1913 Mercer Type 35J Raceabout

The legendary T-head Mercer Raceabout was one of the most significant cars produced during the glorious Brass Age. The enthusiasm shared by those fortunate few owners and admirers who have experienced the thrill of a Raceabout has elevated these pioneering sports cars to mythical status.
The 300-c.i. four-cylinder engine had massive 2¼-inch valves, high-lift cams, a high compression ratio, and generous and efficient intake/exhaust manifolding. This was mated to a beautifully engineered Brown & Lipe gearbox, with three speeds Read More

1967 Shelby Mustang GT350 Competition Coupe

Highly original, genuine Shelby American Mustangs such as Carroll Shelby’s 1967 competition car, production number “20” shown here, very rarely emerge onto the US market.
Individual records indicate that only 26 such cars were produced by Shelby American for the 1967 season and that the 20th car’s rarity is heightened by the fact that, among that select group, it is the only one to have been delivered with Weber twin-choke carburetors fitted as new. It was supplied Read More

1920 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Victoria

The model J Duesenberg has long been regarded as the most outstanding example of design and engineering of the classic era. Introduced in 1929, trading was halted on the New York stock exchange for the announcement. At $8,500 for the chassis alone, it was by far the most expensive car in America. With coachwork, the delivered price of many Duesenbergs approached $20,000, a staggering sum at a time when a typical new family car cost around $500.

Few would Read More

1960 Ford Thunderbird Convertible

The classic Thunderbird was introduced in 1955 in response to the Corvette. With the same wheelbase, the T-Bird was designed to be more comfortable and luxurious. The 1958-60 models added more chrome and two seats. This car is one of the rare “J” code cars-only 250 were built in 1960- with a 430-c.i., 350-horsepower Lincoln engine, a $177 option. Other features include Cruise-O-Matic transmission, tinted power windows, power seats and air conditioning. In show condition following a three-year ground-up Read More

2002 Chrysler Prowler

The Prowler, approved for concept in July 1992, was a showstopper in January 1993 when it made its debut at the North American International AutoShow in Detroit. In September 1994, top management officially approved the Prowler for production and it was in 1997 that the first production version of the Prowler rolled off the line at Conner Avenue Assembly in Detroit.

The Prowler salutes the great American hot rod tradition, but deliberately does so in a thoroughly contemporary manner. Read More

1932 Stutz SV-16 Derham Convertible

Harry C. Stutz was born in Ohio in 1876 where he grew up caring for and repairing agricultural machinery on the family farm. Fascinated by gasoline engines, he built his first car in 1897 followed by a second effort using an engine of his own design and manufacture.

By 1925 the Stutz Motor Car Company was under the stewardship of Frederick Moskovics, who had left Franklin to become Stutz’s new president. Moskovics was responsible for the new Vertical Eight Read More

1958 Chevrolet Corvette

The Chevrolet Corvette saw the light of day at the 1953 Motorama, the concept coming from Harley Earl, head of GM’s Art and Color Department, who sought to produce an American counterpart to the imported Jaguar XK 120. Until then, America had been without a real postwar sports car. The Corvette was the first quantity-produced car to use a fiberglass body and was initially fitted with a straight six-cylinder engine producing 150 bhp through a two-speed Powerglide automatic transmission. Read More

1970 Chevrolet Chevelle LS6 Convertible

The 1970s were the glory years for American muscle. Gas was cheap, and insurance companies hadn’t yet realized just how different an LS6 Chevelle was from a 350-cubic-inch commuter special. The 454-cubic-inch, 450-horsepower LS6 engine was put together, along with the car it rode in, at Chevrolet’s big-block V8 production plant in Tonawanda, New York. Specially built from air cleaner to oil pan, with tire-melting performance in mind, it is thought that just 17 LS6 convertibles equipped with an Read More

1957 Ford Intruder Custom Wagon

Created by Troy Trepanier, Intruder came out of the box in San Bernardino, California, with three miles showing on the odometer. Six days and 2,900 cross-country miles later, on the Hot Rod Power Tour, Intruder had performed flawlessly, and even returned 20 miles per gallon.

The goal for Rad Rides, the builders of Intruder, was to set new standards in style and performance, as part of bringing the new generation of super rods to a higher level. By any Read More

1935 Auburn Model 851 Boattail Speedster

Frank and Morris Eckhart of Auburn, Indiana, started the Auburn Motor Company in 1903. As their business grew, they acquired more dealerships to stay ahead of the competition, but by the mid-’20s size had caught up with them and they were in need of new leadership. In 1925 E. L. Cord became general manager. Under Cord the new Auburn became a very different company, emphasizing style when others in the industry concentrated on engineering.

By 1931 Auburn was able Read More