1977 Chevron B36

The Chevron B36 was designed to enter the 2-liter racing class of sports car racing, with the chassis accepting various types of engines. Chassis 367705 was built by Chevron in May 1977 and delivered new to owner and driver Gordon Hamilton of Kansas. Fitted with the highly developed Cosworth BDG 1,975-cc, 4-cylinder engine, it was entered in many events during the 1977, 1978 and 1979 seasons. After the 1980 season it was put it into dry storage, where it remained Read More

1953 Jaguar C-Type Racer

This wonderful Le Mans racing Jaguar is one of the most unmolested, highly original, 1950s 24-Hour-race sports cars still surviving anywhere in the world today. It is also much more than “just” a Le Mans 24-Hour race car — it is a Le Mans 24-Hour-race top-10 finisher, and it achieved that feat in the Jaguar C-type model’s greatest Le Mans year — 1953 — when the Works cars finished 1st, 2nd, 4th and 9th overall.

This remarkably conserved Jaguar C-type Read More

1987 Ford RS200 Coupe

Masterminded by its European Motor Sports boss, Stuart Turner, the RS200 was Ford’s ambitious attempt at producing a championship-winning Group B rally car.

Overseen by Ford Motor Sports Chief Engineer John Wheeler, the RS200 project commenced in 1983 with production of 200 cars planned to meet Group B requirements, hence the name. The design, by Tony Southgate, eventually crystallized as a compact mid-engined coupe powered by a turbocharged version of the 1.8-liter 16-valve Cosworth BDA engine and equipped with four-wheel Read More

1974 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.0 IROC RSR

In 1973, Roger Penske created a racing series called the International Race of Champions, or IROC. Equally ambitious and unique in concept, the IROC series aimed to place the world’s best racing drivers in identical cars to compete against each other over several rounds at leading U.S. venues. In so doing, Penske’s aim was to reduce all the usual variables in motor racing, so that only the bravest, cleverest and most skilled driver would prevail.

While deciding on a car Read More

1975 Fiat-Abarth 124 Sport Rally Group 4 Spider

The Fiat 124 Abarth Rally was a high-performance homologation special based on the 124 Sport Spider. First introduced in 1966 at the Turin Show and based on a shortened 124 saloon floor pan and running gear, the attractive Pininfarina-styled Sport Spider and its derivatives would prove an outstanding success for Fiat, over 200,000 being sold before production ended in 1982.

The Abarth Rally first became available in November 1972, having been seen previously in prototype form at the Geneva Salon. Read More

1966 McLaren M1B Can-Am

In 1961, Bruce McLaren applied his design skills to the M1 sports racer, developed at the same time as the Lola T70. The two mid-engine cars would fiercely contest the new Canadian-American race series.

McLaren launched the M1 at the Mosport Grand Prix for sports cars in September 1964, where he led the race until throttle problems dropped him to 3rd. McLaren contested the rest of the season, and the car attracted customers. The first customer car was delivered in Read More

1964 Alfa Romeo Giulia TI Super Competition Saloon

The Giulia TI (Turismo Internationale) was Alfa Romeo’s flagship high-performance saloon in the 1960s. Introduced in 1962 and outwardly almost indistinguishable from the outgoing 1.3-liter Giulietta, the Series 101 Giulia boasted a more powerful and much less fussy 1,570-cc engine. Despite their boxy, unitary construction body, the Giulietta and Giulia were paragons of aerodynamic efficiency and possessed a distinctly sporting nature.

Announced in April 1963, the Giulia TI Super was a lightweight, more powerful homologation special built for international touring-car Read More

1956 Fiat-Bartoletti Tipo 306 Race Car Transporter

This is the Maserati factory team’s transporter of its World Championship-winning Fangio 250F season of 1957 — and which would also have taken Fangio’s Piccolo 250F (Chassis 2533) to the last race of his glittering career at Reims in 1958.

It was subsequently acquired by Lance Reventlow for his Team America Scarab assault upon the European Grand Prix series in 1960–61.

The transporter’s next American owners then made the most massive impact of the post-war period upon the European road-racing Read More

1960 Scarab-Offenhauser Formula One Racing Single-Seater

In recent years, front-engine Formula One car competition at historic and vintage level has seen the full flowering of a fabulous and brave American motor racing project that has been recalled with great pride and nostalgic pleasure by generations of road-racing enthusiasts.

Where front-running success in such historic races had for long years been the preserve of Italian Maserati 250Fs, then Ferrari Dino 246s and the British BRM Type 25s, the almost all-American Scarab-Offenhausers have in recent years rewritten the Read More

1963 Lotus Super Seven Series 2 1500 Cosworth

Courtesy of Silverstone Auctions

The Lotus Seven is a small, simple, lightweight two-seater open-top sports car produced by Lotus Cars (initially called Lotus Engineering) between 1957 and 1972. It was designed by Lotus founder Colin Chapman, and has been considered the embodiment of the Lotus philosophy of performance through low weight and simplicity. The original model was highly successful, with more than 2,500 cars sold, partly because of its attraction as a road-legal car that could be used for Clubmans racing, but mainly because Read More

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