1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Competizione

In July 1966, the Ferrari factory received an order from SAVAF for a 275 GTB Competizione, later specified to be chassis 09079. Late in the specialty model’s limited run, the car was the penultimate example of the thinly aluminum-skinned competition GTB, making it the second-to-last GT car ever produced by Maranello’s factory competition department.

Factory records indicate the Tipo 213 competition engine was completed on September 8, 1966, with dynamometer testing occurring a day later. Trimmed with a light gray Read More

1934 Talbot AV105 “Alpine Racer”

Simply the best. No other phrase better sums up BGH 23. In its day, this was the outstanding British sports touring car.

Georges Roesch’s long line of “Invincible Talbots” needs little introduction to the discerning car connoisseur, and only a combination of poor luck and poor timing meant they never achieved the big-race overall victory which would have made the Talbots from Barlby Road, London, W10, much more widely appreciated.

Talbot competed so widely within their period that BGH 23, Read More

1964 Austin Mini Cooper 1275 S Competition Saloon

DPE 608B was purchased new by the current vendor on August 12, 1964, from BMC dealer Jackson’s Garages of Godalming, Surrey. The Mini was primarily his road car but was raced whenever the opportunity arose. Early outings included Rufforth and Cadwell Park, both in September 1964, and Goodwood on March 13, 1965 (original program on file).

The Mini then passed through the hands of various other owners. In 2004, the vendor was able to buy it from Gordon Cameron, who Read More

1965 Alfa Romeo Giulia Sprint GTA

Courtesy of Bonhams

Introduced in 1965, the GTA — the A stood for Alleggerita (lightened) — was the official competition version of the Giulia Sprint GT, and it was produced in both road and race variants. The latter, as usual, was the responsibility of the factory’s Autodelta competitions department, which had been founded in 1961 as an independent company by Carlo Chiti and Ludovico Chizzola, and subsequently absorbed by Alfa Romeo.

Visually almost indistinguishable from the road-going Sprint GT, the GTA differed by Read More

1936 Lagonda LG45R Rapide Sports-Racing Two-Seater

Chip Riegel, courtesy of Bonhams

This is the most famous Lagonda of all.

Special competition variants of the LG45 were tailor-made at Staines Bridge for the Lagonda company’s experienced and battle-hardened quasi-Works racing team: Fox & Nicholl Limited of Tolworth, Surrey. Just as Enzo Ferrari’s private Scuderia ran the quasi-Works Alfa Romeo team cars from 1932 to ’37, so Fox & Nicholl represented Lagonda’s vital interests in International motor racing.

For 1936, the production department at Staines Bridge built four competition cars specifically for Fox Read More

1972 McLaren M20 Can-Am

David Newhardt, courtesy of Mecum Auctions

After several years dominating the Can-Am series with a series of school-bus-yellow racers, McLaren Cars stood up to the developing Porsche challenge with the brand-new 1972 M20. Designers Gordon Coppuck and Tyler Alexander departed from standard McLaren practice in the M20 by removing the radiator from the front of the car and replacing it with two side-mounted units. This allowed improved cooling, relief from cockpit heat for drivers Denis Hulme and Peter Revson, and improved front-end aerodynamics. The latter was Read More

1966 Brabham-Repco BT20 F1 and 1968–69 Lotus-Cosworth Ford Type 49B F1

Tim Scott ©2014, courtesy of RM Auctions

1966 Brabham-Repco BT20 F1

When the FIA announced in late 1963 that a 3-liter limit would be imposed on Formula One racing in 1966, a scramble ensued among competitors to develop suitable new engines. Jack Brabham turned to Repco, an Australian parts supplier. Development centered on Oldsmobile’s F-85 V8 block, which offered the advantage of a pre-existing and proven crankcase to create a 300-hp, 2,994-cc SOHC V8 engine.

Jack Brabham began the 1966 season driving the sole BT19 chassis, but Read More

1954 Ferrari 375 Plus Competizione

Courtesy of Bonhams

In the winter of 1953–54, Enzo Ferrari concentrated his engineers’ attention upon perfecting a line of large-capacity sports-racing cars for customer sale, backed by a secondary line of smaller variants. To promote and publicize the new sports cars, he approved development of a muscle-bound, outsized “big bazooka” for his Works team.

Mr. Ferrari authorized construction of a handful of very special, even larger-capacity Works team competition spiders, which were intended as his main defense of the World Sportscar Championship title.

Read More

1964 Alpine M64

Neil Fraser ©2014, courtesy of RM Auctions

In 1955, Alpine was founded by Jean Rédélé, who originally modified and campaigned Renault 4CVs but quickly found success in many of the world’s most illustrious sports car races. Soon enough, Rédélé started building his own cars on the 4CV chassis and mechanicals, with the A106 being produced in 1955. Nevertheless, Rédélé’s passion for racing never wavered, and in 1962, he introduced the M63, which was developed specifically for sports car racing. An updated version, dubbed the M64, was released Read More

1968 Porsche 907 LH “Longtail”

Mathieu Heurtault, courtesy of Gooding & Company

Today, Porsche remains the uncontested champion of more endurance races than any other manufacturer, having amassed the most outright wins at Le Mans, Daytona and Sebring. Yet in the early 1960s, Porsche remained an unconventional, small-displacement manufacturer only capable of winning class victories. At the onset of the prototype era, however, Porsche’s strategy on motorsports development was beginning to pay great dividends. Their immediate focus was to build a Porsche Le Mans winner for 1967.

That year’s event guaranteed competition Read More

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