1963 Dual-Ghia L6.4 Coupe

If the Chrysler-powered Facel-Vega is a French Imperial, consider the L6.4
a Mopar Maserati

{vsig}2008-7_2193{/vsig}

The brainchild of Eugene Casaroll, the Italian-American hybrid known as the Dual-Ghia was largely based on the Ghia-designed Chrysler Firearrow, a concept car for which he acquired the production rights. Luxurious and extravagant, it had the longest production line in the world-from Detroit to Milan and back-as it utilized an American drivetrain and Italian coachwork. Read More

Edsel Ford’s 1934 Model 40 Special Speedster

A determined, wealthy collector slugged it out with Ford family representatives, resulting in the $1.76 million price

{vsig}2008-6_2180{/vsig}

As president of Ford Motor Company from 1925 until his untimely death in 1943, from cancer and undulant fever, Edsel Bryant Ford had a considerable influence on Ford styling, first with Lincoln, then with the 1928 Model A, the 1932 Ford, and models that followed. He oversaw the design of the first Mercury Read More

Who’s a Mister Softee, Then?

At first glance I’d have to say very well sold indeed, but what price can you put on fun? Maybe it’s a bargain

{vsig}2008-5_2167{/vsig}

This month’s “American Profile” is going to take a tiptoe amongst the automotive daisies, the puff and fluff of the market.

Along with the heavy hitters at RM’s February 15-17 Fort Lauderdale, Florida, auction-like the 1958 Mercedes-Benz 300SL for $495,000, the 1938 Brunn-bodied Packard for $187,000, and Read More

1941 Chrysler Town & Country Barrel Back Estate Wagon

Built for a limited time, the Town & Country remains arguably the rarest, most desirable pre-war Woody produced

{vsig}2008-4_2154{/vsig}

Conceived in 1939, the Town & Country Estate wagon represented Chrysler’s desire to create an entirely new car that was both luxurious and dramatic. It had to be elegant enough for city driving and chauffeur driving, but utilitarian enough for country living.

David Wallace, Chrysler’s president, was the driving force behind Read More

1958 Cadillac Eldorado Biarritz “The Raindrop Car”

In 1958, Cadillac produced a total of 815 Biarritz convertibles. Five were taken straight from the assembly line to GM’s super-secret Styling Center, where they were highly modified. At least one of these cars has survived, reportedly the prototype of the “Raindrop” modification, and is presented here as part of the Wiseman Collection.

At first glance, this unique convertible, finished in its original shade of red, may look like its regular Biarritz counterparts, but the rear-end styling used on this Read More

1965 Pontiac GTO Convertible

I suspect the judges who previously gave this car an AACA Senior badge would not have done so on sale day

{vsig}2008-2_2128{/vsig}

Pontiac first offered the GTO option on the Tempest in 1964, and despite UAW strikes, which kept production down, it was a big hit.

The muscle car market was evolving, and in 1965, the GTO was named Motor Trend Magazine’s Car of the Year. It was easily distinguished Read More

1911 Oldsmobile Limited 7-passenger Touring

Without evidence of time, what does a real object offer the collector that a perfect replica does not as well?

{vsig}2008-1_2114{/vsig}

Oldsmobile made its name with the tiny single-cylinder “curve dash” buckboard in the early years of the 20th century, but went on to produce one of the most significant and largest early American cars.

Based on the earlier Model Z, the 1910 Limited rode on the same 130-inch wheelbase with Read More

1903 Cadillac Runabout Rear-Entrance Tonneau

Founded by Henry Leland and Robert Faulconer, the Cadillac Automobile Company of Detroit completed its first car in October 1902. The firm’s superior manufacturing technology-precise gear cutting was Leland and Faulconer’s specialty-soon established it as the foremost builder of quality cars in the United States. The company was formed using funds supplied by two of Henry Ford’s ex-backers and took its name from Le Sieur Antoine de la Mothe Cadillac, the great French 17th century explorer who founded Detroit in Read More

1974 Pontiac Trans Am Super Duty

The Trans Am was not without options, and one in particular made this Trans Am the king of the no-horsepower kingdom

{vsig}2007-10_2071{/vsig}

The year 1974 was a tough time for American automakers, with many legislated changes. The results were not good.

New emission regulations, which had gone into effect in 1968, gradually sapped horsepower by the early 1970s. They also added additional weight, further inhibiting performance. In addition. the government enacted Read More

1970 Chevrolet Camaro Sport Coupe

It seems hard to justify the extra $75,000 to own #1, especially as there’s another #1 out there from the Norwood plant

{vsig}2007-9_2056{/vsig}

Introduced to the public on February 26, 1970, the 1970 Camaro series stayed in production for twelve years. This handsome design survived gas crises, “big bumper” redesigns, and emasculating emissions. Attesting to its popularity, the last year’s production in 1981 totaled 126,139 units, almost the same as the Read More