1929 Duesenberg Model J Sports Sedan

It is difficult to imagine the excitement with which the Model J Duesenberg was received in 1929. Here was a chassis with an engine that-at 265 hp-beat its nearest competitor by more than 100 hp. The famed Packard 734 speedster produced 145 hp and the Cadillac V16, 175 hp. Coming from a company whose racing successes were legendary, it was the perfect marketing move. Priced at $8,500 for just the chassis, the Model J was by far the most Read More

1918 Stutz Series S Roadster

The general public could be forgiven for thinking that the Stutz Bearcat was the only model made by the company. However, since 1911 when Harry Stutz had set up his own firm, there had always been two-seat roadsters and touring cars to keep the limited number of Bearcats made each year company. Mechanically there was no significant difference between the stark Bearcat and the far more practical roadster, simply a ten-inch shorter wheelbase and less bodywork for the former.

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1933 Cadillac V12 Sport Phaeton

Although the US was engulfed in the Great Depression in 1930-1931, Cadillac brought out an absolutely splendid line of cars. One of them, unveiled at the National Automobile Show in January 1930 was the world’s first production V16 automobile. The Cadillac V16 and V12 engines were designed by the long-time head of the engineering division, Ernest Seaholm, with the assistance and expertise of designer Owen Nacker.

One of the most distinctive features of the V12s and V16s was Read More

1955 Packard Caribbean Convertible

It is ironic that Packard should fail just as the company introduced what may be the most innovative and well-designed product line in the history of the company. The blame lay not with the product, but rather a series of management misadventures, including the ill-fated merger with Studebaker.
The Caribbean featured a new, high output OHV V8 with dual 4 bbl carburetors which produced 275 bhp. A new push button Twin Ultramatic transmission was also debuted as was an Read More

1957 Ford Thunderbird F-Series

In 1955, Ford responded to the Chevy Corvette with the introduction of the Thunderbird. Ford knew that its more luxurious two-seater V8 was going to attract a wider audience than Corvette’s spartan racing/performance-oriented approach to the market. The Thunderbird design incorporated Ford features found on other models to creat Ford cars as well. The universal appeal of the Thunderbird’s styling made it an instant success and the 1955 model out-sold the more expensive Corvette by 24 to 1.

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1953 Cadillac Eldorado Custom

n 1953 the Cadillac Motor Car Company introduced the Eldorado line of cars. Original sales brochures described the car as “dramatically styled by Fleetwood to capture the heart of all America.” The standard equipment list read like a menu and it was far and away the most luxurious car America had mass produced in its long automotive history. The car was pure Hollywood and engendered names for its exterior trim and chrome­. For example the rear bumper protuberances became Read More

1956 DeSoto Fireflyte Convertible

DeSoto, like many automobile manufacturers, were heavily involved in the war effort and indeed were responsible for the assembly of the fuselage sections for the Martin B26 Marauder amongst many other important war machines. The transference back to a civilian factory with appropriate tooling did not take place until 1946 but DeSoto’s first real post-war model appeared in 1949 as “The Car With You in Mind.”

DeSoto’s top line, the Fireflyte, was introduced in 1955. It offered avant-guard Read More

1954 Pontiac Bonneville Special

mericans in the ’50s were fascinated by the future. Newspapers and magazines were full of stories about futuristic technology-rocket ships, jet airplanes, and even television. Car companies were quick to capitalize on the trend, offering a dizzying variety of fantastic show cars. They were shipped from one city to another, and people would line up around the block for a glimpse of the latest chromed and finned creation.

One of these special cars was the Pontiac Bonneville Special. Read More

1986 Callaway Twin-Turbo Corvette Coupe

This car is one of 50 Malcolm Konner Special Edition Corvettes built by Chevrolet in honor of Malcolm Konner’s retirement from his New Jersey Chevrolet dealership.

In 1985, Chevrolet sought a high-performance option to bridge the gap caused by delays in introducing the all-aluminum twin-cam ZR1 engine.

Corvette chief engineer Dave McLellan had tried one of the 150+hp Alfa Romeo Callaway Twin Turbo GTV-6s and called Reeves Callaway to see Read More

1966 Ford F-100 “Good Humor” Ice Cream Truck

Ford has a history of producing not only popular and economical road cars but also rugged and capable everyday utility vehicles. Their trucks and light-commercial range have been options since the company’s early days, and the small business owner or manager could choose from a myriad of body styles to suit the need at hand.

The F-100 series was introduced in the spring of 1953, totally updating its predecessor, the F-1. The F-100 utility had a more modern, Read More