1956 Talbot-Lago T14 LS Special

The cars were quicker than the standard T14LS, accelerating from0-100 km/hour in all of 14.5 seconds. Of course this was still slower than the much cheaper MG-TF

by the 1950s, the racing credentials of Talbot-Lago had been firmly established after years of active Grand Prix competition. The sensational new 2.5-liter car announced at the Paris Salon in 1955 was an altogether superior sports car, powered by a four-cylinder, twin high-camshaft, overhead-valve engine Read More

1954 Arnolt Bristol DeLuxe Roadster

There sat my never-forgotten love from Paris, among common British machinery like Morris Minors and MG Magnettes

The Arnolt Bristol was the obsession of engineer, industrialist, importer, and sports car enthusiast Stanley “Wacky” Arnolt. He made his fortune building marine engines during World War II, and, seeing a market for sports cars in America during the early 1950s, cut a deal with Bristol to use an updated version of its 400 chassis, Read More

1970 Moretti Sportiva

The heavy body weighed 1,500 pounds, too much for its puny 47-hp motor

Giovanni Moretti founded his company in 1925, and started off designing and building motorcycles. The Cita, built in 1946, a tiny two-seater powered by an air-cooled 250-cc motor, was Moretti’s first conventional car.

In 1949, Moretti introduced the 600, a front-engine, rear-drive car powered by a bespoke 592 cc, water-cooled four-cylinder engine. Four years later, the 600’s chassis Read More

1956 Maserati A6G2000 Zagato Coupe

Maserati decided to build a slightly de-tuned version of the A6GCS and go for the Holy Grail of specialty manufacturers, the dual-purpose sports car

This beautiful 2-liter Berlinetta was one of a handful of Maserati’s sports-racing A6G series to be clothed by that master of ultra-light bodywork, Zagato. Allemano, Frua, and Vignale all built bodies for the A6G2000 chassis, but these striking Zagato coupes are considered the prettiest today.

This particular Read More

1903 Martini 41/18hp 4.1-Liter Type Rochers de Naye

In 1902, Martini acquired a license to build Rochet-Schneider designs and began production, rapidly establishing its reputation as Switzerland’s most exclusive manufacturer. In 1903, a Martini stole the headlines by ascending the Rochers de Naye cog wheel railway, an astonishing 11-km ascent with an average gradient of 22%. The car was driven by English entrepreneur and gentleman, Captain H. H. P. Deasy of London. Deasy’s stand at the February 1904 Crystal Palace Show in London displayed the famous car and Read More

1973 Citroen SM Coupe

The SM is the symbol of demise of Citroën as an independent company. It is also the story of corporate management embracing the “bigger is better” theory, and the engineering department wanting to make a better and more sophisticated car, but ending up with something that was just more complex, less reliable and infinitely more expensive than the models it already had.

In the late ’60s, Citroën, at last freed from family control, embarked on a buying spree: Read More

1899 Clement-Panhard Voiture Legere Type VCP

As motoring got into its stride in France in the latter part of the 1890s, it was realized that there was a need to fill the gap between the larger, powerful, expensive motor cars and motor tricycles. The great firm of Panhard-Levassor joined the throng with a light car. Panhard-Levassor could not produce enough of these cars to satisfy demand and so licensed the manufacture of their Voiture Légère to one of their directors, Adolphe Clément, resulting in the Clément-Panhard Read More

1961 OSCA 1600GT Coupe

Brothers Ernesto, Ettore and Bindo Maserati, the vagabonds of the exotic car world, had sold their family company in 1947 to the Orsi family. They then returned from Modena to their original manufacturing home in Bologna where they established the company first known as “OSCA Maserati,” and subsequently just as “OSCA.”
Under this acronym-today so familiar to aficionados of fine Italian high-performance cars-they produced an initial series of small 1100cc sports racing cars, but speedily developed a big 4.5-liter Read More

1962 Fiat Jolly

Launched at the 25th Geneva Salon in March 1955, the Fiat 600 was designed by Dante Giacosa. This successor to the Fiat 500 “Topolino” (“Mickey Mouse”) mini-car was hailed as “an intriguing car with a future…[showing] how a rearrangement of the basic components can often result in a considerable saving of space.”
With a water-cooled, rear-mounted in-line 633cc four-cylinder engine and all-around independent suspension, the 600 could carry four adults at over 65 miles per hour and sold Read More

1962 Maserati 3500 GT Coupe

The definitive Gran Turismo of its era, the Maserati 3500 GT debuted in 1957 and was the company’s first genuine series-production road car. Maserati’s three decades as constructors of perhaps the world’s finest racing cars showed in every detail of the elegant Touring-bodied coupe, from its exquisite, race-derived 3.5-liter engine through its impeccable road manners, fine brakes and faultless build quality. Here was a car to rival the best that Stuttgart, Newport Pagnell and Maranello had to offer.

This Read More

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