giving the Corvette a run for its money. With the hot new Miata Read More

1975-1980 AMC Pacer

“You only ride like a Pacer if you’re wide like a Pacer”

If you’re among the many who laugh at AMC Pacers, let us introduce you to “Weird” Harrel Lamkin of Ruston, LA. He drag-raced a 550-hp Pacer from 1987 to 1996, turning 10-second quarter miles at 124 mph. As he said, “I wanted to build a Pacer no one would dare laugh at. I think I succeeded.”
And lest you think Read More

1954-1963 Mercedes-Benz 190SL

The 190SL’s designers had a challenge on their hands-to echo the 300SL’s styling, but not copy it

Close your eyes and picture your local main drag on a Saturday afternoon. Parked outside the neighborhood coffee shop, what do you see? Likely one or two Mercedes SLs, 280s. 560s. 450s. 380s. They’re a breeze to own and drive, good-looking cars that have always been popular, comfortable, and tasteful. On the used market, they’re Read More

1967-1969 Saab Sonett II

Above 3,000 rpm driving a Sonett II is like hanging onto an out-of-control chainsaw

The words “Swedish” and “sports car” seem entirely uncomfortable bedfellows. But back in the 1950s, before Saab and Volvo had acquired the safe-and-sane reputations that still accompany their current American parents, both companies set off to create their version of a driver’s car. They took different directions, with similarly disastrous results, at least at first.Volvo’s P1900 of 1956-1957 Read More