1936 Lincoln Model K “Howard Hughes” Boattail Speedster

This Lincoln Model K speedster started out as Howard Hughes’s personal 1936 Lincoln K model V12 Limousine, until he converted the car into his idea of a Boattail Speedster.

It was originally shipped to Long Beach, California, in January of 1936 and apparently special ordered with only one foot rest in the rear. Other documents indicate the car was customized by the Hughes Aircraft Company shortly thereafter in Culver City, California. It was restored in Spring 2009.

1969 Dodge Charger Daytona vs. 1970 Plymouth Hemi Superbird

In 2007, these cars would have cost nearly twice as much, but they are still priced above five years ago. Hemi magic still outweighs Daytona’s rarity

It’s a long time since any Dodge Daytona or Plymouth Superbird raced on the high banks in NASCAR competition, but they routinely fly across auction blocks these days. There’s no question the 1969-only Daytonas, with 503 produced, are more desirable than the 1970-only Superbird (with 1,935 Read More

1965 Chevrolet Chevelle Z16 Prototype

It’s quite possible the Z16 was the first Chevrolet product to be powered by the legendary big-block, beating its counterparts by a few weeks

The early success of other GM division big-block cars pushed Chevrolet to pump up the power in its 1965 Chevelle in a big way, stuffing the smallish mid-sized mainstay with the hairiest 396 available-the 375-horsepower Z16. With only 200 coupes and one convertible slated for the market, a Read More

1934 Auburn 1250 Salon Cabriolet

Even at $253,000, this car is still less than half the price of some Packard V12 Cabriolets

{vsig}2009-7_2340{/vsig}

This 1934 Auburn 1250 Salon Cabriolet was driven by James Cagney in the 1930s film “The Mayor of Hell.” It was restored over 20 years ago, and it’s been certified by the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Club, which means it has its original chassis, engine, and drivetrain.

The Salon model was the top Read More

1966 Shelby Cobra 427 Street Roadster

3187 was a well-restored, correct car. Most 427 Cobras have been heavily modified or re-skinned after drivers ran out of talent

{vsig}2009-6_2329{/vsig}

Only 291 Shelby 427 Cobras were ever sold in America for street use, of which 31 were S/C (“Semi Competition”) cars. About one-fourth of all street cars were later converted for competition duty, and most of the less desirable 428-equipped Cobras were ultimately fitted with 427s. Original, unmolested Shelby Read More

1964 Ford Thunderbolt – Galaxie Lightweight

Thunderbolts were designed for high-profile Factory Experimental and Super Stock classes; Galaxie Lightweights targeted regional Stock-class competition

{vsig}2009-5_2319{/vsig}

In March 1963, General Motors dropped a bombshell by banning factory support of auto racing. Ironically, just one month later, Ford Vice President Lee Iacocca issued a press release that read, in part:

“Our attitude is based on three points:

  • We believe that performance events-whether they be races, road rallies, or acceleration-economy-braking Read More
  • 1954 Dodge Firearrow III Concept

    Chysler’s financial crises of the early 1950s couldn’t stop the string of Virgil Exner’s Ghia concept cars

    {vsig}2009-4_2307{/vsig}

    In 1953, Dodge unveiled its first concept car, the Firearrow, a sleek out-of-this-world roadster that provided a glimpse of what everyone’s new automobile would look like in just a few years. While this stylish open-top car looked like it was ready to ply the highways of tomorrow, it was just a rolling concept Read More

    1963 Pontiac Super Duty LeMans Coupe

    Imagine if an unknown Van Gogh was discovered on eBay. In the musclecar community, the discovery of this Super Duty is no less stunning

    {vsig}2009-3_2280{/vsig}

    By the late 1950s, the horsepower race was on, and stock-bodied racing was the perfect place for Detroit to display its latest engineering feats. Pontiac was the car to beat, both in NASCAR and USAC stock car racing, and in NHRA drags. But by the summer Read More

    1967 Chevrolet Stage III Nickey Camaro

    To those not familiar with the documented, dealer-converted supercar market, $446,250 would appear to be a staggering amount for a lowly Camaro

    {vsig}2009-2_2279{/vsig}

    Nickey Chevrolet of Chicago was one of the largest Chevy dealers in America and had big plans for Chevrolet’s new pony car in 1967. Working with legendary Chevrolet engine builder Bill Thomas in California, Nickey developed a plan to install the potent 427-ci Corvette engines into the Camaro Read More

    1933 Duesenberg SJ LaGrande Phaeton

    Duesenberg expert Randy Ema affirms that cars like this, with original major components-chassis, body, engine-are at the top of the scale

    Duesenberg Automobiles was plucked from the post-World War I recession by Errett Cord, the savior of Auburn. By 1927, he was looking to build a more prestigious car and bought the innovative but struggling Duesenberg company.

    Cord had been attracted by the Duesenberg brothers’ engineering prowess and gave Fred an Read More

    Page 12 of 25« First...1011121314...20...Last »