1970 Ford Mustang Boss

These are one of the few cars where the car is the cheap part

Fewer than 900 Boss 429 Mustangs were created for 1969, followed by a smaller run of just 500 copies for 1970, prior to the cancellation of Ford’s corporate racing program. Although the Boss 429 was conservatively rated at 375 horsepower in street trim, it easily developed over 600 horsepower in racing tune, and today, it remains one of the most exotic racing Read More

1970 Dodge Challenger R/T Hemi Convertible

Finding a Hemi Challenger convertible today is no ordinary thing, especially when one considers that Dodge produced only nine such cars in 1970. Our subject car, the second one produced, and the first to hit the street, did so under unusual circumstances: it was sold by the dealer principle at cost to a friend while they were playing their weekly game of checkers. In return for the sizeable discount, the buyer, a Poplar Bluffs, MO anesthesiologist named Langford Palmer, agreed Read More

1963 Shelby 289 Cobra Roadster “Le Mans”

In April 1963, Shelby prepared two cars for Le Mans that summer. Features included Dunlop magnesium wheels with larger fender flares, FIA hood scoops and a 37-gallon fuel tank. The engines, stated to be “moderate tune,” had four Weber downdraught carburetors.

One team car entered by AC Cars, managed by Stirling Moss and driven by Bolton/ Sanderson, finished seventh overall, third in the GT category and won the 4-5 liter class. This success resulted in the construction of six more Read More

1999 Shelby Series 1 Roadster Prototype

The Shelby Series 1 was a high-performance roadster manufactured by Shelby American from 1996 to 2002. Only 249 Shelby Series 1s were built, and this was the first running car, as well as the “pre-production” #1 Series 1, which was featured on the cover of Motor Trend.

With a carbon fiber body, sophisticated chassis, and Oldsmobile 4.0-liter Aurora V8 engine, it was considered a modern reincarnation of the 289 Cobra. It was the first Shelby vehicle built with a Shelby-designed Read More

1930 Duesenberg J Murphy Sport Berline

More than half of all the Model Js produced were closed and were generally more expensive and popular than the sporty, open cars. Styling was mostly both very conservative and conventional. However, Murphy of Pasadena, California, was an exception among Duesenberg coachbuilders, for their unique sedans were sporting.

George Whittell Jr. bought more new Duesenbergs than anyone else. He was one of America’s most colorful millionaires, sole heir to the marriage of two Californian fortunes. His grandfathers had gained their Read More

1967 Chevrolet Corvette 427/435 Convertible-The “Survivor Platform Car”

In recent years the word “survivor” has gradually entered the collector car lexicon as a way of describing a well-preserved, original, unrestored vehicle. “Survivor,” in context, is also a trademark registered to Bloomington Gold founder David Burroughs. And in 1989, this Marlboro Maroon 1967 427 convertible became Burroughs’s benchmark for establishing standards for the Bloomington Gold Survivor Award.

For years, Burroughs had encouraged the owners of original Corvettes to forego restoration and preserve their originality, even searching out and buying Read More

1954 Mercury XM-800 Dream Car

In the 1950s, concept cars-often referred to as Dream Machines-were built to test new ideas. For 1954, Ford Motor Company fielded two new entries in the show circuit: a sporty little two-seater called the Thunderbird and a full-size two-door hard top produced under the Mercury banner and called the XM-800. Ford’s head of design, George Walker, sent this project to the Mercury Pre-Production Design Studios, which was headed up by John Najjar.

Initial designs for the XM-800 used sweeping lines Read More

2005 Ford GT Coupe

In 1962, Henry Ford II, keen to add some racing luster to his company, started negotiations to buy Ferrari. The deal never happened, so Ford decided to build his own race-bred car. That car was the incomparable icon GT40, created in England in 1964 and capable of over 200 mph. Victory followed four times in a row at Le Mans between 1966 and 1969, and the GT40 also became the first car to cover 3,000 miles in this famous race.

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1970 Pontiac GTO Judge Ram Air IV Convertible

Pontiac’s 1970 Ram Air IV GTO Judge convertibles are so rare that, for any genuine Pontiac enthusiast, seeing one today is an event in itself. Only 17 were built, twelve are known to exist today, and only six were optioned with a 400 Turbo Hydra-Matic transmission. The L76 Ram Air IV engine, which became available in the GTO as a result of GM lifting its corporate ban on 400-plus cubic inch powerplants, is central to the car’s pavement-ripping character. Rated Read More

1970 Chevrolet Chevelle SS 454 LS6 Convertible

Big changes at GM for 1970 included the end of the corporate edict forbidding engines larger than 400 cubic inches in its intermediate models. Chevrolet’s “big-block” V8 was enlarged to 454 ci and formed the basis of the LS6 option, intended to help Chevrolet wrest control of Super Stock drag racing from Chrysler.

The redesigned 1970 Chevelle SS was the perfect platform for the LS6 engine, which was underrated at 450 hp and 500 ft-lb of torque. It was backed Read More