1935 Aston Martin Ulster 2/4 Seater Tourer

Manufactured by Robert Bamford and Lionel Martin, the first Aston-Martins (the hyphen is correct for the period) rapidly established a reputation for high performance and sporting prowess in the years immediately following World War I.

The foundations were laid for proper series production with the formation of Aston Martin Motors Ltd. in 1926 under the stewardship of Augustus “Bert” Bertelli and William Renwick. Bertelli understood the effect of competition success on sales and sanctioned the construction of two Works racers Read More

1958 Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta Competizione TdF

The Ferrari 250 GT LWB Berlinetta is one of the most influential and impressive automobiles ever produced. It is the most successful competition 250 GT Ferrari model, having garnered more victories than any other model, including the revered 250 GTO. With the 3.0-liter Colombo V12 engine fitted to Ferrari’s 2,600-millimeter wheelbase chassis, this car was the first of numerous highly desirable Ferraris including the 250 GT SWB Berlinetta and the 250 GTO.

With incredible alloy coachwork that was designed by Read More

1974 Lotus Europa Twin Cam Special

This is a two-owner car originally from Laguna Beach, CA. The restoration was completed by David Zumstein. It is said that he has restored many concours-winning English cars. The engine was rebuilt with higher-performance cams, pistons and valve-train components to give the car a little more power for the driver to enjoy. This has a one-piece Weber aluminum cylinder head with twin Weber carburetors and its original Renault 5-speed manual transmission with new bushings in the linkage. The woodgrain on Read More

1960 Scarab-Offenhauser Formula One Racing Single-Seater

In recent years, front-engine Formula One car competition at historic and vintage level has seen the full flowering of a fabulous and brave American motor racing project that has been recalled with great pride and nostalgic pleasure by generations of road-racing enthusiasts.

Where front-running success in such historic races had for long years been the preserve of Italian Maserati 250Fs, then Ferrari Dino 246s and the British BRM Type 25s, the almost all-American Scarab-Offenhausers have in recent years rewritten the Read More

The Virtue of Patience

Of all the variations made of VW’s venerable Type 2 van from the first model in 1950 through the end of the air-cooled engine in 1984, the Westfalia camper is probably the most recognizable and the most popular among American buyers. Further, if there was a vehicle that could capture the hippie spirit of the 1960s, what else could it be but a VW Microbus kitted out for camping?

A better camper van

From the beginning of the line in Read More

2008 Koenigsegg CCXR

  • 1,018-bhp, 4,700-cc, DOHC aluminum V8 with twin Rotex centrifugal superchargers, 6-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension with double wishbones and two-way adjustable VPS gas-hydraulic shock absorbers, and four-wheel ventilated carbon-ceramic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 104.7 in.
  • Capable of producing 1,018 horsepower on E85 ethanol and 0–100 km/h (62 mph) in 3.1 seconds
  • Presented at the opening of Koenigsegg Abu Dhabi and the 2007 Middle East International Motor Show
  • Featured in “Fast Five,” the fifth installment of “The Fast and the Read More

1990 Alfa Romeo SZ

This modern interpretation of the Sprint Zagato was also known internally as the ES-30, or Experimental Sports Three-Liter. This low-production, high-performance automobile was designed by Robert Opron and Antonio Castellana, who had based it on the floorpan of the Group A/IMSA Alfa 75. The front-engine/rear-drive design also borrowed that model’s 5-speed manual rear transaxle and suspension, which was comprised of lower front wishbones with coil springs, transverse links, and an anti-roll bar; in the rear, a De Dion axle with Read More

1914 Mercedes 28/95 Phaeton

Readied in 1914 to replace the 4-cylinder 37/90, for all intents and purposes, the Mercedes 28/95 did not reach production until after World War I. By the time it did reach its customers, the big 7,280-cc, 90-bhp overhead-camshaft 6-cylinder engine had been fitted with a cover to enclose the previously exposed shaft-and-bevel gear-driven valve-gear.

Two Zenith updraft carburetors and individual intake passages to each cylinder ensured exceptional breathing for the period. The large six was closely related to the Daimler Read More

1960 Chrysler 300F Hard Top

Road & Track magazine called out the Chrysler “letter cars” as being a very significant automobile. They stressed to their European-favoring readers that it was not a sports car, but it was the best that Detroit had to offer in its luxury “sedan class.” They succinctly summed up an evaluation as “an athletic, but lovable Amazon.”

All of Chrysler’s 1960 cars were built with frameless, unibody construction, and the 300F got a complete makeover. The new F rode on a Read More

Volkswagen’s Hot Hatch Turns Collectible

By 1970, Volkswagen’s “People’s Car,” the venerable Type 1 Beetle, was long in the tooth. The company knew it was time for a successor — something cleaner than the stinky old air-cooled model, with a modern body design. The company got to work on a new project called the Type 17.

The new car used a transverse engine and front-wheel-drive layout borrowed from VW’s Audi subsidiary, and Italdesign Giugiaro provided the bodywork for an attractive compact hatchback car.

Most of Read More

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