1972 Ferrari 246 GT Dino Berlinetta

The need for a production-based engine for Formula 2 led to the introduction of a “junior” Ferrari — the Dino 206 GT — at the Turin Motor Show in 1967. Building on experience gained with its Dino 206S sports racer, Ferrari retained the racer’s mid-engined layout for the road car but installed the power unit transversely rather than longitudinally.

A compact, aluminum-bodied coupe of striking appearance, the Pininfarina-styled Dino — named after Enzo Ferrari’s late son Alfredino Ferrari — was Read More

1969 Ferrari 365 GTC

In essence a closed version of the 275 GTS, the 330 GTC, which was the immediate forerunner of the 365 GTC, was first shown at the Geneva Motor Show in March 1966. Beneath the understated Pininfarina coachwork, there was the 4-liter version of Ferrari’s familiar, Colombo-designed two-cam, 60-degree V12 (as used in the 330 GT 2+2) mated to a 5-speed all-synchromesh transaxle. The chassis was of relatively short wheelbase, and the suspension independent all around by wishbones and coil springs. Read More

1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4S NART Spyder

Luigi Chinetti recognized the viability of sporty open cars in the American market. The 250 GT SWB California Spyder in particular proved itself a resounding success. But whereas the 4-cam’s predecessor — the 275 GTB — offered a Spyder variant, the wind-in-your-hair alternative to the 275 GTB/4 was a 330 GTS.

As such, the 275 GTB/4S NART Spyder was born of a direct request from Luigi Chinetti to Ferrari. NART stands for North American Racing Team, the Read More

1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica SWB

As the echoes of World War II austerity faded in Europe, it occurred to Enzo Ferrari that his wealthiest clients were ready for a super-fast, road-going gran turismo. The result was a series of exclusive Ferraris built with especially powerful engines wrapped in elegant bodies from the finest Italian coachbuilders. Each car was individually tailored to its owner’s requests, blisteringly fast, and sophisticated enough to transport a royal. One model in the series was the 400 Superamerica.

Read More

1958 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe

With the 250 engine came a family of cars that turned Ferrari from a small-scale marque to a world-renowned manufacturer. This range was based on a powerful 3-liter V12 engine designed by Gioacchino Colombo. The engine was adaptable to use on the road or the track. After the first examples of the 250 Ellena and 250 GT Europa, the development of this group of cars took off in 1958 with the arrival of the 250 Read More

A Tale of Two 1964 Ferrari 275 GTB 2-Cams

1964 Ferrari 275 GTB Berlinetta

Chassis number 06663 was originally built as a short-nose model with a steel body. Factory records show that the car was originally finished in Azzurro (blue) with Pelle Nera (black leather) interior.

Less than two weeks after it was sold to its first owner, 06663 was sold again. The new owner quickly put the car to work on the hillclimb circuit. Around the end of 1966, the owner ordered a long-nose front section from Scaglietti Read More

F40 and F50 Showdown in Amelia

1990 Ferrari F40

• The last Enzo-era Ferrari

• One of only 213 U.S.-specification F40s

• Displayed at Concorso Italiano in 1991 and 1993

• Approximately 7,050 miles from new

• Very original, unmodified example

• Recently serviced at Norbert Hofer’s Grand Touring Classics

• Offered with owner handbooks and tool kit

• Ferrari historian Marcel Massini documentation

• Recent $22,000 service at Grand Touring Classics Inc.

1995 Ferrari F50

• A groundbreaking Ferrari supercar

Read More

1952 Ferrari 225 Sport Berlinetta “Tuboscocca”

The lifeblood of Ferrari, particularly in the early years, was competition. It is a widely held belief that the creation of road-going versions of the competition sports cars existed almost solely to support Il Commendatore’s racing effort. In many instances, engineering advances developed for battle can be traced directly to the road cars, such as the pioneering weight-balancing use of the transaxle from the 275 series GTs.

Ferrari’s competition teeth were cut along with the continuous progress of the Read More

1962 Ferrari 250 GT PF Cabriolet Series II

The 250 engine paved the way for a large family of cars that helped Ferrari expand their limited output into series-produced sports cars. The new range was based on the 3-liter V12 engine designed by Gioacchino Colombo. The engine was powerful, smooth and adaptable to both touring and racing. The trend continued with the arrival of the Cabriolet 250 GT PF in 1957 — the last two letters standing for Pinin Farina (then still written as two words), who oversaw Read More

1960 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta “Competizione”

In the tradition of Ferrari’s dual-purpose road and racing berlinettas, the new 250 GT SWB was a tractable and well-mannered daily driver about town — and a veritable beast in a race. Competition-specification cars with additionally up-rated engines and lightweight alloy aluminum bodies were immediately made available for racing customers.

Competizione-specification examples totaled to 72 alloy-bodied examples among the overall output of just 165 SWB cars. It is a credit to the SWB’s strength of design, durability and no-hassle Read More